Antibiotic Prophylaxis: Use of antibiotics before, during, or after a diagnostic, therapeutic, or surgical procedure to prevent infectious complications.Surgical Wound Infection: Infection occurring at the site of a surgical incision.Premedication: Preliminary administration of a drug preceding a diagnostic, therapeutic, or surgical procedure. The commonest types of premedication are antibiotics (ANTIBIOTIC PROPHYLAXIS) and anti-anxiety agents. It does not include PREANESTHETIC MEDICATION.Anti-Bacterial Agents: Substances that reduce the growth or reproduction of BACTERIA.Cefazolin: A semisynthetic cephalosporin analog with broad-spectrum antibiotic action due to inhibition of bacterial cell wall synthesis. It attains high serum levels and is excreted quickly via the urine.Cefuroxime: Broad-spectrum cephalosporin antibiotic resistant to beta-lactamase. It has been proposed for infections with gram-negative and gram-positive organisms, GONORRHEA, and HAEMOPHILUS.Floxacillin: Antibiotic analog of CLOXACILLIN.Pancreatitis, Acute Necrotizing: A severe form of acute INFLAMMATION of the PANCREAS characterized by one or more areas of NECROSIS in the pancreas with varying degree of involvement of the surrounding tissues or organ systems. Massive pancreatic necrosis may lead to DIABETES MELLITUS, and malabsorption.Cephradine: A semi-synthetic cephalosporin antibiotic.Bacterial Infections: Infections by bacteria, general or unspecified.Cefamandole: Semisynthetic wide-spectrum cephalosporin with prolonged action, probably due to beta-lactamase resistance. It is used also as the nafate.Cloxacillin: A semi-synthetic antibiotic that is a chlorinated derivative of OXACILLIN.Breast Implantation: Surgical insertion of an inert sac filled with silicone or other material to augment the female form cosmetically.Wound Infection: Invasion of the site of trauma by pathogenic microorganisms.Puerperal Infection: An infection occurring in PUERPERIUM, the period of 6-8 weeks after giving birth.Penicillin V: A broad-spectrum penicillin antibiotic used orally in the treatment of mild to moderate infections by susceptible gram-positive organisms.Prosthesis-Related Infections: Infections resulting from the implantation of prosthetic devices. The infections may be acquired from intraoperative contamination (early) or hematogenously acquired from other sites (late).Endotamponade: A method of stopping internal bleeding or blood flow, or the closure of a wound or body cavity, achieved by applying pressure or introducing an absorbent liquid, gel, or tampon.Vesico-Ureteral Reflux: Retrograde flow of urine from the URINARY BLADDER into the URETER. This is often due to incompetence of the vesicoureteral valve leading to ascending bacterial infection into the KIDNEY.Cephalosporins: A group of broad-spectrum antibiotics first isolated from the Mediterranean fungus ACREMONIUM. They contain the beta-lactam moiety thia-azabicyclo-octenecarboxylic acid also called 7-aminocephalosporanic acid.Osteotomy, Le Fort: Transverse sectioning and repositioning of the maxilla. There are three types: Le Fort I osteotomy for maxillary advancement or the treatment of maxillary fractures; Le Fort II osteotomy for the treatment of maxillary fractures; Le Fort III osteotomy for the treatment of maxillary fractures with fracture of one or more facial bones. Le Fort III is often used also to correct craniofacial dysostosis and related facial abnormalities. (From Dorland, 28th ed, p1203 & p662)Clindamycin: An antibacterial agent that is a semisynthetic analog of LINCOMYCIN.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Hypoprothrombinemias: Absence or reduced levels of PROTHROMBIN in the blood.Sepsis: Systemic inflammatory response syndrome with a proven or suspected infectious etiology. When sepsis is associated with organ dysfunction distant from the site of infection, it is called severe sepsis. When sepsis is accompanied by HYPOTENSION despite adequate fluid infusion, it is called SEPTIC SHOCK.Gentamicins: A complex of closely related aminoglycosides obtained from MICROMONOSPORA purpurea and related species. They are broad-spectrum antibiotics, but may cause ear and kidney damage. They act to inhibit PROTEIN BIOSYNTHESIS.Urinary Tract Infections: Inflammatory responses of the epithelium of the URINARY TRACT to microbial invasions. They are often bacterial infections with associated BACTERIURIA and PYURIA.Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Urologic Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the urinary tract or its parts in the male or female. For surgery of the male genitalia, UROLOGIC SURGICAL PROCEDURES, MALE is available.Fever: An abnormal elevation of body temperature, usually as a result of a pathologic process.Sulbactam: A beta-lactamase inhibitor with very weak antibacterial action. The compound prevents antibiotic destruction of beta-lactam antibiotics by inhibiting beta-lactamases, thus extending their spectrum activity. Combinations of sulbactam with beta-lactam antibiotics have been used successfully for the therapy of infections caused by organisms resistant to the antibiotic alone.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Bites and StingsTreatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Cesarean Section: Extraction of the FETUS by means of abdominal HYSTEROTOMY.Ciprofloxacin: A broad-spectrum antimicrobial carboxyfluoroquinoline.Gastrostomy: Creation of an artificial external opening into the stomach for nutritional support or gastrointestinal compression.Catheters, Indwelling: Catheters designed to be left within an organ or passage for an extended period of time.