Foot: The distal extremity of the leg in vertebrates, consisting of the tarsus (ANKLE); METATARSUS; phalanges; and the soft tissues surrounding these bones.Foot Diseases: Anatomical and functional disorders affecting the foot.Diabetic Foot: Common foot problems in persons with DIABETES MELLITUS, caused by any combination of factors such as DIABETIC NEUROPATHIES; PERIPHERAL VASCULAR DISEASES; and INFECTION. With the loss of sensation and poor circulation, injuries and infections often lead to severe foot ulceration, GANGRENE and AMPUTATION.Foot Deformities, Acquired: Distortion or disfigurement of the foot, or a part of the foot, acquired through disease or injury after birth.Foot Ulcer: Lesion on the surface of the skin of the foot, usually accompanied by inflammation. The lesion may become infected or necrotic and is frequently associated with diabetes or leprosy.Foot Injuries: General or unspecified injuries involving the foot.Foot Deformities: Alterations or deviations from normal shape or size which result in a disfigurement of the foot.Foot Bones: The TARSAL BONES; METATARSAL BONES; and PHALANGES OF TOES. The tarsal bones consists of seven bones: CALCANEUS; TALUS; cuboid; navicular; internal; middle; and external cuneiform bones. The five metatarsal bones are numbered one through five, running medial to lateral. There are 14 phalanges in each foot, the great toe has two while the other toes have three each.Foot Joints: The articulations extending from the ANKLE distally to the TOES. These include the ANKLE JOINT; TARSAL JOINTS; METATARSOPHALANGEAL JOINT; and TOE JOINT.Foot Deformities, Congenital: Alterations or deviations from normal shape or size which result in a disfigurement of the foot occurring at or before birth.Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease: A mild, highly infectious viral disease of children, characterized by vesicular lesions in the mouth and on the hands and feet. It is caused by coxsackieviruses A.Foot Dermatoses: Skin diseases of the foot, general or unspecified.Flatfoot: A condition in which one or more of the arches of the foot have flattened out.Clubfoot: A deformed foot in which the foot is plantarflexed, inverted and adducted.ShoesFoot Orthoses: Devices used to support or align the foot structure, or to prevent or correct foot deformities.Tarsal Bones: The seven bones which form the tarsus - namely, CALCANEUS; TALUS; cuboid, navicular, and the internal, middle, and external cuneiforms.Forefoot, Human: The forepart of the foot including the metatarsals and the TOES.Arthropathy, Neurogenic: Chronic progressive degeneration of the stress-bearing portion of a joint, with bizarre hypertrophic changes at the periphery. It is probably a complication of a variety of neurologic disorders, particularly TABES DORSALIS, involving loss of sensation, which leads to relaxation of supporting structures and chronic instability of the joint. (Dorland, 27th ed)Foot Rot: A disease of the horny parts and of the adjacent soft structures of the feet of cattle, swine, and sheep. It is usually caused by Corynebacterium pyogenes or Bacteroides nodosus (see DICHELOBACTER NODOSUS). It is also known as interdigital necrobacillosis. (From Black's Veterinary Dictionary, 18th ed)Orthotic Devices: Apparatus used to support, align, prevent, or correct deformities or to improve the function of movable parts of the body.Tarsal Joints: The articulations between the various TARSAL BONES. This does not include the ANKLE JOINT which consists of the articulations between the TIBIA; FIBULA; and TALUS.Podiatry: A specialty concerned with the diagnosis and treatment of foot disorders and injuries and anatomic defects of the foot.Toes: Any one of five terminal digits of the vertebrate FOOT.Hallux Valgus: Lateral displacement of the great toe (HALLUX), producing deformity of the first METATARSOPHALANGEAL JOINT with callous, bursa, or bunion formation over