Arthritis, Rheumatoid: A chronic systemic disease, primarily of the joints, marked by inflammatory changes in the synovial membranes and articular structures, widespread fibrinoid degeneration of the collagen fibers in mesenchymal tissues, and by atrophy and rarefaction of bony structures. Etiology is unknown, but autoimmune mechanisms have been implicated.Genome-Wide Association Study: An analysis comparing the allele frequencies of all available (or a whole GENOME representative set of) polymorphic markers in unrelated patients with a specific symptom or disease condition, and those of healthy controls to identify markers associated with a specific disease or condition.ArthritisExpressed Sequence Tags: Partial cDNA (DNA, COMPLEMENTARY) sequences that are unique to the cDNAs from which they were derived.Arthritis, Experimental: ARTHRITIS that is induced in experimental animals. Immunological methods and infectious agents can be used to develop experimental arthritis models. These methods include injections of stimulators of the immune response, such as an adjuvant (ADJUVANTS, IMMUNOLOGIC) or COLLAGEN.Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide: A single nucleotide variation in a genetic sequence that occurs at appreciable frequency in the population.Genome, Human: The complete genetic complement contained in the DNA of a set of CHROMOSOMES in a HUMAN. The length of the human genome is about 3 billion base pairs.Cell Division: The fission of a CELL. It includes CYTOKINESIS, when the CYTOPLASM of a cell is divided, and CELL NUCLEUS DIVISION.Genetic Variation: Genotypic differences observed among individuals in a population.STAT3 Transcription Factor: A signal transducer and activator of transcription that mediates cellular responses to INTERLEUKIN-6 family members. STAT3 is constitutively activated in a variety of TUMORS and is a major downstream transducer for the CYTOKINE RECEPTOR GP130.Cell Membrane: The lipid- and protein-containing, selectively permeable membrane that surrounds the cytoplasm in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.Cell Nucleus: Within a eukaryotic cell, a membrane-limited body which contains chromosomes and one or more nucleoli (CELL NUCLEOLUS). The nuclear membrane consists of a double unit-type membrane which is perforated by a number of pores; the outermost membrane is continuous with the ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM. A cell may contain more than one nucleus. (From Singleton & Sainsbury, Dictionary of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, 2d ed)Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Sleep: A readily reversible suspension of sensorimotor interaction with the environment, usually associated with recumbency and immobility.Sleep, REM: A stage of sleep characterized by rapid movements of the eye and low voltage fast pattern EEG. It is usually associated with dreaming.Sleep Disorders: Conditions characterized by disturbances of usual sleep patterns or behaviors. Sleep disorders may be divided into three major categories: DYSSOMNIAS (i.e. disorders characterized by insomnia or hypersomnia), PARASOMNIAS (abnormal sleep behaviors), and sleep disorders secondary to medical or psychiatric disorders. (From Thorpy, Sleep Disorders Medicine, 1994, p187)Circadian Rhythm: The regular recurrence, in cycles of about 24 hours, of biological processes or activities, such as sensitivity to drugs and stimuli, hormone secretion, sleeping, and feeding.Drosophila melanogaster: A species of fruit fly much used in genetics because of the large size of its chromosomes.Time Perception: The ability to estimate periods of time lapsed or duration of time.Sleep Apnea, Obstructive: A disorder characterized by recurrent apneas during sleep despite persistent respiratory efforts. It is due to upper airway obstruction. The respiratory pauses may induce HYPERCAPNIA or HYPOXIA. Cardiac arrhythmias and elevation of systemic and pulmonary arterial pressures may occur. Frequent partial arousals occur throughout sleep, resulting in relative SLEEP DEPRIVATION and daytime tiredness. Associated conditions include OBESITY; ACROMEGALY; MYXEDEMA; micrognathia; MYOTONIC DYSTROPHY; adenotonsilar dystrophy; and NEUROMUSCULAR DISEASES. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p395)Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats: Repetitive nucleic acid sequences that are principal components of the archaeal and bacterial CRISPR-CAS SYSTEMS, which function as adaptive antiviral defense systems.CRISPR-Cas Systems: Adaptive antiviral defense mechanisms, in archaea and bacteria, based on DNA repeat arrays called CLUSTERED REGULARLY INTERSPACED SHORT PALINDROMIC REPEATS (CRISPR elements) that function in conjunction with CRISPR-ASSOCIATED PROTEINS (Cas proteins). Several types have been distinguished, including Type I, Type II, and Type III, based on signature motifs of CRISPR-ASSOCIATED PROTEINS.Inverted Repeat Sequences: Copies of nucleic acid sequence that are arranged in opposing orientation. They may lie adjacent to each other (tandem) or be separated by some sequence that is not part of the repeat (hyphenated). They may be true palindromic repeats, i.e. read the same backwards as forward, or complementary which reads as the base complement in the opposite orientation. Complementary inverted repeats have the potential to form hairpin loop or stem-loop structures which results in cruciform structures (such as CRUCIFORM DNA) when the complementary inverted repeats occur in double stranded regions.CRISPR-Associated Proteins: Protein components of the CRISPR-CAS SYSTEMS for anti-viral defense in ARCHAEA and BACTERIA. These are proteins that carry out a variety of functions during the creation and expansion of the CRISPR ARRAYS, the capture of new CRISPR SPACERS, biogenesis of SMALL INTERFERING RNA (CRISPR or crRNAs), and the targeting and silencing of invading viruses and plasmids. They include DNA HELICASES; RNA-BINDING PROTEINS; ENDONUCLEASES; and RNA and DNA POLYMERASES.Thermococcales: An order of strictly anaerobic, thermophilic archaea, in the kingdom EURYARCHAEOTA. Members exhibit heterotropic growth by sulfur respiration. There is a single family THERMOCOCCACEAE.Macrocephaly: A congenital abnormality in which the occipitofrontal circumference is greater than two standard deviations above the mean for a given age. It is associated with HYDROCEPHALUS; SUBDURAL EFFUSION; ARACHNOID CYSTS; or is part of a genetic condition (e.g., ALEXANDER DISEASE; SOTOS SYNDROME).Newspapers: Publications printed and distributed daily, weekly, or at some other regular and usually short interval, containing news, articles of opinion (as editorials and letters), features, advertising, and announcements of current interest. (Webster's 3d ed)Neoplasm Metastasis: The transfer of a neoplasm from one organ or part of the body to another remote from the primary site.Neoplasms: New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.Cell Line, Tumor: A cell line derived from cultured tumor cells.Breast Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the human BREAST.Lymphatic Metastasis: Transfer of a neoplasm from its primary site to lymph nodes or to distant parts of the body by way of the lymphatic system.Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in neoplastic tissue.Neoplasm Invasiveness: Ability of neoplasms to infiltrate and actively destroy surrounding tissue.2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic Acid: An herbicide with irritant effects on the eye and the gastrointestinal system.Arabidopsis Proteins: Proteins that originate from plants species belonging to the genus ARABIDOPSIS. The most intensely studied species of Arabidopsis, Arabidopsis thaliana, is commonly used in laboratory experiments.Arabidopsis: A plant genus of the family BRASSICACEAE that contains ARABIDOPSIS PROTEINS and MADS DOMAIN PROTEINS. The species A. thaliana is used for experiments in classical plant genetics as well as molecular genetic studies in plant physiology, biochemistry, and development.Herbicides: Pesticides used to destroy unwanted vegetation, especially various types of weeds, grasses (POACEAE), and woody plants. Some plants develop HERBICIDE RESISTANCE.2-Methyl-4-chlorophenoxyacetic Acid: A powerful herbicide used as a selective weed killer.Plant Somatic Embryogenesis Techniques: The process of embryo initiation in culture from vegetative, non-gametic, sporophytic, or somatic plant cells.Gene Expression Regulation, Plant: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in plants.Biological Science Disciplines: All of the divisions of the natural sciences dealing with the various aspects of the phenomena of life and vital processes. The concept