Language Development: The gradual expansion in complexity and meaning of symbols and sounds as perceived and interpreted by the individual through a maturational and learning process. Stages in development include babbling, cooing, word imitation with cognition, and use of short sentences.Language Disorders: Conditions characterized by deficiencies of comprehension or expression of written and spoken forms of language. These include acquired and developmental disorders.Language Development Disorders: Conditions characterized by language abilities (comprehension and expression of speech and writing) that are below the expected level for a given age, generally in the absence of an intellectual impairment. These conditions may be associated with DEAFNESS; BRAIN DISEASES; MENTAL DISORDERS; or environmental factors.Sign Language: A system of hand gestures used for communication by the deaf or by people speaking different languages.Programming Languages: Specific languages used to prepare computer programs.Language Therapy: Rehabilitation of persons with language disorders or training of children with language development disorders.Natural Language Processing: Computer processing of a language with rules that reflect and describe current usage rather than prescribed usage.Linguistics: The science of language, including phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, pragmatics, and historical linguistics. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Language Arts: Skills in the use of language which lead to proficiency in written or spoken communication.Semantics: The relationships between symbols and their meanings.Unified Medical Language System: A research and development program initiated by the NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE to build knowledge sources for the purpose of aiding the development of systems that help health professionals retrieve and integrate biomedical information. The knowledge sources can be used to link disparate information systems to overcome retrieval problems caused by differences in terminology and the scattering of relevant information across many databases. The three knowledge sources are the Metathesaurus, the Semantic Network, and the Specialist Lexicon.Verbal Behavior: Includes both producing and responding to words, either written or spoken.Psycholinguistics: A discipline concerned with relations between messages and the characteristics of individuals who select and interpret them; it deals directly with the processes of encoding (phonetics) and decoding (psychoacoustics) as they relate states of messages to states of communicators.Comprehension: The act or fact of grasping the meaning, nature, or importance of; understanding. (American Heritage Dictionary, 4th ed) Includes understanding by a patient or research subject of information disclosed orally or in writing.Schizophrenic Language: The artificial language of schizophrenic patients - neologisms (words of the patient's own making with new meanings).Communication Barriers: Those factors, such as language or sociocultural relationships, which interfere in the meaningful interpretation and transmission of ideas between individuals or groups.Phonetics: The science or study of speech sounds and their production, transmission, and reception, and their analysis, classification, and transcription. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Deafness: A general term for the complete loss of the ability to hear from both ears.ReadingCultural Evolution: The continuous developmental process of a culture from simple to complex forms and from homogeneous to heterogeneous qualities.Speech Disorders: Acquired or developmental conditions marked by an impaired ability to comprehend or generate spoken forms of language.Speech Production Measurement: Measurement of parameters of the speech product such as vocal tone, loudness, pitch, voice quality, articulation, resonance, phonation, phonetic structure and prosody.Persons With Hearing Impairments: Persons with any degree of loss of hearing that has an impact on their activities of daily living or that requires special assistance or intervention.Functional Laterality: Behavioral manifestations of cerebral dominance in which there is preferential use and superior functioning of either the left or the right side, as in the preferred use of the right hand or right foot.Translating: Conversion from one language to another language.Speech Therapy: Treatment for individuals with speech defects and disorders that involves counseling and use of various exercises and aids to help the development of new speech habits.Verbal Learning: Learning to respond verbally to a verbal stimulus cue.Brain Mapping: Imaging techniques used to colocalize sites of brain functions or physiological activity with brain structures.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Dominance, Cerebral: Dominance of one cerebral hemisphere over the other in cerebral functions.Anomia: A language dysfunction characterized by the inability to name people and objects that are correctly perceived. The individual is able to describe the object in question, but cannot provide the name. This condition is associated with lesions of the dominant hemisphere involving the language areas, in particular the TEMPORAL LOBE. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p484)Terminology as Topic: The terms, expressions, designations, or symbols used in a particular science, discipline, or specialized subject area.Articulation Disorders: Disorders of the quality of speech characterized by the substitution, omission, distortion, and addition of phonemes.Education of Hearing Disabled: The teaching or training of those individuals with hearing disability or impairment.Neuropsychological Tests: Tests designed to assess neurological function associated with certain behaviors. They are used in diagnosing brain dysfunction or damage and central nervous system disorders or injury.Aphasia, Broca: An aphasia characterized by impairment of expressive LANGUAGE (speech, writing, signs) and relative preservation of receptive language abilities (i.e., comprehension). This condition is caused by lesions of the motor association cortex in the FRONTAL LOBE (BROCA AREA and adjacent cortical and white matter regions).Cognition: Intellectual or mental process whereby an organism obtains knowledge.Vocabulary, Controlled: A specified list of terms with a fixed and unalterable meaning, and from which a selection is made when CATALOGING; ABSTRACTING AND INDEXING; or searching BOOKS; JOURNALS AS TOPIC; and other documents. The control is intended to avoid the scattering of related subjects under different headings (SUBJECT HEADINGS). The list may be altered or extended only by the publisher or issuing agency. (From Harrod's Librarians' Glossary, 7th ed, p163)Nonverbal Communication: Transmission of emotions, ideas, and attitudes between individuals in ways other than the spoken language.Symbolism: A concept that stands for or suggests something else by reason of its relationship, association, convention, or resemblance. The symbolism may be mental or a visible sign or representation. (From Webster, 3d ed)Temporal Lobe: Lower lateral part of the cerebral hemisphere responsible for auditory, olfactory, and semantic processing. It is located inferior to the lateral fissure and anterior to the OCCIPITAL LOBE.Information Storage and Retrieval: Organized activities related to the storage, location, search, and retrieval of information.Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.Autistic Disorder: A disorder beginning in childhood. It is marked by the presence of markedly abnormal or impaired development in social interaction and communication and a markedly restricted repertoire of activity and interest. Manifestations of the disorder vary greatly depending on the developmental level and chronological age of the individual. (DSM-V)Learning: Relatively permanent change in behavior that is the result of past experience or practice. The concept includes the acquisition of knowledge.Cochlear Implants: Electronic hearing devices typically used for patients with normal outer and middle ear function, but defective inner ear function. In the COCHLEA, the hair cells (HAIR CELLS, VESTIBULAR) may be absent or damaged but there are residual nerve fibers. The device electrically stimulates the COCHLEAR NERVE to create sound sensation.Frontal Lobe: The part of the cerebral hemisphere anterior to the central sulcus, and anterior and superior to the lateral sulcus.Concept Formation: A cognitive process involving the formation of ideas generalized from the knowledge of qualities, aspects, and relations of objects.Writing: The act or practice of literary composition, the occupation of writer, or producing or engaging in literary work as a profession.Software: Sequential operating programs and data which instruct the functioning of a digital computer.Narration: The act, process, or an instance of narrating, i.e., telling a story. In the context of MEDICINE or ETHICS, narration includes relating the particular and the personal in the life story of an individual.Aptitude: The ability to acquire general or special types of knowledge or skill.Communication Disorders: Disorders of verbal and nonverbal communication caused by receptive or expressive LANGUAGE DISORDERS, cognitive dysfunction (e.g., MENTAL RETARDATION), psychiatric conditions, and HEARING DISORDERS.Names: Personal names, given or surname, as cultural characteristics, as ethnological or religious patterns, as indications of the geographic distribution of families and inbreeding, etc. Analysis of isonymy, the quality of having the same or similar names, is useful in the study of population genetics. NAMES is used also for the history of names or name changes of corporate bodies, such as medical societies, universities, hospitals, government agencies, etc.Aphasia, Wernicke: Impairment in the comprehension of speech and meaning of words, both spoken and written, and of the meanings conveyed by their grammatical relationships in sentences. It is caused by lesions that primarily affect Wernicke's area, which lies in the posterior perisylvian region of the temporal lobe of the dominant hemisphere. (From Brain & Bannister, Clinical Neurology, 7th ed, p141; Kandel et al., Principles of Neural Science, 3d ed, p846)Acoustic Stimulation: Use of sound to elicit a response in the nervous system.Subject Headings: Terms or expressions which provide the major means of access by subject to the bibliographic unit.Child Development: The continuous sequential physiological and psychological maturing of an individual from birth up to but not including ADOLESCENCE.Amobarbital: A barbiturate with hypnotic and sedative properties (but not antianxiety). Adverse effects are mainly a consequence of dose-related CNS depression and the risk of dependence with continued use is high. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p565)Child Development Disorders, Pervasive: Severe distortions in the development of many basic psychological functions that are not normal for any stage in development. These distortions are manifested in sustained social impairment, speech abnormalities, and peculiar motor movements.Translations: Products resulting from the conversion of one language to another.Lipreading: The process by which an observer comprehends speech by watching the movements of the speaker's lips without hearing the speaker's voice.Speech Acoustics: The acoustic aspects of speech in terms of frequency, intensity, and time.Cerebral Cortex: The thin layer of GRAY MATTER on the surface of the CEREBRAL HEMISPHERES that develops from the TELENCEPHALON and folds into gyri and sulchi. It reaches its highest development in humans and is responsible for intellectual faculties and higher mental functions.Aphasia, Primary Progressive: A progressive form of dementia characterized by the global loss of language abilities and initial preservation of other cognitive functions. Fluent and nonfluent subtypes have been described. Eventually a pattern of global cognitive dysfunction, similar to ALZHEIMER DISEASE, emerges. Pathologically, there are no Alzheimer or PICK DISEASE like changes, however, spongiform changes of cortical layers II and III are present in the TEMPORAL LOBE and FRONTAL LOBE. (From Brain 1998 Jan;121(Pt 1):115-26)Cross-Cultural Comparison: Comparison of various psychological, sociological, or cultural factors in order to assess the similarities or diversities occurring in two or more different cultures or societies.User-Computer Interface: The portion of an interactive computer program that issues messages to and receives commands from a user.Image Processing, Computer-Assisted: A technique of inputting two-dimensional images into a computer and then enhancing or analyzing the imagery into a form that is more useful to the human observer.Cochlear Implantation: Surgical insertion of an electronic hearing device (COCHLEAR IMPLANTS) with electrodes to the COCHLEAR NERVE in the inner ear to create sound sensation in patients with residual nerve fibers.Auditory Perception: The process whereby auditory stimuli are selected, organized, and interpreted by the organism.Metaphor: The application of a concept to that which it is not literally the same but which suggests a resemblance and comparison. Medical metaphors were widespread in ancient literature; the description of a sick body was often used by ancient writers to define a critical condition of the State, in which one corrupt part can ruin the entire system. (From Med Secoli Arte Sci, 1990;2(3):abstract 331)Stuttering: A disturbance in the normal fluency and time patterning of speech that is inappropriate for the individual's age. This disturbance is characterized by frequent repetitions or prolongations of sounds or syllables. Various other types of speech dysfluencies may also be involved including interjections, broken words, audible or silent blocking, circumlocutions, words produced with an excess of physical tension, and monosyllabic whole word repetitions. Stuttering may occur as a developmental condition in childhood or as an acquired disorder which may be associated with BRAIN INFARCTIONS and other BRAIN DISEASES. (From DSM-IV, 1994)Developmental Disabilities: Disorders in which there is a delay in development based on that expected for a given age level or stage of development. These impairments or disabilities originate before age 18, may be expected to continue indefinitely, and constitute a substantial impairment. Biological and nonbiological factors are involved in these disorders. (From American Psychiatric Glossary, 6th ed)Apraxias: A group of cognitive disorders characterized by the inability to perform previously learned skills that cannot be attributed to deficits of motor or sensory function. The two major subtypes of this condition are ideomotor (see APRAXIA, IDEOMOTOR) and ideational apraxia, which refers to loss of the ability to mentally formulate the processes involved with performing an action. For example, dressing apraxia may result from an inability to mentally formulate the act of placing clothes on the body. Apraxias are generally associated with lesions of the dominant PARIETAL LOBE and supramarginal gyrus. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp56-7)History, Ancient: The period of history before 500 of the common era.Hispanic Americans: Persons living in the United States of Mexican (MEXICAN AMERICANS), Puerto Rican, Cuban, Central or South American, or other Spanish culture or origin. The concept does not include Brazilian Americans or Portuguese Americans.Reaction Time: The time from the onset of a stimulus until a response is observed.Speech Intelligibility: Ability to make speech sounds that are recognizable.Acculturation: Process of cultural change in which one group or members of a group assimilate various cultural patterns from another.Auditory Perceptual Disorders: Acquired or developmental cognitive disorders of AUDITORY PERCEPTION characterized by a reduced ability to perceive information contained in auditory stimuli despite intact auditory pathways. Affected individuals have difficulty with speech perception, sound localization, and comprehending the meaning of inflections of speech.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Intelligence: The ability to learn and to deal with new situations and to deal effectively with tasks involving abstractions.Cultural Competency: Cultural and linguistic competence is a set of congruent behaviors, attitudes, and policies that come together in a system, agency, or among professionals that enables effective work in cross-cultural situations. Competence implies the capacity to function effectively as an individual and an organization within the context of the cultural beliefs, behaviors, and needs presented by consumers and their communities.Cognition Disorders: Disturbances in mental processes related to learning, thinking, reasoning, and judgment.Abstracting and Indexing as Topic: Activities performed to identify concepts and aspects of published information and research reports.Logic: The science that investigates the principles governing correct or reliable inference and deals with the canons and criteria of validity in thought and demonstration. This system of reasoning is applicable to any branch of knowledge or study. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed & Sippl, Computer Dictionary, 4th ed)Internet: A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.Imitative Behavior: The mimicking of the behavior of one individual by another.Educational Status: Educational attainment or level of education of individuals.Culture: A collective expression for all behavior patterns acquired and socially transmitted through symbols. Culture includes customs, traditions, and language.Algorithms: A procedure consisting of a sequence of algebraic formulas and/or logical steps to calculate or determine a given task.Databases, Factual: Extensive collections, reputedly complete, of facts and data garnered from material of a specialized subject area and made available for analysis and application. The collection can be automated by various contemporary methods for retrieval. The concept should be differentiated from DATABASES, BIBLIOGRAPHIC which is restricted to collections of bibliographic references.Neural Pathways: Neural tracts connecting one part of the nervous system with another.Cultural Characteristics: Those aspects or characteristics which identify a culture.Electroencephalography: Recording of electric currents developed in the brain by means of electrodes applied to the scalp, to the surface of the brain, or placed within the substance of the brain.Mental Processes: Conceptual functions or thinking in all its forms.Database Management Systems: Software designed to store, manipulate, manage, and control data for specific uses.Medical Records Systems, Computerized: Computer-based systems for input, storage, display, retrieval, and printing of information contained in a patient's medical record.Dictionaries as Topic: Lists of words, usually in alphabetical order, giving information about form, pronunciation, etymology, grammar, and meaning.Evoked Potentials: Electrical responses recorded from nerve, muscle, SENSORY RECEPTOR, or area of the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM following stimulation. They range from less than a microvolt to several microvolts. The evoked potential can be auditory (EVOKED POTENTIALS, AUDITORY), somatosensory (EVOKED POTENTIALS, SOMATOSENSORY), visual (EVOKED POTENTIALS, VISUAL), or motor (EVOKED POTENTIALS, MOTOR), or other modalities that have been reported.Intelligence Tests: Standardized tests that measure the present general ability or aptitude for intellectual performance.Manual Communication: Method of nonverbal communication utilizing hand movements as speech equivalents.Hypermedia: Computerized compilations of information units (text, sound, graphics, and/or video) interconnected by logical nonlinear linkages that enable users to follow optimal paths through the material and also the systems used to create and display this information. (From Thesaurus of ERIC Descriptors, 1994)Psychomotor Performance: The coordination of a sensory or ideational (cognitive) process and a motor activity.Cultural Diversity: Coexistence of numerous distinct ethnic, racial, religious, or cultural groups within one social unit, organization, or population. (From American Heritage Dictionary, 2d college ed., 1982, p955)Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Mathematical Concepts: Numeric or quantitative entities, descriptions, properties, relationships, operations, and events.Magnetoencephalography: The measurement of magnetic fields over the head generated by electric currents in the brain. As in any electrical conductor, electric fields in the brain are accompanied by orthogonal magnetic fields. The measurement of these fields provides information about the localization of brain activity which is complementary to that provided by ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAPHY. Magnetoencephalography may be used alone or together with electroencephalography, for measurement of spontaneous or evoked activity, and for research or clinical purposes.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Memory, Short-Term: Remembrance of information for a few seconds to hours.Data Mining: Use of sophisticated analysis tools to sort through, organize, examine, and combine large sets of information.Emigrants and Immigrants: People who leave their place of residence in one country and settle in a different country.Echolalia: Involuntary ("parrot-like"), meaningless repetition of a recently heard word, phrase, or song. This condition may be associated with transcortical APHASIA; SCHIZOPHRENIA; or other disorders. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p485)Early Intervention (Education): Procedures and programs that facilitate the development or skill acquisition in infants and young children who have disabilities, who are at risk for developing disabilities, or who are gifted. It includes programs that are designed to prevent handicapping conditions in infants and young children and family-centered programs designed to affect the functioning of infants and children with special needs. (From Journal of Early Intervention, Editorial, 1989, vol. 13, no. 1, p. 3; A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, prepared for the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce, 1976)Psychometrics: Assessment of psychological variables by the application of mathematical procedures.Speech Recognition Software: Software capable of recognizing dictation and transcribing the spoken words into written text.Attention: Focusing on certain aspects of current experience to the exclusion of others. It is the act of heeding or taking notice or concentrating.United StatesNerve Net: A meshlike structure composed of interconnecting nerve cells that are separated at the synaptic junction or joined to one another by cytoplasmic processes. In invertebrates, for example, the nerve net allows nerve impulses to spread over a wide area of the net because synapses can pass information in any direction.Longitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.Hearing Loss: A general term for the complete or partial loss of the ability to hear from one or both ears.Kinesics: Systematic study of the body and the use of its static and dynamic position as a means of communication.Cerebrum: Derived from TELENCEPHALON, cerebrum is composed of a right and a left hemisphere. Each contains an outer cerebral cortex and a subcortical basal ganglia. The cerebrum includes all parts within the skull except the MEDULLA OBLONGATA, the PONS, and the CEREBELLUM. Cerebral functions include sensorimotor, emotional, and intellectual activities.Voice: The sounds produced by humans by the passage of air through the LARYNX and over the VOCAL CORDS, and then modified by the resonance organs, the NASOPHARYNX, and the MOUTH.Artificial Intelligence: Theory and development of COMPUTER SYSTEMS which perform tasks that normally require human intelligence. Such tasks may include speech recognition, LEARNING; VISUAL PERCEPTION; MATHEMATICAL COMPUTING; reasoning, PROBLEM SOLVING, DECISION-MAKING, and translation of language.Memory: Complex mental function having four distinct phases: (1) memorizing or learning, (2) retention, (3) recall, and (4) recognition. Clinically, it is usually subdivided into immediate, recent, and remote memory.Dysarthria: Disorders of speech articulation caused by imperfect coordination of pharynx, larynx, tongue, or face muscles. This may result from CRANIAL NERVE DISEASES; NEUROMUSCULAR DISEASES; CEREBELLAR DISEASES; BASAL GANGLIA DISEASES; BRAIN STEM diseases; or diseases of the corticobulbar tracts (see PYRAMIDAL TRACTS). The cortical language centers are intact in this condition. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p489)Epilepsy: A disorder characterized by recurrent episodes of paroxysmal brain dysfunction due to a sudden, disorderly, and excessive neuronal discharge. Epilepsy classification systems are generally based upon: (1) clinical features of the seizure episodes (e.g., motor seizure), (2) etiology (e.g., post-traumatic), (3) anatomic site of seizure origin (e.g., frontal lobe seizure), (4) tendency to spread to other structures in the brain, and (5) temporal patterns (e.g., nocturnal epilepsy). (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p313)Models, Theoretical: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of systems, processes, or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Ethnic Groups: A group of people with a common cultural heritage that sets them apart from others in a variety of social relationships.Hearing Aids: Wearable sound-amplifying devices that are intended to compensate for impaired hearing. These generic devices include air-conduction hearing aids and bone-conduction hearing aids. (UMDNS, 1999)Pattern Recognition, Physiological: The analysis of a critical number of sensory stimuli or facts (the pattern) by physiological processes such as vision (PATTERN RECOGNITION, VISUAL), touch, or hearing.Generalization (Psychology): The phenomenon of an organism's responding to all situations similar to one in which it has been conditioned.Emigration and Immigration: The process of leaving one's country to establish residence in a foreign country.Encyclopedias as Topic: Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Learning Disorders: Conditions characterized by a significant discrepancy between an individual's perceived level of intellect and their ability to acquire new language and other cognitive skills. These disorders may result from organic or psychological conditions. Relatively common subtypes include DYSLEXIA, DYSCALCULIA, and DYSGRAPHIA.Music: Sound that expresses emotion through rhythm, melody, and harmony.Asian Americans: Persons living in the United States having origins in any of the original peoples of the Far East, Southeast Asia, or the Indian subcontinent.Literature: Writings having excellence of form or expression and expressing ideas of permanent or universal interest. The body of written works produced in a particular language, country, or age. (Webster, 3d ed)Human Migration: Periodic movement of human settlement from one geographical location to another.Achievement: Success in bringing an effort to the desired end; the degree or level of success attained in some specified area (esp. scholastic) or in general.Thinking: Mental activity, not predominantly perceptual, by which one apprehends some aspect of an object or situation based on past learning and experience.Periodicals as Topic: A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.Theory of Mind: The ability to attribute mental states (e.g., beliefs, desires, feelings, intentions, thoughts, etc.) to self and to others, allowing an individual to understand and infer behavior on the basis of the mental states. Difference or deficit in theory of mind is associated with ASPERGER SYNDROME; AUTISTIC DISORDER; and SCHIZOPHRENIA, etc.Play and Playthings: Spontaneous or voluntary recreational activities pursued for enjoyment and accessories or equipment used in the activities; includes games, toys, etc.Visual Perception: The selecting and organizing of visual stimuli based on the individual's past experience.Recognition (Psychology): The knowledge or perception that someone or something present has been previously encountered.Software Design: Specifications and instructions applied to the software.Evoked Potentials, Auditory: The electric response evoked in the CEREBRAL CORTEX by ACOUSTIC STIMULATION or stimulation of the AUDITORY PATHWAYS.