the bony prominence.Metatarsus: The part of the foot between the tarsa and the TOES.Metatarsal Bones: The five long bones of the METATARSUS, articulating with the TARSAL BONES proximally and the PHALANGES OF TOES distally.Gait: Manner or style of walking.Immersion Foot: A condition of the feet produced by prolonged exposure of the feet to water. Exposure for 48 hours or more to warm water causes tropical immersion foot or warm-water immersion foot common in Vietnam where troops were exposed to prolonged or repeated wading in paddy fields or streams. Trench foot results from prolonged exposure to cold, without actual freezing. It was common in trench warfare during World War I, when soldiers stood, sometimes for hours, in trenches with a few inches of cold water in them. (Andrews' Diseases of the Skin, 8th ed, p27)Ankle Joint: The joint that is formed by the inferior articular and malleolar articular surfaces of the TIBIA; the malleolar articular surface of the FIBULA; and the medial malleolar, lateral malleolar, and superior surfaces of the TALUS.Pronation: Applies to movements of the forearm in turning the palm backward or downward. When referring to the foot, a combination of eversion and abduction movements in the tarsal and metatarsal joints (turning the foot up and in toward the midline of the body).Metatarsophalangeal Joint: The articulation between a metatarsal bone (METATARSAL BONES) and a phalanx.Ankle: The region of the lower limb between the FOOT and the LEG.Diabetic Neuropathies: Peripheral, autonomic, and cranial nerve disorders that are associated with DIABETES MELLITUS. These conditions usually result from diabetic microvascular injury involving small blood vessels that supply nerves (VASA NERVORUM). Relatively common conditions which may be associated with diabetic neuropathy include third nerve palsy (see OCULOMOTOR NERVE DISEASES); MONONEUROPATHY; mononeuropathy multiplex; diabetic amyotrophy; a painful POLYNEUROPATHY; autonomic neuropathy; and thoracoabdominal neuropathy. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1325)Amputation: The removal of a limb or other appendage or outgrowth of the body. (Dorland, 28th ed)Calcaneus: The largest of the TARSAL BONES which is situated at the lower and back part of the FOOT, forming the HEEL.Hand Deformities, Congenital: Alterations or deviations from normal shape or size which result in a disfigurement of the hand occurring at or before birth.Biomechanical Phenomena: The properties, processes, and behavior of biological systems under the action of mechanical forces.Hallux: The innermost digit of the foot in PRIMATES.Talus: The second largest of the TARSAL BONES. It articulates with the TIBIA and FIBULA to form the ANKLE JOINT.Hammer Toe Syndrome: A condition characterized by a series of interrelated digital symptoms and joint changes of the lesser digits and METATARSOPHALANGEAL JOINTS of the FOOT. The syndrome can include some or all of the following conditions: hammer toe, claw toe, mallet toe, overlapping fifth toe, curly toe, EXOSTOSIS; HYPEROSTOSIS; interdigital heloma, or contracted toe.Fasciitis, Plantar: Inflammation of the thick tissue on the bottom of the foot (plantar fascia) causing HEEL pain. The plantar fascia (also called plantar aponeurosis) are bands of fibrous tissue extending from the calcaneal tuberosity to the TOES. The etiology of plantar fasciitis remains controversial but is likely to involve a biomechanical imbalance. Though often presenting along with HEEL SPUR, they do not appear to be causally related.Subtalar Joint: Formed by the articulation of the talus with the calcaneus.Heel: The back (or posterior) of the FOOT in PRIMATES, found behind the ANKLE and distal to the TOES.Casts, Surgical: Dressings made of fiberglass, plastic, or bandage impregnated with plaster of paris used for immobilization of various parts of the body in cases of fractures, dislocations, and infected wounds. In comparison with plaster casts, casts made of fiberglass or plastic are lightweight, radiolucent, able to withstand moisture, and less rigid.Enterovirus A, Human: A species of ENTEROVIRUS infecting humans and containing 10 serotypes, mostly coxsackieviruses.Pressure: A type of stress exerted uniformly in all directions. Its measure is the force exerted per unit area. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Gait Disorders, Neurologic: Gait abnormalities that are a manifestation of nervous system dysfunction. These conditions may be caused by a wide variety of disorders which affect motor control, sensory feedback, and muscle strength including: CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES; PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES; NEUROMUSCULAR DISEASES; or MUSCULAR DISEASES.Callosities: Localized hyperplasia of the horny layer of the epidermis due to pressure or friction. (Dorland, 27th ed)Toe Joint: The articulation between the head of one phalanx and the base of the one distal to it, in each toe.Leg: The inferior part of the lower extremity between the KNEE and the ANKLE.Supination: Applies to movements of the forearm in turning the palm forward or upward. When referring to the foot, a combination of adduction and inversion movements of the foot.Equinus Deformity: Plantar declination of the foot.Arthrodesis: The surgical fixation of a joint by a procedure designed to accomplish fusion of the joint surfaces by promoting the proliferation of bone cells. (Dorland, 28th ed)Ankle Injuries: Harm or hurt to the ankle or ankle joint usually inflicted by an external source.Tendon Transfer: Surgical procedure by which a tendon is incised at its insertion and placed at an anatomical site distant from the original insertion. The tendon remains attached at the point of origin and takes over the function of a muscle inactivated by trauma or disease.Podocytes: Highly differentiated epithelial cells of the visceral layer of BOWMAN CAPSULE of the KIDNEY. They are composed of a cell body with major CELL SURFACE EXTENSIONS and secondary fingerlike extensions called pedicels. They enwrap the KIDNEY GLOMERULUS capillaries with their cell surface extensions forming a filtration structure. The pedicels of neighboring podocytes interdigitate with each other leaving between them filtration slits that are bridged by an extracellular structure impermeable to large macromolecules called the slit diaphragm, and provide the last barrier to protein loss in the KIDNEY.Artificial Limbs: Prosthetic replacements for arms, legs, and parts thereof.Hand: The distal part of the arm beyond the wrist in humans and primates, that includes the palm, fingers, and thumb.Posture: The position or attitude of the body.Peroneal Nerve: The lateral of the two terminal branches of the sciatic nerve. The peroneal (or fibular) nerve provides motor and sensory innervation to parts of the leg and foot.OsteomyelitisTinea Pedis: Dermatological pruritic lesion in the feet, caused by Trichophyton rubrum, T. mentagrophytes, or Epidermophyton floccosum.Hydra: A genus of freshwater polyps in the family Hydridae, order Hydroida, class HYDROZOA. They are of special interest because of their complex organization and because their adult organization corresponds roughly to the gastrula of higher animals.Locomotion: Movement or the ability to move from one place or another. It can refer to humans, vertebrate or invertebrate animals, and microorganisms.Metatarsalgia: Pain in the region of the METATARSUS. It can include pain in the METATARSAL BONES; METATARSOPHALANGEAL JOINT; and/or intermetatarsal joints (TARSAL JOINTS).Hoof and Claw: Highly keratinized processes that are sharp and curved, or flat with pointed margins. They are found especially at the end of the limbs in certain animals.Gangrene: Death and putrefaction of tissue usually due to a loss of blood supply.