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Streptococcal Infections: Infections with bacteria of the genus STREPTOCOCCUS.Infection Control: Programs of disease surveillance, generally within health care facilities, designed to investigate, prevent, and control the spread of infections and their causative microorganisms.Bacteria: One of the three domains of life (the others being Eukarya and ARCHAEA), also called Eubacteria. They are unicellular prokaryotic microorganisms which generally possess rigid cell walls, multiply by cell division, and exhibit three principal forms: round or coccal, rodlike or bacillary, and spiral or spirochetal. Bacteria can be classified by their response to OXYGEN: aerobic, anaerobic, or facultatively anaerobic; by the mode by which they obtain their energy: chemotrophy (via chemical reaction) or PHOTOTROPHY (via light reaction); for chemotrophs by their source of chemical energy: CHEMOLITHOTROPHY (from inorganic compounds) or chemoorganotrophy (from organic compounds); and by their source for CARBON; NITROGEN; etc.; HETEROTROPHY (from organic sources) or AUTOTROPHY (from CARBON DIOXIDE). They can also be classified by whether or not they stain (based on the structure of their CELL WALLS) with CRYSTAL VIOLET dye: gram-negative or gram-positive.Neutropenia: A decrease in the number of NEUTROPHILS found in the blood.Drug Administration Schedule: Time schedule for administration of a drug in order to achieve optimum effectiveness and convenience.Injections, Intravenous: Injections made into a vein for therapeutic or experimental purposes.Physician's Practice Patterns: Patterns of practice related to diagnosis and treatment as especially influenced by cost of the service requested and provided.Microbial Sensitivity Tests: Any tests that demonstrate the relative efficacy of different chemotherapeutic agents against specific microorganisms (i.e., bacteria, fungi, viruses).Double-Blind Method: A method of studying a drug or procedure in which both the subjects and investigators are kept unaware of who is actually getting which specific treatment.Staphylococcal Infections: Infections with bacteria of the genus STAPHYLOCOCCUS.Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic: Works about clinical trials that involve at least one test treatment and one control treatment, concurrent enrollment and follow-up of the test- and control-treated groups, and in which the treatments to be administered are selected by a random process, such as the use of a random-numbers table.Bacteremia: The presence of viable bacteria circulating in the blood. Fever, chills, tachycardia, and tachypnea are common acute manifestations of bacteremia. The majority of cases are seen in already hospitalized patients, most of whom have underlying diseases or procedures which render their bloodstreams susceptible to invasion.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Drug Therapy, Combination: Therapy with two or more separate preparations given for a combined effect.Guideline Adherence: Conformity in fulfilling or following official, recognized, or institutional requirements, guidelines, recommendations, protocols, pathways, or other standards.Medical Audit: A detailed review and evaluation of selected clinical records by qualified professional personnel for evaluating quality of medical care.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Drug Resistance, Bacterial: The ability of bacteria to resist or to become tolerant to chemotherapeutic agents, antimicrobial agents, or antibiotics. This resistance may be acquired through gene mutation or foreign DNA in transmissible plasmids (R FACTORS).Drug Resistance, Microbial: The ability of microorganisms, especially bacteria, to resist or to become tolerant to chemotherapeutic agents, antimicrobial agents, or antibiotics. This resistance may be acquired through gene mutation or foreign DNA in transmissible plasmids (R FACTORS).Streptomyces: A genus of bacteria that form a nonfragmented aerial mycelium. Many species have been identified with some being pathogenic. This genus is responsible for producing a majority of the ANTI-BACTERIAL AGENTS of practical value.Antibiotics, Antineoplastic: Chemical substances, produced by microorganisms, inhibiting or preventing the proliferation of neoplasms.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Aminoglycosides: Glycosylated compounds in which there is an amino substituent on the glycoside. Some of them are clinically important ANTIBIOTICS.Recurrence: The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Drug Utilization: The utilization of drugs as reported in individual hospital studies, FDA studies, marketing, or consumption, etc. This includes drug stockpiling, and patient drug profiles.Penicillins: A group of antibiotics that contain 6-aminopenicillanic acid with a side chain attached to the 6-amino group. The penicillin nucleus is the chief structural requirement for biological activity. The side-chain structure determines many of the antibacterial and pharmacological characteristics. (Goodman and Gilman's The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, 8th ed, p1065)beta-Lactams: Four-membered cyclic AMIDES, best known for the PENICILLINS based on a bicyclo-thiazolidine, as well as the CEPHALOSPORINS based on a bicyclo-thiazine, and including monocyclic MONOBACTAMS. The BETA-LACTAMASES hydrolyze the beta lactam ring, accounting for BETA-LACTAM RESISTANCE of infective bacteria.Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols: The use of two or more chemicals simultaneously or sequentially in the drug therapy of neoplasms. The drugs need not be in the same dosage form.Erythromycin: A bacteriostatic antibiotic macrolide produced by Streptomyces erythreus. Erythromycin A is considered its major active component. In sensitive organisms, it inhibits protein synthesis by binding to 50S ribosomal subunits. This binding process inhibits peptidyl transferase activity and interferes with translocation of amino acids during translation and assembly of proteins.Ampicillin: Semi-synthetic derivative of penicillin that functions as an orally active broad-spectrum antibiotic.Staphylococcus aureus: Potentially pathogenic bacteria found in nasal membranes, skin, hair follicles, and perineum of warm-blooded animals. They may cause a wide range of infections and intoxications.Anti-Infective Agents: Substances that prevent infectious agents or organisms from spreading or kill infectious agents in order to prevent the spread of infection.Escherichia coli: A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria (GRAM-NEGATIVE FACULTATIVELY ANAEROBIC RODS) commonly found in the lower part of the intestine of warm-blooded animals. It is usually nonpathogenic, but some strains are known to produce DIARRHEA