The use of one's knowledge in a particular profession. It includes, in the case of the field of biomedicine, professional activities related to health care and the actual performance of the duties related to the provision of health care.
A medical specialty concerned with the use of physical agents, mechanical apparatus, and manipulation in rehabilitating physically diseased or injured patients.
The quality or state of being independent and self-directing, especially in making decisions, enabling professionals to exercise judgment as they see fit during the performance of their jobs.
The capability to perform the duties of one's profession generally, or to perform a particular professional task, with skill of an acceptable quality.
The assessment, treatment, and management of soft tissue injury or dysfunction. Therapy is designed to reduce tension and irritation in affected tissues and may include MASSAGE; muscle stretching, or direct pressure on muscles, connective tissue, and TRIGGER POINTS.
The collective designation of three organizations with common membership: the European Economic Community (Common Market), the European Coal and Steel Community, and the European Atomic Energy Community (Euratom). It was known as the European Community until 1994. It is primarily an economic union with the principal objectives of free movement of goods, capital, and labor. Professional services, social, medical and paramedical, are subsumed under labor. The constituent countries are Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, and the United Kingdom. (The World Almanac and Book of Facts 1997, p842)
The principles of proper conduct concerning the rights and duties of the professional, relations with patients or consumers and fellow practitioners, as well as actions of the professional and interpersonal relations with patient or consumer families. (From Stedman, 25th ed)
The sum total of nursing activities which includes assessment (identifying needs), intervention (ministering to needs), and evaluation (validating the effectiveness of the help given).
A way of providing health care that is guided by a thoughtful integration of the best available scientific knowledge with clinical expertise. This approach allows the practitioner to critically assess research data, clinical guidelines, and other information resources in order to correctly identify the clinical problem, apply the most high-quality intervention, and re-evaluate the outcome for future improvement.
Care given to patients by nursing service personnel.
The capability to perform acceptably those duties directly related to patient care.
Promotion and protection of the rights of patients, frequently through a legal process.
Patterns of practice related to diagnosis and treatment as especially influenced by cost of the service requested and provided.
Formal instruction, learning, or training in the preparation, dispensing, and proper utilization of drugs in the field of medicine.
Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.
Men and women working in the provision of health services, whether as individual practitioners or employees of health institutions and programs, whether or not professionally trained, and whether or not subject to public regulation. (From A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, 1976)
Individuals enrolled in a school of pharmacy or a formal educational program leading to a degree in pharmacy.
Directions or principles presenting current or future rules of policy for assisting health care practitioners in patient care decisions regarding diagnosis, therapy, or related clinical circumstances. The guidelines may be developed by government agencies at any level, institutions, professional societies, governing boards, or by the convening of expert panels. The guidelines form a basis for the evaluation of all aspects of health care and delivery.
A medical specialty concerned with the provision of continuing, comprehensive primary health care for the entire family.
Those persons legally qualified by education and training to engage in the practice of pharmacy.
Educational programs designed to inform physicians of recent advances in their field.
Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).
Activities and programs intended to assure or improve the quality of care in either a defined medical setting or a program. The concept includes the assessment or evaluation of the quality of care; identification of problems or shortcomings in the delivery of care; designing activities to overcome these deficiencies; and follow-up monitoring to ensure effectiveness of corrective steps.
A course of study offered by an educational institution.
Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.
Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.
An approach of practicing medicine with the goal to improve and evaluate patient care. It requires the judicious integration of best research evidence with the patient's values to make decisions about medical care. This method is to help physicians make proper diagnosis, devise best testing plan, choose best treatment and methods of disease prevention, as well as develop guidelines for large groups of patients with the same disease. (from JAMA 296 (9), 2006)
I'm sorry for any confusion, but 'Europe' is a geographical continent and not a medical term; therefore, it doesn't have a medical definition.
Geographic area in which a professional person practices; includes primarily physicians and dentists.
Great Britain is not a medical term, but a geographical name for the largest island in the British Isles, which comprises England, Scotland, and Wales, forming the major part of the United Kingdom.
The term "United States" in a medical context often refers to the country where a patient or study participant resides, and is not a medical term per se, but relevant for epidemiological studies, healthcare policies, and understanding differences in disease prevalence, treatment patterns, and health outcomes across various geographic locations.
The expected function of a member of a particular profession.
Patient-based medical care provided across age and gender or specialty boundaries.
The organization and operation of the business aspects of a physician's practice.
Practice of a health profession by an individual, offering services on a person-to-person basis, as opposed to group or partnership practice.
Formal education and training in preparation for the practice of a profession.
The reciprocal interaction of two or more professional individuals.
Individuals licensed to practice medicine.
Care which provides integrated, accessible health care services by clinicians who are accountable for addressing a large majority of personal health care needs, developing a sustained partnership with patients, and practicing in the context of family and community. (JAMA 1995;273(3):192)
Any type of research that employs nonnumeric information to explore individual or group characteristics, producing findings not arrived at by statistical procedures or other quantitative means. (Qualitative Inquiry: A Dictionary of Terms Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 1997)
Performance of an act one or more times, with a view to its fixation or improvement; any performance of an act or behavior that leads to learning.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but 'England' is not a medical term and does not have a medical definition. England is a country that is part of the United Kingdom, known for its rich history, cultural heritage, and contributions to medical science. However, in a medical context, it may refer to the location of a patient, healthcare provider, or research study, but it is not a term with a specific medical meaning.
The interactions between physician and patient.
Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.
Interactions between health personnel and patients.
Individuals licensed to practice DENTISTRY.
Professionals qualified by graduation from an accredited school of nursing and by passage of a national licensing examination to practice nursing. They provide services to patients requiring assistance in recovering or maintaining their physical or mental health.
Those physicians who have completed the education requirements specified by the American Academy of Family Physicians.
An excessive stress reaction to one's occupational or professional environment. It is manifested by feelings of emotional and physical exhaustion coupled with a sense of frustration and failure.
Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.
Professions or other business activities directed to the cure and prevention of disease. For occupations of medical personnel who are not physicians but who are working in the fields of medical technology, physical therapy, etc., ALLIED HEALTH OCCUPATIONS is available.
Statistical measures of utilization and other aspects of the provision of health care services including hospitalization and ambulatory care.
Care of patients by a multidisciplinary team usually organized under the leadership of a physician; each member of the team has specific responsibilities and the whole team contributes to the care of the patient.
A method of data collection and a QUALITATIVE RESEARCH tool in which a small group of individuals are brought together and allowed to interact in a discussion of their opinions about topics, issues, or questions.
Health care workers specially trained and licensed to assist and support the work of health professionals. Often used synonymously with paramedical personnel, the term generally refers to all health care workers who perform tasks which must otherwise be performed by a physician or other health professional.
The expected function of a member of the medical profession.
The exchange or transmission of ideas, attitudes, or beliefs between individuals or groups.
The practice of sending a patient to another program or practitioner for services or advice which the referring source is not prepared to provide.
Conformity in fulfilling or following official, recognized, or institutional requirements, guidelines, recommendations, protocols, pathways, or other standards.
Educational programs designed to inform individuals of recent advances in their particular field of interest. They do not lead to any formal advanced standing.
Violation of laws, regulations, or professional standards.
The levels of excellence which characterize the health service or health care provided based on accepted standards of quality.
Business management of medical, dental and veterinary practices that may include capital financing, utilization management, and arrangement of capitation agreements with other parties.
A voluntary contract between two or more doctors who may or may not share responsibility for the care of patients, with proportional sharing of profits and losses.
Health services, public or private, in rural areas. The services include the promotion of health and the delivery of health care.
The smallest continent and an independent country, comprising six states and two territories. Its capital is Canberra.
The principles of professional conduct concerning the rights and duties of the physician, relations with patients and fellow practitioners, as well as actions of the physician in patient care and interpersonal relations with patient families.
Use for general articles concerning medical education.
The expected function of a member of the nursing profession.
Personal satisfaction relative to the work situation.
The interaction of two or more persons or organizations directed toward a common goal which is mutually beneficial. An act or instance of working or acting together for a common purpose or benefit, i.e., joint action. (From Random House Dictionary Unabridged, 2d ed)
The field of nursing care concerned with the promotion, maintenance, and restoration of health.
The process of making a selective intellectual judgment when presented with several complex alternatives consisting of several variables, and usually defining a course of action or an idea.
Studies designed to assess the efficacy of programs. They may include the evaluation of cost-effectiveness, the extent to which objectives are met, or impact.
The teaching or training of patients concerning their own health needs.
Patterns of practice in nursing related to provision of services including diagnosis and treatment.
Country located in EUROPE. It is bordered by the NORTH SEA, BELGIUM, and GERMANY. Constituent areas are Aruba, Curacao, Sint Maarten, formerly included in the NETHERLANDS ANTILLES.
Use for general articles concerning nursing education.
Nonspecialized dental practice which is concerned with providing primary and continuing dental care.
Public attitudes toward health, disease, and the medical care system.
The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.
Societies whose membership is limited to physicians.
Selection of a type of occupation or profession.
Patterns of practice in dentistry related to diagnosis and treatment.
The degree to which the individual regards the health care service or product or the manner in which it is delivered by the provider as useful, effective, or beneficial.
The educational process of instructing.
Compliance with a set of standards defined by non-governmental organizations. Certification is applied for by individuals on a voluntary basis and represents a professional status when achieved, e.g., certification for a medical specialty.
Systematic statements of principles or rules of appropriate professional conduct, usually established by professional societies.
The process of formulating, improving, and expanding educational, managerial, or service-oriented work plans (excluding computer program development).
A medical specialty concerned with maintaining health and providing medical care to children from birth to adolescence.
A game in which a round inflated ball is advanced by kicking or propelling with any part of the body except the hands or arms. The object of the game is to place the ball in opposite goals.
A system of medical care regulated, controlled and financed by the government, in which the government assumes responsibility for the health needs of the population.
The obligations and accountability assumed in carrying out actions or ideas on behalf of others.
Introduction of changes which are new to the organization and are created by management.
Physicians whose practice is not restricted to a specific field of MEDICINE.
Communication, in the sense of cross-fertilization of ideas, involving two or more academic disciplines (such as the disciplines that comprise the cross-disciplinary field of bioethics, including the health and biological sciences, the humanities, and the social sciences and law). Also includes problems in communication stemming from differences in patterns of language usage in different academic or medical disciplines.
The broad dissemination of new ideas, procedures, techniques, materials, and devices and the degree to which these are accepted and used.
The process of choosing employees for specific types of employment. The concept includes recruitment.
The principles of proper professional conduct concerning the rights and duties of nurses themselves, their patients, and their fellow practitioners, as well as their actions in the care of patients and in relations with their families.
The organization and operation of the business aspects of a dental practice.
A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.
The degree to which individuals are inhibited or facilitated in their ability to gain entry to and to receive care and services from the health care system. Factors influencing this ability include geographic, architectural, transportational, and financial considerations, among others.
Education and training in PUBLIC HEALTH for the practice of the profession.
A systematic statement of policy rules or principles. Guidelines may be developed by government agencies at any level, institutions, professional societies, governing boards, or by convening expert panels. The text may be cursive or in outline form but is generally a comprehensive guide to problems and approaches in any field of activity. For guidelines in the field of health care and clinical medicine, PRACTICE GUIDELINES AS TOPIC is available.
An occupation limited in scope to a subsection of a broader field.
Encouraging consumer behaviors most likely to optimize health potentials (physical and psychosocial) through health information, preventive programs, and access to medical care.
Systematic identification of a population's needs or the assessment of individuals to determine the proper level of services needed.
The assessing of academic or educational achievement. It includes all aspects of testing and test construction.
The seeking and acceptance by patients of health service.
On the job training programs for personnel carried out within an institution or agency. It includes orientation programs.
The process by which the employer promotes staff performance and efficiency consistent with management goals and objectives.
An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.
Theoretical representations and constructs that describe or explain the structure and hierarchy of relationships and interactions within or between formal organizational entities or informal social groups.
The principles of proper professional conduct concerning the rights and duties of the dentist, relations with patients and fellow practitioners, as well as actions of the dentist in patient care and interpersonal relations with patient families. (From Stedman, 25th ed)
Professional medical personnel approved to provide care to patients in a hospital.
The inability of a health professional to provide proper professional care of patients due to his or her physical and/or mental disability.
Theoretical models which propose methods of learning or teaching as a basis or adjunct to changes in attitude or behavior. These educational interventions are usually applied in the fields of health and patient education but are not restricted to patient care.
Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.
Educational programs designed to inform nurses of recent advances in their fields.
The function of directing or controlling the actions or attitudes of an individual or group with more or less willing acquiescence of the followers.
The auxiliary health profession which makes use of PHYSICAL THERAPY MODALITIES to prevent, correct, and alleviate movement dysfunction of anatomic or physiological origin.
A course or method of action selected, usually by an organization, institution, university, society, etc., from among alternatives to guide and determine present and future decisions and positions on matters of public interest or social concern. It does not include internal policy relating to organization and administration within the corporate body, for which ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION is available.
The art and science of studying, performing research on, preventing, diagnosing, and treating disease, as well as the maintenance of health.
Beliefs and values shared by all members of the organization. These shared values, which are subject to change, are reflected in the day to day management of the organization.
Design of patient care wherein institutional resources and personnel are organized around patients rather than around specialized departments. (From Hospitals 1993 Feb 5;67(3):14)
Education that increases the awareness and favorably influences the attitudes and knowledge relating to the improvement of health on a personal or community basis.
Educational programs for medical graduates entering a specialty. They include formal specialty training as well as academic work in the clinical and basic medical sciences, and may lead to board certification or an advanced medical degree.
Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.
The interactions between the professional person and the family.
Individuals enrolled in a school of medicine or a formal educational program in medicine.
The activities and endeavors of the public health services in a community on any level.
The medical science that deals with the origin, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of mental disorders.
A province of Canada lying between the provinces of Manitoba and Quebec. Its capital is Toronto. It takes its name from Lake Ontario which is said to represent the Iroquois oniatariio, beautiful lake. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p892 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p391)
I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Scotland" is not a medical term and does not have a medical definition. Scotland is one of the four constituent countries of the United Kingdom, located in the northern part of Great Britain. If you have any questions related to healthcare or medical terminology, I would be happy to help answer those!
Programs of training in medicine and medical specialties offered by hospitals for graduates of medicine to meet the requirements established by accrediting authorities.
The giving of advice and assistance to individuals with educational or personal problems.
The availability of HEALTH PERSONNEL. It includes the demand and recruitment of both professional and allied health personnel, their present and future supply and distribution, and their assignment and utilization.
Decisions, usually developed by government policymakers, for determining present and future objectives pertaining to the health care system.
Health services required by a population or community as well as the health services that the population or community is able and willing to pay for.
Interaction between the patient and nurse.
The upward or downward mobility in an occupation or the change from one occupation to another.
Individuals enrolled in a school or formal educational program in the health occupations.
Directions written for the obtaining and use of DRUGS.
Fundamental claims of patients, as expressed in statutes, declarations, or generally accepted moral principles. (Bioethics Thesaurus) The term is used for discussions of patient rights as a group of many rights, as in a hospital's posting of a list of patient rights.
Organized periodic procedures performed on large groups of people for the purpose of detecting disease.
The circulation or wide dispersal of information.
Patient involvement in the decision-making process in matters pertaining to health.
Organized services to provide information on any questions an individual might have using databases and other sources. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)
Studies beyond the bachelor's degree at an institution having graduate programs for the purpose of preparing for entrance into a specific field, and obtaining a higher degree.
Self-directing freedom and especially moral independence. An ethical principle holds that the autonomy of persons ought to be respected. (Bioethics Thesaurus)
The profession concerned with the teeth, oral cavity, and associated structures, and the diagnosis and treatment of their diseases including prevention and the restoration of defective and missing tissue.
Personnel who provide nursing service to patients in a hospital.
The services rendered by members of the health profession and non-professionals under their supervision.
Use for articles concerning dental education in general.
Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.
Senior professionals who provide guidance, direction and support to those persons desirous of improvement in academic positions, administrative positions or other career development situations.
Personnel who provide nursing service to patients in an organized facility, institution, or agency.
Individuals enrolled in a school of nursing or a formal educational program leading to a degree in nursing.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
The privacy of information and its protection against unauthorized disclosure.
A medical-surgical specialty concerned with management and care of women during pregnancy, parturition, and the puerperium.
Women licensed to practice medicine.
Persons trained in PHYSICAL THERAPY SPECIALTY to make use of PHYSICAL THERAPY MODALITIES to prevent, correct, and alleviate movement dysfunction.
Personnel who provide dental service to patients in an organized facility, institution or agency.
A geographic location which has insufficient health resources (manpower and/or facilities) to meet the medical needs of the resident population.
Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but "London" is a place name and not a medical term, so it doesn't have a medical definition. It's the capital city of England and the United Kingdom, known for its rich history, culture, and landmarks. If you have any questions related to health or medicine, I'd be happy to help answer those!
The remuneration paid or benefits granted to an employee.
The teaching staff and members of the administrative staff having academic rank in an educational institution.
The attainment or process of attaining a new level of performance or quality.
Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.
Abstract standards or empirical variables in social life which are believed to be important and/or desirable.
Organizations composed of members with common interests and whose professions may be similar.
The expected and characteristic pattern of behavior exhibited by an individual as a member of a particular social group.
The development of systems to prevent accidents, injuries, and other adverse occurrences in an institutional setting. The concept includes prevention or reduction of adverse events or incidents involving employees, patients, or facilities. Examples include plans to reduce injuries from falls or plans for fire safety to promote a safe institutional environment.
Individuals participating in the health care system for the purpose of receiving therapeutic, diagnostic, or preventive procedures.
Critical and exhaustive investigation or experimentation, having for its aim the discovery of new facts and their correct interpretation, the revision of accepted conclusions, theories, or laws in the light of newly discovered facts, or the practical application of such new or revised conclusions, theories, or laws. (Webster, 3d ed)
Certification as complying with a standard set by non-governmental organizations, applied for by institutions, programs, and facilities on a voluntary basis.
Health care provided on a continuing basis from the initial contact, following the patient through all phases of medical care.
Persons trained in an accredited school or dental college and licensed by the state in which they reside to provide dental prophylaxis under the direction of a licensed dentist.
Research aimed at assessing the quality and effectiveness of health care as measured by the attainment of a specified end result or outcome. Measures include parameters such as improved health, lowered morbidity or mortality, and improvement of abnormal states (such as elevated blood pressure).
A way of providing nursing care that is guided by the integration of the best available scientific knowledge with nursing expertise. This approach requires nurses to critically assess relevant scientific data or research evidence, and to implement high-quality interventions for their nursing practice.
A plan for collecting and utilizing data so that desired information can be obtained with sufficient precision or so that an hypothesis can be tested properly.
An enduring, learned predisposition to behave in a consistent way toward a given class of objects, or a persistent mental and/or neural state of readiness to react to a certain class of objects, not as they are but as they are conceived to be.
The period of medical education in a medical school. In the United States it follows the baccalaureate degree and precedes the granting of the M.D.
Voluntary authorization, by a patient or research subject, with full comprehension of the risks involved, for diagnostic or investigative procedures, and for medical and surgical treatment.
Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.
The practice of assisting women in childbirth.
Performance of activities or tasks traditionally performed by professional health care providers. The concept includes care of oneself or one's family and friends.
An infant during the first month after birth.
Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.
The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.
The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)
Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.
A game played by two or four players with rackets and an elastic ball on a level court divided by a low net.
Educational programs designed to inform dentists of recent advances in their fields.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Brazil" is not a medical term or concept, it is a country located in South America, known officially as the Federative Republic of Brazil. If you have any questions related to health, medicine, or science, I'd be happy to help answer those!
Differences of opinion or disagreements that may arise, for example, between health professionals and patients or their families, or against a political regime.
Diagnostic, therapeutic and preventive health services provided for individuals in the community.
Personnel whose work is prescribed and supervised by the dentist.
The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.
Medical specialty concerned with the promotion and maintenance of the physical and mental health of employees in occupational settings.

Consent obtained by the junior house officer--is it informed? (1/1071)

Of 30 junior house officers questioned, 21 had obtained patients' consent for colonoscopy. Of these 21, about one-third did not routinely discuss with patients the risks of perforation and haemorrhage. Ideally, consent should be obtained by a person capable of performing the procedure. If it is to be obtained by junior house officers, they need to know exactly what must be disclosed about each procedure. This could easily be done as part of the induction package.  (+info)

Computers in ophthalmology practice. (2/1071)

Computers are already in widespread use in medical practice throughout the world and their utility and popularity is increasing day by day. While future generations of medical professionals will be computer literate with a corresponding increase in use of computers in medical practice, the current generation finds itself in a dilemma of how best to adapt to the fast-evolving world of information technology. In addition to practice management, information technology has already had a substantial impact on diagnostic medicine, especially in imaging techniques and maintenance of medical records. This information technology is now poised to make a big impact on the way we deliver medical care in India. Ophthalmology is no exception to this, but at present very few practices are either fully or partially computerized. This article provides a practical account of the uses and advantages of computers in ophthalmic practice, as well as a step-by-step approach to the optimal utilization of available computer technology.  (+info)

The implementation of evidence-based medicine in general practice prescribing. (3/1071)

BACKGROUND: Research on the implementation of evidence-based medicine has focused on how best to influence doctors through information and education strategies. In order to understand the barriers and facilitators to implementation, it may also be important to study the characteristics of those doctors and practices that successfully implement evidence-based changes. AIM: To determine the relationship between practice and doctor characteristics and the implementation of recommended evidence-based changes in the area of prescribing. METHOD: Visits were made to 39 practices in southern England. Audits of three key prescribing changes were carried out and amalgamated to produce an 'implementation score' for each practice. These scores were related to a wide range of practice and doctor variables obtained from a questionnaire survey of doctors and practice managers. RESULTS: There was wide variation between the practices' implementation scores (mean 67%, range 45% to 88%). The only factors that had a significant relationship with implementation of these important prescribing changes were an innovative approach among the doctors (most practitioners were cautious of change), and fundholding status. Use of clinical protocols, disease registers, or computers was not associated with overall implementation score, nor was the doctor's age. Doctors complained of information overload. CONCLUSIONS: The emphasis on the need for evidence in medicine, and better transmission of information, needs to be balanced by a recognition that most general practitioners are pragmatic, averse to innovation, and already feel overwhelmed with information. Important advances in therapy may be crowded out. More attention should be given to the facilitation of priority changes in practices.  (+info)

Repeat dispensing by community pharmacists: advantages for patients and practitioners. (4/1071)

Repeat prescribing is an appreciable chore for general practitioners (GPs), and often lacks rigorous clinical control. This paper reports on a pilot repeat dispensing system, which employed community pharmacists to streamline the process and provide clinical supervision. The system described operated within the current regulations, was popular, and worked well for patients on stable treatment regimes.  (+info)

Audiotapes and letters to patients: the practice and views of oncologists, surgeons and general practitioners. (5/1071)

A range of measures have been proposed to enhance the provision of information to cancer patients and randomized controlled trials have demonstrated their impact on patient satisfaction and recall. The current study explored the practice and views of oncologists, surgeons and general practitioners (GPs) with regards to providing patients with consultation audiotapes and summary letters. In stage 1, 28 semi-structured interviews with doctors were conducted to provide qualitative data on which to base a questionnaire. In stage 2, 113 medical oncologists, 43 radiation oncologists, 55 surgeons and 108 GPs completed questionnaires. Only one-third of doctors had ever provided patients with a copy of the letter written to the oncologist or referring doctor, and one-quarter had provided a summary letter or tape. The majority of doctors were opposed to such measures; however, a substantial minority were in favour of providing a letter or tape under certain conditions. More surgeons and GPs (> two-thirds) were opposed to specialists providing a consultation audiotape than oncologists (one-third). Gender, years of experience and attitude to patient involvement in decision-making were predictive of doctors' attitudes. The majority of doctors remain opposed to offering patients personalized information aids. However, practice and perspectives appear to be changing.  (+info)

How should we pay doctors? A systematic review of salary payments and their effect on doctor behaviour. (6/1071)

We reviewed the published and unpublished international literature to determine the influence of salaried payment on doctor behaviour. We systematically searched Medline, BIDS Embase, Econlit and BIDS ISI and the reference lists of located papers to identify relevant empirical studies comparing salaried doctors with those paid by alternative methods. Only studies which reported objective outcomes and measures of the behaviour of doctors paid by salary compared to an alternative method were included in the review. Twenty-three papers were identified as meeting the selection criteria. Only one of the studies in this review reported a proxy for health status, but none examined whether salaried doctors differentiated between patients on the basis of health needs. Therefore, we were unable to draw conclusions on the likely impact of salaried payment on efficiency and equity. However, the limited evidence in our review does suggest that payment by salaries is associated with the lowest use of tests, and referrals compared with FFS and capitation. Salary payment is also associated with lower numbers of procedures per patient, lower throughput of patients per doctor, longer consultations, more preventive care and different patterns of consultation compared with FFS payment.  (+info)

Primary inguinal hernia repair: how audit changed a surgeon's practice. (7/1071)

Over 10 years one senior consultant surgeon performed 114 standard plication darn herniorraphies on 92 patients with primary inguinal hernias. These patients were contacted and were reviewed if there was any suspicion of recurrence. Four recurrences were detected, giving an overall recurrence rate of about 3.5%. According to actuarial life-table analysis the risks of recurrence at 1 year, 5 years and 10 years were 0.94%, 3.02% and 9%. This level of recurrence is unacceptable in modern practice and, as a result of the audit, the surgeon changed his technique of primary inguinal hernia repair.  (+info)

Primary care units in A&E departments in North Thames in the 1990s: initial experience and future implications. (8/1071)

BACKGROUND: In 1992, the Tomlinson Report recommended a shift from secondary to primary care, including specific primary care provision in accident and emergency (A&E) departments. Availability of short-term so-called Tomlinson moneys allowed a number of experimental services. A study of the experience of A&E-based staff is reported to assist general practitioners (GPs) and purchasers and identify areas for further research. AIMS: To find the number and scope of primary care facilities in A&E services in North Thames; to find factors encouraging or inhibiting the setting-up of a successful service; to examine the views of a range of A&E staff including GPs, consultants, and nurses; and to suggest directions for more specific research. METHOD: A postal questionnaire was sent to all North Thames A&E departments, and an interview study of staff in one unit was arranged, leading to a questionnaire study of all GPs employed in North Thames primary care services in A&E. This was followed by interviews of staff members in five contrasting primary care units in A&E. RESULTS: By mid-1995, at least 16 of the 33 North Thames A&E departments ran a primary care service. Seven mainly employed GPs, the others employed nurse practitioners (NPs). Problems for GPs included unclear role definition and their non-availability at times of highest patient demand. GPs' reasons for working in A&E sometimes differed from the aims of primary care in an A&E service. Staff interviews revealed differing views about their role and about use of triage protocols. Ethnicity data were being collected, but not yet being used, to improve service to patients. CONCLUSIONS: A number of benefits follow the introduction of primary care practitioners into A&E. Different models have evolved, with a variety of GP and NP staffing arrangements according to local ideas and priorities. There is some confusion over whether these services aim to improve A&E-based care or to divert it to general practice. Cost information is inadequate so far, though the use of GPs has shown the possibility of economy. Appropriate location of services requires clearer identification of costs. This may be possible for the proposed primary care groups.  (+info)

Professional practice in the context of medicine refers to the responsible and ethical application of medical knowledge, skills, and judgement in providing healthcare services to patients. It involves adhering to established standards, guidelines, and best practices within the medical community, while also considering individual patient needs and preferences. Professional practice requires ongoing learning, self-reflection, and improvement to maintain and enhance one's competence and expertise. Additionally, it encompasses effective communication, collaboration, and respect for colleagues, other healthcare professionals, and patients. Ultimately, professional practice is aimed at promoting the health, well-being, and autonomy of patients while also safeguarding their rights and dignity.

Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine (PRM), also known as Physiatry, is a medical specialty that deals with the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of patients with disabilities or functional limitations related to musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, pulmonary, neurologic, and other systems. The main goal of this discipline is to restore optimal function, reduce symptoms, and improve the overall quality of life for individuals who have experienced injuries, illnesses, or disabling conditions.

PRM physicians use a variety of techniques, including physical therapy, occupational therapy, speech-language pathology, assistive devices, medications, and various types of injections to manage pain and spasticity. They also perform electrodiagnostic studies to diagnose neuromuscular disorders and provide comprehensive rehabilitation plans tailored to each patient's unique needs and goals.

In addition to direct patient care, PRM specialists often work as part of multidisciplinary teams in hospitals, rehabilitation centers, and outpatient clinics, collaborating with other healthcare professionals such as nurses, therapists, psychologists, and social workers to provide coordinated, holistic care for patients.

Professional autonomy in a medical context refers to the freedom and independence that healthcare professionals, particularly doctors, have in making clinical decisions and judgments regarding the care and treatment of their patients. This concept is based on the ethical principle of self-determination, which allows individuals to make informed decisions about their own health and well-being.

Professional autonomy encompasses several key elements, including:

1. Clinical judgment: The ability to evaluate a patient's condition, consider various treatment options, and make an evidence-based decision regarding the most appropriate course of action.
2. Informed consent: The process of ensuring that patients understand their medical condition, the proposed treatment plan, and any potential risks or benefits associated with the recommended care. Patients must provide their informed consent before any medical intervention can take place.
3. Confidentiality: The obligation to protect a patient's personal and medical information, sharing it only with those directly involved in the patient's care or as required by law.
4. Continuing professional development: The commitment to maintaining and updating one's knowledge and skills through ongoing education, training, and research.
5. Peer review and accountability: The responsibility to participate in peer review processes and be held accountable for one's actions and decisions, including any adverse outcomes or complications that may arise from treatment.

Professional autonomy is essential for maintaining the trust and confidence of patients, as it allows healthcare professionals to provide care that is tailored to each individual's unique needs and circumstances. However, this autonomy must be balanced with the need for collaboration, communication, and shared decision-making with other healthcare team members, as well as consideration for ethical principles such as non-maleficence (do no harm) and beneficence (acting in the best interest of the patient).

Professional competence, in the context of medicine, refers to the possession of the necessary skills, knowledge, and behaviors required for the provision of high-quality healthcare services. It involves the ability to apply medical knowledge and clinical skills effectively in practice, make informed and evidence-based decisions, communicate clearly and effectively with patients and colleagues, demonstrate professionalism and ethical behavior, and engage in continuous learning and improvement.

Professional competence is evaluated through various means, including assessments of clinical skills, knowledge tests, patient feedback, and peer reviews. It is an ongoing process that requires healthcare professionals to continually update their knowledge and skills, adapt to changes in medical practice, and strive for excellence in patient care. Maintaining professional competence is essential for ensuring the safety and quality of healthcare services and is a key component of medical regulation and licensure.

Soft tissue therapy is a form of manual therapy that involves the assessment, treatment, and rehabilitation of soft tissues such as muscles, tendons, ligaments, and fascia. The goal of soft tissue therapy is to improve the overall health and function of these tissues, reduce pain and inflammation, and promote relaxation and well-being.

Soft tissue therapy may include a variety of techniques, such as:

* Massage: This involves the manipulation of muscles and other soft tissues using pressure and movement. There are many different types of massage, including Swedish, deep tissue, sports, and trigger point massage.
* Myofascial release: This is a technique that involves applying sustained pressure to the connective tissue (fascia) that surrounds and supports muscles and other structures in the body. The goal is to release restrictions and improve mobility.
* Soft tissue mobilization: This is a hands-on technique that involves applying rhythmic pressure and movement to soft tissues to help break up adhesions, reduce scar tissue, and improve circulation.
* Strain-counterstrain: This is a gentle manual therapy technique that involves positioning the body in a way that reduces tension on affected muscles and soft tissues. The goal is to relieve pain and restore normal movement.

Soft tissue therapy can be helpful for a wide range of conditions, including muscle strains and sprains, repetitive strain injuries, chronic pain, headaches, and post-surgical rehabilitation. It is often used in conjunction with other treatments, such as exercise and physical therapy, to provide a comprehensive approach to care.

The European Union (EU) is not a medical term or organization, but rather a political and economic union of 27 European countries. It is primarily involved in matters related to policy, law, and trade, and does not have a direct role in the provision or regulation of healthcare services, except in certain specific areas such as pharmaceutical regulations and cross-border healthcare directives.

Therefore, there is no medical definition for "European Union."

Professional ethics in the medical field are a set of principles that guide physicians and other healthcare professionals in their interactions with patients, colleagues, and society. These ethical standards are based on values such as respect for autonomy, non-maleficence, beneficence, and justice. They help to ensure that medical professionals provide high-quality care that is safe, effective, and respectful of patients' rights and dignity.

Some key principles of professional ethics in medicine include:

1. Respect for autonomy: Healthcare professionals should respect patients' right to make their own decisions about their healthcare, including the right to refuse treatment.
2. Non-maleficence: Medical professionals have a duty to avoid causing harm to their patients. This includes avoiding unnecessary tests or treatments that may cause harm or waste resources.
3. Beneficence: Healthcare professionals have a duty to act in the best interests of their patients and to promote their well-being.
4. Justice: Medical professionals should treat all patients fairly and without discrimination, and should work to ensure that healthcare resources are distributed equitably.
5. Confidentiality: Medical professionals have a duty to keep patient information confidential, unless the patient gives permission to share it or there is a legal or ethical obligation to disclose it.
6. Professional competence: Medical professionals have a duty to maintain their knowledge and skills, and to provide care that meets accepted standards of practice.
7. Honesty and integrity: Medical professionals should be honest and truthful in their interactions with patients, colleagues, and other stakeholders. They should avoid conflicts of interest and should disclose any potential conflicts to patients and others.
8. Responsibility to society: Medical professionals have a responsibility to contribute to the health and well-being of society as a whole, including advocating for policies that promote public health and addressing health disparities.

The Nursing Process is a systematic and organized method used by nurses to provide holistic, individualized, and patient-centered care. It consists of five interrelated steps that are carried out in a continuous and dynamic cycle: assessment, diagnosis, planning, implementation, and evaluation. This framework enables nurses to identify actual or potential health needs, set goals, establish nursing care plans, implement interventions, and evaluate outcomes to ensure the best possible patient outcomes and quality of care. The Nursing Process is grounded in evidence-based practice, critical thinking, and decision-making and is widely accepted as a standard of practice in the nursing profession.

Evidence-Based Practice (EBP) is a medical approach that integrates the best available research evidence with clinical expertise and patient values and preferences to make informed decisions about appropriate health care for individual patients. It is a process of lifelong learning and critical appraisal of new evidence to inform clinical practice. The goal of EBP is to provide high-quality, cost-effective healthcare that is based on the most current and valid scientific research, as well as the unique needs and preferences of each patient. This approach emphasizes the importance of using rigorous, systematic methods to evaluate medical research and to translate findings into clinical practice, while also taking into account individual patient circumstances and values.

'Nursing care' is not a medical term, but rather a general term used to describe the overall process and services provided by registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, and other nursing professionals to promote, maintain, or restore the health of individuals, families, or communities. Nursing care involves various activities such as:

1. Assessment: Collecting and analyzing data related to the patient's physical, psychological, social, and emotional status to identify their healthcare needs.
2. Diagnosis: Identifying the patient's nursing diagnoses based on the assessment data.
3. Outcome identification: Determining the desired outcomes for the patient's health based on their diagnosis and individual needs.
4. Planning: Developing a plan of care that outlines the interventions, resources, and actions required to achieve the identified outcomes.
5. Implementation: Carrying out the planned interventions, including administering medications, providing wound care, educating patients and families, and collaborating with other healthcare professionals.
6. Evaluation: Monitoring and evaluating the patient's progress towards achieving the desired outcomes and modifying the plan of care as needed.

Nursing care is a critical component of the overall healthcare system and encompasses various nursing specialties such as pediatrics, gerontology, critical care, oncology, and mental health, among others.

Clinical competence is the ability of a healthcare professional to provide safe and effective patient care, demonstrating the knowledge, skills, and attitudes required for the job. It involves the integration of theoretical knowledge with practical skills, judgment, and decision-making abilities in real-world clinical situations. Clinical competence is typically evaluated through various methods such as direct observation, case studies, simulations, and feedback from peers and supervisors.

A clinically competent healthcare professional should be able to:

1. Demonstrate a solid understanding of the relevant medical knowledge and its application in clinical practice.
2. Perform essential clinical skills proficiently and safely.
3. Communicate effectively with patients, families, and other healthcare professionals.
4. Make informed decisions based on critical thinking and problem-solving abilities.
5. Exhibit professionalism, ethical behavior, and cultural sensitivity in patient care.
6. Continuously evaluate and improve their performance through self-reflection and ongoing learning.

Maintaining clinical competence is essential for healthcare professionals to ensure the best possible outcomes for their patients and stay current with advances in medical science and technology.

Patient advocacy refers to the process of supporting and empowering patients to make informed decisions about their healthcare. Patient advocates may help patients communicate with healthcare providers, access necessary resources and services, understand their health conditions and treatment options, and navigate complex healthcare systems. They may also work to promote patient-centered care, raise awareness of patient rights and concerns, and advocate for policies that improve the quality and accessibility of healthcare services. Patient advocacy can be provided by healthcare professionals, family members, friends, or dedicated patient advocates.

Physician's practice patterns refer to the individual habits and preferences of healthcare providers when it comes to making clinical decisions and managing patient care. These patterns can encompass various aspects, such as:

1. Diagnostic testing: The types and frequency of diagnostic tests ordered for patients with similar conditions.
2. Treatment modalities: The choice of treatment options, including medications, procedures, or referrals to specialists.
3. Patient communication: The way physicians communicate with their patients, including the amount and type of information shared, as well as the level of patient involvement in decision-making.
4. Follow-up care: The frequency and duration of follow-up appointments, as well as the monitoring of treatment effectiveness and potential side effects.
5. Resource utilization: The use of healthcare resources, such as hospitalizations, imaging studies, or specialist consultations, and the associated costs.

Physician practice patterns can be influenced by various factors, including medical training, clinical experience, personal beliefs, guidelines, and local availability of resources. Understanding these patterns is essential for evaluating the quality of care, identifying potential variations in care, and implementing strategies to improve patient outcomes and reduce healthcare costs.

Pharmacy education refers to the formal learning process and academic program designed to prepare individuals to become licensed pharmacists. The curriculum typically includes courses in biology, chemistry, physics, mathematics, and specialized subjects such as pharmaceutical chemistry, pharmacology, pharmacotherapy, and clinical practice. Pharmacy education also covers topics related to the ethical and legal aspects of pharmacy practice, communication skills, and management of pharmacy operations.

The duration and format of pharmacy education vary by country and region. In the United States, for example, pharmacy education typically involves completing a Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm.D.) degree, which takes six years of full-time study beyond high school. This includes two years of pre-professional studies and four years of professional studies in a college or school of pharmacy.

After completing their pharmacy education, graduates must pass licensure exams to practice as a pharmacist. The specific requirements for licensure vary by jurisdiction but typically include passing both a written and practical examination. Continuing education is also required to maintain licensure and stay up-to-date with advances in the field of pharmacy.

The "attitude of health personnel" refers to the overall disposition, behavior, and approach that healthcare professionals exhibit towards their patients or clients. This encompasses various aspects such as:

1. Interpersonal skills: The ability to communicate effectively, listen actively, and build rapport with patients.
2. Professionalism: Adherence to ethical principles, confidentiality, and maintaining a non-judgmental attitude.
3. Compassion and empathy: Showing genuine concern for the patient's well-being and understanding their feelings and experiences.
4. Cultural sensitivity: Respecting and acknowledging the cultural backgrounds, beliefs, and values of patients.
5. Competence: Demonstrating knowledge, skills, and expertise in providing healthcare services.
6. Collaboration: Working together with other healthcare professionals to ensure comprehensive care for the patient.
7. Patient-centeredness: Focusing on the individual needs, preferences, and goals of the patient in the decision-making process.
8. Commitment to continuous learning and improvement: Staying updated with the latest developments in the field and seeking opportunities to enhance one's skills and knowledge.

A positive attitude of health personnel contributes significantly to patient satisfaction, adherence to treatment plans, and overall healthcare outcomes.

"Health personnel" is a broad term that refers to individuals who are involved in maintaining, promoting, and restoring the health of populations or individuals. This can include a wide range of professionals such as:

1. Healthcare providers: These are medical doctors, nurses, midwives, dentists, pharmacists, allied health professionals (like physical therapists, occupational therapists, speech therapists, dietitians, etc.), and other healthcare workers who provide direct patient care.

2. Public health professionals: These are individuals who work in public health agencies, non-governmental organizations, or academia to promote health, prevent diseases, and protect populations from health hazards. They include epidemiologists, biostatisticians, health educators, environmental health specialists, and health services researchers.

3. Health managers and administrators: These are professionals who oversee the operations, finances, and strategic planning of healthcare organizations, such as hospitals, clinics, or public health departments. They may include hospital CEOs, medical directors, practice managers, and healthcare consultants.

4. Health support staff: This group includes various personnel who provide essential services to healthcare organizations, such as medical records technicians, billing specialists, receptionists, and maintenance workers.

5. Health researchers and academics: These are professionals involved in conducting research, teaching, and disseminating knowledge related to health sciences, medicine, public health, or healthcare management in universities, research institutions, or think tanks.

The World Health Organization (WHO) defines "health worker" as "a person who contributes to the promotion, protection, or improvement of health through prevention, treatment, rehabilitation, palliation, health promotion, and health education." This definition encompasses a wide range of professionals working in various capacities to improve health outcomes.

I'm happy to help! However, I believe there may be a slight misunderstanding in your question. "Students, Pharmacy" is not a medical term or concept. Instead, it likely refers to individuals who are studying to become pharmacists or are taking courses related to pharmacy as part of their education.

Pharmacy students are typically enrolled in a professional degree program, such as a Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm.D.) program, which prepares them to become licensed pharmacists. These programs typically include coursework in topics such as pharmaceutical chemistry, pharmacology, and clinical practice, as well as supervised clinical experiences in various healthcare settings.

Therefore, the term "Students, Pharmacy" generally refers to individuals who are pursuing a degree or certification in the field of pharmacy.

Practice guidelines, also known as clinical practice guidelines, are systematically developed statements that aim to assist healthcare professionals and patients in making informed decisions about appropriate health care for specific clinical circumstances. They are based on a thorough evaluation of the available scientific evidence, consensus of expert opinion, and consideration of patient preferences. Practice guidelines can cover a wide range of topics, including diagnosis, management, prevention, and treatment options for various medical conditions. They are intended to improve the quality and consistency of care, reduce unnecessary variations in practice, and promote evidence-based medicine. However, they should not replace clinical judgment or individualized patient care.

Family practice, also known as family medicine, is a medical specialty that provides comprehensive and continuous care to patients of all ages, genders, and stages of life. Family physicians are trained to provide a wide range of services, including preventive care, diagnosis and treatment of acute and chronic illnesses, management of complex medical conditions, and providing health education and counseling.

Family practice emphasizes the importance of building long-term relationships with patients and their families, and takes into account the physical, emotional, social, and psychological factors that influence a person's health. Family physicians often serve as the primary point of contact for patients within the healthcare system, coordinating care with other specialists and healthcare providers as needed.

Family practice is a broad and diverse field, encompassing various areas such as pediatrics, internal medicine, obstetrics and gynecology, geriatrics, and behavioral health. The goal of family practice is to provide high-quality, patient-centered care that meets the unique needs and preferences of each individual patient and their family.

A Pharmacist is a healthcare professional who practices in the field of pharmacy, focusing on the safe and effective use of medications. They are responsible for dispensing medications prescribed by physicians and other healthcare providers, as well as providing information and counseling to patients about their medications. This includes explaining how to take the medication, potential side effects, and any drug interactions. Pharmacists may also be involved in medication therapy management, monitoring patient health and adjusting medication plans as needed. They must have a deep understanding of the properties and actions of drugs, including how they are absorbed, distributed, metabolized, and excreted by the body, as well as their potential interactions with other substances and treatments. In addition to a Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm.D.) degree, pharmacists must also be licensed in the state where they practice.

Continuing medical education (CME) refers to the process of ongoing learning and professional development that healthcare professionals engage in throughout their careers. The goal of CME is to enhance knowledge, skills, and performance in order to provide better patient care and improve health outcomes.

CME activities may include a variety of formats such as conferences, seminars, workshops, online courses, journal clubs, and self-study programs. These activities are designed to address specific learning needs and objectives related to clinical practice, research, or healthcare management.

Healthcare professionals are required to complete a certain number of CME credits on a regular basis in order to maintain their licensure, certification, or membership in professional organizations. The content and quality of CME activities are typically overseen by accreditation bodies such as the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) in the United States.

Overall, continuing medical education is an essential component of maintaining competence and staying up-to-date with the latest developments in healthcare.

"Health Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices" (HKAP) is a term used in public health to refer to the knowledge, beliefs, assumptions, and behaviors that individuals possess or engage in that are related to health. Here's a brief definition of each component:

1. Health Knowledge: Refers to the factual information and understanding that individuals have about various health-related topics, such as anatomy, physiology, disease processes, and healthy behaviors.
2. Attitudes: Represent the positive or negative evaluations, feelings, or dispositions that people hold towards certain health issues, practices, or services. These attitudes can influence their willingness to adopt and maintain healthy behaviors.
3. Practices: Encompass the specific actions or habits that individuals engage in related to their health, such as dietary choices, exercise routines, hygiene practices, and use of healthcare services.

HKAP is a multidimensional concept that helps public health professionals understand and address various factors influencing individual and community health outcomes. By assessing and addressing knowledge gaps, negative attitudes, or unhealthy practices, interventions can be designed to promote positive behavior change and improve overall health status.

Quality Assurance in the context of healthcare refers to a systematic approach and set of activities designed to ensure that health care services and products consistently meet predetermined standards of quality and safety. It includes all the policies, procedures, and processes that are put in place to monitor, assess, and improve the quality of healthcare delivery.

The goal of quality assurance is to minimize variability in clinical practice, reduce medical errors, and ensure that patients receive evidence-based care that is safe, effective, timely, patient-centered, and equitable. Quality assurance activities may include:

1. Establishing standards of care based on best practices and clinical guidelines.
2. Developing and implementing policies and procedures to ensure compliance with these standards.
3. Providing education and training to healthcare professionals to improve their knowledge and skills.
4. Conducting audits, reviews, and evaluations of healthcare services and processes to identify areas for improvement.
5. Implementing corrective actions to address identified issues and prevent their recurrence.
6. Monitoring and measuring outcomes to evaluate the effectiveness of quality improvement initiatives.

Quality assurance is an ongoing process that requires continuous evaluation and improvement to ensure that healthcare delivery remains safe, effective, and patient-centered.

In the context of medical education, a curriculum refers to the planned and organized sequence of experiences and learning opportunities designed to achieve specific educational goals and objectives. It outlines the knowledge, skills, and attitudes that medical students or trainees are expected to acquire during their training program. The curriculum may include various components such as lectures, small group discussions, clinical rotations, simulations, and other experiential learning activities. It is typically developed and implemented by medical education experts and faculty members in consultation with stakeholders, including learners, practitioners, and patients.

Data collection in the medical context refers to the systematic gathering of information relevant to a specific research question or clinical situation. This process involves identifying and recording data elements, such as demographic characteristics, medical history, physical examination findings, laboratory results, and imaging studies, from various sources including patient interviews, medical records, and diagnostic tests. The data collected is used to support clinical decision-making, inform research hypotheses, and evaluate the effectiveness of treatments or interventions. It is essential that data collection is performed in a standardized and unbiased manner to ensure the validity and reliability of the results.

A questionnaire in the medical context is a standardized, systematic, and structured tool used to gather information from individuals regarding their symptoms, medical history, lifestyle, or other health-related factors. It typically consists of a series of written questions that can be either self-administered or administered by an interviewer. Questionnaires are widely used in various areas of healthcare, including clinical research, epidemiological studies, patient care, and health services evaluation to collect data that can inform diagnosis, treatment planning, and population health management. They provide a consistent and organized method for obtaining information from large groups or individual patients, helping to ensure accurate and comprehensive data collection while minimizing bias and variability in the information gathered.

Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM) is a medical approach that combines the best available scientific evidence with clinical expertise and patient values to make informed decisions about diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of diseases. It emphasizes the use of systematic research, including randomized controlled trials and meta-analyses, to guide clinical decision making. EBM aims to provide the most effective and efficient care while minimizing variations in practice, reducing errors, and improving patient outcomes.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but the term "Europe" is a geographical and political designation, rather than a medical one. It refers to the continent located entirely in the Northern Hemisphere and mostly in the Eastern Hemisphere. It is bordered by the Arctic Ocean to the north, the Atlantic Ocean to the west, and the Mediterranean Sea to the south. Europe is made up of approximately 50 countries, depending on how one defines a "country."

If you have any questions related to medical terminology or health-related topics, I'd be happy to help answer them!

"Professional Practice Location" is a term commonly used in the medical field to refer to the specific geographic location where a healthcare professional, such as a doctor or nurse, practices their profession. This can include a hospital, clinic, private practice, or other healthcare facility. The professional practice location is often considered when evaluating a healthcare provider's qualifications and experience, as well as when determining issues such as licensing and reimbursement for medical services. It may also be relevant in the context of malpractice claims, as the standard of care that a provider is expected to meet can vary based on their professional practice location.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but the term "Great Britain" is not a medical concept or condition. It is a geographical and political term referring to the largest island in the British Isles, on which the majority of England, Scotland, and Wales are located. It's also used to refer to the political union of these three countries, which is called the United Kingdom. Therefore, it doesn't have a medical definition.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "United States" is a geopolitical entity, specifically the name of the country consisting of 50 states, and it is not a medical term or concept. Therefore, I can't provide a medical definition for it. If you have any questions related to health, medicine, or biology, I would be happy to try to help answer those!

A "Professional Role" in the context of medicine typically refers to the specific duties, responsibilities, and expectations associated with a particular healthcare position. It encompasses the legal, ethical, and clinical aspects of the job, and is shaped by education, training, and professional standards. Examples include roles such as a physician, nurse, pharmacist, or therapist, each with their own distinct set of professional responsibilities and obligations to patients, colleagues, and society.

"General practice" in the context of medicine refers to the provision of primary care services that are delivered by a general practitioner (GP) or family physician. These healthcare professionals offer broad-based, first-contact care for a wide range of health issues and conditions, regardless of age, gender, or type of disease. They provide continuous and comprehensive care to individuals and families in their communities, acting as the entry point into the healthcare system and coordinating care with other specialists when needed. General practice emphasizes prevention, health promotion, early intervention, and management of acute and chronic conditions.

Medical practice management refers to the administrative and operational aspects of running a healthcare organization or medical practice. It involves overseeing and coordinating various business functions such as finance, human resources, marketing, patient scheduling, billing and coding, compliance with regulations, and information technology systems. The goal of medical practice management is to ensure that the practice runs efficiently, effectively, and profitably while delivering high-quality care to patients.

Medical practice managers may be responsible for developing policies and procedures, hiring and training staff, managing patient flow, ensuring regulatory compliance, implementing quality improvement initiatives, and overseeing financial performance. They must have a strong understanding of medical billing and coding practices, healthcare regulations, and electronic health record (EHR) systems. Effective communication skills, leadership abilities, and attention to detail are also important qualities for successful medical practice managers.

In medical terms, "private practice" refers to the provision of healthcare services by a licensed and trained medical professional (such as a doctor, nurse practitioner, or dentist) who operates independently and is not employed by a hospital, clinic, or other health care institution. In private practice, these professionals offer their medical expertise and treatments directly to patients on a fee-for-service basis or through insurance billing. They are responsible for managing their own schedules, appointments, staff, and finances while maintaining compliance with relevant laws, regulations, and professional standards.

Private practices can vary in size and structure, ranging from solo practitioners working alone to larger group practices with multiple healthcare providers sharing resources and expertise. The primary advantage of private practice is the autonomy it provides for medical professionals to make decisions regarding patient care, treatment options, and business management without interference from external entities.

Professional education refers to the educational programs and training that prepare individuals to enter a recognized profession. This type of education is typically focused on providing students with the specific knowledge, skills, and abilities required to practice in a particular field, such as medicine, law, engineering, or teaching. Professional education often includes a combination of classroom instruction, practical experience, and examination or assessment to ensure that students have met the necessary standards to enter the profession. It is designed to develop the competencies required for safe and effective practice, and may include ongoing education and training throughout a professional's career to maintain and enhance their skills and knowledge.

Interprofessional relations, in the context of healthcare, refers to the interactions and collaborative practices between different healthcare professionals (such as physicians, nurses, pharmacists, therapists, social workers, etc.) when providing care for patients. It involves developing and maintaining positive and effective communication, respect, trust, and collaboration among various healthcare disciplines to ensure coordinated, safe, and high-quality patient care. The goal of interprofessional relations is to enhance collaborative practice, improve patient outcomes, and promote a supportive work environment.

A physician is a healthcare professional who practices medicine, providing medical care and treatment to patients. Physicians may specialize in various fields of medicine, such as internal medicine, surgery, pediatrics, psychiatry, or radiology, among others. They are responsible for diagnosing and treating illnesses, injuries, and disorders; prescribing medications; ordering and interpreting diagnostic tests; providing counseling and education to patients; and collaborating with other healthcare professionals to provide comprehensive care. Physicians may work in a variety of settings, including hospitals, clinics, private practices, and academic medical centers. To become a physician, one must complete a Doctor of Medicine (M.D.) or Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine (D.O.) degree program and pass licensing exams to practice medicine in their state.

Primary health care is defined by the World Health Organization (WHO) as:

"Essential health care that is based on practical, scientifically sound and socially acceptable methods and technology made universally accessible to individuals and families in the community through their full participation and at a cost that the community and country can afford. It forms an integral part both of the country's health system, of which it is the central function and main focus, and of the overall social and economic development of the community. It is the first level of contact of individuals, the family and community with the national health system bringing health care as close as possible to where people live and work, and constitutes the first element of a continuing health care process."

Primary health care includes a range of services such as preventive care, health promotion, curative care, rehabilitation, and palliative care. It is typically provided by a team of health professionals including doctors, nurses, midwives, pharmacists, and other community health workers. The goal of primary health care is to provide comprehensive, continuous, and coordinated care to individuals and families in a way that is accessible, affordable, and culturally sensitive.

Qualitative research is a methodological approach in social sciences and healthcare research that focuses on understanding the meanings, experiences, and perspectives of individuals or groups within a specific context. It aims to gather detailed, rich data through various techniques such as interviews, focus groups, observations, and content analysis. The findings from qualitative research are typically descriptive and exploratory, providing insights into processes, perceptions, and experiences that may not be captured through quantitative methods.

In medical research, qualitative research can be used to explore patients' experiences of illness, healthcare providers' perspectives on patient care, or the cultural and social factors that influence health behaviors. It is often used in combination with quantitative methods to provide a more comprehensive understanding of complex health issues.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "England" is not a medical term or concept. It is one of the four constituent countries that make up the United Kingdom, along with Wales, Scotland, and Northern Ireland. England is located in the southern part of Great Britain, which is the largest island of the British Isles.

If you have any questions related to medicine or healthcare, I would be happy to try to help answer them for you!

Physician-patient relations, also known as doctor-patient relationships, refer to the interaction and communication between healthcare professionals and their patients. This relationship is founded on trust, respect, and understanding, with the physician providing medical care and treatment based on the patient's needs and best interests. Effective physician-patient relations involve clear communication, informed consent, shared decision-making, and confidentiality. A positive and collaborative relationship can lead to better health outcomes, improved patient satisfaction, and increased adherence to treatment plans.

I'm happy to help, but it seems there might be some confusion in your question. "Interviews" is a broad topic that isn't typically a medical term or subject. However, interviews can certainly be a part of medical settings and procedures, such as job interviews for healthcare positions, patient interviews during medical consultations, or research interviews in clinical studies.

In the context of medical education, an interview might refer to the process by which medical schools evaluate applicants for admission, known as the medical school interview. This is a critical component of the application process and typically involves one-on-one conversations between the applicant and an admissions committee member or a series of multiple mini-interviews (MMIs) with various evaluators.

If you could provide more context or clarify what you mean by "Interviews as Topic" in a medical setting, I'd be happy to help further!

Professional-patient relations, also known as physician-patient relationships or doctor-patient relationships, refer to the interactions and communications between healthcare professionals and their patients. It is a critical aspect of healthcare delivery that involves trust, respect, understanding, and collaboration. The American Medical Association (AMA) defines it as "a ethical relationship in which a physician, by virtue of knowledge and skills, provides medical services to a patient in need."

Professional-patient relations encompass various elements, including:

1. Informed Consent: Healthcare professionals must provide patients with adequate information about their medical condition, treatment options, benefits, risks, and alternatives to enable them to make informed decisions about their healthcare.
2. Confidentiality: Healthcare professionals must respect patients' privacy and maintain the confidentiality of their medical information, except in specific circumstances where disclosure is required by law or necessary for patient safety.
3. Communication: Healthcare professionals must communicate effectively with patients, listening to their concerns, answering their questions, and providing clear and concise explanations about their medical condition and treatment plan.
4. Empathy and Compassion: Healthcare professionals must demonstrate empathy and compassion towards their patients, recognizing their emotional and psychological needs and providing support and comfort when necessary.
5. Cultural Competence: Healthcare professionals must be aware of and respect cultural differences among their patients, adapting their communication style and treatment approach to meet the unique needs of each patient.
6. Shared Decision-Making: Healthcare professionals and patients should work together to make medical decisions based on the best available evidence, the patient's values and preferences, and the healthcare professional's expertise.
7. Continuity of Care: Healthcare professionals must ensure continuity of care for their patients, coordinating with other healthcare providers and ensuring that patients receive appropriate follow-up care.

Professional-patient relations are essential to achieving positive health outcomes, improving patient satisfaction, and reducing medical errors and adverse events. Healthcare professionals must maintain ethical and professional standards in their interactions with patients, recognizing the power imbalance in the relationship and striving to promote trust, respect, and collaboration.

A dentist is a healthcare professional who specializes in the diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of diseases and conditions that affect the oral cavity and maxillofacial region. This includes the teeth, gums, jaw, and related structures. Dentists are trained to provide a wide range of services, including:

1. Routine dental exams and cleanings
2. Fillings, crowns, and other restorative treatments
3. Root canals and extractions
4. Dental implants and dentures
5. Orthodontic treatment (braces, aligners)
6. Treatment of gum disease
7. Oral cancer screenings
8. Cosmetic dental procedures (teeth whitening, veneers)
9. Management of temporomandibular joint disorders (TMJ)
10. Emergency dental care

To become a dentist, one must complete a Doctor of Dental Surgery (DDS) or Doctor of Medical Dentistry (DMD) degree from an accredited dental school and pass written and clinical exams to obtain licensure in their state. Many dentists also choose to specialize in a particular area of dentistry, such as orthodontics, oral surgery, or pediatric dentistry, by completing additional training and residency programs.

I'm happy to help, but it seems there might be a slight misunderstanding in your question. "Nurses" is not a medical term per se, but rather a job title or professional role within the healthcare field. Here's a brief description of what nurses do:

Nurses are healthcare professionals who work closely with patients to provide and coordinate care, education, and support. They play a critical role in promoting health, preventing illness, and helping patients cope with various medical conditions. Nurses can be found in various settings such as hospitals, clinics, private practices, long-term care facilities, community health centers, and patient homes.

There are different nursing specialties and levels of education, including:

1. Registered Nurse (RN): Typically holds an associate's or bachelor's degree in nursing and has passed a licensing exam. RNs provide direct patient care, administer medications, and coordinate treatment plans.
2. Advanced Practice Registered Nurse (APRN): Has completed additional education and training beyond the RN level, often earning a master's or doctoral degree. APRNs can specialize in areas such as nurse practitioner, clinical nurse specialist, certified registered nurse anesthetist, or certified nurse-midwife.
3. Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN) or Licensed Vocational Nurse (LVN): Holds a diploma or certificate from a practical nursing program and has passed a licensing exam. LPNs/LVNs provide basic patient care under the supervision of RNs and physicians.

These definitions are not exhaustive, but they should give you an idea of what nurses do and their roles within the healthcare system.

"Family Physicians" are medical doctors who provide comprehensive primary care to individuals and families of all ages. They are trained to diagnose and treat a wide range of medical conditions, from minor illnesses to complex diseases. In addition to providing acute care, family physicians also focus on preventive medicine, helping their patients maintain their overall health and well-being through regular checkups, screenings, and immunizations. They often serve as the patient's main point of contact within the healthcare system, coordinating care with specialists and other healthcare professionals as needed. Family physicians may work in private practices, community health centers, hospitals, or other healthcare settings.

Professional burnout is a state of emotional, physical, and mental exhaustion caused by excessive and prolonged stress. It occurs when someone feels overwhelmed, emotionally drained, and unable to meet constant demands, particularly in the work environment.

The symptoms of professional burnout may include:

1. Feelings of energy depletion or exhaustion
2. Increased mental distance from one's job or feelings of negativism or cynicism related to one's job
3. Reduced professional efficacy

Burnout is often characterized by a reduced sense of accomplishment and personal satisfaction in work, as well as a lack of engagement and motivation. It can lead to a variety of negative outcomes, including decreased productivity, absenteeism, and turnover, as well as physical and mental health problems.

A cross-sectional study is a type of observational research design that examines the relationship between variables at one point in time. It provides a snapshot or a "cross-section" of the population at a particular moment, allowing researchers to estimate the prevalence of a disease or condition and identify potential risk factors or associations.

In a cross-sectional study, data is collected from a sample of participants at a single time point, and the variables of interest are measured simultaneously. This design can be used to investigate the association between exposure and outcome, but it cannot establish causality because it does not follow changes over time.

Cross-sectional studies can be conducted using various data collection methods, such as surveys, interviews, or medical examinations. They are often used in epidemiology to estimate the prevalence of a disease or condition in a population and to identify potential risk factors that may contribute to its development. However, because cross-sectional studies only provide a snapshot of the population at one point in time, they cannot account for changes over time or determine whether exposure preceded the outcome.

Therefore, while cross-sectional studies can be useful for generating hypotheses and identifying potential associations between variables, further research using other study designs, such as cohort or case-control studies, is necessary to establish causality and confirm any findings.

"Health occupations" is a broad term that refers to careers or professions involved in the delivery, management, and improvement of health services. These occupations encompass a wide range of roles, including but not limited to:

1. Healthcare providers: This group includes medical doctors (MDs), doctors of osteopathic medicine (DOs), nurses, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, dentists, dental hygienists, optometrists, pharmacists, and other professionals who provide direct patient care.
2. Allied health professionals: These are healthcare workers who provide diagnostic, technical, therapeutic, and support services. Examples include respiratory therapists, radiologic technologists, dietitians, occupational therapists, physical therapists, speech-language pathologists, and medical laboratory scientists.
3. Public health professionals: This group focuses on preventing diseases and promoting community health. They work in various settings, such as government agencies, non-profit organizations, and academic institutions, addressing public health issues like infectious disease control, environmental health, health education, and policy development.
4. Health administrators and managers: These professionals oversee the operations of healthcare facilities, including hospitals, clinics, nursing homes, and managed care organizations. They ensure that resources are used efficiently, that services meet quality standards, and that regulatory requirements are met.
5. Health educators: These individuals work in various settings to promote health awareness and teach individuals and communities about healthy behaviors and practices.
6. Health information specialists: Professionals in this field manage and analyze health data, maintain medical records, and ensure the security and privacy of patient information.

Overall, health occupations play a crucial role in maintaining, promoting, and restoring the health and well-being of individuals and communities.

Health care surveys are research tools used to systematically collect information from a population or sample regarding their experiences, perceptions, and knowledge of health services, health outcomes, and various other health-related topics. These surveys typically consist of standardized questionnaires that cover specific aspects of healthcare, such as access to care, quality of care, patient satisfaction, health disparities, and healthcare costs. The data gathered from health care surveys are used to inform policy decisions, improve healthcare delivery, identify best practices, allocate resources, and monitor the health status of populations. Health care surveys can be conducted through various modes, including in-person interviews, telephone interviews, mail-in questionnaires, or online platforms.

A Patient Care Team is a group of healthcare professionals from various disciplines who work together to provide comprehensive, coordinated care to a patient. The team may include doctors, nurses, pharmacists, social workers, physical therapists, dietitians, and other specialists as needed, depending on the patient's medical condition and healthcare needs.

The Patient Care Team works collaboratively to develop an individualized care plan for the patient, taking into account their medical history, current health status, treatment options, and personal preferences. The team members communicate regularly to share information, coordinate care, and make any necessary adjustments to the care plan.

The goal of a Patient Care Team is to ensure that the patient receives high-quality, safe, and effective care that is tailored to their unique needs and preferences. By working together, the team can provide more comprehensive and coordinated care, which can lead to better outcomes for the patient.

"Focus groups" is a term from the field of social science research, rather than medicine. It does not have a specific medical definition. However, focus groups are sometimes used in medical research to gather data and insights from a small group of people on a specific topic or product. This can include gathering feedback on patient experiences, testing prototypes of medical devices or treatments, or exploring attitudes and perceptions related to health issues. The goal is to gain a deeper understanding of the perspectives and needs of the target population through facilitated group discussion.

Allied health personnel refers to a group of healthcare professionals who are licensed or regulated to provide specific services within the healthcare system. They work in collaboration with physicians and other healthcare providers to deliver comprehensive medical care. Allied health personnel include various disciplines such as:

1. Occupational therapists
2. Physical therapists
3. Speech-language pathologists
4. Audiologists
5. Respiratory therapists
6. Dietitians and nutritionists
7. Social workers
8. Diagnostic medical sonographers
9. Radiologic technologists
10. Clinical laboratory scientists
11. Genetic counselors
12. Rehabilitation counselors
13. Therapeutic recreation specialists

These professionals play a crucial role in the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of various medical conditions and are essential members of the healthcare team.

A physician's role is defined as a licensed healthcare professional who practices medicine, diagnoses and treats injuries or illnesses, and promotes health and wellness. Physicians may specialize in various fields such as cardiology, dermatology, psychiatry, surgery, etc., requiring additional training and certification beyond medical school. They are responsible for providing comprehensive medical care to patients, including:

1. Obtaining a patient's medical history and performing physical examinations
2. Ordering and interpreting diagnostic tests
3. Developing treatment plans based on their diagnosis
4. Prescribing medications or performing procedures as necessary
5. Coordinating with other healthcare professionals for multidisciplinary care
6. Providing counseling and education to patients about their health, disease prevention, and wellness promotion
7. Advocating for their patients' rights and ensuring quality of care
8. Maintaining accurate medical records and staying updated on the latest medical research and advancements in their field.

In the medical context, communication refers to the process of exchanging information, ideas, or feelings between two or more individuals in order to facilitate understanding, cooperation, and decision-making. Effective communication is critical in healthcare settings to ensure that patients receive accurate diagnoses, treatment plans, and follow-up care. It involves not only verbal and written communication but also nonverbal cues such as body language and facial expressions.

Healthcare providers must communicate clearly and empathetically with their patients to build trust, address concerns, and ensure that they understand their medical condition and treatment options. Similarly, healthcare teams must communicate effectively with each other to coordinate care, avoid errors, and provide the best possible outcomes for their patients. Communication skills are essential for all healthcare professionals, including physicians, nurses, therapists, and social workers.

**Referral:**
A referral in the medical context is the process where a healthcare professional (such as a general practitioner or primary care physician) sends or refers a patient to another healthcare professional who has specialized knowledge and skills to address the patient's specific health condition or concern. This could be a specialist, a consultant, or a facility that provides specialized care. The referral may involve transferring the patient's care entirely to the other professional or may simply be for a consultation and advice.

**Consultation:**
A consultation in healthcare is a process where a healthcare professional seeks the opinion or advice of another professional regarding a patient's medical condition. This can be done in various ways, such as face-to-face meetings, phone calls, or written correspondence. The consulting professional provides their expert opinion to assist in the diagnosis, treatment plan, or management of the patient's condition. The ultimate decision and responsibility for the patient's care typically remain with the referring or primary healthcare provider.

Guideline adherence, in the context of medicine, refers to the extent to which healthcare professionals follow established clinical practice guidelines or recommendations in their daily practice. These guidelines are systematically developed statements designed to assist practitioners and patient decisions about appropriate health care for specific clinical circumstances. Adherence to evidence-based guidelines can help improve the quality of care, reduce unnecessary variations in practice, and promote optimal patient outcomes. Factors that may influence guideline adherence include clinician awareness, familiarity, agreement, self-efficacy, outcome expectancy, and the complexity of the recommendation.

Continuing education (CE) in the medical field refers to the ongoing process of learning and professional development that healthcare professionals engage in throughout their careers. The goal of CE is to maintain, develop, and increase knowledge, skills, and competence in order to provide safe, effective, and high-quality care to patients.

Continuing education activities can take many forms, including conferences, seminars, workshops, online courses, and self-study programs. These activities may cover a wide range of topics, such as new research findings, advances in clinical practice, changes in regulations or guidelines, and ethical issues.

Healthcare professionals are often required to complete a certain number of CE credits each year in order to maintain their licensure or certification. This helps ensure that they stay up-to-date with the latest developments in their field and are able to provide the best possible care to their patients.

Professional misconduct, in the context of medical law, refers to any behavior or action by a healthcare professional that fails to meet the expected standards of conduct and violates professional regulations and ethical guidelines. This can include various forms of unethical or illegal behavior, such as:

1. Engaging in sexual relationships with patients or engaging in any form of sexual harassment.
2. Practicing medicine while impaired by drugs, alcohol, or mental illness.
3. Failing to maintain accurate and complete medical records.
4. Performing unnecessary medical procedures or treatments for financial gain.
5. Engaging in fraudulent activities related to medical practice, such as billing fraud.
6. Abandoning patients without providing appropriate care or notification.
7. Discriminating against patients based on race, religion, gender, sexual orientation, or other protected characteristics.
8. Failing to obtain informed consent from patients before performing medical procedures.
9. Violating patient confidentiality and privacy.
10. Engaging in unprofessional behavior that harms the reputation of the medical profession.

Professional misconduct can result in disciplinary action by a state medical board or licensing authority, including fines, license suspension or revocation, and mandatory education or treatment.

Quality of health care is a term that refers to the degree to which health services for individuals and populations increase the likelihood of desired health outcomes and are consistent with current professional knowledge. It encompasses various aspects such as:

1. Clinical effectiveness: The use of best available evidence to make decisions about prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and care. This includes considering the benefits and harms of different options and making sure that the most effective interventions are used.
2. Safety: Preventing harm to patients and minimizing risks associated with healthcare. This involves identifying potential hazards, implementing measures to reduce errors, and learning from adverse events to improve systems and processes.
3. Patient-centeredness: Providing care that is respectful of and responsive to individual patient preferences, needs, and values. This includes ensuring that patients are fully informed about their condition and treatment options, involving them in decision-making, and providing emotional support throughout the care process.
4. Timeliness: Ensuring that healthcare services are delivered promptly and efficiently, without unnecessary delays. This includes coordinating care across different providers and settings to ensure continuity and avoid gaps in service.
5. Efficiency: Using resources wisely and avoiding waste, while still providing high-quality care. This involves considering the costs and benefits of different interventions, as well as ensuring that healthcare services are equitably distributed.
6. Equitability: Ensuring that all individuals have access to quality healthcare services, regardless of their socioeconomic status, race, ethnicity, gender, age, or other factors. This includes addressing disparities in health outcomes and promoting fairness and justice in healthcare.

Overall, the quality of health care is a multidimensional concept that requires ongoing evaluation and improvement to ensure that patients receive the best possible care.

Practice management, in the context of healthcare, refers to the activities and processes involved in running a medical practice efficiently and effectively. It encompasses various administrative, financial, and clinical functions that are necessary for providing high-quality patient care while ensuring the practice's financial sustainability.

The following are some of the key components of practice management:

1. Financial Management: This includes revenue cycle management, which involves billing and coding, claims processing, and collections. It also includes budgeting, financial planning, and managing expenses to ensure the practice's financial health.
2. Human Resources Management: This involves hiring, training, and managing staff, including physicians, nurses, medical assistants, and administrative personnel. It also includes developing policies and procedures for employee conduct, performance management, and benefits administration.
3. Operations Management: This includes scheduling appointments, managing patient flow, maintaining medical records, and ensuring compliance with regulatory requirements. It also involves managing the practice's facilities, equipment, and supplies.
4. Clinical Operations Management: This involves overseeing the delivery of clinical services, including developing clinical protocols, coordinating care across providers, and ensuring that patients receive high-quality care. It may also involve quality improvement initiatives, such as analyzing patient outcomes and implementing changes to improve care.
5. Marketing and Business Development: This includes promoting the practice to potential patients, building relationships with referring physicians, and developing partnerships with other healthcare organizations. It may also involve exploring new service lines or expanding the practice's geographic reach.