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Judgment: The process of discovering or asserting an objective or intrinsic relation between two objects or concepts; a faculty or power that enables a person to make judgments; the process of bringing to light and asserting the implicit meaning of a concept; a critical evaluation of a person or situation.Motor Skills: Performance of complex motor acts.Psychological Tests: Standardized tests designed to measure abilities, as in intelligence, aptitude, and achievement tests, or to evaluate personality traits.Biological Evolution: The process of cumulative change over successive generations through which organisms acquire their distinguishing morphological and physiological characteristics.Hearing: The ability or act of sensing and transducing ACOUSTIC STIMULATION to the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. It is also called audition.Dichotic Listening Tests: Tests for central hearing disorders based on the competing message technique (binaural separation).Social Behavior: Any behavior caused by or affecting another individual, usually of the same species.Individuality: Those psychological characteristics which differentiate individuals from one another.Correction of Hearing Impairment: Procedures for correcting HEARING DISORDERS.Electronic Health Records: Media that facilitate transportability of pertinent information concerning patient's illness across varied providers and geographic locations. Some versions include direct linkages to online consumer health information that is relevant to the health conditions and treatments related to a specific patient.Speech Discrimination Tests: Tests of the ability to hear and understand speech as determined by scoring the number of words in a word list repeated correctly.Parents: Persons functioning as natural, adoptive, or substitute parents. The heading includes the concept of parenthood as well as preparation for becoming a parent.Computational Biology: A field of biology concerned with the development of techniques for the collection and manipulation of biological data, and the use of such data to make biological discoveries or predictions. This field encompasses all computational methods and theories for solving biological problems including manipulation of models and datasets.Anthropology: The science devoted to the comparative study of man.Models, Psychological: Theoretical representations that simulate psychological processes and/or social processes. These include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Tool Use Behavior: Modifying, carrying, or manipulating an item external to itself by an animal, before using it to effect a change on the environment or itself (from Beck, Animal Tool Behavior, 1980).Systems Integration: The procedures involved in combining separately developed modules, components, or subsystems so that they work together as a complete system. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Physician-Patient Relations: The interactions between physician and patient.Executive Function: A set of cognitive functions that controls complex, goal-directed thought and behavior. Executive function involves multiple domains, such as CONCEPT FORMATION, goal management, cognitive flexibility, INHIBITION control, and WORKING MEMORY. Impaired executive function is seen in a range of disorders, e.g., SCHIZOPHRENIA; and ADHD.Task Performance and Analysis: The detailed examination of observable activity or behavior associated with the execution or completion of a required function or unit of work.Communication Aids for Disabled: Equipment that provides mentally or physically disabled persons with a means of communication. The aids include display boards, typewriters, cathode ray tubes, computers, and speech synthesizers. The output of such aids includes written words, artificial speech, language signs, Morse code, and pictures.Agraphia: Loss or impairment of the ability to write (letters, syllables, words, or phrases) due to an injury to a specific cerebral area or occasionally due to emotional factors. This condition rarely occurs in isolation, and often accompanies APHASIA. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p485; APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 1994)ArtPhotic Stimulation: Investigative technique commonly used during ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAPHY in which a series of bright light flashes or visual patterns are used to elicit brain activity.Neuroanatomy: Study of the anatomy of the nervous system as a specialty or discipline.Medical Informatics: The field of information science concerned with the analysis and dissemination of medical data through the application of computers to various aspects of health care and medicine.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Auditory Cortex: The region of the cerebral cortex that receives the auditory radiation from the MEDIAL GENICULATE BODY.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Remedial Teaching: Specialized instruction for students deviating from the expected norm.Pitch Perception: A dimension of auditory sensation varying with cycles per second of the sound stimulus.Neuroimaging: Non-invasive methods of visualizing the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM, especially the brain, by various imaging modalities.Parietal Lobe: Upper central part of the cerebral hemisphere. It is located posterior to central sulcus, anterior to the OCCIPITAL LOBE, and superior to the TEMPORAL LOBES.Diffusion Tensor Imaging: The use of diffusion ANISOTROPY data from diffusion magnetic resonance imaging results to construct images based on the direction of the faster diffusing molecules.Computer Graphics: The process of pictorial communication, between human and computers, in which the computer input and output have the form of charts, drawings, or other appropriate pictorial representation.Education, Special: Education of the individual who markedly deviates intellectually, physically, socially, or emotionally from those considered to be normal, thus requiring special instruction.Rehabilitation of Speech and Language Disorders: Procedures for assisting a person with a speech or language disorder to communicate with maximum efficiency.Hearing Tests: Part of an ear examination that measures the ability of sound to reach the brain.Transfer (Psychology): Change in learning in one situation due to prior learning in another situation. The transfer can be positive (with second learning improved by first) or negative (where the reverse holds).ComputersChromosomes, Human, Y: The human male sex chromosome, being the differential sex chromosome carried by half the male gametes and none of the female gametes in humans.Databases, Bibliographic: Extensive collections, reputedly complete, of references and citations to books, articles, publications, etc., generally on a single subject or specialized subject area. Databases can operate through automated files, libraries, or computer disks. The concept should be differentiated from DATABASES, FACTUAL which is used for collections of data and facts apart from bibliographic references to them.CaliforniaNeuronal Plasticity: The capacity of the NERVOUS SYSTEM to change its reactivity as the result of successive activations.Radiology Information Systems: Information systems, usually computer-assisted, designed to store, manipulate, and retrieve information for planning, organizing, directing, and controlling administrative activities associated with the provision and utilization of radiology services and facilities.Speech Articulation Tests: Tests of accuracy in pronouncing speech sounds, e.g., Iowa Pressure Articulation Test, Deep Test of Articulation, Templin-Darley Tests of Articulation, Goldman-Fristoe Test of Articulation, Screening Speech Articulation Test, Arizona Articulation Proficiency Scale.Knowledge Bases: Collections of facts, assumptions, beliefs, and heuristics that are used in combination with databases to achieve desired results, such as a diagnosis, an interpretation, or a solution to a problem (From McGraw Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed).Dictionaries, MedicalPhilosophy: A love or pursuit of wisdom. A search for the underlying causes and principles of reality. (Webster, 3d ed)Hearing Disorders: Conditions that impair the transmission of auditory impulses and information from the level of the ear to the temporal cortices, including the sensorineural pathways.