and pyogenic infections. Pathogenic strains (virotypes) are classified by their specific pathogenic mechanisms such as toxins (ENTEROTOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI), etc.Fermentation: Anaerobic degradation of GLUCOSE or other organic nutrients to gain energy in the form of ATP. End products vary depending on organisms, substrates, and enzymatic pathways. Common fermentation products include ETHANOL and LACTIC ACID.Tetracycline: A naphthacene antibiotic that inhibits AMINO ACYL TRNA binding during protein synthesis.Vancomycin: Antibacterial obtained from Streptomyces orientalis. It is a glycopeptide related to RISTOCETIN that inhibits bacterial cell wall assembly and is toxic to kidneys and the inner ear.Macrolides: A group of often glycosylated macrocyclic compounds formed by chain extension of multiple PROPIONATES cyclized into a large (typically 12, 14, or 16)-membered lactone. Macrolides belong to the POLYKETIDES class of natural products, and many members exhibit ANTIBIOTIC properties.Drug Resistance, Multiple, Bacterial: The ability of bacteria to resist or to become tolerant to several structurally and functionally distinct drugs simultaneously. This resistance may be acquired through gene mutation or foreign DNA in transmissible plasmids (R FACTORS).Bacterial Proteins: Proteins found in any species of bacterium.Gram-Positive Bacteria: Bacteria which retain the crystal violet stain when treated by Gram's method.Pseudomonas aeruginosa: A species of gram-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped bacteria commonly isolated from clinical specimens (wound, burn, and urinary tract infections). It is also found widely distributed in soil and water. P. aeruginosa is a major agent of nosocomial infection.Gram-Negative Bacteria: Bacteria which lose crystal violet stain but are stained pink when treated by Gram's method.Kanamycin: Antibiotic complex produced by Streptomyces kanamyceticus from Japanese soil. Comprises 3 components: kanamycin A, the major component, and kanamycins B and C, the minor components.Penicillin G: A penicillin derivative commonly used in the form of its sodium or potassium salts in the treatment of a variety of infections. It is effective against most gram-positive bacteria and against gram-negative cocci. It has also been used as an experimental convulsant because of its actions on GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID mediated synaptic transmission.Streptomycin: An antibiotic produced by the soil actinomycete Streptomyces griseus. It acts by inhibiting the initiation and elongation processes during protein synthesis.Drug Prescriptions: Directions written for the obtaining and use of DRUGS.Lactams: Cyclic AMIDES formed from aminocarboxylic acids by the elimination of water. Lactims are the enol forms of lactams.Mastectomy: Surgical procedure to remove one or both breasts.Antifungal Agents: Substances that destroy fungi by suppressing their ability to grow or reproduce. They differ from FUNGICIDES, INDUSTRIAL because they defend against fungi present in human or animal tissues.Azithromycin: A semi-synthetic macrolide antibiotic structurally related to ERYTHROMYCIN. It has been used in the treatment of Mycobacterium avium intracellulare infections, toxoplasmosis, and cryptosporidiosis.Oxytetracycline: A TETRACYCLINE analog isolated from the actinomycete STREPTOMYCES rimosus and used in a wide variety of clinical conditions.Chloramphenicol: An antibiotic first isolated from cultures of Streptomyces venequelae in 1947 but now produced synthetically. It has a relatively simple structure and was the first broad-spectrum antibiotic to be discovered. It acts by interfering with bacterial protein synthesis and is mainly bacteriostatic. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 29th ed, p106)Chemistry: A basic science concerned with the composition, structure, and properties of matter; and the reactions that occur between substances and the associated energy exchange.Cephaloridine: A cephalosporin antibiotic.Chemical Phenomena: The composition, conformation, and properties of atoms and molecules, and their reaction and interaction processes.Tobramycin: An aminoglycoside, broad-spectrum antibiotic produced by Streptomyces tenebrarius. It is effective against gram-negative bacteria, especially the PSEUDOMONAS species. It is a 10% component of the antibiotic complex, NEBRAMYCIN, produced by the same species.DNA, Bacterial: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.Neomycin: Antibiotic complex produced by Streptomyces fradiae. It is composed of neomycins A, B, and C. It acts by inhibiting translation during protein synthesis.Cross Infection: Any infection which a patient contracts in a health-care institution.Amoxicillin: A broad-spectrum semisynthetic antibiotic similar to AMPICILLIN except that its resistance to gastric acid permits higher serum levels with oral administration.Ceftriaxone: A broad-spectrum cephalosporin antibiotic with a very long half-life and high penetrability to meninges, eyes and inner ears.Penicillin Resistance: Nonsusceptibility of an organism to the action of penicillins.Staphylococcus: A genus of gram-positive, facultatively anaerobic, coccoid bacteria. Its organisms occur singly, in pairs, and in tetrads and characteristically divide in more than one plane to form irregular clusters. Natural populations of Staphylococcus are found on the skin and mucous membranes of warm-blooded animals. Some species are opportunistic pathogens of humans and animals.Administration, Oral: The giving of drugs, chemicals, or other substances by mouth.Lincomycin: An antibiotic produced by Streptomyces lincolnensis var. lincolnensis. It has been used in the treatment of staphylococcal, streptococcal, and Bacteroides fragilis infections.Acute Disease: Disease having a short and relatively severe course.Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections: Infections caused by bacteria that show up as pink (negative) when treated by the gram-staining method.Trimethoprim-Sulfamethoxazole Combination: This drug combination has proved to be an effective therapeutic agent with broad-spectrum antibacterial activity against both gram-positive and gram-negative organisms. It is effective in the treatment of many infections, including PNEUMOCYSTIS PNEUMONIA in AIDS.beta-Lactamases: Enzymes found in many bacteria which catalyze the hydrolysis of the amide bond in the beta-lactam ring. Well known antibiotics destroyed by these enzymes are penicillins and cephalosporins.Polymyxins: Basic lipopeptide antibiotic group obtained from Bacillus polymyxa. They affect the cell membrane by detergent action and may cause neuromuscular and kidney damage. At least eleven different members of the polymyxin group have been identified, each designated by a letter.Pseudomonas Infections: Infections with bacteria of the genus PSEUDOMONAS.Culture Media: Any liquid or solid preparation made specifically for the growth, storage, or transport of microorganisms or other types of cells. The variety of media that exist allow for the culturing of specific microorganisms and cell types, such as differential media, selective media, test media, and defined media. Solid media consist of liquid media that have been solidified with an agent such as AGAR or GELATIN.Leucomycins: An antibiotic complex produced by Streptomyces kitasatoensis. The complex consists of a mixture of at least eight biologically active components, A1 and A3 to A9. Leucomycins have both antibacterial and antimycoplasmal activities.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Staphylococcus epidermidis: A species of STAPHYLOCOCCUS that is a spherical, non-motile, gram-positive, chemoorganotrophic, facultative anaerobe. Mainly found on the skin and mucous membrane of warm-blooded animals, it can be primary pathogen or secondary invader.Colony Count, Microbial: Enumeration by direct count of viable, isolated bacterial, archaeal, or fungal CELLS or SPORES capable of growth on solid CULTURE MEDIA. The method is used routinely by environmental microbiologists for quantifying organisms in AIR; FOOD; and WATER; by clinicians for measuring patients' microbial load; and in antimicrobial drug testing.Cefotaxime: Semisynthetic broad-spectrum cephalosporin.Rifampin: A semisynthetic antibiotic produced from Streptomyces mediterranei. It has a broad antibacterial spectrum, including activity against several forms of Mycobacterium. In susceptible organisms it inhibits DNA-dependent RNA polymerase activity by forming a stable complex with the enzyme. It thus suppresses the initiation of RNA synthesis. Rifampin is bactericidal, and acts on both intracellular and extracellular organisms. (From Gilman et al., Goodman and Gilman's The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, 9th ed, p1160)Micromonospora: A genus of gram-positive bacteria that forms a branched mycelium. It commonly occurs as a saprophytic form in soil and aquatic environments.Molecular Structure: The location of the atoms, groups or ions relative to one another in a molecule, as well as the number, type and location of covalent bonds.Metronidazole: A nitroimidazole used to treat AMEBIASIS; VAGINITIS; TRICHOMONAS INFECTIONS; GIARDIASIS; ANAEROBIC BACTERIA; and TREPONEMAL INFECTIONS. It has also been proposed as a radiation sensitizer for hypoxic cells. According to the Fourth Annual Report on Carcinogens (NTP 85-002, 1985, p133), this substance may reasonably be anticipated to be a carcinogen (Merck, 11th ed).Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Doxycycline: A synthetic tetracycline derivative with similar antimicrobial activity.Thienamycins: Beta-lactam antibiotics that differ from PENICILLINS in having the thiazolidine sulfur atom replaced by carbon, the sulfur then becoming the first atom in the side chain. They are unstable chemically, but have a very broad antibacterial spectrum. Thienamycin and its more stable derivatives are proposed for use in combinations with enzyme inhibitors.Biofilms: Encrustations, formed from microbes (bacteria, algae, fungi, plankton, or protozoa) embedding in extracellular polymers, that adhere to surfaces such as teeth (DENTAL DEPOSITS); PROSTHESES AND IMPLANTS; and catheters. Biofilms are prevented from forming by treating surfaces with DENTIFRICES; DISINFECTANTS; ANTI-INFECTIVE AGENTS; and antifouling agents.Anthraquinones: Compounds based on ANTHRACENES which contain two KETONES in any position. Substitutions can be in any position except on the ketone groups.Osteomyelitis
Prophylactic antibiotics are not necessary. The diameter of the hysteroscope is generally too large to conveniently pass the ...
Antibiotics are effective. Prophylactic treatment consists in prevention of suppuration. Ignaz Semmelweis, the original ... It was almost universally fatal before the introduction of antibiotics. Sir William Osler included a three-page discussion of ...
Measures to prevent OPSI include vaccination and prophylactic antibiotics. The spleen contains many macrophages (part of the ... Individuals with OPSI are most commonly treated with antibiotics and supportive care. ...
Avni T, Levcovich A, Ad-El DD, Leibovici L, Paul M (2010). "Prophylactic antibiotics for burns patients: systematic review and ... While topical antibiotics are often recommended, there is little evidence to support their use. Silver sulfadiazine (a type of ... Intravenous antibiotics are recommended before surgery for those with extensive burns (>60% TBSA). As of 2008[update], ... guidelines do not recommend their general use due to concerns regarding antibiotic resistance and the increased risk of fungal ...
Long-term prophylactic antibiotics may be given in certain cases. In cases of infectious mononucleosis splenomegaly is a common ...
This form usually lessens in severity within two years of diagnosis.[citation needed] The use of prophylactic antibiotics has ... Treatment Treatment consists of corticosteroids to reduce autoantibody production, antibiotics to prevent infection and ... are the most common infection seen in autoimmune neutropenia and typically infection responds to antibiotic treatment alone. ...
El-Mufti ME, Rakas F, Glessa A, Sanallah B, Abusidra A (1989). "A single prophylactic antibiotic for emergency appendicectomy ... assessing newer antibiotics. During that period he developed and reported (1993) a simplified procedure for sclerotherapy of ...