Effective practice management is critical for ensuring that medical practices operate smoothly, provide high-quality care, and remain financially viable in a rapidly changing healthcare environment.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Partnership Practice" is not a standard medical term or concept in the way that other medical terms like "diagnosis," "treatment," or "disease" are. It seems to be more related to the administration and organization of healthcare services.

In a broad context, a Partnership Practice could refer to a collaborative arrangement between different healthcare providers or organizations, where they work together to provide comprehensive care to patients. This could involve various arrangements, such as:

1. A group of physicians coming together to form a partnership to share resources, expenses, and profits while providing coordinated patient care.
2. Healthcare organizations (e.g., hospitals, clinics, or long-term care facilities) partnering with one another to improve the quality, efficiency, and accessibility of healthcare services in a community.
3. Healthcare providers collaborating with community-based organizations, such as public health departments, social service agencies, or schools, to address the social determinants of health and provide holistic care to patients.

However, without more specific context, it's challenging to provide a precise definition of "Partnership Practice" in the medical field. If you could provide more information about the context in which this term is being used, I would be happy to help further!

Rural health services refer to the healthcare delivery systems and facilities that are located in rural areas and are designed to meet the unique health needs of rural populations. These services can include hospitals, clinics, community health centers, mental health centers, and home health agencies, as well as various programs and initiatives aimed at improving access to care, addressing health disparities, and promoting health and wellness in rural communities.

Rural health services are often characterized by longer travel distances to healthcare facilities, a greater reliance on primary care and preventive services, and a higher prevalence of certain health conditions such as chronic diseases, injuries, and mental health disorders. As a result, rural health services must be tailored to address these challenges and provide high-quality, affordable, and accessible care to rural residents.

In many countries, rural health services are supported by government policies and programs aimed at improving healthcare infrastructure, workforce development, and telehealth technologies in rural areas. These efforts are critical for ensuring that all individuals, regardless of where they live, have access to the healthcare services they need to maintain their health and well-being.

I apologize for any confusion, but "Australia" is not a medical term or concept. It is the world's largest island and smallest continent, located in the Southern Hemisphere, surrounded by the Pacific and Indian Oceans. It is composed of many diverse ecosystems, including deserts, rainforests, and coastal areas, and is home to a wide variety of unique plant and animal species.

If you have any questions related to medical terminology or health-related topics, I would be happy to try and help answer them for you!

Medical ethics is a branch of ethics that deals with moral issues in medical care, research, and practice. It provides a framework for addressing questions related to patient autonomy, informed consent, confidentiality, distributive justice, beneficentia (doing good), and non-maleficence (not doing harm). Medical ethics also involves the application of ethical principles such as respect for persons, beneficence, non-maleficence, and justice to specific medical cases and situations. It is a crucial component of medical education and practice, helping healthcare professionals make informed decisions that promote patient well-being while respecting their rights and dignity.

Medical education is a systematic process of acquiring knowledge, skills, and values necessary for becoming a healthcare professional, such as a doctor, nurse, or allied health professional. It involves a combination of theoretical instruction, practical training, and experiential learning in clinical settings. The goal of medical education is to produce competent, compassionate, and ethical practitioners who can provide high-quality care to patients and contribute to the advancement of medicine. Medical education typically includes undergraduate (pre-medical) studies, graduate (medical) school, residency training, and continuing medical education throughout a healthcare professional's career.

A nurse's role is not a medical condition or diagnosis, but rather a professional occupation and set of responsibilities in the healthcare system. However, I can provide a general description of the role of a nurse in a medical context:

A nurse is a healthcare professional who provides care, support, and education to patients, families, and communities. Nurses work in a variety of settings, including hospitals, clinics, long-term care facilities, and community health centers. They collaborate with other healthcare professionals, such as physicians, social workers, and therapists, to provide comprehensive care to patients.

The specific duties of a nurse may vary depending on their role and specialty, but some common responsibilities include:

* Administering medications and treatments prescribed by doctors
* Monitoring patients' vital signs and overall health status
* Providing emotional support and education to patients and families
* Collaborating with other healthcare professionals to develop care plans
* Performing diagnostic tests and analyzing results
* Assisting with procedures and surgeries
* Supervising and training nursing assistants and other support staff.

Nurses play a critical role in the healthcare system, providing compassionate care and advocacy for patients and their families.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "job satisfaction" is not a medical term or concept. It falls under the domain of occupational or organizational psychology and refers to the degree to which employees like their jobs and are content with their role in the organization. High job satisfaction is generally associated with positive outcomes such as increased productivity, lower turnover rates, and better mental health. However, low job satisfaction can contribute to stress, burnout, and other negative health outcomes.

Cooperative behavior, in a medical or healthcare context, refers to the actions and attitudes displayed by individuals or groups working together to achieve a common goal related to health and well-being. This may involve patients following their healthcare providers' advice, healthcare professionals collaborating to diagnose and treat medical conditions, or communities coming together to promote healthy behaviors and environments. Cooperative behavior is essential for positive health outcomes, as it fosters trust, communication, and shared decision-making between patients and healthcare providers, and helps to ensure that everyone involved in the care process is working towards the same goal.

Here's a medical definition of "nursing" from Stedman's Medical Dictionary:

"The profession practiced by those who have completed a program of study, usually in a college or university, and who are licensed to provide nursing care under the direction of a physician. Nursing includes such functions as taking patient histories, administering and monitoring medications and treatments, applying dressings, instructing patients about care of their bodies and diseases, and assisting physicians during surgery and other medical procedures. Modern nursing also encompasses case management, health education, counseling, and collaboration with other healthcare professionals in the diagnosis and treatment of acute and chronic illnesses."

Decision-making is the cognitive process of selecting a course of action from among multiple alternatives. In a medical context, decision-making refers to the process by which healthcare professionals and patients make choices about medical tests, treatments, or management options based on a thorough evaluation of available information, including the patient's preferences, values, and circumstances.

The decision-making process in medicine typically involves several steps:

1. Identifying the problem or issue that requires a decision.
2. Gathering relevant information about the patient's medical history, current condition, diagnostic test results, treatment options, and potential outcomes.
3. Considering the benefits, risks, and uncertainties associated with each option.
4. Evaluating the patient's preferences, values, and goals.
5. Selecting the most appropriate course of action based on a careful weighing of the available evidence and the patient's individual needs and circumstances.
6. Communicating the decision to the patient and ensuring that they understand the rationale behind it, as well as any potential risks or benefits.
7. Monitoring the outcomes of the decision and adjusting the course of action as needed based on ongoing evaluation and feedback.

Effective decision-making in medicine requires a thorough understanding of medical evidence, clinical expertise, and patient preferences. It also involves careful consideration of ethical principles, such as respect for autonomy, non-maleficence, beneficence, and justice. Ultimately, the goal of decision-making in healthcare is to promote the best possible outcomes for patients while minimizing harm and respecting their individual needs and values.

Program Evaluation is a systematic and objective assessment of a healthcare program's design, implementation, and outcomes. It is a medical term used to describe the process of determining the relevance, effectiveness, and efficiency of a program in achieving its goals and objectives. Program evaluation involves collecting and analyzing data related to various aspects of the program, such as its reach, impact, cost-effectiveness, and quality. The results of program evaluation can be used to improve the design and implementation of existing programs or to inform the development of new ones. It is a critical tool for ensuring that healthcare programs are meeting the needs of their intended audiences and delivering high-quality care in an efficient and effective manner.

Patient education, as defined by the US National Library of Medicine's Medical Subject Headings (MeSH), is "the teaching or training of patients concerning their own health needs. It includes the patient's understanding of his or her condition and the necessary procedures for self, assisted, or professional care." This encompasses a wide range of activities and interventions aimed at helping patients and their families understand their medical conditions, treatment options, self-care skills, and overall health management. Effective patient education can lead to improved health outcomes, increased patient satisfaction, and better use of healthcare resources.

Nurse's practice patterns refer to the professional behaviors and actions exhibited by nurses as they deliver patient care. These patterns are shaped by education, experience, clinical judgment, and evidence-based practice guidelines. They encompass various nursing activities such as assessment, diagnosis, planning, implementation, and evaluation of patient care.

Nurse's practice patterns also include communication with patients, families, and other healthcare providers, as well as the management of nursing interventions and resources. These patterns may vary depending on the nurse's specialty, setting, and population served, but they are all guided by the overall goal of providing safe, effective, and high-quality care to promote positive patient outcomes.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Netherlands" is not a medical term. It is a country located in Western Europe, known for its artistic heritage, elaborate canal system, and legalized marijuana and prostitution. If you have any questions about medical terms or concepts, I would be happy to help with those!

"Nursing Education" refers to the process of teaching and learning the knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary for nursing practice. This can occur in a variety of settings, including academic institutions and clinical environments. The goal of nursing education is to prepare nurses to provide safe, effective, and compassionate care to patients across the lifespan and in a variety of healthcare settings.

Nursing education programs may lead to various levels of qualification, such as a diploma, associate's degree, bachelor's degree, master's degree, or doctoral degree in nursing. The length and content of these programs vary, but all include coursework in topics such as anatomy and physiology, microbiology, pharmacology, health assessment, pathophysiology, and nursing theory. In addition to classroom instruction, nursing education also includes clinical experiences, where students apply their knowledge and skills in a supervised healthcare setting.

Nursing education is essential for ensuring that nurses are prepared to meet the challenges of an increasingly complex healthcare system. It provides the foundation for nursing practice and enables nurses to provide high-quality care to patients and families.

"General practice dentistry" is a term used to describe the provision of primary dental care to patients of all ages. A general practice dentist provides a wide range of dental services, including preventative care (such as cleanings and fluoride treatments), restorative care (fillings, crowns, bridges), endodontics (root canals), oral surgery (extractions), periodontics (treatment of gum disease), prosthodontics (dentures, implants), and orthodontics (braces). They also diagnose and manage dental diseases and provide advice on oral health. General practice dentists aim to provide comprehensive and continuous care to their patients, coordinating with other dental and medical professionals as needed.

An "attitude to health" is a set of beliefs, values, and behaviors that an individual holds regarding their own health and well-being. It encompasses their overall approach to maintaining good health, preventing illness, seeking medical care, and managing any existing health conditions.

A positive attitude to health typically includes:

1. A belief in the importance of self-care and taking responsibility for one's own health.
2. Engaging in regular exercise, eating a balanced diet, getting enough sleep, and avoiding harmful behaviors such as smoking and excessive alcohol consumption.
3. Regular check-ups and screenings to detect potential health issues early on.
4. Seeking medical care when necessary and following recommended treatment plans.
5. A willingness to learn about and implement new healthy habits and lifestyle changes.
6. Developing a strong support network of family, friends, and healthcare professionals.

On the other hand, a negative attitude to health may involve:

1. Neglecting self-care and failing to take responsibility for one's own health.
2. Engaging in unhealthy behaviors such as sedentary lifestyle, poor diet, lack of sleep, smoking, and excessive alcohol consumption.
3. Avoidance of regular check-ups and screenings, leading to delayed detection and treatment of potential health issues.
4. Resistance to seeking medical care or following recommended treatment plans.
5. Closed-mindedness towards new healthy habits and lifestyle changes.
6. Lack of a support network or reluctance to seek help from others.

Overall, an individual's attitude to health can significantly impact their physical and mental well-being, as well as their ability to manage and overcome any health challenges that may arise.

I apologize, but "Canada" is not a medical term or concept. It is a country located in North America, known for its vast wilderness, multicultural cities, and significant natural resources. If you have any questions related to healthcare or medical terms, I would be happy to help answer those!

Medical societies are professional organizations composed of physicians, surgeons, and other healthcare professionals who share a common purpose of promoting medical research, education, and patient care. These societies can focus on specific medical specialties, such as the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) for cancer specialists or the American College of Surgeons (ACS) for surgeons. They may also address broader issues related to healthcare policy, advocacy, and ethics. Medical societies often provide resources for continuing medical education, publish scientific journals, establish clinical practice guidelines, and offer networking opportunities for members.

A career choice refers to the decision or selection of a job or profession that an individual makes, typically based on their interests, skills, values, and personal goals. It involves considering various factors such as education and training requirements, job outlook, salary potential, and work-life balance. A well-informed career choice can lead to long-term job satisfaction, success, and fulfillment. It is essential to note that career choices can change over time due to various reasons, including personal growth, industry trends, or changes in life circumstances.

Dentist's practice patterns refer to the typical habits, behaviors, and procedures followed by dental professionals when providing oral health care to patients. These patterns can encompass a wide range of factors, including:

1. Clinical Procedures: The types of dental treatments and services that a dentist routinely performs, such as fillings, crowns, root canals, extractions, cleanings, or orthodontic care.
2. Diagnostic Approaches: The methods used by the dentist to identify oral health issues, such as visual examinations, X-rays, or diagnostic tests.
3. Treatment Planning: How a dentist develops and communicates treatment plans to patients, including discussing various treatment options, potential risks and benefits, and costs.
4. Preventive Care: The emphasis placed on preventive dental care, such as regular cleanings, fluoride treatments, and patient education about oral hygiene practices.
5. Use of Technology: The adoption and integration of new technologies in dental practice, such as digital radiography, CAD/CAM systems for restorations, or 3D printing.
6. Referral Patterns: How often a dentist refers patients to specialists for more complex treatments, and which specialists they typically refer to.
7. Patient Communication: The manner in which a dentist communicates with patients, including explaining procedures, discussing treatment plans, and addressing concerns or questions.
8. Record Keeping: The systems used by the dentist to maintain patient records, including electronic health records (EHRs), treatment notes, and communication with other healthcare providers.
9. Infection Control: The practices and protocols in place to prevent the spread of infectious diseases within the dental practice.
10. Practice Management: The business aspects of running a dental practice, such as scheduling, billing, insurance management, and staffing.

Understanding dentist's practice patterns can provide valuable insights into the quality and consistency of dental care provided by different practitioners, as well as help identify areas for improvement in dental education, policy, and research.

Patient satisfaction is a concept in healthcare quality measurement that reflects the patient's perspective and evaluates their experience with the healthcare services they have received. It is a multidimensional construct that includes various aspects such as interpersonal mannerisms of healthcare providers, technical competence, accessibility, timeliness, comfort, and communication.

Patient satisfaction is typically measured through standardized surveys or questionnaires that ask patients to rate their experiences on various aspects of care. The results are often used to assess the quality of care provided by healthcare organizations, identify areas for improvement, and inform policy decisions. However, it's important to note that patient satisfaction is just one aspect of healthcare quality and should be considered alongside other measures such as clinical outcomes and patient safety.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "teaching" is a general term that refers to the act of imparting knowledge or skills to others and is not a medical term. However, in the context of medical education, teaching refers to the instruction and training of medical students, residents, fellows, and other healthcare professionals to develop their knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary for providing high-quality patient care. This can take place in various settings such as classrooms, clinical wards, simulation centers, or online platforms, and can involve a range of teaching methods including lectures, small group discussions, bedside teaching, case-based learning, and hands-on training.

Certification is the act of granting a formal warranty or guarantee (a certificate) that a product, process, or service conforms to specified requirements. In the medical field, certification often refers to the process by which a regulatory body or professional organization grants recognition to a healthcare professional, institution, or program that meets certain predetermined standards.

For example, in the United States, physicians can become certified in a particular medical specialty through the American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS) after completing residency training and passing a rigorous examination. Similarly, hospitals and other healthcare facilities may be certified by organizations such as The Joint Commission to demonstrate that they meet established quality and safety standards.

Medical certification serves several purposes, including:

1. Ensuring competence: Certification helps establish that the certified individual or organization possesses the necessary knowledge, skills, and abilities to provide safe and effective care in their area of expertise.
2. Protecting patients: By setting and enforcing standards, certification organizations aim to protect patients from harm and ensure they receive high-quality care.
3. Promoting continuous improvement: Certification programs often require ongoing professional development and continuing education, encouraging healthcare professionals and institutions to stay current with best practices and advancements in their field.
4. Enhancing public trust: Certification can help build public confidence in the competence and expertise of healthcare providers and organizations, making it easier for patients to make informed decisions about their care.

A Code of Ethics is a set of principles and guidelines that outline appropriate behavior and conduct for individuals within a particular profession or organization. In the medical field, Codes of Ethics are designed to uphold the values of respect for autonomy, non-maleficence, beneficence, and justice, which are fundamental to the practice of ethical medicine.

The Code of Ethics for medical professionals may include guidelines on issues such as patient confidentiality, informed consent, conflicts of interest, and professional competence. These codes serve as a framework for decision-making and help to ensure that healthcare providers maintain high standards of conduct and behavior in their interactions with patients, colleagues, and the broader community.

The American Medical Association (AMA) and other medical organizations have developed Codes of Ethics that provide specific guidance for medical professionals on ethical issues that may arise in the course of their work. These codes are regularly reviewed and updated to reflect changes in medical practice and societal values.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Program Development" is not a medical term. It is a general term that refers to the process of creating, planning, and implementing a new program or project, typically in a business, education, or community setting. In a healthcare context, it might refer to the development of a new healthcare service, treatment program, or educational initiative.

If you have any questions related to medical terminology or concepts, I'd be happy to try and help!

Pediatrics is a branch of medicine that deals with the medical care and treatment of infants, children, and adolescents, typically up to the age of 18 or sometimes up to 21 years. It covers a wide range of health services including preventive healthcare, diagnosis and treatment of physical, mental, and emotional illnesses, and promotion of healthy lifestyles and behaviors in children.

Pediatricians are medical doctors who specialize in this field and have extensive training in the unique needs and developmental stages of children. They provide comprehensive care for children from birth to young adulthood, addressing various health issues such as infectious diseases, injuries, genetic disorders, developmental delays, behavioral problems, and chronic conditions like asthma, diabetes, and cancer.

In addition to medical expertise, pediatricians also need excellent communication skills to build trust with their young patients and their families, and to provide education and guidance on various aspects of child health and well-being.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "soccer" is not a medical term. It is the common name for the sport also known as football in many parts of the world. The official name of the sport in the United States and Canada is "soccer," which helps distinguish it from other forms of football that involve carrying the ball, such as American football or Canadian football.

If you have any medical questions or terms you'd like defined, I'd be happy to help!

"State Medicine" is not a term that has a widely accepted or specific medical definition. However, in general terms, it can refer to the organization, financing, and delivery of healthcare services and resources at the national or regional level, overseen and managed by the government or state. This can include public health initiatives, regulation of healthcare professionals and institutions, and the provision of healthcare services through publicly funded programs.

In some contexts, "State Medicine" may also refer to the practice of using medical treatments or interventions as a means of achieving political or social objectives, such as reducing crime rates or improving economic productivity. However, this usage is less common and more controversial.

I'm not able to provide a medical definition of "social responsibility" as it is not a term that has a specific meaning within the field of medicine. However, I can tell you that social responsibility generally refers to the idea that individuals and organizations have a duty to act in the best interests of society and to contribute to its overall well-being. This might involve taking actions to protect the environment, promote social justice, or support the needs of vulnerable populations. In a medical context, this could mean providing care to underserved communities, engaging in public health advocacy, or conducting research that addresses important societal issues.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "organizational innovation" is not a term that has a specific medical definition. It is a concept that is more commonly used in the fields of business and management, where it refers to the introduction of new methods, ideas, or products within an organization. This can include things like new processes, structures, or technologies that are designed to improve efficiency, effectiveness, or competitive advantage.

In healthcare organizations, for example, organizational innovation might involve the implementation of new electronic health records systems, the creation of multidisciplinary care teams, or the adoption of novel approaches to patient engagement and empowerment. These types of innovations can help to improve patient outcomes, reduce costs, and enhance the overall quality of care.

A General Practitioner (GP) is a medical doctor who provides primary care and treats a wide range of health conditions in patients of all ages. They serve as the first point of contact for individuals seeking healthcare services and provide ongoing, person-centered care, including prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and management of acute and chronic illnesses. GPs often collaborate with specialists, hospitals, and other healthcare professionals to ensure their patients receive comprehensive and coordinated care. They are trained to recognize a wide variety of diseases and conditions, and to handle a majority of health problems that present in their patients. General practitioners may also provide health education, lifestyle advice, and counseling to promote overall well-being and disease prevention.

Interdisciplinary communication in a medical context refers to the exchange of information and ideas between professionals from different healthcare disciplines, such as doctors, nurses, pharmacists, social workers, and therapists. This form of communication is essential for coordinating patient care, making informed treatment decisions, and ensuring that all members of the healthcare team are aware of the patient's needs, goals, and progress. Effective interdisciplinary communication can help to improve patient outcomes, increase patient satisfaction, and reduce medical errors. It typically involves clear, concise, and respectful communication, often through regular meetings, shared documentation, and collaborative decision-making processes.

"Diffusion of Innovation" is a theory that describes how new ideas, products, or methods spread within a population or society. It was first introduced by Everett M. Rogers in his book "Diffusion of Innovations" in 1962. The theory explains the process and factors that influence the adoption and implementation of an innovation over time.

The diffusion of innovation model includes five stages:

1. Knowledge: Individuals become aware of the innovation but lack further information about it.
2. Persuasion: Individuals form a positive or negative opinion about the innovation and consider adopting it.
3. Decision: Individuals decide whether to adopt or reject the innovation.
4. Implementation: Individuals put the innovation into practice.
5. Confirmation: Individuals seek reinforcement of their decision to continue using the innovation or, in some cases, to reverse their decision and abandon it.

The theory also identifies five categories of adopters based on their willingness to adopt an innovation:

1. Innovators: Those who are willing to take risks and try new ideas early on.
2. Early Adopters: Those who have social networks, respect, and influence and are opinion leaders in their communities.
3. Early Majority: Those who deliberate before adopting an innovation but eventually adopt it.
4. Late Majority: Those who are skeptical about the innovation and only adopt it when it becomes mainstream or necessary.
5. Laggards: Those who resist change and are the last to adopt an innovation.

In medical contexts, diffusion of innovation theory can be applied to understand how new treatments, drugs, or medical devices spread within healthcare systems and communities. It can help healthcare professionals and policymakers develop strategies to promote evidence-based practices and improve patient outcomes.

"Personnel Selection," in a medical context, refers to the process of choosing and hiring healthcare professionals for various positions within a healthcare organization or setting. This process typically involves several steps, including job analysis, recruitment, application screening, interviews, testing, background checks, and reference checks. The goal is to identify and select the most qualified, competent, and suitable candidates who possess the necessary knowledge, skills, abilities, and behaviors to perform the job duties effectively and safely, while also aligning with the organization's mission, values, and culture. Personnel selection in healthcare aims to ensure high-quality patient care, improve patient outcomes, reduce medical errors, and enhance overall organizational performance.

Nursing ethics refers to the principles that guide the behavior and decision-making of nurses in their practice. These principles are based on values such as respect for autonomy, non-maleficence (do no harm), beneficence (do good), justice, and veracity (truthfulness). Nursing ethics provides a framework for nurses to make decisions that promote the health and well-being of their patients while also respecting their rights and dignity.

Nurses may encounter ethical dilemmas in their practice, such as when there is conflict between the interests of different patients or between the interests of the patient and those of the nurse or healthcare organization. In these situations, nurses are expected to engage in a process of ethical reasoning and decision-making that involves identifying the ethical issues involved, considering the relevant ethical principles and values, and seeking input from colleagues and other stakeholders as appropriate.

Nursing ethics is an essential component of nursing practice and education, and it is closely linked to broader bioethical considerations related to healthcare and medical research. Nurses are expected to be familiar with relevant ethical guidelines and regulations, such as those established by professional organizations and regulatory bodies, and to engage in ongoing reflection and learning to maintain and develop their ethical competence.

Practice management in dentistry refers to the administration and operation of a dental practice. It involves various aspects such as:

1. Business Operations: This includes financial management, billing and coding, human resources, and office management.

2. Patient Care: This includes scheduling appointments, managing patient records, treatment planning, and ensuring quality care.

3. Marketing and Promotion: This includes advertising the practice, attracting new patients, and maintaining relationships with existing ones.