RNA movies: visualizing RNA secondary structure spaces. (1/1253)

MOTIVATION: RNA Movies is a system for the visualization of RNA secondary structure spaces. Its input is a script consisting of primary and secondary structure information. From this script, the system fully automatically generates animated graphical structure representations. In this way, it creates the impression of an RNA molecule exploring its own two-dimensional structure space. RESULTS: RNA Movies has been used to generate animations of a switching structure in the spliced leader RNA of Leptomonas collosoma and sequential foldings of potato spindle tuber viroid transcripts. AVAILABILITY: Demonstrations of the animations mentioned in this paper can be viewed on our Bioinformatics web server under the following address: http://BiBiServ.TechFak.Uni-Bielefeld. DE/rnamovies/. The RNA Movies software is available upon request from the authors.  (+info)

A proposal for a standard CORBA interface for genome maps. (2/1253)

MOTIVATION: The scientific community urgently needs to standardize the exchange of biological data. This is helped by the use of a common protocol and the definition of shared data structures. We have based our standardization work on CORBA, a technology that has become a standard in the past years and allows interoperability between distributed objects. RESULTS: We have defined an IDL specification for genome maps and present it to the scientific community. We have implemented CORBA servers based on this IDL to distribute RHdb and HuGeMap maps. The IDL will co-evolve with the needs of the mapping community. AVAILABILITY: The standard IDL for genome maps is available at http:// corba.ebi.ac.uk/RHdb/EUCORBA/MapIDL.htm l. The IORs to browse maps from Infobiogen and EBI are at http://www.infobiogen.fr/services/Hugemap/IOR and http://corba.ebi.ac.uk/RHdb/EUCORBA/IOR CONTACT: [email protected], [email protected]  (+info)