There is not enough evidence for the use of prophylactic antibiotics to prevent endometritis after manual removal of placental ... "Prophylactic antibiotics for manual removal of retained placenta in vaginal birth". The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews ... Pyometra is treated with antibiotics, according to culture and sensitivity. Maternal death Puerperal fever "endometritis" at ... Antibiotic therapy is curative in most cases (depending on underlying cause), with fairly rapid alleviation of symptoms after ...
... and prophylactic antibiotic treatment. However, the use of prophylactic antibiotics, such as penicillin, remains controversial ...
Surgery may be an option, or some physicians order prophylactic antibiotics. Klob J. Pancreas accessorium. Zeitschrift der ...
Aggressive surveillance is essential as prophylactic antibiotics have shown little benefit. Fungal infections, particularly in ... Defective cellular and humoral immunity as well as presence of indwelling catheters, coma, broad-spectrum antibiotics, and ... the setting of broad-spectrum antibiotics, are also common, and disseminated fungemia is a poor prognostic sign. The advent of ...
Prophylactic antibiotics have been injected into the uterus to treat infertility. This has been done before the transfer of ... No association exists between successful implantation and antibiotic treatment. Infertility treatments often progress to the ...
Doctors will prescribe pain medication and prophylactic antibiotics to the patient. There is often a large amount of swelling ... and the consumption of antibiotics. Cleaning of the mouth should always be done regardless of surgery to ensure healthy, strong ... "Bacteremia After Oral Surgery and Antibiotic Prophylaxis for Endocarditis". Clinical Infectious Diseases. 29 (1): 1-8. doi: ... and effective way of minimizing threat of a bacterial infection is to prevent it at all costs with pre and post antibiotic ...
Recurrent bacterial infections, if severe, might be managed with prophylactic antibiotics. Estimating the mortality rate based ...
Nellis, JC; Kesser, BW; Park, SS (January 2014). "What is the efficacy of prophylactic antibiotics in basilar skull fractures ... Unfortunately, the efficacy of prophylactic antibiotics in these cases is uncertain. Acute injury to the internal carotid ... Preventative antibiotics are of unclear use. It occurs in about 12% of people with a severe head injury. Battle's sign -- ... "Antibiotics in base of skull fractures". BestBets. Retrieved 2014-03-22. Resnick, Daniel K.; Subach, Brian R.; Marion, Donald W ...
antibiotics, called prophylactic when given as prevention rather as treatment of infection. However, long term use of ... Sometimes, multiple antibiotics are used in case there is resistance to one antibiotic. Antibiotics only work for bacteria and ... Antibiotics work by slowing down the multiplication of bacteria or killing the bacteria. The most common classes of antibiotics ... Thus, avoiding using antibiotics longer than necessary helps preventing bacteria from forming mutations that aide in antibiotic ...
Herath, SC; Poole, P (Nov 28, 2013). "Prophylactic antibiotic therapy for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)". ... In those with a severe exacerbation, antibiotics improve outcomes. A number of different antibiotics may be used including ... Long-term antibiotics, specifically those from the macrolide class such as erythromycin, reduce the frequency of exacerbations ... "Antibiotics for exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease". Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 12: CD010257. doi:10.1002/ ...
... infection rate and multiple dosage antibiotic infection rate of 0.8%. The authors had previously used prophylactic antibiotics ... Based on the CDC guideline, a single dose of prophylactic antibiotic was proven to be efficacious for the prevention of ... 1998). "Influence of antibiotics on infection in spinal surgery: a prospective study of 110 patients". J. Spinal Disord. 11 (6 ... Antimicrobial prophylaxis (giving antibiotics during or after surgery before an infection begins) reduces the rate of surgical ...
... a single dose of prophylactic intravenous antibiotics is given immediately before surgery. General anaesthesia is induced, with ... In general terms, the procedure for an open appendectomy is: Antibiotics are given immediately if signs of sepsis are seen; ...
People with AIDS are given macrolide antibiotics such as azithromycin for prophylactic treatment. People with HIV infection and ... It is typically treated with a series of three antibiotics for a period of at least six months. M. avium, M. intracellulare, ... The treatment of choice is surgical excision of the affected lymph nodes, with antibiotic treatment (usually clarithromycin and ... Postinfection treatment involves a combination of antituberculosis antibiotics, including rifampicin, rifabutin, ciprofloxacin ...
Following surgery, nasal decongestants and prophylactic antibiotics are often prescribed to prevent postoperative infection. ... Antibiotics can help control or prevent any sinus infections. Preoperative nasal decongestants usage can reduce any existing ... outcomes of non-surgical management comprising antibiotics and local decongestion therapy". The Journal of Laryngology & ...
Clostridum difficile colitis can also develop when prophylactic or post-operative antibiotics are used. A pleurectomy is a ...
Prophylactic antibiotic treatments for tics and OCD are experimental and controversial; overdiagnosis of PANDAS may have led to ... Murphy, Kurlan and Leckman (2010) say, "The use of prophylactic antibiotics to treat PANDAS has become widespread in the ... of prophylactic antibiotic treatment of 37 children found that penicillin V did not prevent GABHS infections or exacerbation of ... The safety and efficacy of antibiotic therapy for patients meeting the PANDAS criteria needs to be determined in carefully ...
"Timing of intravenous prophylactic antibiotics for preventing postpartum infectious morbidity in women undergoing cesarean ... Antibiotic prophylaxis is used before an incision. The uterus is incised, and this incision is extended with blunt pressure ... Taking antibiotics before skin incision rather than after cord clamping reduces the risk for the mother, without increasing ... The use of preventative antibiotics in women undergoing cesarean section decreased wound infection, endometritis, and serious ...