4. Compliance: This includes adhering to laws and regulations related to dental practices, such as HIPAA for patient privacy and OSHA for workplace safety.

5. Continuous Improvement: This involves regularly assessing the practice's performance, implementing changes to improve efficiency and effectiveness, and keeping up-to-date with advancements in dentistry and healthcare management.

The goal of dental practice management is to ensure the smooth running of the practice, provide high-quality patient care, and maintain a successful and profitable business.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Internet" is a term that pertains to the global network of interconnected computers and servers that enable the transmission and reception of data via the internet protocol (IP). It is not a medical term and does not have a specific medical definition. If you have any questions related to medicine or health, I'd be happy to try to help answer them for you!

Health services accessibility refers to the degree to which individuals and populations are able to obtain needed health services in a timely manner. It includes factors such as physical access (e.g., distance, transportation), affordability (e.g., cost of services, insurance coverage), availability (e.g., supply of providers, hours of operation), and acceptability (e.g., cultural competence, language concordance).

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), accessibility is one of the key components of health system performance, along with responsiveness and fair financing. Improving accessibility to health services is essential for achieving universal health coverage and ensuring that everyone has access to quality healthcare without facing financial hardship. Factors that affect health services accessibility can vary widely between and within countries, and addressing these disparities requires a multifaceted approach that includes policy interventions, infrastructure development, and community engagement.

A public health professional is a trained and educated individual who works to improve the health and well-being of communities and populations through education, research, policy development, and advocacy. A public health professional in the field of education may work in various settings such as universities, colleges, public health departments, non-profit organizations, or government agencies.

Their responsibilities typically include:

1. Developing and implementing educational programs to promote healthy behaviors and prevent disease and injury.
2. Conducting research to identify the health needs and concerns of communities and developing strategies to address them.
3. Advocating for policies and practices that support public health and promote health equity.
4. Collaborating with other professionals, such as healthcare providers, community leaders, and policymakers, to develop and implement effective public health interventions.
5. Evaluating the impact of public health programs and using data to inform decision-making and improve outcomes.

To become a public health professional in education, one typically needs to have at least a master's degree in public health or a related field, such as health education, health promotion, or health services administration. Some positions may require a doctoral degree or additional certifications. Relevant work experience, such as internships or volunteer work, is also valuable for gaining practical skills and making professional connections.

'Guidelines' in the medical context are systematically developed statements or sets of recommendations designed to assist healthcare professionals and patients in making informed decisions about appropriate health care for specific clinical circumstances. They are based on a thorough evaluation of the available evidence, including scientific studies, expert opinions, and patient values. Guidelines may cover a wide range of topics, such as diagnosis, treatment, prevention, screening, and management of various diseases and conditions. They aim to standardize care, improve patient outcomes, reduce unnecessary variations in practice, and promote efficient use of healthcare resources.

In the context of medicine, specialization refers to the process or state of a physician, surgeon, or other healthcare professional acquiring and demonstrating expertise in a particular field or area of practice beyond their initial general training. This is usually achieved through additional years of education, training, and clinical experience in a specific medical discipline or subspecialty.

For instance, a doctor who has completed medical school and a general residency program may choose to specialize in cardiology, dermatology, neurology, orthopedics, psychiatry, or any other branch of medicine. After completing a specialized fellowship program and passing the relevant certification exams, they become certified as a specialist in that field, recognized by professional medical organizations such as the American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS) or the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada (RCPSC).

Specialization allows healthcare professionals to provide more focused, expert care for patients with specific conditions or needs. It also contributes to the development and advancement of medical knowledge and practice, as specialists often conduct research and contribute to the evidence base in their respective fields.

Health promotion is the process of enabling people to increase control over their health and its determinants, and to improve their health. It moves beyond a focus on individual behavior change to include social and environmental interventions that can positively influence the health of individuals, communities, and populations. Health promotion involves engaging in a wide range of activities, such as advocacy, policy development, community organization, and education that aim to create supportive environments and personal skills that foster good health. It is based on principles of empowerment, participation, and social justice.

A needs assessment in a medical context is the process of identifying and evaluating the health needs of an individual, population, or community. It is used to determine the resources, services, and interventions required to address specific health issues and improve overall health outcomes. This process often involves collecting and analyzing data on various factors such as demographics, prevalence of diseases, access to healthcare, and social determinants of health. The goal of a needs assessment is to ensure that resources are allocated effectively and efficiently to meet the most pressing health needs and priorities.

Educational measurement is a field of study concerned with the development, administration, and interpretation of tests, questionnaires, and other assessments for the purpose of measuring learning outcomes, abilities, knowledge, skills, and attitudes in an educational context. The goal of educational measurement is to provide valid, reliable, and fair measures of student achievement and growth that can inform instructional decisions, guide curriculum development, and support accountability efforts.

Educational measurement involves a variety of statistical and psychometric methods for analyzing assessment data, including classical test theory, item response theory, and generalizability theory. These methods are used to establish the reliability and validity of assessments, as well as to score and interpret student performance. Additionally, educational measurement is concerned with issues related to test fairness, accessibility, and bias, and seeks to ensure that assessments are equitable and inclusive for all students.

Overall, educational measurement plays a critical role in ensuring the quality and effectiveness of educational programs and policies, and helps to promote student learning and achievement.

Patient acceptance of health care refers to the willingness and ability of a patient to follow and engage in a recommended treatment plan or healthcare regimen. This involves understanding the proposed medical interventions, considering their potential benefits and risks, and making an informed decision to proceed with the recommended course of action.

The factors that influence patient acceptance can include:

1. Patient's understanding of their condition and treatment options
2. Trust in their healthcare provider
3. Personal beliefs and values related to health and illness
4. Cultural, linguistic, or socioeconomic barriers
5. Emotional responses to the diagnosis or proposed treatment
6. Practical considerations, such as cost, time commitment, or potential side effects

Healthcare providers play a crucial role in facilitating patient acceptance by clearly communicating information, addressing concerns and questions, and providing support throughout the decision-making process. Encouraging shared decision-making and tailoring care plans to individual patient needs and preferences can also enhance patient acceptance of health care.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Inservice Training" is not a medical term per se. Instead, it is a general term used in various fields, including healthcare and education, to refer to training or professional development programs provided to staff members who are already employed or working in a particular organization or industry.

In the context of healthcare, Inservice Training might involve workshops, seminars, or other educational activities designed to enhance the knowledge, skills, and abilities of healthcare professionals such as nurses, doctors, allied health professionals, and administrative staff. These training programs can cover a wide range of topics, including new medical technologies, patient care protocols, safety procedures, regulatory requirements, and leadership development.

The primary goal of Inservice Training is to ensure that healthcare professionals remain up-to-date with the latest developments in their field and are equipped with the necessary skills to provide high-quality care to their patients. By promoting ongoing learning and professional development, organizations can improve patient outcomes, increase staff satisfaction, and enhance the overall quality of care delivered in the healthcare setting.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "staff development" is not a medical term per se. It is a general human resources term that refers to the process of improving and increasing the knowledge, skills, and abilities of an organization's workforce. In a healthcare setting, staff development might involve training programs, workshops, or continuing education opportunities for medical professionals to enhance their clinical skills, patient communication, leadership abilities, and other competencies necessary for providing high-quality care and ensuring positive patient outcomes.

Medical Definition:

"Risk factors" are any attribute, characteristic or exposure of an individual that increases the likelihood of developing a disease or injury. They can be divided into modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors. Modifiable risk factors are those that can be changed through lifestyle choices or medical treatment, while non-modifiable risk factors are inherent traits such as age, gender, or genetic predisposition. Examples of modifiable risk factors include smoking, alcohol consumption, physical inactivity, and unhealthy diet, while non-modifiable risk factors include age, sex, and family history. It is important to note that having a risk factor does not guarantee that a person will develop the disease, but rather indicates an increased susceptibility.

Organizational models in the context of medicine refer to frameworks that are used to describe, analyze, and improve the structure, processes, and outcomes of healthcare organizations. These models provide a systematic way of understanding how different components of an organization interact with each other and how they contribute to the overall performance of the system.

Examples of organizational models in healthcare include:

1. The Donabedian model: This model focuses on the structure, process, and outcome of healthcare as interrelated components that influence the quality of care.
2. The Baldrige Performance Excellence Program: This model provides a framework for organizations to evaluate their performance and identify areas for improvement in seven categories: leadership, strategic planning, customer focus, measurement, analysis, and knowledge management; workforce focus; process management; and results.
3. The Institute of Medicine's (IOM) six aims for improvement: The IOM has identified six aims that should be the focus of healthcare quality improvement efforts: safety, timeliness, patient-centeredness, effectiveness, efficiency, and equity.
4. The Lean management system: This model is a process improvement approach that focuses on eliminating waste and maximizing value for customers through continuous improvement and respect for people.
5. The Six Sigma methodology: This model is a data-driven approach to quality improvement that seeks to reduce variation and defects in processes through the use of statistical tools and techniques.

These are just a few examples of organizational models used in healthcare. Each model has its own strengths and limitations, and organizations may choose to adopt one or more models depending on their specific needs and goals.

Dental ethics refers to the principles and rules that guide the conduct of dental professionals in their interactions with patients, colleagues, and society. These ethical standards are designed to promote trust, respect, and fairness in dental care, and they are often based on fundamental ethical principles such as autonomy, beneficence, non-maleficence, and justice.

Autonomy refers to the patient's right to make informed decisions about their own health care, free from coercion or manipulation. Dental professionals have an obligation to provide patients with accurate information about their dental conditions and treatment options, so that they can make informed choices about their care.

Beneficence means acting in the best interests of the patient, and doing what is medically necessary and appropriate to promote their health and well-being. Dental professionals have a duty to provide high-quality care that meets accepted standards of practice, and to use evidence-based treatments that are likely to be effective.

Non-maleficence means avoiding harm to the patient. Dental professionals must take reasonable precautions to prevent injuries or complications during treatment, and they should avoid providing unnecessary or harmful treatments.

Justice refers to fairness and equity in the distribution of dental resources and services. Dental professionals have an obligation to provide care that is accessible, affordable, and culturally sensitive, and to advocate for policies and practices that promote health equity and social justice.

Dental ethics also encompasses issues related to patient confidentiality, informed consent, research integrity, professional competence, and boundary violations. Dental professionals are expected to adhere to ethical guidelines established by their professional organizations, such as the American Dental Association (ADA) or the British Dental Association (BDA), and to comply with relevant laws and regulations governing dental practice.

'Medical Staff, Hospital' is a general term that refers to the group of licensed physicians and other healthcare professionals who are responsible for providing medical care to patients in a hospital setting. The medical staff may include attending physicians, residents, interns, fellows, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, and other advanced practice providers.

The medical staff is typically governed by a set of bylaws that outline the structure, authority, and responsibilities of the group. They are responsible for establishing policies and procedures related to patient care, quality improvement, and safety. The medical staff also plays a key role in the hospital's credentialing and privileging process, which ensures that healthcare professionals meet certain standards and qualifications before they are allowed to practice in the hospital.

The medical staff may work in various departments or divisions within the hospital, such as internal medicine, surgery, pediatrics, obstetrics and gynecology, psychiatry, and radiology. They may also participate in teaching and research activities, as well as hospital committees and leadership roles.

Professional impairment is a term used in the medical field to describe a situation where a healthcare professional's ability to perform their duties competently and safely is compromised due to various factors, such as:

1. Physical or mental illness
2. Substance abuse or addiction
3. Psychological distress or emotional instability
4. Cognitive decline or neurological disorders
5. Personal issues or stressors that interfere with professional performance

Professional impairment can lead to suboptimal patient care, medical errors, and compromised patient safety. It is essential for healthcare organizations to have policies and procedures in place to identify, address, and manage cases of professional impairment to ensure the well-being of both patients and practitioners.

Educational models, in the context of medicine and healthcare, are simplified representations or simulations of a real-world concept, process, or system. They are used as teaching tools to facilitate learning and understanding of complex medical concepts. These models can be physical (e.g., anatomical models, simulated patients), digital (e.g., computer-based simulations), or theoretical (e.g., conceptual frameworks). By providing a tangible or visual representation, educational models help students grasp abstract ideas, develop problem-solving skills, and rehearse procedures in a controlled and safe environment.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "pilot projects" is not a medical term per se. Instead, it is a general term used in various fields, including healthcare and medicine, to describe a small-scale initiative that is implemented on a temporary basis to evaluate its feasibility, effectiveness, or impact before deciding whether to expand or continue it.

In the context of healthcare, pilot projects might involve testing new treatment protocols, implementing innovative care models, or introducing technology solutions in a limited setting to assess their potential benefits and drawbacks. The results of these projects can help inform decisions about broader implementation and provide valuable insights for improving the quality and efficiency of healthcare services.

Continuing nursing education (CNE) refers to the lifelong learning process that enables nurses to expand their knowledge and skills, update their practice, and improve patient outcomes. CNE programs are designed to meet the needs of practicing nurses and can include a variety of formats such as conferences, seminars, workshops, online courses, and self-study modules. These activities provide nurses with the opportunity to learn about new developments in nursing practice, research, and technology, and to earn continuing education credits or contact hours that are required for licensure renewal and professional certification. The goal of CNE is to promote excellence in nursing practice and to ensure that nurses have the knowledge and skills necessary to provide safe, high-quality care to their patients.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "leadership" is not a term that has a specific medical definition. Leadership is a concept that relates to the ability of an individual or an organization's management to set and achieve challenging goals, take swift and decisive action, outperform the competition, and inspire others to perform at their best.

In healthcare settings, leadership refers to the skills, behaviors, and attitudes of those in positions of authority within a healthcare organization. Effective healthcare leaders are able to create a positive organizational culture, communicate a clear vision, motivate and engage staff, manage resources effectively, and ensure high-quality patient care. They must also be able to adapt to changing circumstances, make informed decisions based on data and evidence, and work collaboratively with other healthcare professionals and stakeholders.

A Physical Therapy Specialty refers to an area of practice within the field of physical therapy that requires advanced knowledge, skills, and experience beyond the entry-level degree. The American Board of Physical Therapy Specialties (ABPTS) recognizes nine specialty areas: Cardiovascular and Pulmonary, Clinical Electrophysiology, Geriatrics, Neurology, Oncology, Orthopaedics, Pediatrics, Sports, and Women's Health.

To become a board-certified specialist in one of these areas, physical therapists must meet specific education, practice, and examination requirements established by the ABPTS. Specialty certification is valid for ten years, after which specialists must recertify to maintain their credential. Board certification in a specialty area demonstrates a commitment to excellence and expertise in providing high-quality patient care within that specialized area of practice.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "organizational policy" is not a medical term. It falls under the broader category of management or administrative terminology.

An organizational policy generally refers to a formal statement or set of guidelines that outline an organization's approved course of action or conduct regarding various matters. These policies guide decision-making and help ensure consistent action across the organization. They can cover a wide range of topics, including (but not limited to) employee behavior, data security, patient care standards, and operational procedures.

In a healthcare setting, organizational policies play a crucial role in maintaining quality of care, ensuring patient safety, and complying with relevant laws and regulations.

Medicine is a branch of healthcare that deals with the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of disease, injury, and illness. It encompasses a variety of health profession practices, including but not limited to, the services provided by physicians, nurses, pharmacists, dentists, and allied health professionals.

Medicine can also refer to the substances or compounds used in the treatment and prevention of disease, often referred to as medications or drugs. These substances can be administered in various forms, such as oral (pills, liquids), topical (creams, ointments), injectable (shots, IVs), or inhaled (aerosols, nebulizers).

Overall, medicine is a multidisciplinary field that combines scientific research, clinical expertise, and patient values to promote health, prevent disease, and provide treatment for individuals and communities.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Organizational Culture" is a term commonly used in the field of organizational studies and management, rather than in medical terminology. It refers to the shared values, beliefs, practices, customs, and traditions that shape the behavior and attitudes of members within an organization.

However, I can provide you with a definition related to healthcare:

"Organizational Culture in Healthcare" often refers to the unique social and psychological environment or climate within a healthcare organization, which influences the way its employees and managers think, feel, and behave. This culture is frequently reflected in the organization's policies, practices, and decision-making processes, as well as in its approach to patient care, safety, quality, and staff development. A positive organizational culture in healthcare can contribute to improved patient outcomes, increased job satisfaction, and reduced staff turnover.

Patient-centered care is a healthcare approach that places the patient at the center of the care experience and considers their preferences, values, and needs in making clinical decisions. It is based on partnership between the patient and healthcare provider, with open communication, mutual respect, and shared decision-making. Patient-centered care aims to improve the quality of care, increase patient satisfaction, and lead to better health outcomes by addressing not only the medical needs but also the emotional, social, and cultural factors that affect a patient's health.

Health education is the process of providing information and strategies to individuals and communities about how to improve their health and prevent disease. It involves teaching and learning activities that aim to empower people to make informed decisions and take responsible actions regarding their health. Health education covers a wide range of topics, including nutrition, physical activity, sexual and reproductive health, mental health, substance abuse prevention, and environmental health. The ultimate goal of health education is to promote healthy behaviors and lifestyles that can lead to improved health outcomes and quality of life.

Medical education, graduate refers to the post-baccalaureate programs of study leading to a doctoral degree in medicine (MD) or osteopathic medicine (DO). These programs typically include rigorous coursework in the basic medical sciences, clinical training, and research experiences. The goal of medical education at this level is to prepare students to become competent, caring physicians who are able to provide high-quality medical care to patients, conduct research to advance medical knowledge, and contribute to the improvement of health care systems.

Graduate medical education (GME) typically includes residency programs, which are postgraduate training programs that provide specialized clinical training in a particular field of medicine. Residency programs typically last three to seven years, depending on the specialty, and provide hands-on experience in diagnosing and treating patients under the supervision of experienced physicians.

Medical education at the graduate level is designed to build upon the foundational knowledge and skills acquired during undergraduate medical education (UME) and to prepare students for licensure and certification as practicing physicians. Graduates of GME programs are eligible to take licensing exams and apply for certification in their chosen specialty through professional organizations such as the American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS).

Public health is defined by the World Health Organization (WHO) as "the art and science of preventing disease, prolonging life and promoting human health through organized efforts of society." It focuses on improving the health and well-being of entire communities, populations, and societies, rather than individual patients. This is achieved through various strategies, including education, prevention, surveillance of diseases, and promotion of healthy behaviors and environments. Public health also addresses broader determinants of health, such as access to healthcare, housing, food, and income, which have a significant impact on the overall health of populations.

I couldn't find a medical definition specifically for "professional-family relations," as it is more commonly referred to as "professional-patient relationship" in the medical field. However, I can provide you with the definition of professional-patient relationship:

A professional-patient relationship is a formal relationship between a healthcare provider and a patient, characterized by trust, honesty, and mutual respect. The healthcare provider has a duty to act in the best interest of the patient, providing competent and ethical care, while maintaining appropriate boundaries and confidentiality. Effective communication, shared decision-making, and informed consent are essential components of this relationship.

Family members may also be involved in the professional-patient relationship, particularly when the patient is unable to make decisions for themselves or when family involvement is necessary for the patient's care. In these cases, healthcare providers must communicate clearly and respectfully with family members while still maintaining the primary focus on the patient's needs and autonomy.

I'm assuming you are asking for a definition of "medical students." Here it is:

Medical students are individuals who are enrolled in a program of study to become medical doctors. They typically complete four years of undergraduate education before entering a medical school, where they spend another four years studying basic sciences and clinical medicine. After completing medical school, they become physicians (M.D.) and continue their training through residency programs in their chosen specialties. Some medical students may choose to pursue a research career and complete a Ph.D. during or after medical school.

Public health practice is a multidisciplinary approach that aims to prevent disease, promote health, and protect communities from harmful environmental and social conditions through evidence-based strategies, programs, policies, and interventions. It involves the application of epidemiological, biostatistical, social, environmental, and behavioral sciences to improve the health of populations, reduce health disparities, and ensure equity in health outcomes. Public health practice includes a wide range of activities such as disease surveillance, outbreak investigation, health promotion, community engagement, program planning and evaluation, policy analysis and development, and research translation. It is a collaborative and systems-based approach that involves partnerships with various stakeholders, including communities, healthcare providers, policymakers, and other organizations to achieve population-level health goals.

Psychiatry is the branch of medicine focused on the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of mental, emotional, and behavioral disorders. A psychiatrist is a medically trained doctor who specializes in psychiatry, and they are qualified to assess both the mental and physical aspects of psychological problems. They can use a variety of treatments, including psychotherapy, medications, psychoeducation, and psychosocial interventions, to help patients manage their symptoms and improve their quality of life.

Psychiatrists often work in multidisciplinary teams that include other mental health professionals such as psychologists, social workers, and mental health nurses. They may provide services in a range of settings, including hospitals, clinics, community mental health centers, and private practices.

It's important to note that while I strive to provide accurate and helpful information, my responses should not be used as a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. If you or someone else has concerns about mental health, it is always best to consult with a qualified healthcare provider.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Ontario" is not a medical term. It is the name of a province in Canada, similar to how "California" is the name of a state in the United States. If you have any questions related to medical terminology or health conditions, I would be happy to try and help answer those for you!

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Scotland" is not a medical term or concept. It is one of the four constituent countries of the United Kingdom. If you have any questions related to medical terminology or health-related topics, I would be happy to try and help answer those for you.

Internship: In medical terms, an internship is a supervised program of hospital-based training for physicians and surgeons who have recently graduated from medical school. The duration of an internship typically ranges from one to three years, during which the intern engages in a variety of clinical rotations in different departments such as internal medicine, surgery, pediatrics, obstetrics and gynecology, psychiatry, and neurology. The primary aim of an internship is to provide newly graduated doctors with hands-on experience in patient care, diagnosis, treatment planning, and communication skills under the close supervision of experienced physicians.

Residency: A residency is a structured and intensive postgraduate medical training program that typically lasts between three and seven years, depending on the specialty. Residents are licensed physicians who have completed their internship and are now receiving advanced training in a specific area of medicine or surgery. During this period, residents work closely with experienced attending physicians to gain comprehensive knowledge and skills in their chosen field. They are responsible for managing patient care, performing surgical procedures, interpreting diagnostic tests, conducting research, teaching medical students, and participating in continuing education activities. Residency programs aim to prepare physicians for independent practice and board certification in their specialty.

Counseling is a therapeutic intervention that involves a trained professional working with an individual, family, or group to help them understand and address their problems, concerns, or challenges. The goal of counseling is to help the person develop skills, insights, and resources that will allow them to make positive changes in their thoughts, feelings, and behaviors, and improve their overall mental health and well-being.

Counseling can take many forms, depending on the needs and preferences of the individual seeking help. Some common approaches include cognitive-behavioral therapy, psychodynamic therapy, humanistic therapy, and solution-focused brief therapy. These approaches may be used alone or in combination with other interventions, such as medication or group therapy.

The specific goals and techniques of counseling will vary depending on the individual's needs and circumstances. However, some common objectives of counseling include:

* Identifying and understanding the underlying causes of emotional or behavioral problems
* Developing coping skills and strategies to manage stress, anxiety, depression, or other mental health concerns
* Improving communication and relationship skills
* Enhancing self-esteem and self-awareness
* Addressing substance abuse or addiction issues
* Resolving conflicts and making difficult decisions
* Grieving losses and coping with life transitions

Counseling is typically provided by licensed mental health professionals, such as psychologists, social workers, marriage and family therapists, and professional counselors. These professionals have completed advanced education and training in counseling techniques and theories, and are qualified to provide a range of therapeutic interventions to help individuals, families, and groups achieve their goals and improve their mental health.

"Health manpower" is a term that refers to the number and type of healthcare professionals (such as doctors, nurses, allied health professionals, and support staff) who are available to provide healthcare services in a particular area or system. It's an important consideration in healthcare planning and policy, as the availability and distribution of health manpower can have a significant impact on access to care, quality of care, and health outcomes.

Therefore, medical definition of 'Health Manpower' could be: "The composition and distribution of healthcare professionals who are available to deliver healthcare services, including their skills, training, and experience. Health manpower is an essential component of healthcare systems and is influenced by factors such as population needs, workforce supply, and government policies."