includes anatomy and physiology, biochemistry and biophysics, and the biology of animals, plants, and microorganisms. It should be differentiated from BIOLOGY, one of its subdivisions, concerned specifically with the origin and life processes of living organisms.Inflammation: A pathological process characterized by injury or destruction of tissues caused by a variety of cytologic and chemical reactions. It is usually manifested by typical signs of pain, heat, redness, swelling, and loss of function.Legal Guardians: A legal concept for individuals who are designated to act on behalf of persons who are considered incapable of acting in their own behalf, e.g., minors and persons found to be not mentally competent.Laboratories: Facilities equipped to carry out investigative procedures.CaliforniaDNA Damage: Injuries to DNA that introduce deviations from its normal, intact structure and which may, if left unrepaired, result in a MUTATION or a block of DNA REPLICATION. These deviations may be caused by physical or chemical agents and occur by natural or unnatural, introduced circumstances. They include the introduction of illegitimate bases during replication or by deamination or other modification of bases; the loss of a base from the DNA backbone leaving an abasic site; single-strand breaks; double strand breaks; and intrastrand (PYRIMIDINE DIMERS) or interstrand crosslinking. Damage can often be repaired (DNA REPAIR). If the damage is extensive, it can induce APOPTOSIS.BostonDNA Repair: The reconstruction of a continuous two-stranded DNA molecule without mismatch from a molecule which contained damaged regions. The major repair mechanisms are excision repair, in which defective regions in one strand are excised and resynthesized using the complementary base pairing information in the intact strand; photoreactivation repair, in which the lethal and mutagenic effects of ultraviolet light are eliminated; and post-replication repair, in which the primary lesions are not repaired, but the gaps in one daughter duplex are filled in by incorporation of portions of the other (undamaged) daughter duplex. Excision repair and post-replication repair are sometimes referred to as "dark repair" because they do not require light.Ectromelia: Gross hypo- or aplasia of one or more long bones of one or more limbs. The concept includes amelia, hemimelia, phocomelia, and sirenomelia.Education, Graduate: Studies beyond the bachelor's degree at an institution having graduate programs for the purpose of preparing for entrance into a specific field, and obtaining a higher degree.Schizophrenia: A severe emotional disorder of psychotic depth characteristically marked by a retreat from reality with delusion formation, HALLUCINATIONS, emotional disharmony, and regressive behavior.Cell Differentiation: Progressive restriction of the developmental potential and increasing specialization of function that leads to the formation of specialized cells, tissues, and organs.
  • In a functional screen using a chemical-inducible activation-tagging system, we identified two alleles of Arabidopsis gene PGA6 whose induced overexpression caused high-frequency somatic embryo formation in all tissues and organs tested, without any external plant hormones. (nih.gov)
  • To investigate the impact of overexpression of heterologous SUS on the growth and development of Arabidopsis, we transformed Arabidopsis plants with an overexpression vector containing an aspen SUS gene (PtrSUS1). (scirp.org)
  • Taken together, these results showed that the early flowering, faster growth and increased tolerance to higher sucrose in transgenic lines were caused by the genome integration and constitutive expression of the aspen PtrSUS1 gene in transgenic Arabidopsis. (scirp.org)
  • In Arabidopsis ( Arabidopsis thaliana ), the two major miR159 family members, miR159a and miR159b, are functionally specific for two GAMYB-like genes, MYB33 and MYB65 . (plantphysiol.org)
  • To clarify the role of a cotton COBL gene, GhCOBL9A, we conducted the ectopic expression and functional analysis in Arabidopsis. (deepdyve.com)
  • In addition, overexpression of GhCOBL9A in Arabidopsis AtCOBL4 mutants, a paralogous gene of GhCOBL9A, also led to a stronger growth potential, but the Atcobl4 mutant phenotype could not be rescued, implying the functional divergence of GhCOBL9A and AtCOBL4 paralogs. (deepdyve.com)