  • When unusual stress is applied over a period of years, the joints and tendons of your foot can cease to function in a balanced manner and toes, in an effort to compensate, can begin to bend into the hammertoe shape. (wordpress.com)
  • Common causes of this joint dislocation include a toe injury, arthritis, a high foot arch, wearing shoes that don?t fit properly, tightened ligaments or tendons in the foot, pressure from a bunion (when your big toe points inward toward your second toe) Spinal cord or peripheral nerve damage may cause all of your toes to curl downward. (wordpress.com)
  • However the subset of patients with an anesthetic foot and a wound on the sole of the forefoot should be marked for intensive surveillance and early surgical intervention if infection occurs. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Surgeons usually witness only the limb-threatening stages of infected puncture wounds of the feet in diabetics as surgical consultation at the earlier, pre-infection phase is uncommon. (biomedcentral.com)
  • After all, debridement or amputation just ahead of advancing sepsis almost always controls invasive infection in a diabetic foot and therefore debridement of contaminated tissue ought to prevent evolution into infection. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The reason for this is unclear but it could be that puncture wounds of the feet may be a proportionally less significant precipitant for serious lower limb infections among diabetics in developed countries than they appear to be in developing countries. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Managing Citrus Gummosis Problems Early detection of citrus foot rot is critical, but the initial signs may be difficult to spot. (fcorel.ru)
  • Sprains are also very common if when running you switch direction or pace abruptly, awkwardly land on your feet, or collide with another object or person, for example, when playing football. (shoewawa.com)
  • There is 3 different levels of foot sprains that can occur. (shoewawa.com)
  • If you have sprained your foot there are a number of different treatments that you can try including: For mild and moderate sprains you can apply RICE which stands for rest, ice, compression and elevation, you can find out more about RICE below. (shoewawa.com)
  • You can avoid foot sprains by making sure to wear stiff-soled shoes that stabilize the foot. (shoewawa.com)
  • As for extra ways to avoid ending up with nasty foot infections, apply foot cream regularly, let your feet breathe when you sleep (so no socks in bed! (beautyheaven.com.au)
  • Increase your amount of exercise slowly over time to avoid putting excessive strain on your feet. (medlineplus.gov)
  • adequate stretching and warming up before exercise or playing sport can also help you to avoid spraining your feet. (shoewawa.com)
  • It's likely that your feet are not exactly the same size so you want to avoid one shoe feeling too snug or too loose. (shoes.com)
  • Arthritis is a painful and debilitating medical condition that can affect the joints in almost any part of your body, including your feet. (livestrong.com)
  • If your foot is swollen due to arthritis, this natural shock absorption can be compromised and become painful during athletic movement. (livestrong.com)
  • Continuous standing can cause the joints of bones of the feet to become misaligned (e.g., cause flat feet) and can cause inflammation that can lead later to rheumatism and arthritis. (ccohs.ca)
  • Foot care for patients with severe orthopedic or systemic disease, including the care of the diabetic or vascularly compromised foot, is beyond the scope of this article. (aafp.org)
  • During a typical day, people spend about 4 hours on their feet and take 8,000 to 10,000 steps. (umm.edu)
  • The Sawtooth NRA has over 700 miles of trails, 40 peaks rising over 10,000 feet and 300-plus high-elevation alpine lakes that add to the spectacular scenery and vistas. (usda.gov)
  • There are numerous spectacular mountain peaks includinf Propsect Point, Robinson Bar Peak, Lookout Mountain, Watson Peak, O'Calkens Peak, David O. Lee Peak, Merriam Peak, Castle Peak and Blackman Peak, many of which are over 10,000 feet in elevation. (usda.gov)
  • Once your injury has been diagnosed, you'll be able to give it the care it needs in order for it to heal properly. (doctorvikki.com)
  • When the wound failed to heal properly, he faced losing his foot at midcalf. (wsj.com)
  • After several knee operations, George Osgood lacked the lower leg strength needed to keep his feet on the footplates of the wheelchair he used in the Tenison Residential Aged Care Swansea facility, south of Newcastle. (abc.net.au)
  • Graduated compression means that the hosiery is tightest around the areas of your worst swelling (usually your feet or lower leg). (footsmart.com)
  • Once those seven days are up, continue to soak your foot for one to two times a day for three more days. (wikihow.com)
  • This is the initial step to take before performing any treatments for callus-induced cracks on feet. (dermanities.com)
  • They have become more common over the last several hundred years due to the increased use of shoes that don't allow the feet to breathe, which creates an ideal environment for the fungus to grow. (mydr.com.au)
  • So what should you look for if you suffer from common foot-related ailments like plantar fasciitis? (shoes.com)
  • A. One of the most common foot ailments, it's helpful to identify what is causing strain to effectively treat plantar fasciitis. (shoes.com)
  • Surveys suggest that two out of every three workers suffer from some form of a foot problem. (ccohs.ca)