Health policy refers to a set of decisions, plans, and actions that are undertaken to achieve specific healthcare goals within a population. It is formulated by governmental and non-governmental organizations with the objective of providing guidance and direction for the management and delivery of healthcare services. Health policies address various aspects of healthcare, including access, financing, quality, and equity. They can be designed to promote health, prevent disease, and provide treatment and rehabilitation services to individuals who are sick or injured. Effective health policies require careful consideration of scientific evidence, ethical principles, and societal values to ensure that they meet the needs of the population while being fiscally responsible.

Health services needs refer to the population's requirement for healthcare services based on their health status, disease prevalence, and clinical guidelines. These needs can be categorized into normative needs (based on expert opinions or clinical guidelines) and expressed needs (based on individuals' perceptions of their own healthcare needs).

On the other hand, health services demand refers to the quantity of healthcare services that consumers are willing and able to pay for, given their preferences, values, and financial resources. Demand is influenced by various factors such as price, income, education level, and cultural beliefs.

It's important to note that while needs represent a population's requirement for healthcare services, demand reflects the actual utilization of these services. Understanding both health services needs and demand is crucial in planning and delivering effective healthcare services that meet the population's requirements while ensuring efficient resource allocation.

Nurse-patient relations refer to the interactions and relationships between registered nurses (RNs) or licensed practical nurses (LPNs) and their patients. This relationship is based on trust, respect, and collaboration, with the goal of providing safe, effective, and compassionate care that promotes the physical, emotional, and psychological well-being of the patient.

The nurse-patient relationship involves several key elements, including:

1. Communication: Effective communication is essential in the nurse-patient relationship. Nurses must listen actively to their patients, understand their needs and concerns, and provide clear and concise information about their care.
2. Empathy: Nurses should demonstrate empathy and compassion towards their patients, recognizing their feelings and emotions and providing emotional support when needed.
3. Autonomy: Nurses should respect their patients' autonomy and self-determination, involving them in decision-making about their care and promoting their independence whenever possible.
4. Confidentiality: Nurses must maintain confidentiality and protect their patients' privacy, ensuring that sensitive information is shared only with those who have a legitimate need to know.
5. Advocacy: Nurses should advocate for their patients, ensuring that they receive the care and resources they need to achieve optimal health outcomes.

Overall, nurse-patient relations are critical to the delivery of high-quality healthcare and can significantly impact patient satisfaction, adherence to treatment plans, and clinical outcomes.

Career mobility, in a medical context, refers to the ability of healthcare professionals to advance or move between different roles, positions, or departments within a healthcare organization or field. It can include lateral moves (changing to a similar position in another department) or vertical moves (promotion to a higher-level position). Career mobility is often facilitated by continuing education, professional development opportunities, and the acquisition of new skills and experiences. High career mobility can lead to better job satisfaction, increased compensation, and improved patient care.

I'm happy to help! However, I believe there might be a slight confusion in your question. "Students, Health Occupations" is not a medical term or definition per se, but rather a general description of individuals who are studying to become healthcare professionals.

Healthcare occupations encompass a wide range of professions, including (but not limited to) physicians, nurses, pharmacists, dentists, mental health professionals, allied health professionals (such as physical therapists, respiratory therapists, and diagnostic medical sonographers), and public health professionals.

Students in health occupations are individuals who are pursuing education and training to enter these professions. They may be enrolled in various types of educational programs, such as undergraduate or graduate degree programs, vocational schools, certificate programs, or on-the-job training. The specific requirements for becoming a healthcare professional vary depending on the profession and the location, but typically involve a combination of education, clinical training, licensure, and certification.

A drug prescription is a written or electronic order provided by a licensed healthcare professional, such as a physician, dentist, or advanced practice nurse, to a pharmacist that authorizes the preparation and dispensing of a specific medication for a patient. The prescription typically includes important information such as the patient's name and date of birth, the name and strength of the medication, the dosage regimen, the duration of treatment, and any special instructions or precautions.

Prescriptions serve several purposes, including ensuring that patients receive the appropriate medication for their medical condition, preventing medication errors, and promoting safe and effective use of medications. They also provide a legal record of the medical provider's authorization for the pharmacist to dispense the medication to the patient.

There are two main types of prescriptions: written prescriptions and electronic prescriptions. Written prescriptions are handwritten or printed on paper, while electronic prescriptions are transmitted electronically from the medical provider to the pharmacy. Electronic prescriptions are becoming increasingly common due to their convenience, accuracy, and security.

It is important for patients to follow the instructions provided on their prescription carefully and to ask their healthcare provider or pharmacist any questions they may have about their medication. Failure to follow a drug prescription can result in improper use of the medication, which can lead to adverse effects, treatment failure, or even life-threatening situations.

Patient rights refer to the ethical principles, legal regulations, and professional guidelines that protect and ensure the autonomy, dignity, and well-being of patients during healthcare encounters. These rights encompass various aspects of patient care, including informed consent, privacy, confidentiality, access to medical records, freedom from abuse and discrimination, pain management, and communication with healthcare providers.

The specific components of patient rights may vary depending on the jurisdiction and legal framework but generally include:

1. Right to receive information: Patients have the right to obtain accurate, clear, and comprehensive information about their health status, diagnosis, treatment options, benefits, risks, and prognosis in a manner they can understand. This includes the right to ask questions and seek clarification.
2. Informed consent: Patients have the right to make informed decisions about their care based on complete and accurate information. They must be given sufficient time and support to consider their options and provide voluntary, informed consent before any treatment or procedure is performed.
3. Privacy and confidentiality: Patients have the right to privacy during medical examinations and treatments. Healthcare providers must protect patients' personal and medical information from unauthorized access, disclosure, or use.
4. Access to medical records: Patients have the right to access their medical records and obtain copies of them in a timely manner. They can also request amendments to their records if they believe there are errors or inaccuracies.
5. Freedom from discrimination: Patients have the right to receive care without discrimination based on race, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, age, disability, or socioeconomic status.
6. Pain management: Patients have the right to appropriate pain assessment and management, including access to palliative and hospice care when appropriate.
7. Refusal of treatment: Patients have the right to refuse any treatment or procedure, even if it may be life-saving, as long as they are competent to make that decision and understand the consequences.
8. Communication and language assistance: Patients have the right to clear, effective communication with their healthcare providers, including access to interpreters or other necessary language assistance services.
9. Respect and dignity: Patients have the right to be treated with respect, dignity, and consideration during all aspects of their care.
10. Complaint resolution: Patients have the right to voice concerns about their care and receive timely responses from healthcare providers or institutions. They also have the right to file complaints with regulatory bodies if necessary.

Medical mass screening, also known as population screening, is a public health service that aims to identify and detect asymptomatic individuals in a given population who have or are at risk of a specific disease. The goal is to provide early treatment, reduce morbidity and mortality, and prevent the spread of diseases within the community.

A mass screening program typically involves offering a simple, quick, and non-invasive test to a large number of people in a defined population, regardless of their risk factors or symptoms. Those who test positive are then referred for further diagnostic tests and appropriate medical interventions. Examples of mass screening programs include mammography for breast cancer detection, PSA (prostate-specific antigen) testing for prostate cancer, and fecal occult blood testing for colorectal cancer.

It is important to note that mass screening programs should be evidence-based, cost-effective, and ethically sound, with clear benefits outweighing potential harms. They should also consider factors such as the prevalence of the disease in the population, the accuracy and reliability of the screening test, and the availability and effectiveness of treatment options.

I'm happy to help! However, I must clarify that "information dissemination" is not a medical term per se, but rather a general term used in various fields, including healthcare and medicine. It refers to the process of spreading or distributing information to a specific audience or the public.

In the context of medicine and healthcare, information dissemination often relates to sharing clinical guidelines, research findings, public health messages, or patient education materials with healthcare professionals, patients, or the general public. This can occur through various channels, such as scientific conferences, peer-reviewed journals, newsletters, websites, social media platforms, and other communication methods.

The goal of information dissemination in medicine is to ensure that accurate, evidence-based, and up-to-date information reaches the intended audience, ultimately improving healthcare quality, patient outcomes, and decision-making processes.

Patient participation refers to the active involvement of patients in their own healthcare process. This includes:

1. Making informed decisions about their health and treatment options in partnership with healthcare professionals.
2. Communicating effectively with healthcare providers to ensure their needs, preferences, and values are taken into account.
3. Monitoring their own health status and seeking appropriate care when needed.
4. Providing feedback on the quality of care they receive to help improve healthcare services.

Patient participation is considered a key component of patient-centered care, which aims to treat patients as whole persons with unique needs, values, and preferences, rather than simply treating their medical conditions. It is also an essential element of shared decision-making, where patients and healthcare providers work together to make informed decisions based on the best available evidence and the patient's individual circumstances.

In the context of healthcare, "Information Services" typically refers to the department or system within a healthcare organization that is responsible for managing and providing various forms of information to support clinical, administrative, and research functions. This can include:

1. Clinical Information Systems: These are electronic systems that help clinicians manage and access patient health information, such as electronic health records (EHRs), computerized physician order entry (CPOE) systems, and clinical decision support systems.

2. Administrative Information Systems: These are electronic systems used to manage administrative tasks, such as scheduling appointments, billing, and maintaining patient registries.

3. Research Information Services: These provide support for research activities, including data management, analysis, and reporting. They may also include bioinformatics services that deal with the collection, storage, analysis, and dissemination of genomic and proteomic data.

4. Health Information Exchange (HIE): This is a system or service that enables the sharing of clinical information between different healthcare organizations and providers.

5. Telemedicine Services: These allow remote diagnosis and treatment of patients using telecommunications technology.

6. Patient Portals: Secure online websites that give patients convenient, 24-hour access to their personal health information.

7. Data Analytics: The process of examining data sets to draw conclusions about the information they contain, often with the intention of predicting future trends or behaviors.

8. Knowledge Management: The process of identifying, capturing, organizing, storing, and sharing information and expertise within an organization.

The primary goal of healthcare Information Services is to improve the quality, safety, efficiency, and effectiveness of patient care by providing timely, accurate, and relevant information to the right people in the right format.

Graduate education typically refers to educational programs beyond the undergraduate level that lead to an advanced degree, such as a master's, doctoral, or professional degree. These programs usually require completion of a Bachelor's degree as a prerequisite and involve more specialized and in-depth study in a particular field. Graduate education may include coursework, research, examinations, and the completion of a thesis or dissertation. The specific requirements for graduate education vary depending on the field of study and the institution offering the degree program.

"Personal Autonomy" is not a medical term per se, but it is often used in medical ethics and patient care. It refers to the ability of an individual to make informed decisions about their own health and healthcare, based on their own values, beliefs, and preferences, without undue influence or coercion from others. This includes the right to accept or refuse medical treatment, to maintain confidentiality, and to participate in shared decision-making with healthcare providers. Personal autonomy is recognized as a fundamental principle in medical ethics and patient rights, and is protected by laws and regulations in many countries.

Dentistry is the branch of medicine that is concerned with the examination, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of diseases, disorders, and conditions of the oral cavity (mouth), including the teeth, gums, and other supporting structures. Dentists use a variety of treatments and procedures to help patients maintain good oral health and prevent dental problems from developing or worsening. These may include:

* Routine cleanings and checkups to remove plaque and tartar and detect any potential issues early on
* Fillings, crowns, and other restorative treatments to repair damaged teeth
* Root canal therapy to treat infected or inflamed tooth pulp
* Extractions of severely decayed or impacted teeth
* Dentures, bridges, and implants to replace missing teeth
* Orthodontic treatment to align crooked or misaligned teeth
* Treatment for temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders and other issues affecting the jaw and surrounding muscles

Dental health is an important part of overall health and well-being. Poor oral health has been linked to a variety of systemic conditions, including heart disease, diabetes, and respiratory infections. Regular dental checkups and good oral hygiene practices can help prevent these and other dental problems from developing.

'Hospital Nursing Staff' refers to the group of healthcare professionals who are licensed and trained to provide nursing care to patients in a hospital setting. They work under the direction of a nurse manager or director and collaborate with an interdisciplinary team of healthcare providers, including physicians, therapists, social workers, and other support staff.

Hospital nursing staff can include registered nurses (RNs), licensed practical nurses (LPNs) or vocational nurses (LVNs), and unlicensed assistive personnel (UAPs) such as nursing assistants, orderlies, and patient care technicians. Their responsibilities may vary depending on their role and the needs of the patients, but they typically include:

* Administering medications and treatments prescribed by physicians
* Monitoring patients' vital signs and overall condition
* Providing emotional support and education to patients and their families
* Assisting with activities of daily living such as bathing, dressing, and grooming
* Documenting patient care and progress in medical records
* Collaborating with other healthcare professionals to develop and implement individualized care plans.

Hospital nursing staff play a critical role in ensuring the safety, comfort, and well-being of hospitalized patients, and they are essential members of the healthcare team.

Patient care is a broad term that refers to the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of illnesses or injuries, as well as the promotion of health and the maintenance of mental and physical well-being. It involves a wide range of services and activities, including:

1. Medical history taking and physical examination
2. Diagnostic tests and procedures
3. Treatment planning and implementation
4. Patient education and counseling
5. Collaboration with other healthcare professionals
6. Continuity of care and follow-up
7. Emotional support and empathy
8. Respect for patient autonomy and dignity
9. Advocacy for patients' rights and needs
10. Coordination of care across different settings and providers.

Patient care can be provided in various settings, such as hospitals, clinics, nursing homes, home health agencies, and community-based organizations. It can be delivered by a variety of healthcare professionals, including physicians, nurses, physician assistants, social workers, physical therapists, occupational therapists, and others.

The ultimate goal of patient care is to help patients achieve the best possible outcomes in terms of their health and well-being, while also respecting their values, preferences, and cultural backgrounds.

Dental education refers to the process of teaching, training, and learning in the field of dentistry. It involves a curriculum of academic and clinical instruction that prepares students to become licensed dental professionals, such as dentists, dental hygienists, and dental assistants. Dental education typically takes place in accredited dental schools or programs and includes classroom study, laboratory work, and supervised clinical experience. The goal of dental education is to provide students with the knowledge, skills, and values necessary to deliver high-quality oral health care to patients and promote overall health and wellness.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "History, 20th Century" is a broad and complex topic that refers to the events, developments, and transformations that occurred throughout the world during the 1900s. It is not a medical term or concept. If you're interested in learning more about this historical period, I would recommend consulting a history textbook, reputable online resources, or speaking with a historian. They can provide detailed information about the political, social, economic, and cultural changes that took place during the 20th century.

I believe you may have made a typo in your question. The term you're asking about should be "mentor" instead of "mentors." A mentor is not a medical term per se, but I can certainly provide a general definition.

A mentor is a experienced and trusted advisor or guide who provides support, shares knowledge, and helps in the personal and professional development of an individual, often in a specific field or industry. In a medical context, a mentor could be a senior physician or researcher who guides and supports a medical student, resident, or fellow in their learning and career progression.

'Nursing Staff' is a general term that refers to healthcare professionals who deliver nursing care to patients in various settings. Nursing staff includes several roles and positions, such as registered nurses (RNs), licensed practical nurses (LPNs)/licensed vocational nurses (LVNs), nurse practitioners (NPs), clinical nurse specialists (CNSs), certified nurse midwives (CNMs), and nursing assistants/aides.

Registered Nurses (RNs) are responsible for assessing, planning, implementing, and evaluating patient care plans based on their education, training, and clinical judgment. They often supervise other members of the nursing staff and collaborate with interdisciplinary teams to ensure optimal patient outcomes.

Licensed Practical Nurses/Licensed Vocational Nurses (LPNs/LVNs) provide basic nursing care under the direction of RNs or other healthcare professionals. Their responsibilities typically include taking vital signs, administering medications, and providing personal care to patients.

Nurse Practitioners (NPs), Clinical Nurse Specialists (CNSs), and Certified Nurse Midwives (CNMs) are advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) who have completed additional education and training beyond the RN degree. NPs can independently diagnose and manage common illnesses, prescribe medications, and provide primary care services to patients of all ages. CNSs focus on improving patient outcomes through evidence-based practice, research, and education within a specific specialty area. CNMs are specialized APRNs who provide comprehensive gynecological and obstetric care, including prenatal, delivery, and postpartum care for women, as well as newborn care.

Nursing Assistants/Aides, also known as Certified Nursing Assistants (CNAs) or Patient Care Technicians (PCTs), provide basic patient care under the supervision of RNs or LPNs/LVNs. Their duties may include assisting with personal hygiene, mobility, and nutrition; taking vital signs; and answering call lights.

Overall, nursing staff plays a critical role in maintaining patient safety, promoting health and well-being, and providing compassionate care to individuals across the lifespan.

I'm happy to help! However, it seems there might be a slight confusion in your request. "Students, Nursing" is not a medical term or concept but rather refers to individuals studying to become nurses. Nonetheless, I can certainly provide you with some information about nursing education and the types of students involved.

Nursing students are individuals who pursue formal education to acquire knowledge, skills, and competencies required to become registered nurses (RNs) or advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs). There are several educational paths for nursing students:

1. **Associate Degree in Nursing (ADN):** A two-year program that prepares students to provide direct patient care as a registered nurse. ADN programs typically cover fundamental nursing concepts and clinical practice.
2. **Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN):** A four-year undergraduate degree program that combines general education courses with nursing theory, research, leadership, and practice. BSN-prepared nurses often have better career advancement opportunities compared to ADN graduates.
3. **Direct Entry Master's Degree in Nursing (DEM):** A graduate-level program designed for individuals who hold a bachelor's degree in a non-nursing field and wish to transition into nursing. DEM programs typically take 18-24 months to complete and prepare students to become registered nurses.
4. **Master of Science in Nursing (MSN):** A graduate-level program for RNs who want to specialize or advance their careers as nurse practitioners, clinical nurse specialists, nurse educators, or nurse administrators. MSN programs usually take 2-3 years to complete and require a BSN degree for admission.
5. **Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP):** A terminal professional degree that prepares advanced practice registered nurses for the highest level of clinical practice, leadership, and healthcare policy. DNP programs typically take 3-4 years to complete and require an MSN degree for admission.

In summary, nursing students are individuals who enroll in various educational programs to become qualified nursing professionals, ranging from associate to doctoral degrees.

In the field of medicine, "time factors" refer to the duration of symptoms or time elapsed since the onset of a medical condition, which can have significant implications for diagnosis and treatment. Understanding time factors is crucial in determining the progression of a disease, evaluating the effectiveness of treatments, and making critical decisions regarding patient care.

For example, in stroke management, "time is brain," meaning that rapid intervention within a specific time frame (usually within 4.5 hours) is essential to administering tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a clot-busting drug that can minimize brain damage and improve patient outcomes. Similarly, in trauma care, the "golden hour" concept emphasizes the importance of providing definitive care within the first 60 minutes after injury to increase survival rates and reduce morbidity.

Time factors also play a role in monitoring the progression of chronic conditions like diabetes or heart disease, where regular follow-ups and assessments help determine appropriate treatment adjustments and prevent complications. In infectious diseases, time factors are crucial for initiating antibiotic therapy and identifying potential outbreaks to control their spread.

Overall, "time factors" encompass the significance of recognizing and acting promptly in various medical scenarios to optimize patient outcomes and provide effective care.

Confidentiality is a legal and ethical principle in medicine that refers to the obligation of healthcare professionals to protect the personal and sensitive information of their patients. This information, which can include medical history, diagnosis, treatment plans, and other private details, is shared between the patient and the healthcare provider with the expectation that it will be kept confidential and not disclosed to third parties without the patient's consent.

Confidentiality is a fundamental component of the trust relationship between patients and healthcare providers, as it helps to ensure that patients feel safe and comfortable sharing sensitive information with their doctors, nurses, and other members of their healthcare team. It also helps to protect patients' privacy rights and uphold their autonomy in making informed decisions about their healthcare.

There are some limited circumstances in which confidentiality may be breached, such as when there is a legal obligation to report certain types of information (e.g., suspected child abuse or neglect), or when the disclosure is necessary to protect the health and safety of the patient or others. However, these exceptions are typically narrowly defined and subject to strict guidelines and safeguards to ensure that confidentiality is protected as much as possible.

Obstetrics is a branch of medicine and surgery concerned with the care of women during pregnancy, childbirth, and the postnatal period. It involves managing potential complications that may arise during any stage of pregnancy or delivery, as well as providing advice and guidance on prenatal care, labor and delivery, and postpartum care. Obstetricians are medical doctors who specialize in obstetrics and can provide a range of services including routine check-ups, ultrasounds, genetic testing, and other diagnostic procedures to monitor the health and development of the fetus. They also perform surgical procedures such as cesarean sections when necessary.

"Physicians, Women" refers to medical doctors who identify as female. They have completed the required education and training to provide medical diagnosis, treatment, and preventive care to patients. They can specialize in various fields such as cardiology, pediatrics, psychiatry, surgery, etc. Their role is to promote and restore health by providing comprehensive medical care to individuals, families, and communities.

A physical therapist (PT), also known as a physiotherapist in some countries, is a healthcare professional who provides treatment to individuals to develop, maintain, and restore maximum body movement and functional ability throughout the lifespan. This is achieved through promotion of mobility, functional ability, quality of life and prevention of activity limitations and participation restrictions due to diseases, disorders or injuries.

Physical therapists evaluate and assess an individual'

s mobility, strength, flexibility, balance, coordination, posture, and cardiopulmonary status to determine a diagnosis and prognosis. They then develop an individualized treatment plan, incorporating a variety of therapeutic interventions such as exercise, manual therapy, education, modalities (e.g., heat, cold, electrical stimulation), assistive devices, and technology to achieve the goals outlined in the treatment plan.

Physical therapists may practice in various settings including hospitals, outpatient clinics, private practices, rehabilitation centers, skilled nursing facilities, home health agencies, schools, sports and fitness facilities, workplaces, and universities. They often collaborate with other healthcare professionals such as physicians, nurses, occupational therapists, speech-language pathologists, and social workers to provide comprehensive care to patients.

In addition to direct patient care, physical therapists may also be involved in education, research, and administration related to the field of physical therapy.

The term "dental staff" generally refers to the group of professionals who work together in a dental practice or setting to provide oral health care services to patients. The composition of a dental staff can vary depending on the size and type of the practice, but it typically includes:

1. Dentists: These are medical doctors who specialize in oral health. They diagnose and treat dental diseases, conditions, and disorders, and perform various procedures such as fillings, root canals, extractions, and crowns.
2. Dental Hygienists: These are licensed healthcare professionals who provide preventive dental care services to patients. They clean teeth, remove plaque and tartar, apply fluoride and sealants, take X-rays, and educate patients on proper oral hygiene practices.
3. Dental Assistants: These are trained professionals who assist dentists during procedures and perform various administrative tasks in a dental practice. They prepare patients for treatment, sterilize instruments, take impressions, and schedule appointments.
4. Front Office Staff: These are the receptionists, schedulers, and billing specialists who manage the administrative aspects of a dental practice. They handle patient inquiries, schedule appointments, process insurance claims, and maintain patient records.
5. Other Specialists: Depending on the needs of the practice, other dental professionals such as orthodontists, oral surgeons, endodontists, periodontists, or prosthodontists may also be part of the dental staff. These specialists have advanced training in specific areas of dentistry and provide specialized care to patients.

Overall, a well-functioning dental staff is essential for providing high-quality oral health care services to patients in a safe, efficient, and patient-centered manner.

A Medically Underserved Area (MUA) is a designation used by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA). It refers to a geographic area that lacks sufficient access to primary care services, as defined by specific criteria such as:

1. The ratio of primary medical care physicians per thousand population is less than 30% of the national average.
2. The population has a poverty rate of at least 20%.
3. The population has an infant mortality rate that is higher than the U.S. average.
4. The population has a high elderly population (over 65 years old) and/or a large minority population.

MUAs are often located in rural or inner-city areas where there is a shortage of healthcare providers, facilities, and services. This designation helps to identify areas with significant healthcare needs and makes them eligible for federal assistance and resources, including funding for community health centers and other programs aimed at improving access to care.

Prospective studies, also known as longitudinal studies, are a type of cohort study in which data is collected forward in time, following a group of individuals who share a common characteristic or exposure over a period of time. The researchers clearly define the study population and exposure of interest at the beginning of the study and follow up with the participants to determine the outcomes that develop over time. This type of study design allows for the investigation of causal relationships between exposures and outcomes, as well as the identification of risk factors and the estimation of disease incidence rates. Prospective studies are particularly useful in epidemiology and medical research when studying diseases with long latency periods or rare outcomes.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "London" is a place and not a medical term or condition. It is the capital city and largest metropolitan area in both England and the United Kingdom. If you have any questions related to medical definitions or health-related topics, I would be happy to help!