  • 2018 A horizontally gene transferred copper resistance locus confers hyper-resistance to antibacterial copper toxicity and enables survival of community acquired methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus USA300 in macrophages. (findaphd.com)
  • Long, Lin;He, Jian-Zhong;Chen, Ye;Xu, Xiu-E;Liao, Lian-Di;Xie, Yang-Min;Li, En-Min;Xu, Li-Yan 2018-05-07 00:00:00 Abstract Background Riboflavin is an essential component of the human diet and its derivative cofactors play an established role in oxidative metabolism. (deepdyve.com)
  • A large portion of PRC2 target genes acquired DNA hypermethylation of their promoters following reductions in H3K27me3 levels upon the loss of Ezh2, which included pivotal T cell differentiation-regulating genes. (jci.org)
  • The reactivation of a set of regulators by a DNA-demethylating agent, but not the transduction of single regulator genes, effectively induced the differentiation of ETP-ALL cells. (jci.org)
  • The IGF-1 gene was introduced into human synovial MSCs with a lentiviral vector and examined the levels of gene expression and morphological status of MSCs under chondrogenic differentiation condition using pellet cultures. (hindawi.com)
  • Thus, IGF-1 gene transfer to human synovial MSCs led to an improved chondrogenic differentiation capacity without the detectable induction of a hypertrophic or osteogenic phenotype. (hindawi.com)
  • These results support the argument that OCT4 remodels the phenotype of HUVECs from endothelial cells to EPCs by up-regulating the genes responsible for stem cell maintenance and down-regulating the genes for cell differentiation. (medsci.org)
  • Recent studies have identified a number of genes involved in the control of cell division and differentiation in lateral organs. (biologists.org)
  • Furthermore, when expressed in Th2-skewed cells, caNFATc1 appears to attenuate Th2 differentiation by decreasing production of IL-4 and promoting the expression of IFN-γ. (jimmunol.org)
  • This process of Ag-induced T cell activation and differentiation proceeds via a complex genetic program of transcriptional events involving the regulated expression of numerous genes, including those encoding cytokines, cytokine receptors, and other immunoregulatory molecules ( 2 , 3 ). (jimmunol.org)
  • In this study, we demonstrate that overexpression of the progranulin gene in SW-13 adrenal carcinoma cells and MDCK nontransformed renal epithelia results in the transfection-specific secretion of progranulin, acquired clonogenicity in semisolid agar, and increased mitosis in monolayer culture, whereas diminution of progranulin gene expression impairs growth of these cells. (nih.gov)
  • Adenovirus-medicated overexpression of Sox4 in the livers of lean mice promotes liver steatosis, whereas liver-specific knockdown of Sox4 ameliorates TG accumulation and improves insulin resistance in obese mice. (diabetesjournals.org)
  • Overexpression and knocking down of these genes in CRC cells promoted and inhibited, respectively, experimental metastasis in mice, EMT and cell motility in culture. (bmj.com)
  • Conversely, overexpression of EpCAM significantly increased the number of alkaline phosphatase positive colonies and elevated the expression of endogenous pluripotent genes. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • Fish Collagen Promotes the Expression of Genes Related to Osteoblastic Activity," International Journal of Polymer Science , vol. 2016, Article ID 5785819, 7 pages, 2016. (hindawi.com)
  • Researchers have found that in a subset of women, consumption of soy could boost the expression of genes linked to breast cancer. (mskcc.org)
  • In a controlled, randomized study of women with newly diagnosed, early-stage breast cancer , MSK scientists found that, in a subset of participants, adding a moderate amount of soy to the diet led to an increase in the expression of genes associated with cancer growth. (mskcc.org)
  • Overexpressing ERBB4 in cultured mammary epithelial cells or adding the ERBB4 ligand neuregulin 1 (NRG1) to breast cancer cell cultures promoted the expression of genes regulated by YAP, such as CTGF . (sciencemag.org)
  • Introduction Helicobacter pylori is the leading cause of peptic ulceration worldwide and possession of duodenal ulcer promoting gene A ( dupA ) increases ulcer risk. (bmj.com)