Units of measure in clinical information systems. (3/1253)

The authors surveyed existing standard codes for units of measures, such as ISO 2955, ANSI X3.50, and Health Level 7's ISO+. Because these standards specify only the character representation of units, the authors developed a semantic model for units based on dimensional analysis. Through this model, conversion between units and calculations with dimensioned quantities become as simple as calculating with numbers. All atomic symbols for prefixes and units are defined in one small table. Huge permutated conversion tables are not required. This method is also simple enough to be widely implementable in today's information systems. To promote the application of the method the authors provide an open-source implementation of this method in JAVA. All existing code standards for units, however, are incomplete for practical use and require substantial changes to correct their many ambiguities. The authors therefore developed a code for units that is much more complete and free from ambiguities.  (+info)

Motif-based searching in TOPS protein topology databases. (4/1253)

MOTIVATION: TOPS cartoons are a schematic ion of protein three-dimensional structures in two dimensions, and are used for understanding and manual comparison of protein folds. Recently, an algorithm that produces the cartoons automatically from protein structures has been devised and cartoons have been generated to represent all the structures in the structural databank. There is now a need to be able to define target topological patterns and to search the database for matching domains. RESULTS: We have devised a formal language for describing TOPS diagrams and patterns, and have designed an efficient algorithm to match a pattern to a set of diagrams. A pattern-matching system has been implemented, and tested on a database derived from all the current entries in the Protein Data Bank (15,000 domains). Users can search on patterns selected from a library of motifs or, alternatively, they can define their own search patterns. AVAILABILITY: The system is accessible over the Web at http://tops.ebi.ac.uk/tops  (+info)

The Biopolymer Markup Language. (5/1253)

SUMMARY: An XML derived from a data model designed to be a hierarchical representation of an organism has been specified and a browser to use this language has been developed. AVAILABILITY: The language definition is available in HTML form at http://www.proteometrics.com/BIOML/. The BioML browser is available on request from the author.  (+info)

Syntactic analysis and languages of shape feature description in computer-aided diagnosis and recognition of cancerous and inflammatory lesions of organs in selected x-ray images. (6/1253)

We present new algorithms for the recognition of morphologic changes and shape feature analysis, which have been proposed to be used in a diagnosis of pathologic symptoms characteristic of cancerous and inflammatory lesions. These methods have been used so far for early detection and diagnosis of neoplastic changes in pancreas and chronic pancreatitis based on x-ray images acquired by endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). Preliminary processing of x-ray images involves binarization, and, subsequently, pancreatic ducts shown in the pictures are subjected to the straightening transformation, which enables obtaining two-dimensional width graphs that show contours of objects with their morphologic changes. Recognition of such changes was performed using attributed context-free grammars. Correct description and diagnosis of some symptoms (e.g., large cavitary projections) required two-dimensional analysis of width graphs. In such cases, languages of shape feature description with special multidirectional sinquad distribution were additionally applied.  (+info)

The clinical display of radiologic information as an interactive multimedia report. (7/1253)

We regard the delivery of radiological information as an interactive multimedia report. We use a multimedia report model based on Extensible Markup Language (XML), rather than a traditional workstation model. Others have suggested a similar document-based approach. This display presentation includes image-related and text-based information and may contain interactive components (e.g., window, level and zoom). Using XML as a foundation for this multimedia presentation, we achieve flexibility and platform independence at a lower cost. XML allows for the separation of content and form. Content information, defined as elements (e.g., images, radiologic reports, and demographic information), is treated as independent information objects. The behavior of the elements can be changed for different users and tasks. In addition, by separating format detail from content, the appearance of the elements within the report can be modified. XML does not replace existing standards (i.e., Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine [DICOM], Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol [TCP/IP]). Instead, it provides a powerful framework that is used in combination with existing standards to allow system designers to modify display characteristics based on user need. We describe our application of XML to the clinical display of radiologic information.  (+info)

Combining dictionary techniques with extensible markup language (XML)--requirements to a new approach towards flexible and standardized documentation. (8/1253)

In oncology various international and national standards exist for the documentation of different aspects of a disease. Since elements of these standards are repeated in different contexts, a common data dictionary could support consistent representation in any context. For the construction of such a dictionary existing documents have to be worked up in a complex procedure, that considers aspects of hierarchical decomposition of documents and of domain control as well as aspects of user presentation and models of the underlying model of patient data. In contrast to other thesauri, text chunks like definitions or explanations are very important and have to be preserved, since oncologic documentation often means coding and classification on an aggregate level and the safe use of coding systems is an important precondition for comparability of data. This paper discusses the potentials of the use of XML in combination with a dictionary for the promotion and development of standard conformable applications for tumor documentation.  (+info)