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Salaries and Fringe Benefits" is not a medical term or concept.

Salaries and fringe benefits are terms used in the context of employment and compensation. A salary is the amount of money or other forms of compensation paid to an employee by an employer in return for work performed. It is usually expressed as a monthly or annual sum.

Fringe benefits, on the other hand, are additional benefits that employers may provide to their employees, such as health insurance, retirement plans, vacation and sick leave, and other perks. These benefits are offered in addition to the employee's regular salary or wages.

In a medical setting, healthcare professionals may receive salaries and fringe benefits as part of their employment compensation package, but the terms themselves do not have specific medical meanings.

In a medical context, "faculty" most commonly refers to the inherent abilities or powers of a normal functioning part of the body or mind. For example, one might speak of the "faculties of perception" to describe the senses of sight, hearing, touch, taste, and smell. It can also refer to the teaching staff or body of instructors at a medical school or other educational institution. Additionally, it can be used more generally to mean a capability or skill, as in "the faculty of quick thinking."

Quality improvement (QI) in a healthcare setting is a systematic and continuous approach to improving patient care and outcomes by identifying and addressing gaps or deficiencies in care processes, protocols, and systems. It involves the use of evidence-based practices, data analysis, and performance measurement to drive changes that lead to improvements in the quality, safety, and efficiency of healthcare services.

QI aims to reduce variations in practice, eliminate errors, prevent harm, and ensure that patients receive the right care at the right time. It is a collaborative process that involves healthcare professionals, patients, families, and other stakeholders working together to identify opportunities for improvement and implement changes that lead to better outcomes. QI initiatives may focus on specific clinical areas, such as improving diabetes management or reducing hospital-acquired infections, or they may address broader system issues, such as improving patient communication or reducing healthcare costs.

QI is an ongoing process that requires a culture of continuous learning and improvement. Healthcare organizations that prioritize QI are committed to measuring their performance, identifying areas for improvement, testing new approaches, and sharing their successes and failures with others in the field. By adopting a QI approach, healthcare providers can improve patient satisfaction, reduce costs, and enhance the overall quality of care they provide.

Treatment outcome is a term used to describe the result or effect of medical treatment on a patient's health status. It can be measured in various ways, such as through symptoms improvement, disease remission, reduced disability, improved quality of life, or survival rates. The treatment outcome helps healthcare providers evaluate the effectiveness of a particular treatment plan and make informed decisions about future care. It is also used in clinical research to compare the efficacy of different treatments and improve patient care.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "social values" is not a term that has a specific medical definition. However, in a broader social context, "social values" refer to the beliefs, principles, and standards that a group or society holds in regard to what is considered important, desirable, or acceptable. These values can influence attitudes, behaviors, and decisions related to health and healthcare. They may also impact medical research, policy-making, and patient care.

I believe there may be a misunderstanding in your question. "Societies" is a broad term that generally refers to organized groups of individuals who share common interests, goals, or characteristics. It does not have a specific medical definition. However, if you're referring to "society" in the context of social determinants of health, it relates to the conditions in which people are born, grow, live, work, and age, including the systems put in place to deal with illness. These factors can greatly influence health outcomes. If you could provide more context or clarify your question, I would be happy to help further.

In the context of medicine, a "role" generally refers to the function or position that an individual holds within a healthcare system or team. This could include roles such as:

* Physician
* Nurse
* Allied health professional (e.g., physical therapist, occupational therapist, speech-language pathologist)
* Social worker
* Administrative staff member

Each role comes with its own set of responsibilities and expectations for how the individual in that role will contribute to the overall care and well-being of patients. Effective communication, collaboration, and coordination among team members in their various roles are essential for providing high-quality patient care.

Safety management is a systematic and organized approach to managing health and safety in the workplace. It involves the development, implementation, and monitoring of policies, procedures, and practices with the aim of preventing accidents, injuries, and occupational illnesses. Safety management includes identifying hazards, assessing risks, setting objectives and targets for improving safety performance, implementing controls, and evaluating the effectiveness of those controls. The goal of safety management is to create a safe and healthy work environment that protects workers, visitors, and others who may be affected by workplace activities. It is an integral part of an organization's overall management system and requires the active involvement and commitment of managers, supervisors, and employees at all levels.

In medical terms, a patient is an individual who receives medical attention, treatment, or care from a healthcare professional or provider. This could be in the context of seeking help for a specific health concern, receiving ongoing management for a chronic condition, or being under observation as part of preventative healthcare. The term "patient" implies a level of trust and vulnerability, where the individual places their health and well-being in the hands of a medical expert. It's important to note that patients have rights and responsibilities too, including informed consent, confidentiality, and active participation in their own care.

Research, in the context of medicine, is a systematic and rigorous process of collecting, analyzing, and interpreting information in order to increase our understanding, develop new knowledge, or evaluate current practices and interventions. It can involve various methodologies such as observational studies, experiments, surveys, or literature reviews. The goal of medical research is to advance health care by identifying new treatments, improving diagnostic techniques, and developing prevention strategies. Medical research is typically conducted by teams of researchers including clinicians, scientists, and other healthcare professionals. It is subject to ethical guidelines and regulations to ensure that it is conducted responsibly and with the best interests of patients in mind.

Accreditation is a process in which a healthcare organization, facility, or program is evaluated and certified as meeting certain standards and criteria established by a recognized accrediting body. The purpose of accreditation is to ensure that the organization, facility, or program provides safe, high-quality care and services to its patients or clients.

Accreditation typically involves a thorough review of an organization's policies, procedures, practices, and outcomes, as well as an on-site survey by a team of experts from the accrediting body. The evaluation focuses on various aspects of the organization's operations, such as leadership and management, patient safety, infection control, clinical services, quality improvement, and staff competence.

Accreditation is voluntary, but many healthcare organizations seek it as a way to demonstrate their commitment to excellence and continuous improvement. Accreditation can also be a requirement for licensure, reimbursement, or participation in certain programs or initiatives.

Examples of accrediting bodies in the healthcare field include The Joint Commission, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME), the Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF), and the National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA).

Continuity of patient care is a concept in healthcare that refers to the consistent and seamless delivery of medical services to a patient over time, regardless of changes in their location or healthcare providers. It emphasizes the importance of maintaining clear communication, coordination, and information sharing among all members of a patient's healthcare team, including physicians, nurses, specialists, and other caregivers.

The goal of continuity of patient care is to ensure that patients receive high-quality, safe, and effective medical treatment that is tailored to their individual needs and preferences. This can help to reduce the risk of medical errors, improve patient outcomes, enhance patient satisfaction, and decrease healthcare costs.

There are several types of continuity that are important in patient care, including:

1. Relational continuity: This refers to the ongoing relationship between a patient and their primary care provider or team, who knows the patient's medical history, values, and preferences.
2. Management continuity: This involves the coordination and management of a patient's care across different settings, such as hospitals, clinics, and long-term care facilities.
3. Informational continuity: This refers to the sharing of accurate and up-to-date information among all members of a patient's healthcare team, including test results, medication lists, and treatment plans.

Continuity of patient care is particularly important for patients with chronic medical conditions, who require ongoing monitoring and management over an extended period. It can also help to reduce the risk of fragmented care, which can occur when patients receive care from multiple providers who do not communicate effectively with each other. By promoting continuity of care, healthcare systems can improve patient safety, quality of care, and overall health outcomes.

A dental hygienist is a licensed healthcare professional who works as part of the dental team, providing educational, clinical, and therapeutic services to prevent and control oral diseases. They are trained and authorized to perform various duties such as:

1. Cleaning and polishing teeth (prophylaxis) to remove plaque, calculus, and stains.
2. Applying fluoride and sealants to protect tooth surfaces from decay.
3. Taking dental radiographs (x-rays) to help diagnose dental issues.
4. Providing oral health education, including proper brushing, flossing techniques, and nutrition counseling.
5. Performing screenings for oral cancer and other diseases.
6. Documenting patient care and treatment plans in medical records.
7. Collaborating with dentists to develop individualized treatment plans for patients.
8. Managing infection control protocols and maintaining a safe, clean dental environment.
9. Providing supportive services, such as applying anesthetics or administering nitrous oxide, under the direct supervision of a dentist (depending on state regulations).

Dental hygienists typically work in private dental offices but can also be found in hospitals, clinics, public health settings, educational institutions, and research facilities. They must complete an accredited dental hygiene program and pass written and clinical exams to obtain licensure in their state of practice. Continuing education is required to maintain licensure and stay current with advancements in the field.

Evidence-Based Nursing (EBN) is a approach to nursing practice that incorporates the best available evidence from research, clinical expertise, and patient values and preferences into decision-making about care. The goal of EBN is to provide high-quality, safe, and effective nursing care that is based on the most current and valid evidence.

The process of EBN involves several steps:

1. Formulating a well-defined clinical question based on a specific patient problem or issue.
2. Searching for and critically appraising relevant research studies to answer the question.
3. Evaluating the quality and strength of the evidence.
4. Integrating the evidence with clinical expertise and patient values and preferences to make a informed decision about care.
5. Implementing the decision and evaluating its outcomes.
6. Disseminating the results of the evidence-based practice to improve nursing care.

EBN is an ongoing process that requires nurses to continually update their knowledge and skills to provide the best possible care for their patients. It is a key component of quality improvement in healthcare and is supported by various professional organizations, including the American Nurses Association and the World Health Organization.

A research design in medical or healthcare research is a systematic plan that guides the execution and reporting of research to address a specific research question or objective. It outlines the overall strategy for collecting, analyzing, and interpreting data to draw valid conclusions. The design includes details about the type of study (e.g., experimental, observational), sampling methods, data collection techniques, data analysis approaches, and any potential sources of bias or confounding that need to be controlled for. A well-defined research design helps ensure that the results are reliable, generalizable, and relevant to the research question, ultimately contributing to evidence-based practice in medicine and healthcare.

In the context of medical terminology, "attitude" generally refers to the position or posture of a patient's body or a part of it. It can also refer to the mental set or disposition that a person has towards their health, illness, or healthcare providers. However, it is not a term that has a specific medical definition like other medical terminologies do.

For example, in orthopedics, "attitude" may be used to describe the position of a limb or joint during an examination or surgical procedure. In psychology, "attitude" may refer to a person's feelings, beliefs, and behaviors towards a particular object, issue, or idea related to their health.

Therefore, the meaning of "attitude" in medical terminology can vary depending on the context in which it is used.

Medical education, undergraduate, refers to the initial formal educational phase in which students learn the basic sciences and clinical skills required to become a physician. In the United States, this typically involves completing a four-year Bachelor's degree followed by four years of medical school. The first two years of medical school are primarily focused on classroom instruction in subjects such as anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, pharmacology, and pathology. The final two years involve clinical rotations, during which students work directly with patients under the supervision of licensed physicians. After completing medical school, graduates must then complete a residency program in their chosen specialty before they are eligible to practice medicine independently.

Informed consent is a process in medical care where patients are provided with all relevant information about their health status, proposed treatments, potential risks and benefits, and alternative options. This allows patients to make informed decisions regarding their healthcare and understand the consequences of their choices. The process includes ensuring that the patient has adequate mental capacity to make such decisions, is fully aware of the implications, and gives their voluntary agreement for the proposed treatment or procedure. It's a fundamental principle in medical ethics and is required by law in many jurisdictions to protect patients' rights.

Socioeconomic factors are a range of interconnected conditions and influences that affect the opportunities and resources a person or group has to maintain and improve their health and well-being. These factors include:

1. Economic stability: This includes employment status, job security, income level, and poverty status. Lower income and lack of employment are associated with poorer health outcomes.
2. Education: Higher levels of education are generally associated with better health outcomes. Education can affect a person's ability to access and understand health information, as well as their ability to navigate the healthcare system.
3. Social and community context: This includes factors such as social support networks, discrimination, and community safety. Strong social supports and positive community connections are associated with better health outcomes, while discrimination and lack of safety can negatively impact health.
4. Healthcare access and quality: Access to affordable, high-quality healthcare is an important socioeconomic factor that can significantly impact a person's health. Factors such as insurance status, availability of providers, and cultural competency of healthcare systems can all affect healthcare access and quality.
5. Neighborhood and built environment: The physical conditions in which people live, work, and play can also impact their health. Factors such as housing quality, transportation options, availability of healthy foods, and exposure to environmental hazards can all influence health outcomes.

Socioeconomic factors are often interrelated and can have a cumulative effect on health outcomes. For example, someone who lives in a low-income neighborhood with limited access to healthy foods and safe parks may also face challenges related to employment, education, and healthcare access that further impact their health. Addressing socioeconomic factors is an important part of promoting health equity and reducing health disparities.

Midwifery is the health profession that involves providing care to childbearing individuals and their newborns during pregnancy, labor, birth, and postpartum period. Midwives offer a range of services including: conducting physical examinations, monitoring the health of the fetus and mother, providing education and counseling on pregnancy-related topics, managing common complaints and complications, and collaborating with other healthcare professionals when necessary. They promote normal childbirth and work to minimize technological interventions, while ensuring the safety and well-being of both the mother and baby. Midwifery is based on the principles of informed choice, continuity of care, and evidence-based practice.

Self care is a health practice that involves individuals taking responsibility for their own health and well-being by actively seeking out and participating in activities and behaviors that promote healthy living, prevent illness and disease, and manage existing medical conditions. Self care includes a wide range of activities such as:

* Following a healthy diet and exercise routine
* Getting adequate sleep and rest
* Managing stress through relaxation techniques or mindfulness practices
* Practicing good hygiene and grooming habits
* Seeking preventive care through regular check-ups and screenings
* Taking prescribed medications as directed by a healthcare provider
* Monitoring symptoms and seeking medical attention when necessary

Self care is an important part of overall health and wellness, and can help individuals maintain their physical, emotional, and mental health. It is also an essential component of chronic disease management, helping people with ongoing medical conditions to manage their symptoms and improve their quality of life.

A newborn infant is a baby who is within the first 28 days of life. This period is also referred to as the neonatal period. Newborns require specialized care and attention due to their immature bodily systems and increased vulnerability to various health issues. They are closely monitored for signs of well-being, growth, and development during this critical time.

"Age factors" refer to the effects, changes, or differences that age can have on various aspects of health, disease, and medical care. These factors can encompass a wide range of issues, including:

1. Physiological changes: As people age, their bodies undergo numerous physical changes that can affect how they respond to medications, illnesses, and medical procedures. For example, older adults may be more sensitive to certain drugs or have weaker immune systems, making them more susceptible to infections.
2. Chronic conditions: Age is a significant risk factor for many chronic diseases, such as heart disease, diabetes, cancer, and arthritis. As a result, age-related medical issues are common and can impact treatment decisions and outcomes.
3. Cognitive decline: Aging can also lead to cognitive changes, including memory loss and decreased decision-making abilities. These changes can affect a person's ability to understand and comply with medical instructions, leading to potential complications in their care.
4. Functional limitations: Older adults may experience physical limitations that impact their mobility, strength, and balance, increasing the risk of falls and other injuries. These limitations can also make it more challenging for them to perform daily activities, such as bathing, dressing, or cooking.
5. Social determinants: Age-related factors, such as social isolation, poverty, and lack of access to transportation, can impact a person's ability to obtain necessary medical care and affect their overall health outcomes.

Understanding age factors is critical for healthcare providers to deliver high-quality, patient-centered care that addresses the unique needs and challenges of older adults. By taking these factors into account, healthcare providers can develop personalized treatment plans that consider a person's age, physical condition, cognitive abilities, and social circumstances.

Reproducibility of results in a medical context refers to the ability to obtain consistent and comparable findings when a particular experiment or study is repeated, either by the same researcher or by different researchers, following the same experimental protocol. It is an essential principle in scientific research that helps to ensure the validity and reliability of research findings.

In medical research, reproducibility of results is crucial for establishing the effectiveness and safety of new treatments, interventions, or diagnostic tools. It involves conducting well-designed studies with adequate sample sizes, appropriate statistical analyses, and transparent reporting of methods and findings to allow other researchers to replicate the study and confirm or refute the results.

The lack of reproducibility in medical research has become a significant concern in recent years, as several high-profile studies have failed to produce consistent findings when replicated by other researchers. This has led to increased scrutiny of research practices and a call for greater transparency, rigor, and standardization in the conduct and reporting of medical research.

Risk assessment in the medical context refers to the process of identifying, evaluating, and prioritizing risks to patients, healthcare workers, or the community related to healthcare delivery. It involves determining the likelihood and potential impact of adverse events or hazards, such as infectious diseases, medication errors, or medical devices failures, and implementing measures to mitigate or manage those risks. The goal of risk assessment is to promote safe and high-quality care by identifying areas for improvement and taking action to minimize harm.

Retrospective studies, also known as retrospective research or looking back studies, are a type of observational study that examines data from the past to draw conclusions about possible causal relationships between risk factors and outcomes. In these studies, researchers analyze existing records, medical charts, or previously collected data to test a hypothesis or answer a specific research question.

Retrospective studies can be useful for generating hypotheses and identifying trends, but they have limitations compared to prospective studies, which follow participants forward in time from exposure to outcome. Retrospective studies are subject to biases such as recall bias, selection bias, and information bias, which can affect the validity of the results. Therefore, retrospective studies should be interpreted with caution and used primarily to generate hypotheses for further testing in prospective studies.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Tennis" is generally not a term that has a medical definition. It is most commonly known as a sport or game played with rackets and a ball on a court with a net dividing the space in half. If you have any questions about a specific medical condition or term, I'd be happy to help if I can!

Continuing dental education (CDE) refers to the ongoing education and training that dentists and other oral health professionals engage in after completing their initial professional degrees. The purpose of CDE is to help these professionals stay current with advances in dental technology, research, and patient care so they can continue to provide the highest quality of care to their patients.

CDE programs may cover a wide range of topics, including new techniques for treating oral diseases, advances in dental materials and equipment, ethical issues in dental practice, and strategies for managing a successful dental practice. These programs may take many forms, such as lectures, workshops, seminars, online courses, or hands-on training sessions.

In most states, dentists are required to complete a certain number of CDE credits each year in order to maintain their licensure. This helps ensure that all dental professionals are up-to-date on the latest research and best practices in their field, which ultimately benefits patients by promoting better oral health outcomes.

I apologize, but "Brazil" is not a medical term or condition. It is the largest country in both South America and Latin America by land area and population. If you have any questions related to medical terminology or health concerns, please provide more information and I will do my best to help.

"Dissent and disputes" in a medical context generally refer to disagreements or differences of opinion among healthcare professionals, researchers, or patients regarding medical diagnoses, treatments, policies, or ethical issues. These disputes can arise from various factors such as differing clinical experiences, conflicting scientific evidence, differing values and beliefs, or lack of clear guidelines. Dissent and disputes can be resolved through open communication, evidence-based decision making, consensus building, and, when necessary, mediation or arbitration. It is essential to address dissent and disputes in a respectful and constructive manner to ensure the best possible outcomes for patients and to advance medical knowledge and practice.

Community health services refer to a type of healthcare delivery that is organized around the needs of a specific population or community, rather than individual patients. These services are typically focused on preventive care, health promotion, and improving access to care for underserved populations. They can include a wide range of services, such as:

* Primary care, including routine check-ups, immunizations, and screenings
* Dental care
* Mental health and substance abuse treatment
* Public health initiatives, such as disease prevention and health education programs
* Home health care and other supportive services for people with chronic illnesses or disabilities
* Health services for special populations, such as children, the elderly, or those living in rural areas

The goal of community health services is to improve the overall health of a population by addressing the social, economic, and environmental factors that can impact health. This approach recognizes that healthcare is just one factor in determining a person's health outcomes, and that other factors such as housing, education, and income also play important roles. By working to address these underlying determinants of health, community health services aim to improve the health and well-being of entire communities.

Dental auxiliaries are healthcare professionals who provide support to dentists in the delivery of oral healthcare services. They work under the supervision of a licensed dentist and perform tasks that require specific technical skills and knowledge. Examples of dental auxiliaries include dental hygienists, dental assistants, and dental lab technicians.

Dental hygienists are responsible for providing preventive dental care to patients, including cleaning teeth, taking x-rays, and educating patients on oral hygiene practices. They may also perform certain clinical procedures under the direct supervision of a dentist.

Dental assistants work closely with dentists during dental procedures, preparing instruments, mixing materials, and providing patient care. They may also perform administrative tasks such as scheduling appointments and managing patient records.

Dental lab technicians create dental restorations such as crowns, bridges, and dentures based on impressions taken by the dentist. They use a variety of materials and techniques to fabricate these devices with precision and accuracy.

It's important to note that the specific roles and responsibilities of dental auxiliaries may vary depending on the jurisdiction and local regulations.

Pregnancy is a physiological state or condition where a fertilized egg (zygote) successfully implants and grows in the uterus of a woman, leading to the development of an embryo and finally a fetus. This process typically spans approximately 40 weeks, divided into three trimesters, and culminates in childbirth. Throughout this period, numerous hormonal and physical changes occur to support the growing offspring, including uterine enlargement, breast development, and various maternal adaptations to ensure the fetus's optimal growth and well-being.

Occupational medicine is a branch of clinical medicine that deals with the prevention and management of diseases and injuries that may arise in the workplace or as a result of work-related activities. It involves evaluating the health risks associated with various jobs, recommending measures to reduce these risks, providing medical care for workers who become ill or injured on the job, and promoting overall health and wellness in the workplace. Occupational medicine physicians may also be involved in developing policies and procedures related to workplace safety, disability management, and return-to-work programs. The ultimate goal of occupational medicine is to help ensure that workers are able to perform their jobs safely and effectively while maintaining their overall health and well-being.

Total Quality Management (TQM) is not a medical term per se, but rather a management approach that has been adopted in various industries, including healthcare. Here's a general definition:

Total Quality Management (TQM) is a customer-focused management framework that involves all employees in an organization in continuous improvement efforts to meet or exceed customer expectations. It is based on the principles of quality control, continuous process improvement, and customer satisfaction. TQM aims to create a culture where all members of the organization are responsible for quality, with the goal of providing defect-free products or services to customers consistently.

In healthcare, TQM can be used to improve patient care, reduce medical errors, increase efficiency, and enhance patient satisfaction. It involves the use of data-driven decision-making, process improvement techniques such as Lean and Six Sigma, and a focus on evidence-based practices. The ultimate goal of TQM in healthcare is to provide high-quality, safe, and cost-effective care to patients.

The Delphi technique is a structured communication method used to reach a consensus through a series of rounds of questionnaires or surveys. It was originally developed as a way for experts to share their opinions and come to an agreement on a particular topic, even when they may not be able to meet in person. The process typically involves:

1. Identifying a panel of experts in the relevant field.
2. Developing a series of questions or statements related to the topic at hand.
3. Distributing the questions or statements to the panel and collecting their responses.
4. Analyzing the responses and providing feedback to the panel.
5. Repeating steps 3-4 for multiple rounds until a consensus is reached or it becomes clear that a consensus cannot be achieved.

The Delphi technique is often used in healthcare and other fields to gather expert opinions on controversial or complex topics, such as setting clinical guidelines or developing new technologies. It can help to ensure that the perspectives of a diverse group of experts are taken into account, and that the final consensus reflects a broad range of viewpoints.

Administrative personnel in a medical context typically refer to individuals who work in healthcare facilities or organizations, but do not provide direct patient care. Their roles involve supporting the management and operations of the healthcare system through various administrative tasks. These responsibilities may include managing schedules, coordinating appointments, handling billing and insurance matters, maintaining medical records, communicating with patients and other staff members, and performing various clerical duties.

Examples of administrative personnel in a medical setting might include medical office assistants, medical receptionists, medical billers, medical coders, medical transcriptionists, and healthcare administrators. While they do not provide direct patient care, their work is essential to ensuring the smooth functioning of healthcare services and the overall quality of patient care.

'Hospital Personnel' is a general term that refers to all individuals who are employed by or provide services on behalf of a hospital. This can include, but is not limited to:

1. Healthcare professionals such as doctors, nurses, pharmacists, therapists, and technicians.
2. Administrative staff who manage the hospital's operations, including human resources, finance, and management.
3. Support services personnel such as maintenance workers, food service workers, housekeeping staff, and volunteers.
4. Medical students, interns, and trainees who are gaining clinical experience in the hospital setting.