  • Having established the relationship between high expression of the NEK2 gene and poor patient outcome in myeloma, the team then examined the relationship in other common cancers-including breast, lung, and bladder cancer-by analyzing gene expression profiles from 2,500 patients' cells with eight different cancers in Zhan's lab. (healthcanal.com)
  • The microRNA159 (miR159) family represses the conserved GAMYB-like genes that encode R2R3 MYB domain transcription factors that have been implicated in gibberellin (GA) signaling in anthers and germinating seeds. (plantphysiol.org)
  • Nuclear DNA viruses generally encode gene products that function to counteract this inhibitory cellular response by coordinating the modification of these histones and/or by remodeling the viral chromatin state through the redirection of cellular enzymes to the viral genome to allow for efficient viral replication and gene expression. (asm.org)
  • As the B cells of the immune system prepare to manufacture antibodies to fight pathogens, they intentionally fracture and then rearrange their antibody genes. (healthcanal.com)
  • Establishing durable disease resistance in agricultural crops, where much of the plant defense is provided through effector- R gene interactions, is complicated by the ability of pathogens to overcome R gene resistance by losing the corresponding effector gene. (genetics.org)
  • PLANTS have evolved a complex surveillance system, mediated by plant resistance ( R ) genes, that is capable of recognizing and responding to the presence of many different plant pathogens. (genetics.org)
  • Plants carry many different R genes, and pathogens harbor a diverse array of effector genes, but the interaction between an effector and an R gene is quite specific. (genetics.org)
  • Most of these methods assume that pathogens incur a cost to virulence, i.e. , that most, if not all, effector genes are beneficial for pathogen fitness. (genetics.org)
  • On the basis of its ability to both attract and induce virulence gene expression in EHEC, we propose that DHMA acts as a molecular beacon to target pathogens to their preferred sites of infection in vivo . (asm.org)
  • Similarly, pathogens induce virulence genes upon the sensing of host neurotransmitters. (asm.org)
  • IMPORTANCE Changes in the gene content of pathogens can modify their ability to colonize and/or survive in different body sites in the human host. (asm.org)
  • The team found that the redeye gene encodes a subunit of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. (newswise.com)
  • Although acetylcholine signaling -- and cigarette smoking -- typically promote wakefulness, the particular subunit studied in the eLIFE paper is required for sleep in Drosophila. (newswise.com)
  • CRISPR, a system of genes that bacteria use to fend off viruses, is involved in promoting antibiotic resistance in Francisella novicida , a close relative of the bacterium that causes tularemia. (bio-medicine.org)
  • Aquatic environments and water treatment processes are able to affect the efficiency of antibiotic-resistance gene transfer ( 9 ). (pnas.org)
  • However, it is unknown whether or how nanomaterials affect antibiotic-resistance gene transfer between bacteria, especially across genera. (pnas.org)
  • The BqsR regulon-defined through iterative bioinformatic predictions and experimental validation-includes several genes whose products are known to drive antibiotic resistance to aminoglycosides and polymyxins. (caltech.edu)
  • We show here that small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of SNF2H in HEp-2 cells resulted in an approximately 20-fold decrease in HSV-1 replication, arguing that SNF2H promotes efficient HSV-1 replication. (asm.org)
  • Finally, knockdown of BRD1 limited sulfatide-induced H3K9/14 acetylation and occupancy of MOZ or HBO1 on integrin αV gene promoter. (aacrjournals.org)
  • Furthermore, this thesis presents the role of ECM-derived polymer HA in interacting with siRNA and trafficking across the plasma membrane, presumably through CD44 receptors and successfully silencing the target gene in-vitro . (diva-portal.org)
  • The signature included the canonical Wnt target gene BAMBI , which promoted experimental metastasis in mice. (bmj.com)