Prophylactic Antibiotics with Intracranial Pressure Monitors and External Ventricular Drains: A Review of the Evidence. ... One popular theory is the use of prophylactic antibiotics, administered during insertion of external ventricular drains or ... There is some debate as to the most effective antibiotics and the best ways to introduce the drugs (e.g. intravenously, orally ... It is treated with some appropriate combination of antibiotics in order to rid the patient of the underlying infection. Much of ...
This is usually termed "antibiotic sore mouth", "antibiotic sore tongue", or "antibiotic-induced stomatitis" because it is ... Prophylactic use of antifungals is sometimes employed in persons with HIV disease, during radiotherapy, during ... Broad-spectrum antibiotics (e.g. tetracycline) eliminate the competing bacteria and disrupt the normally balanced ecology of ... If candidiasis is secondary to corticosteroid or antibiotic use, then use may be stopped, although this is not always a ...
... of Plasmodium strainsdoxycycline does not suppress Pfalciparums sexual blood stage gametocytessubjects completing prophylactic ... Side effects of doxycycline antibiotics for staph. Doxycycline for ear infection in dogs ...
Tick bite doxycycline prophylactic doxycycline physical properties. Doxycycline hyclate green stool what is the generic brand ... Doxycycline tetracycline antibiotics doxycycline hyclate and blepharitis can, doxycycline treat fever urinary tract infection ... Doxycycline off market antibiotics for syphilis doxycycline. Doxycycline sinus infection dosage doxycycline pleurodesis ... Chlamydia infection doxycycline antibiotics for syphilis doxycycline doxycycline for periodontal disease dosage doxycycline ...
Maravi-Poma, E. (2003). Early antibiotic treatment (prophylaxis) of septic complications in severe acute necrotizing ... Fungal Infections in Patients with Severe Acute Pancreatitis and the Use of Prophylactic Therapy, Clinical Infectious Diseases ... The Transmissibility of Antibiotic-Resistant Enterobacteriaceae in Intensive Care Units. Clinical Infectious Diseases, 66, (4 ...
Many hospitalized children receive prophylactic antibiotics inappropriately, and this could speed the development of ... Prophylactic Broad-Spectrum Antibiotics Common in Pediatric Hospitals - Medscape - Apr 03, 2018. ... Of the 2242 patients who received prophylactic antibiotics, 1420 (63.3%) received one drug, 576 (25.7%) received two drugs, and ... "Guidelines for medical antibiotic prophylaxis can only be found for a few specific medical conditions, such as congenital heart ...
Antibiotic regimens for endocarditis prophylaxis are d... more ... Prophylactic Antibiotic Use in Head and Neck Surgery * ... Antibiotic Prophylactic Regimens for Endocarditis Q&A Which antibiotics are used in prophylactic regimens for endocarditis?. ... Which antibiotics are used in prophylactic regimens for endocarditis?) and Which antibiotics are used in prophylactic regimens ... Antibiotic regimens for endocarditis prophylaxis are directed toward S viridans, and the recommended standard prophylactic ...
From the Editors Desk - Prophylactic antibiotics in total joint arthroplasty. Published: December 17, 2015. ... Michelle Ghert, in her capacity as the Deputy Editor for Bone & Joint Research published the editorial entitled Prophylactic ... antibiotics in total joint arthroplasty To access the editorial: Prophylactic antibiotics in total joint arthroplasty (Bone ...
Prophylactic antibiotics are antibiotics given before surgical procedures to prevent bacterial infection in vulnerable tissues ... People who are at a high risk for endocarditis because of deformed or prosthetic heart valves take prophylactic antibiotics to ... The antibiotics used in prophylaxis specifically target these bacteria.. Following are the antibiotic prophylactic regimens for ... Prophylactic use of antibiotics is the administration of antibiotics before certain surgical procedures to prevent introduction ...
Prophylactic antibiotics significantly reduce the risk of serious bacterial infections in children during the critical first ... 6, 2015) - Prophylactic antibiotics significantly reduce the risk of serious bacterial infections in children during the ... Children with childhood leukemia benefit from prophylactic antibiotics Infection rate during vulnerable stage of treatment ... The proportion of patients given prophylactic antibiotics who experienced at least one infection during induction-phase therapy ...
... Qiang Lu,1 Shu-Qin Xie,1 Si-Yuan Chen,2 Li-Ju Chen,3 ... S. C. Pan, H. Y. Sun, J. W. Lin et al., "Mprovement in timing of antibiotic administration by using a prophylactic ... As for type-I incision, prophylactic antibiotic intends mainly to kill or inhibit the contaminating bacteria from air, ... Based on current practice, most hospitals in China (including Grade-1 and Grade-3 hospitals) are using prophylactic antibiotic ...
Prophylactic Antibiotic Dose Helps Prevent Maternal Infections Following Assisted Births, Study Shows. May 14, 2019 ... Reuters: Antibiotics after assisted births could stop thousands of infections. "Giving a single dose of antibiotics to mothers ... In a study published in The Lancet medical journal, the researchers said prescribing antibiotics as a preventative measure ...
Prophylactic Antibiotic Treatment During Vaginal Repair. The recruitment status of this study is unknown. The completion date ... Prophylactic antibiotic. Postoperative infections. Uterine prolapse grade I - II. cystocele. rectocele. enterocele. defects of ... The objective of this randomized, controlled trial is to investigate the significance of prophylactic antibiotic treatment in ... where prophylactic antibiotic treatment is standard.. *Patients suffering from physical or mental disorders that will not allow ...
Prophylactic Antibiotic Treatment During Vaginal Repair. The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility ... Prophylactic antibiotic. Postoperative infections. Uterine prolapse grade I - II. cystocele. rectocele. enterocele. defects of ... The objective of this randomized, controlled trial is to investigate the significance of prophylactic antibiotic treatment in ... where prophylactic antibiotic treatment is standard.. *Patients suffering from physical or mental disorders that will not allow ...