  • We measured the index of each language as reported by Google Trends using the template "X programming" in June 2017. (ieee.org)
  • We measure the number of hits on Twitter for the template "X programming" for the 12 months ending June 2017. (ieee.org)
  • Using the GitHub API and GitHub tags, we measured two things for the 12 months ending June 2017: (1) the number of new repositories created for each language, and (2) the number of active repositories for each language, where "active" means that someone has edited the code in a particular repository. (ieee.org)
  • We measured two things on Stack Overflow for the 12 months ending June 2017: (1) the number of questions posted mentioning each language, and (2) the amount of attention paid to those questions. (ieee.org)
  • On Reddit we measured the number of posts mentioning each of the languages using the template "X programming" from June 2016 to June 2017 across any subreddit on the site. (ieee.org)
  • We measure the number of posts that mentioned each of the languages using the template "X programming" for the 12 months ending June 2017. (ieee.org)
  • In ACM/IEEE 23rd International Conference on Model Driven Engineering Languages and Systems (MODELS '20 Companion), October 18-23, 2020, Virtual Event, Canada. (uni-ulm.de)
  • This book constitutes the proceedings of the 20th Brazilian Symposium on Progamming Languages, SBLP 2016, held in Maringá, Brazil, in September 2016. (springer.com)
  • Please, we kindly ask you to fill in the form bellow in order to apply to our English language course for the coming summer 2016. (google.com)
  • Starting from a list of over 300 programming languages gathered from GitHub, we looked at the volume of results found on Google when we searched for each one in using the template "X programming" where "X" is the name of the language. (ieee.org)
  • A couple of years ago, developer Sammy Larbi undertook a project to identify which languages had the most instances of the string 'WTF' in their GitHub code repositories. (slashdot.org)
  • Can you name the programming (or scripting) languages most frequently used on Github? (sporcle.com)
  • Guess the most used programming languages by number of active repositories on GitHub. (sporcle.com)
  • In these programs, learners get a chance to analyze the societies in which languages are spoken. (excite.com)
  • Fourth year courses presuppose a significant level of linguistic competence and concentrate on more specialized topics in the history, contemporary society, and literature of the countries where the language is spoken. (usna.edu)
  • Learn to speak, read, write, and understand spoken language, as well as gain valuable cultural insights that can make you more competitive in many fields. (iup.edu)
  • Unlike other programming languages, most of Supernova programming language statements have a rule describe its structure and help users to use and remember the statement in the future. (codeproject.com)
  • Unlike standard study abroad programs that may last a semester or two, there can be a lot of flexibility in the length of programs. (studyabroad.com)
  • If you change your study preferences and decide that you would like to apply for a Griffith University degree, Study Abroad or Exchange program, or Griffith College diploma at a later date, you will already be on the pathway to undertake further study. (edu.au)
  • Choose the right study abroad program for you through the Office of Study Abroad and Global Learning . (wku.edu)
  • Follow up with " Introduction to Java programming, Part 2: Constructs for real-world applications " to build on this foundation. (ibm.com)
  • This article makes the case that the powerful programming constructs available in the XQuery language make it a better programming language than SQL, and that this improvement in expressiveness and ease of use is enough to warrant the design of databases with an increasing emphasis on XML data types. (ibm.com)
  • Computerworld is undertaking a series of investigations into the most widely-used programming languages. (cio.com)
  • About 1970 Niklaus Wirth of Switzerland designed Pascal to teach structured programming, which emphasized the orderly use of conditional and loop control structures without GOTO statements. (britannica.com)
  • Enrolling in this program allows you to perk up your speaking skills in a language and also get to know how to teach it to others. (excite.com)
  • The only thing that will teach you these things any better is a low level language, and with modern processors I wouldn't wish assembler on anyone. (pluralsight.com)
  • The lecturer will oversee and implement the university-wide ITA program, training graduate teaching assistants who teach courses as a TA in their home department. (umbc.edu)
  • By the end of this century, half of the world's languages will have vanished. (pbs.org)
  • The piece is entitled " Programming Languages of the World " and represents 40 of the world's most influential programming languages, past and present, as well as their date of creation, where, by whom, and what application they were designed for. (i-programmer.info)
  • Programming languages differ from natural languages in that natural languages are only used for interaction between people, while programming languages also allow humans to communicate instructions to machines. (wikipedia.org)
  • With linguist Nick Evans, Holman flies to Goulburn Island off the coast of Northern Australia where he meets a community of 400 people speaking ten languages, many endangered, all vulnerable. (pbs.org)
  • Holman explores the humor, rage and lyricism of the Welsh people, who brought their language back from the edge of extinction. (pbs.org)
  • However, I imagine this probably also scales directly with the popularity of the language and indirectly with the skill of the people writing in it. (slashdot.org)
  • There's no reason you can't write a C interpreter and use it as a scripting language (and people have). (stackoverflow.com)
  • I have a need for a language with the portability and automatic memory management of Java, the flexibility of C++, and the ease of implementing event-based solutions of Visual Basic. (gamedev.net)