  • In the present study, comprehensive analyses of DNA methylation, hydroxymethylation and gene expression using microarrays were performed in mouse hepatocellular adenomas induced by a single 90 mg kg −1 intraperitoneal injection dose of diethylnitrosamine (DEN) followed by 500 ppm PB in the diet for 27 weeks. (rsc.org)
  • DNA modification and expression of hundreds of genes are coordinately altered in PB-induced mouse hepatocellular adenomas. (rsc.org)
  • Furthermore, overlap was evaluated between the genes with altered expression levels with 5-methylcytosine (5mC) and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) alterations in mouse hepatocellular adenoma induced by DEN/PB and the genes with altered expression levels in the liver of CD-1 mice or humanized chimeric mice treated with PB for 7 days. (rsc.org)
  • With the integration of transcriptomic and epigenetic approaches, we detected candidate genes responsible for early key events of PB-promoted mouse hepatocellular tumorigenesis. (rsc.org)
  • Coexpression of gene Oct4 and Nanog initiates stem cell characteristics in hepatocellular carcinoma and promotes epithelial-mesenchymal transition through activation of Stat3/Snail signaling. (sigmaaldrich.com)
  • SET-1 7 is concentrated in stable, chromatin-associated nuclear foci at actively transcribed gene clusters, which we term spermatocyte transcription bodies. (mit.edu)
  • In contrast, several of the candidate anti-pairing genes have known interphase functions associated with S-phase progression, DNA replication, and chromatin compaction, including several components of the condensin II complex. (harvard.edu)
  • We hypothesize that SNF2H is recruited to viral promoters during HSV-1 infection, where it can remodel the chromatin state of the viral genome, facilitate the transcription of immediate-early genes, and enhance viral replication. (asm.org)
  • In addition, multiple viral gene products have been reported to play roles in regulating the viral chromatin state. (asm.org)
  • However, the cellular chromatin-remodeling factors involved in altering nucleosome occupancy at viral genes remain largely unknown. (asm.org)
  • One viral gene product that has been shown to play a role in regulating the chromatin state of the viral genome is VP16. (asm.org)
  • Western blot analyses, cell cycle analyses, and chromatin immunoprecipitation were used to validate the expression of cell cycle-related genes. (deepdyve.com)
  • The next step for the Zhu lab is to establish whether genes related to Lin28b have similar effects on the development of cancer, and to determine if those genes might be more effective targets for potential therapies. (medindia.net)
  • Results Three new genes from the colorectal cancer (CRC) metastasis signature, BOP1 , CKS2 and NFIL3 , were identified as direct transcription targets of β-catenin/TCF4. (bmj.com)
  • This project aims to develop and test a new class of drug that targets a known cancer-promoting gene in a completely new way. (prostatecanceruk.org)
  • The APC/C also targets the mitotic cyclins for degradation, resulting in the inactivation of M-CDK (mitotic cyclin-dependent kinase) complexes, promoting exit from mitosis and cytokinesis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Fink, a pioneer in the field of genetics, discussed the evolution of this definition during yesterday's James R. Killian Jr. Faculty Achievement Award Lecture, titled, "What is a Gene? (blogspot.com)
  • In genetics, we've lost a simple definition of the gene - a definition that lasted over 50 years," he said. (blogspot.com)
  • A large protein complex, termed the anaphase-promoting complex (APC), or the cyclosome, promotes metaphase-anaphase transition by ubiquitinating its specific substrates such as mitotic cyclins and anaphase inhibitor, which are subsequently degraded by the 26S proteasome. (nih.gov)
  • Component of the anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C), a cell cycle-regulated E3 ubiquitin ligase that controls progression through mitosis and the G1 phase of the cell cycle. (uniprot.org)
  • Here, we identified three new direct Wnt target genes from the signature, and studied their functions in epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), cell migration and experimental metastasis. (bmj.com)
  • Nine of the 10 sites were within a region of the genome known to play an important role in autoimmune diseases, while the 10th was on a gene that had never before been associated with the disease. (webwire.com)