... by Shirley Johanna on December 7, 2015 at 5:53 ... Administration of prophylactic antibiotics for children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia during the treatment phase reduces ... The proportion of patients given prophylactic antibiotics who experienced at least one infection during induction-phase therapy ... Antibiotics. Antibiotics are among the most used and abused medications. This article explains some general features about ...
Prophylactic antibiotics for transcervical intrauterine procedures. The administration of antibiotics before or following ... The prophylactic administration of antibiotics (giving antibiotics before the development of any infection) in women undergoing ... Prophylactic antibiotics may play a role in the prevention of post-procedure transcervical intrauterine infections. ... It is, therefore, not possible to draw any conclusions regarding the use of prophylactic antibiotics for the prevention of post ...
Prophylactic antibiotics for children with measles seem to have little effect on mortality BMJ 1997; 314 :b ... Prophylactic antibiotics for children with measles seem to have little effect on mortality ... Prophylactic antibiotics for children with measles seem to have little effect on mortality ... Prophylactic antibiotics for children with measles seem to have little effect on mortality. BMJ 1997; 314 doi: https://doi.org/ ...
We reviewed adherence to our own departmental antibiotic protocol to determine its adequacy and effectiveness. METHODS: We ... Published data on the role of antibiotics after open airway reconstruction surgery in children is lacking. ... RESULTS: 36 children underwent surgery, of whom 32 were given appropriate antibiotic prophylaxis. Failure to give antibiotic ... CONCLUSIONS: We present a revised antibiotic protocol based on our experience and local antibiotic advice.. ...
The Use of Prophylactic Antibiotics by Children. Prophylactic antibiotics may be recommended for the use by children for ... What Are Prophylactic Antibiotics?. Prophylactic antibiotics are drugs that are prescribed for the prevention of infection. ... When Should Prophylactic Antibiotics Be Used?. The following procedures require the use of prophylactic antibiotics for ... Is It Really Essential to Use Prophylactic Antibiotics?. One of the reasons for the use of prophylactic antibiotics is aiming ...
Prophylactic antibiotics for preventing pneumococcal infection in children with sickle cell disease. ... OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of prophylactic antibiotic regimes for preventing pneumococcal infection in children with ... Hirst, C., & Owusu-Ofori, S. (2002). Prophylactic antibiotics for preventing pneumococcal infection in children with sickle ... SELECTION CRITERIA: All randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing prophylactic antibiotics to prevent ...
AAHKS Position Statement on CDC Guideline: Post-Operative Prophylactic Antibiotics. For Immediate Release. November 17, 2017 ... The cited literature[2][3][4][5][6][7]is heterogeneous in terms of actual procedures, antibiotic regiments, and antibiotics ... which recommends against the use of post-operative prophylactic antibiotics - including patients undergoing total joint ... Antibiotic use after cefuroxime prophylaxis in hip and knee joint replacement. Clinical pharmacology and therapeutics. Aug 1991 ...
Children with childhood leukemia benefit from prophylactic antibiotics. ORLANDO, FL (December 6, 2015). - Prophylactic ... Children with childhood leukemia benefit from prophylactic antibiotics * Early gene therapy results in Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome ... The proportion of patients given prophylactic antibiotics who experienced at least one infection during induction-phase therapy ... found that prophylactic antibiotic treatment reduced the incidence of infection by approximately 60 percent compared to ...
So, although no studies discuss the use of prophylactic antibiotics in these patients, if an antibiotic were to be used then it ... No evidence for prophylactic antibiotics in pinna laceration.. * Report By: Hannah Kelly - ST4 in Emergency Medicine ... You have heard that we should give prophylactic antibiotics to these patients after suturing the wound as they have a high risk ... In [adults with traumatic laceration of the pinna], do [prophylactic antibiotics after suturing] [help to prevent ...
Prophylactic administration of antibiotics can decrease postoperative morbidity, shorten hospitalization, and reduce overall ... encoded search term (Prophylactic Antibiotic Use in Head and Neck Surgery) and Prophylactic Antibiotic Use in Head and Neck ... Disadvantages of antibiotics. The use of antibiotics may encourage laxity of good surgical technique. It promotes antibiotic ... Prophylactic Perioperative Antibiotic Use in Endoscopic Sinus Surgery: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis. Otolaryngol Head ...
The use of prophylactic antibiotics (PA) during high-risk endoscopic procedures is known to reduce the risk of significant ... Clinical Impact of Prophylactic Antibiotic Treatment for Self-Expandable Metallic Stent Insertion in Patients with Malignant ... The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of prophylactic antibiotics (PA) for reducing the infectious complications ... The following variables were analyzed to compare between prophylactic antibiotics (PA) group and non-PA group: age, sex, body ...
The antibiotic prophylactic regimens below are recommended by the American Heart Association (AHA) only for patients with ... encoded search term (Antibiotic Prophylactic Regimens for Endocarditis) and Antibiotic Prophylactic Regimens for Endocarditis ... Antibiotic Prophylactic Regimens for Endocarditis Updated: Feb 05, 2018 * Author: Mary L Windle, PharmD; Chief Editor: ... Which antibiotics are used in prophylactic regimens for endocarditis?. What is the standard general prophylaxis regimen for ...
... prophylactic measures to prevent OPSI have been recommended. These recommendations include vaccination, use of antibiotics, and ... Antibiotic therapy should include prophylaxis as well as ... The value of prophylactic vaccinations and antibiotic treatment ... The value of prophylactic vaccinations and antibiotic treatment in post-splenectomy patients: a review. ... Antibiotic therapy should include prophylaxis as well as "on-demand" antibiotics when infection is suspected. Importantly, ...