  • A human gene called p53 , which is commonly known as the "guardian of the genome," is widely known to combat the formation and progression of tumors. (ucsd.edu)
  • Although most of the human genome doesn't consist of genes, all of the 27 clusters Alt's team identified were located in genes. (healthcanal.com)
  • This was convenient because it allowed computers to be programmed to search the genome for genes by looking for specific DNA sequences bracketed by codons that indicate the starting and stopping points of a gene. (blogspot.com)
  • The definition of a gene as a DNA sequence that codes for a protein, coupled with the sequencing of the human genome, has revolutionized molecular medicine," he said. (blogspot.com)
  • Such discoveries demonstrate that the traditional definition of a gene is inadequate to encompass all of the information stored in the genome, he said. (blogspot.com)
  • Rather, the genome contains many different categories of informational units, each of which may be considered a gene. (blogspot.com)
  • Several viral gene products have been implicated in playing a role in generation of the euchromatin-like state of the viral genome ( 1 , 2 , 7 , 8 ), suggesting that HSV-1 encodes multiple activities to ensure that its genome remains competent for transcription despite the cellular response that attempts to silence foreign gene expression. (asm.org)
  • This study aims to investigate the potential molecular mechanism of RRM2 for promoting the development of cervical cancer based on The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO). (medsci.org)
  • These genes are additional to existing core genome copper resistance mechanisms, and are not found in typical S. aureus lineages, but are increasingly identified in emerging pathogenic isolates. (findaphd.com)
  • Genome-wide ChIP-seq and RNA-seq analyses indicated that Pou3f1 is an upstream activator of neural lineage genes, and also is a repressor of BMP and Wnt signaling. (elifesciences.org)
  • Human BOC genome location and BOC gene details page in the UCSC Genome Browser. (wikipedia.org)
  • Blue squares indicate phenotypes directly attributed to mutations/alleles of this gene. (jax.org)
  • Double mutants were constructed containing co and mutations affecting gibberellic acid responses, meristem identity, or phytochrome function, and their phenotypes suggested a model for the role of CO in promoting flowering. (nih.gov)
  • To identify the critical genes that are dysregulated in obesity and might contribute to the development of obesity-associated NAFLD, we previously carried out gene expression profiling using Affymetrix arrays on RNAs isolated from livers of mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD) and mice fed a normal diet (ND) ( 10 - 12 ). (diabetesjournals.org)
  • Interestingly, these genes did not overlap with genes altered by the PB treatment of humanized chimeric mice, thus suggesting a species difference between the effects of PB in mouse and human hepatocytes. (rsc.org)
  • Researchers at the Children's Medical Center Research Institute at UT Southwestern (CRI) have identified a gene that contributes to the development of several childhood cancers, in a study conducted with mice designed to model the cancers. (technologynetworks.com)
  • HOUSTON - The molecular machinery that switches on a gene known to cause breast cancer to spread and invade other organs has been identified by an international team led by scientists at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center. (scienceblog.com)
  • The discovery provides a target-rich environment for development of drugs to thwart expression of the RhoA gene, according to Hui-Kuan Lin, Ph.D., the paper's senior author and an assistant professor in M. D. Anderson's Department of Molecular and Cellular Oncology. (scienceblog.com)
  • From the original pool of participants, those in the soy group who had high levels of genistein, a component of soy, were evaluated along with patients in the control group who did not take soy to look for signs of changes in gene expression or molecular changes in their tumors. (mskcc.org)
  • Because of their tardiness, the molecular machinery that reads the genes to allow protein synthesis might collide with the molecular machinery that is copying the genes. (healthcanal.com)