  • RESULTS: 36 children underwent surgery, of whom 32 were given appropriate antibiotic prophylaxis. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Clinical expert panels from the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and physician expert groups of clinical specialty boards have developed guidelines for appropriate antibiotic selection. (nursingcenter.com)
  • In the US, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services has formalized this into part of the Surgical Care Improvement Project (SCIP), which mandates the use of an appropriate antibiotic within 1 hour preop and stopping it within 24 hours postop. (thetraumapro.com)
  • People who are at a high risk for contracting infective endocarditis because of deformed or prosthetic heart valves take prophylactic antibiotics to minimize the risk of infecting the valve with bacteria introduced into the body during an invasive procedure. (rxlist.com)
  • The antibiotics used in prophylaxis specifically target these bacteria. (rxlist.com)
  • Prolonged use of antibiotics could also lead to infection from Clostridium difficile (bacteria that can cause diarrhea and sometimes more serious intestinal issues like colitis). (columbia.edu)
  • Prophylactic antibiotics act mainly by destroying the bacteria and slowing production of bacterial proteases, thus preventing the attachment of bacteria to the mucosal surfaces. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Thus patients with mitral valve prolapse or other heart conditions need to take antibiotics to ensure the bacteria are destroyed. (periopartner.com)
  • Some neurosurgeons consider that there are strong arguments against the use of antimicrobials (promotion of antibiotic-resistant strains of bacteria, superinfection and adverse drug reactions) and meticulous aseptic techniques could be more usefully than prophylactic antibiotics. (mysciencework.com)
  • The overuse of antibiotics has become a growing concern as there is strong evidence to suggest that it has contributed to an increase in the development of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, which can spread to people, rendering antibiotics ineffective for both humans and animals. (farmingmonthly.co.uk)
  • A combination of antibiotic agents covering aerobic, anaerobic and Gram-negative bacteria is superior to single agents. (blogspot.com)
  • which can be defined as a strain of bacteria unable to be killed using multiple antibiotics, is now a large problem, in the past it was not. (bartleby.com)
  • Whilst current practice is to treat pre‐operative bacteriuria in patients managed in urology departments, Herr [ 3 ] has shown it is reasonable not to give prophylactic antibiotics to asymptomatic patients undergoing flexible cystoscopy, even if there is bacteriuria on pre‐procedure urine analysis. (bjuinternational.com)
  • Randomised and some non-randomised (i.e., quasi-randomised trials) controlled trials of adequate quality in which newborn infants with umbilical artery catheters are randomised to receive prophylactic antibiotics versus placebo or no treatment. (cochrane.org)
  • Administration of prophylactic antibiotics for children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia during the treatment phase reduces bacterial infection risk. (medindia.net)
  • A Cochrane review was conducted on appropriate timing (preoperative versus intraoperative) for the administration of prophylactic antibiotics for preventing infectious morbidities following caesarean. (who.int)
  • In the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence update (February 2017) on (general) SSIs, it was advised to provide prophylactic antibiotics in clean-contaminated and in clean surgery with implants or prosthesis, by giving a single dose of intravenous antibiotics prior to incision on starting anaesthesia. (bmj.com)
  • Based on the pharmacokinetics of common intravenous antibiotics, maximal benefit can be expected when administered between 30 and 60 minutes before skin incision. (who.int)
  • Are postoperative intravenous antibiotics necessary after bimaxillary orthognathic surgery? (ac.ir)
  • Every year 250 000 people who have been bitten by dogs attend minor injuries and emergency units in the United Kingdom, 1 and some of them are admitted to hospital for surgical debridement or intravenous antibiotics. (bmj.com)
  • Until 2007 prophylactic antibiotics were not given prior to treatment, but in September 2007 a single oral dose of azithromycin (Zitromax) and moxifloxacin (Avelox) was introduced as prophylactic antibiotics. (jddonline.com)
  • Ritter MA, Campbell E, Keating EM, Faris PM. Comparison of intraoperative versus 24 hour antibiotic prophylaxis in total joint replacement. (aahks.org)
  • The Ohio State Wexner Medical Center is one of just 11 sites participating in an international, multicenter prospective randomized study to provide level I evidence for or against the single-dose versus 24-hour antibiotic. (osu.edu)
  • All of the included trials showed a reduced risk of infection in children with sickle cell disease (SS or Sb0Thal) receiving prophylactic penicillin. (rti.org)
  • Generally, you develop symptoms of a bacterial infection, go to the doctor, and leave the office with a prescription of antibiotics in hand. (inogen.com)
  • The primary outcome was confirmed or suspected maternal infection within 6 weeks of delivery defined by a new prescription of antibiotics for specific indications, confirmed systemic infection on culture, or endometritis. (ox.ac.uk)
  • Additionally, the government is currently not regulating the usage or prescription of antibiotics, and is not expressing nearly the same concern towards this public health matter than towards such diseases as cancer or AIDS, which may eventually be curable through improved medical technology, cannot evolve to become more untreatable as with the superbugs, and do not necessarily come about as a direct result of medicinal abuse. (bartleby.com)
  • Based on our experience, we recommend prophylactic antibiotics to patients who have facial augmentation with polyacrylamide hydrogel in order to avoid infection and risk of biofilm formation due to contamination during injection with naturally occurring micro flora from skin and lips. (jddonline.com)
  • Service users were generally supportive of the trial, although several expressed concerns about taking antibiotics for lengthy periods, and felt that multiple morbidity/old age would limit entry into a 3-year study. (nottingham.ac.uk)