  • Therefore, we conclude that miR159 acts as a molecular switch, only permitting the expression of GAMYB-like genes in anthers and seeds. (plantphysiol.org)
  • Molecular and cellular techniques were used to identify direct transcription target genes of Wnt/β-catenin signals. (bmj.com)
  • We and others have found that Lin28b - a gene that is normally turned on in fetal but not adult tissues - is expressed in several childhood cancers, including neuroblastoma, Wilms' tumor and hepatoblastoma, a type of cancer that accounts for nearly 80 percent of all liver tumors in children," said Dr. Hao Zhu, a principal investigator at CRI, and Assistant Professor of Pediatrics and Internal Medicine at UT Southwestern Medical Center. (medindia.net)
  • The fragility of these genes may help explain why they are often mutated or deleted in cancers or neuropsychiatric disorders. (healthcanal.com)
  • The fragility of those genes could explain why they are often mutated or deleted in cancers and neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia. (healthcanal.com)
  • Objectives We have previously identified a 115-gene signature that characterises the metastatic potential of human primary colon cancers. (bmj.com)
  • We've known for several years that a cancer-promoting gene called ERG is inappropriately switched on in over 50 per cent of prostate cancers, and is especially active in advanced disease. (prostatecanceruk.org)
  • Researchers from the University of Zurich have now discovered a gene that plays a central role in black skin cancer. (medicalxpress.com)
  • Many plant GSTs exhibited the roles on promoting tolerance to drought stress, oxidative stress and plant hormones. (springer.com)
  • Analysis of the expression patterns of GST s in various abscission-promoting treatments in cassava abscission zones helps us to understand the possible roles of GST s in cassava leaf abscission. (springer.com)
  • Streptococcal species are characterized by extensive intraspecies gene diversity that plays critical roles in tissue tropism and, consequently, disease outcomes ( 1 - 3 ). (asm.org)
  • Not everyone who took the soy had high levels of genistein- and changes in gene expression were seen only in patients who did experience an increase. (mskcc.org)
  • The NFAT family of transcription factors is believed to play an important role in coupling these quantitative differences in TCR-induced signaling events into changes in gene expression. (jimmunol.org)
  • This approach identified a gene called NEK2 that is strongly associated with increased drug-resistance, faster cancer growth, and poorer survival for patients. (healthcanal.com)
  • While the ability to switch off a therapeutic gene is a large step forward, the researchers still found small amounts of the active gene when the switch was turned off. (eurekalert.org)
  • There are four components to this complex, which starts RhoA expression by transcribing the gene, and we found that all of them are important to metastasis," Lin said. (scienceblog.com)
  • Two transcript variants encoding different isoforms have been found for this gene. (nih.gov)
  • The research team found that a cluster of gene enhancers called BENC is responsible for Myc's fine control. (dkfz.de)
  • We found that the products of all four effector genes had significant and often additive effects on fitness traits. (genetics.org)
  • Natural News ) A shocking new gene sequencing investigation has found that MMR vaccines are deliberately engineered to cause cance r as a repeat business model for Big Pharma, which manufactures vaccines and cancer treatment drugs for profit. (naturalnews.com)
  • MMR vaccines were found to contain the complete gene sequence of a specific human (aborted) baby whose genes were modified to express cancer. (naturalnews.com)
  • The altered genes are found in ingredients called "MRC-5" or "WI-38," both of which are openly acknowledged by the CDC as ingredients in vaccines. (naturalnews.com)
  • The same aborted human fetal genes, modified to promote cancer, are also found in chicken pox vaccines. (naturalnews.com)
  • We found the phloem translatome is uniquely altered during TMV infection with 90% and 88% of genes down regulated in the pSUC2 and pSULTR2;2 phloem translatomes, compared to 31% of genes down regulated in the whole plant p35S translatome. (umd.edu)