All of these individuals play a critical role in ensuring that the hospital runs smoothly and provides high-quality care to its patients.

Medical Informatics, also known as Healthcare Informatics, is the scientific discipline that deals with the systematic processing and analysis of data, information, and knowledge in healthcare and biomedicine. It involves the development and application of theories, methods, and tools to create, acquire, store, retrieve, share, use, and reuse health-related data and knowledge for clinical, educational, research, and administrative purposes. Medical Informatics encompasses various areas such as bioinformatics, clinical informatics, consumer health informatics, public health informatics, and translational bioinformatics. It aims to improve healthcare delivery, patient outcomes, and biomedical research through the effective use of information technology and data management strategies.

Cultural diversity, in the context of healthcare and medicine, refers to the existence, recognition, and respect of the different cultural backgrounds, beliefs, values, traditions, languages, and practices of individuals or groups. This concept is important in providing culturally competent care, which aims to improve health outcomes by addressing the unique needs and preferences of patients from diverse backgrounds. Cultural diversity in healthcare recognizes that there are variations in how people perceive and experience health and illness, communicate about symptoms and treatments, seek help, and follow medical advice. By understanding and incorporating cultural diversity into healthcare practices, providers can build trust, reduce disparities, and enhance patient satisfaction and adherence to treatment plans.

Benchmarking in the medical context refers to the process of comparing healthcare services, practices, or outcomes against a widely recognized standard or within best practice recommendations, with the aim of identifying areas for improvement and implementing changes to enhance the quality and efficiency of care. This can involve comparing data on various metrics such as patient satisfaction, clinical outcomes, costs, and safety measures. The goal is to continuously monitor and improve the quality of healthcare services provided to patients.

In the context of medicine and psychology, perception refers to the neurophysiological processes, cognitive abilities, and psychological experiences that enable an individual to interpret and make sense of sensory information from their environment. It involves the integration of various stimuli such as sight, sound, touch, taste, and smell to form a coherent understanding of one's surroundings, objects, events, or ideas.

Perception is a complex and active process that includes attention, pattern recognition, interpretation, and organization of sensory information. It can be influenced by various factors, including prior experiences, expectations, cultural background, emotional states, and cognitive biases. Alterations in perception may occur due to neurological disorders, psychiatric conditions, sensory deprivation or overload, drugs, or other external factors.

In a clinical setting, healthcare professionals often assess patients' perceptions of their symptoms, illnesses, or treatments to develop individualized care plans and improve communication and adherence to treatment recommendations.

In the context of healthcare and medical psychology, motivation refers to the driving force behind an individual's goal-oriented behavior. It is the internal or external stimuli that initiate, direct, and sustain a person's actions towards achieving their desired outcomes. Motivation can be influenced by various factors such as biological needs, personal values, emotional states, and social contexts.

In clinical settings, healthcare professionals often assess patients' motivation to engage in treatment plans, adhere to medical recommendations, or make lifestyle changes necessary for improving their health status. Enhancing a patient's motivation can significantly impact their ability to manage chronic conditions, recover from illnesses, and maintain overall well-being. Various motivational interviewing techniques and interventions are employed by healthcare providers to foster intrinsic motivation and support patients in achieving their health goals.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Moral Obligations" is not a term that has a specific medical definition. The term "moral obligations" is more related to ethics and philosophy, referring to the duties or actions that are considered right or wrong based on a set of moral principles or values.

However, in a broader sense, healthcare professionals may use the term "moral obligations" to refer to their professional responsibility and commitment to providing compassionate, respectful, and high-quality care to all patients, regardless of their background, beliefs, or circumstances. This concept is closely related to medical ethics and professionalism, which provide guidelines for ethical decision-making in clinical practice.

Mental health services refer to the various professional health services designed to treat and support individuals with mental health conditions. These services are typically provided by trained and licensed mental health professionals, such as psychiatrists, psychologists, social workers, mental health counselors, and marriage and family therapists. The services may include:

1. Assessment and diagnosis of mental health disorders
2. Psychotherapy or "talk therapy" to help individuals understand and manage their symptoms
3. Medication management for mental health conditions
4. Case management and care coordination to connect individuals with community resources and support
5. Psychoeducation to help individuals and families better understand mental health conditions and how to manage them
6. Crisis intervention and stabilization services
7. Inpatient and residential treatment for severe or chronic mental illness
8. Prevention and early intervention services to identify and address mental health concerns before they become more serious
9. Rehabilitation and recovery services to help individuals with mental illness achieve their full potential and live fulfilling lives in the community.

Occupational health is a branch of medicine that focuses on the physical, mental, and social well-being of workers in all types of jobs. The goal of occupational health is to prevent work-related injuries, illnesses, and disabilities, while also promoting the overall health and safety of employees. This may involve identifying and assessing potential hazards in the workplace, implementing controls to reduce or eliminate those hazards, providing education and training to workers on safe practices, and conducting medical surveillance and screenings to detect early signs of work-related health problems.

Occupational health also involves working closely with employers, employees, and other stakeholders to develop policies and programs that support the health and well-being of workers. This may include promoting healthy lifestyles, providing access to mental health resources, and supporting return-to-work programs for injured or ill workers. Ultimately, the goal of occupational health is to create a safe and healthy work environment that enables employees to perform their jobs effectively and efficiently, while also protecting their long-term health and well-being.

Prevalence, in medical terms, refers to the total number of people in a given population who have a particular disease or condition at a specific point in time, or over a specified period. It is typically expressed as a percentage or a ratio of the number of cases to the size of the population. Prevalence differs from incidence, which measures the number of new cases that develop during a certain period.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "parents" is not a term that has a medical definition. In general usage, parents are the two people (typically) who bring up and care for a child, or who have given birth to or adopted a child. They are responsible for the child's housing, food, clothing, education, and medical care. Is there a specific medical or healthcare-related context you had in mind? I would be happy to help further if I can.

In medical terms, disclosure generally refers to the act of revealing or sharing confidential or sensitive information with another person or entity. This can include disclosing a patient's medical history, diagnosis, treatment plan, or other personal health information to the patient themselves, their family members, or other healthcare providers involved in their care.

Disclosure is an important aspect of informed consent, as patients have the right to know their medical condition and the risks and benefits of various treatment options. Healthcare providers are required to disclose relevant information to their patients in a clear and understandable manner, so that they can make informed decisions about their healthcare.

In some cases, disclosure may also be required by law or professional ethical standards, such as when there is a legal obligation to report certain types of injuries or illnesses, or when there is a concern for patient safety. It is important for healthcare providers to carefully consider the potential risks and benefits of disclosure in each individual case, and to ensure that they are acting in the best interests of their patients while also protecting their privacy and confidentiality.

Clinical medicine is a branch of medical practice that deals with the diagnosis and treatment of diseases in patients. It is based on the direct examination and evaluation of patients, including taking medical histories, performing physical examinations, ordering and interpreting diagnostic tests, and formulating treatment plans. Clinical medicine encompasses various specialties such as internal medicine, surgery, pediatrics, obstetrics and gynecology, psychiatry, and neurology, among others. The goal of clinical medicine is to provide evidence-based, compassionate care to patients to improve their health outcomes and quality of life.

Competency-based education (CBE) is a teaching and learning approach that focuses on measuring and demonstrating specific skills, abilities, or knowledge competencies rather than solely on the amount of time spent in class or completing coursework. In this model, students progress through their education by mastering a series of clearly defined competencies at their own pace.

In medical education, CBE aims to ensure that healthcare professionals possess the necessary skills and knowledge to provide safe and effective patient care. Competency-based medical education often involves the use of direct assessments, such as objective structured clinical examinations (OSCEs), standardized patients, and workplace-based assessments, to evaluate students' competencies in various domains, including medical knowledge, communication, professionalism, and clinical skills.

The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) has identified six core competencies that residents must achieve during their training: patient care, medical knowledge, practice-based learning and improvement, interpersonal and communication skills, professionalism, and systems-based practice. Competency-based medical education helps to ensure that these competencies are systematically assessed and developed throughout a trainee's educational journey.

Physical therapy modalities refer to the various forms of treatment that physical therapists use to help reduce pain, promote healing, and restore function to the body. These modalities can include:

1. Heat therapy: This includes the use of hot packs, paraffin baths, and infrared heat to increase blood flow, relax muscles, and relieve pain.
2. Cold therapy: Also known as cryotherapy, this involves the use of ice packs, cold compresses, or cooling gels to reduce inflammation, numb the area, and relieve pain.
3. Electrical stimulation: This uses electrical currents to stimulate nerves and muscles, which can help to reduce pain, promote healing, and improve muscle strength and function.
4. Ultrasound: This uses high-frequency sound waves to penetrate deep into tissues, increasing blood flow, reducing inflammation, and promoting healing.
5. Manual therapy: This includes techniques such as massage, joint mobilization, and stretching, which are used to improve range of motion, reduce pain, and promote relaxation.
6. Traction: This is a technique that uses gentle pulling on the spine or other joints to help relieve pressure and improve alignment.
7. Light therapy: Also known as phototherapy, this involves the use of low-level lasers or light-emitting diodes (LEDs) to promote healing and reduce pain and inflammation.
8. Therapeutic exercise: This includes a range of exercises that are designed to improve strength, flexibility, balance, and coordination, and help patients recover from injury or illness.

Physical therapy modalities are often used in combination with other treatments, such as manual therapy and therapeutic exercise, to provide a comprehensive approach to rehabilitation and pain management.

'Boxing' is a combat sport that involves two competitors throwing punches at each other with gloved hands within a ring. According to medical definitions, boxing can pose several potential risks and injuries to the participants, including but not limited to:

1. Cuts and bruises from punches or headbutts
2. Fractures or dislocations of bones in the hands, wrists, or face
3. Concussions or traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) from blows to the head
4. Eye injuries, including retinal detachment and cataracts
5. Internal bleeding or organ damage
6. Long-term neurological problems, such as Parkinson's disease or chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE)

It is important for boxers to undergo regular medical evaluations and take measures to minimize the risks associated with the sport, such as wearing protective gear and using proper technique.

Consumer satisfaction in a medical context refers to the degree to which a patient or their family is content with the healthcare services, products, or experiences they have received. It is a measure of how well the healthcare delivery aligns with the patient's expectations, needs, and preferences. Factors that contribute to consumer satisfaction may include the quality of care, communication and interpersonal skills of healthcare providers, accessibility and convenience, affordability, and outcomes. High consumer satisfaction is associated with better adherence to treatment plans, improved health outcomes, and higher patient loyalty.

Biomedical research is a branch of scientific research that involves the study of biological processes and diseases in order to develop new treatments and therapies. This type of research often involves the use of laboratory techniques, such as cell culture and genetic engineering, as well as clinical trials in humans. The goal of biomedical research is to advance our understanding of how living organisms function and to find ways to prevent and treat various medical conditions. It encompasses a wide range of disciplines, including molecular biology, genetics, immunology, pharmacology, and neuroscience, among others. Ultimately, the aim of biomedical research is to improve human health and well-being.

In the context of medicine, "consensus" generally refers to a general agreement or accord reached among a group of medical professionals or experts regarding a particular clinical issue, treatment recommendation, or research direction. This consensus may be based on a review and evaluation of available scientific evidence, as well as consideration of clinical experience and patient values. Consensus-building processes can take various forms, such as formal consensus conferences, Delphi methods, or nominal group techniques. It is important to note that while consensus can help guide medical decision making, it does not necessarily equate with established scientific fact and should be considered alongside other sources of evidence in clinical practice.

In the context of medical science, culture refers to the growth of microorganisms, such as bacteria or fungi, under controlled conditions in a laboratory setting. This process is used to identify and study the characteristics of these microorganisms, including their growth patterns, metabolic activities, and sensitivity to various antibiotics or other treatments.

The culture medium, which provides nutrients for the microorganisms to grow, can be modified to mimic the environment in which the organism is typically found. This helps researchers to better understand how the organism behaves in its natural habitat.

In addition to its use in diagnosis and research, culture is also an important tool in monitoring the effectiveness of treatments and tracking the spread of infectious diseases.

"Foreign Medical Graduates" (FMGs) are physicians who have graduated from a medical school outside of the country where they are seeking to practice medicine. These doctors may be required to pass certain examinations and complete additional training in order to meet the licensing requirements of the new country. The specific requirements for FMGs can vary depending on the country and jurisdiction.

Social support in a medical context refers to the resources and assistance provided by an individual's social network, including family, friends, peers, and community groups. These resources can include emotional, informational, and instrumental support, which help individuals cope with stress, manage health conditions, and maintain their overall well-being.

Emotional support involves providing empathy, care, and encouragement to help an individual feel valued, understood, and cared for. Informational support refers to the provision of advice, guidance, and knowledge that can help an individual make informed decisions about their health or other aspects of their life. Instrumental support includes practical assistance such as help with daily tasks, financial aid, or access to resources.

Social support has been shown to have a positive impact on physical and mental health outcomes, including reduced stress levels, improved immune function, better coping skills, and increased resilience. It can also play a critical role in promoting healthy behaviors, such as adherence to medical treatments and lifestyle changes.

Medical records are organized, detailed collections of information about a patient's health history, including their symptoms, diagnoses, treatments, medications, test results, and any other relevant data. These records are created and maintained by healthcare professionals during the course of providing medical care and serve as an essential tool for continuity, communication, and decision-making in healthcare. They may exist in paper form, electronic health records (EHRs), or a combination of both. Medical records also play a critical role in research, quality improvement, public health, reimbursement, and legal proceedings.

Primary care nursing is a specialized area of nursing practice that focuses on providing first-contact, continuous, comprehensive, and coordinated care to individuals, families, and communities in a primary care setting. It encompasses the promotion of health and prevention of illness, as well as the assessment, diagnosis, and management of acute and chronic conditions. Primary care nurses work collaboratively with other healthcare professionals to ensure that patients receive high-quality, patient-centered care that is tailored to their unique needs and preferences. They may provide a range of services, including health education, counseling, screening, immunizations, and disease management, and play an important role in promoting health equity and reducing health disparities.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "personnel turnover" is not a medical term. It is a business and human resources concept that refers to the measure of how often employees leave a company and are replaced. It is calculated by dividing the number of employees who left during a certain timeframe by the average number of employees during that same period, then multiplying the result by 100 to get a percentage.

In a medical setting, you might encounter terms like "staff turnover" or "employee turnover," which refer to the same concept but in the context of healthcare organizations and their workforce. High personnel/staff/employee turnover can impact patient care, team morale, and organizational efficiency.

Medical malpractice is a legal term that refers to the breach of the duty of care by a healthcare provider, such as a doctor, nurse, or hospital, resulting in harm to the patient. This breach could be due to negligence, misconduct, or a failure to provide appropriate treatment. The standard of care expected from healthcare providers is based on established medical practices and standards within the relevant medical community.

To prove medical malpractice, four key elements must typically be demonstrated:

1. Duty of Care: A healthcare provider-patient relationship must exist, establishing a duty of care.
2. Breach of Duty: The healthcare provider must have failed to meet the standard of care expected in their field or specialty.
3. Causation: The breach of duty must be directly linked to the patient's injury or harm.
4. Damages: The patient must have suffered harm, such as physical injury, emotional distress, financial loss, or other negative consequences due to the healthcare provider's actions or inactions.

Medical malpractice cases can result in significant financial compensation for the victim and may also lead to changes in medical practices and policies to prevent similar incidents from happening in the future.

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... as Professional Psychology, the name of the journal was extended to Professional Psychology: Research and Practice in 1983. The ... The Professional Psychology: Research and Practice is a peer-reviewed, English language journal published six times per year by ... "Professional Psychology: Research and Practice". 2021 Journal Citation Reports. Web of Science (Social Sciences ed.). Clarivate ... "publishes conceptual and data-based articles on the issues and methods involved in the practice of psychology. Topics encompass ...
... (USPAP) can be considered the quality control standards applicable for ... While USPAP answers a specific regulatory need in the U.S., it has also been adopted by many appraisal professional ... In addition, over the years, ten Statements regarding specific practices in appraisal have been developed, however, all ten ... USPAP was originally written in 1986-87 by an ad hoc committee representing the various appraisal professional organizations in ...
"Predictors of program performance on the Examination for Professional Practice in Psychology (EPPP)". Professional Psychology: ... The Examination for Professional Practice in Psychology (EPPP) is a licensing examination developed by the Association of State ... Sharpless, Brian (2018). "Are demographic Variables Associated with Performance on the Examination for Professional Practice in ... Professional Psychology: Research and Practice. 40 (4): 348-353. doi:10.1037/a0015750. Rehm, L.P. (2006). Psychology Licensure ...
Becher, J (2012). "Horizontal Violence in Nursing". Professional Practice. 21 (4): 210-232. PMID 22966523. Board, Belinda Jane ... Threat to professional status - including belittling opinions, public professional humiliation, accusations regarding lack of ... McGraw Hill Professional. ISBN 978-0-07-144672-3. McPhaul, Kathleen; Lipscomb, Jane. "Conceptual and Methodologic Issues in ... Over half (63%) saw a mental health professional for their work-related symptoms. Respondents reported other symptoms that can ...
Professional". Theory into Practice. 9 (2): 89-95. doi:10.1080/00405847009542259. JSTOR 1475566. Dale, Edgar (1929). Factual ...
... improving professional practice; or outstanding contributions towards the objectives of the College of Paramedics. The college ... The introduction of professional national registration of paramedics in 2000 led to a demand for the formation of a new ... The College of Paramedics is the recognised professional body for paramedics in the United Kingdom. The role of the College is ... The college has been the key partner in the development of the Professional Guidance on the Content of Ambulance Clinical ...
Theory in Practice: Increasing Professional Effectiveness. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass. ISBN 0-87589-230-2 Argyris, C. 1976. ... ISBN 0-87589-665-0. Argyris, Chris; Schön, Donald (1974). Theory in Practice. Increasing professional effectiveness. San ... Organizational Learning II: Theory, Method and Practice. Reading, Mass.: Addison-Wesley. ISBN 0-201-62983-6 Argyris, C. 1999. ... Theory in Practice (1974); Organizational Learning (1978); Organizational Learning II (1996) - all with Donald Schön). He has ...
"Professional Practice in Nursing". "Senior Management Team". "Doctor Thierry Daboval". "Governance". "Origins and history of ... It was recognized as a "Best Practice Spotlight Organization" from the Registered Nurses' Association of Ontario (RNAO). In ... It also includes continuous training for health care professionals delivered in French. "Hôpital Montfort receives its Academic ... Montfort trains Francophone healthcare professionals with the help of the hospital's knowledge institute, the Institut du ...
"Division of Professional Practice". Georgia Institute of Technology. Archived from the original on June 30, 2007. Retrieved ... "Academic Information: Professional Practice Programs". Georgia Tech Factbook. Georgia Institute of Technology. Archived from ... "UC Inducts 2007 Honorees into Co-op Hall of Honor". Division of Professional Practice. University of Cincinnati. 2007. Archived ... Georgia Tech's Division of Professional Practice (DoPP), established in 1912 as the Georgia Institute of Technology Cooperative ...
... or license required for professional practice but is defined by the department of education as a professional degree that ... "Doctor's degree-professional practice". U.S. Department of Education. Retrieved March 4, 2017. London, Ralph L. (15 January ... "Doctor's degree-professional practice". Glossary. National Center for Education Statistics. Retrieved 2017-04-23. "Doctor's ... These are titled as doctor's degrees and classified as "doctors degree - professional practice". While research doctorates ...
Christian coaching is an approach to the practice of professional coaching-whether focused on personal or professional growth- ... The Professional Practice Series. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass. pp. 205-227. ISBN 9780470553329. OCLC 635455413. Archived from ... Professional Coaching: Principles and Practice. Springer Publishing. pp. 13-14. ISBN 9780826180094. Retrieved 26 July 2020. ... Professional bodies have continued to develop their own standards, but the lack of regulation means anyone can call themselves ...
... or license required for professional practice." As with the "first professional degree", this classification also requires that ... A Professional Degree meets the accreditation standards of a particular professional association or college Professional ... "first professional degree". Besides professional doctorates, other professional degrees can exist that use the title of ... In addition to initial professional degrees, some professional master's degrees and most professional doctorates, e.g., the ...
"Morality in professional practice". Journal of Applied Linguistics and Professional Practice. 9 (2): 155-64. doi:10.1558/japl. ...
Hillman, Robert S.; Ault, Kenneth A.; Rinder, Henry (June 2005). Hematology in Clinical Practice. McGraw Hill Professional. ... McGraw Hill Professional. ISBN 978-0-07-164137-1. Eisa, Mahmoud S.; Mohamed, Shehab F.; Ibrahim, Firyal; Shariff, Khalid; Sadik ... BRAUNSTEIN.EVAN (2019-05-03). "Overview of Hemolytic Anemia - Hematology and Oncology". Merck Manuals Professional Edition (in ...
"Specialty practice in rehabilitation psychology". Professional Psychology: Research and Practice. 41 (1): 82-88. doi:10.1037/ ... and a passing score on the Examination for Professional Practice in Psychology (EPPP), a standardized knowledge-based ... In S. Davis (Ed.), Rehabilitation: The use of theories and models in practice (pp. 49-62). New York: Elsevier. Wendell, S. ( ... The American Board of Professional Psychology specifies that in order to meet the standards of the speciality, an individual ...
1998). "Psychological practice in primary care settings: Practical tips for clinicians". Professional Psychology: Research and ... Professional Psychology: Research and Practice. 37 (6): 676-682. doi:10.1037/0735-7028.37.6.676. Hunter, C.L., Goodie, J.L., ... Positioning mental health practice with medical/surgical practice. San Diego: Academic Press. Narrow, W.; Reiger, D.; Rae, D.; ... At present professional training programs with an emphasis in primary care are limited in number which has led to the growth of ...
Burnout appears to be more common in occupations include health care and mental health care professionals, social welfare ... Research and Practice. 15 (2): 260-270. doi:10.1037/0735-7028.15.2.260. ISSN 1939-1323. Agras, S.; Sylvester, D.; Oliveau, D. ( ... This anxiety is easily exacerbated by work-related situations such as presentations, professional and friendly social ... Belcastro, Philip A.; Hays, Leon C. (1984). "Ergophilia …ergophobia … ergo … burnout?". Professional Psychology: Research and ...
Professional Psychology: Research and Practice. 36 (4): 376-390. CiteSeerX 10.1.1.472.68. doi:10.1037/0735-7028.36.4.376. S2CID ... Use of electronic games by clinicians is a new practice, and unknown risks as well as benefits may arise as the practice ... Professional Psychology: Research and Practice. 33 (6): 515-522. CiteSeerX 10.1.1.514.4911. doi:10.1037/0735-7028.33.6.515. ... are usually members or affiliates of professional training institutions and tend to be subject to codes of ethical practice. ...
Professional Psychology: Research and Practice. 2007 Dec;38(6):613. Margolin G, Ramos MC, Baucom BR, Bennett DC, Guran EL. ...
Professional Psychology: Research and Practice. 37 (5): 515-522. doi:10.1037/0735-7028.37.5.515. ISSN 1939-1323. Five tests ... It has been rated by mental health professionals as one of the top five most discredited psychological tests. In contrast to ... Deri, Susan (1949) Introduction to the Szondi Test: Theory and Practice Richardson, Diane (2009) The Szondi Test Archived 5 ... Jobs of the hysteriform group include: acting (in females, amazons and tragic heroines roles); politics professionals: member ...
Professional Psychology: Research and Practice. 21 (5): 372-378. doi:10.1037/0735-7028.21.5.372. Hofmann, Stefan G; Barlow, ... Lambert's research later inspired a book on common factors theory in the practice of therapy titled The Heart and Soul of ... To be useful for purposes of psychotherapy practice and training, most models reduce the number of common factors to a handful ... Laska, Kevin M; Gurman, Alan S; Wampold, Bruce E (December 2014). "Expanding the lens of evidence-based practice in ...
Professional Psychology: Research and Practice. 23 (3): 203-210. doi:10.1037/0735-7028.23.3.203. ISSN 1939-1323. Hobman, ... 309, Business Practice Findings. Bolin, A.; Heatherly (2001). "Predictors of Employee Deviance: The Relationship between Bad ...
A content analysis of evaluations in practice". Professional Psychology: Research and Practice. 33 (6): 557-565. doi:10.1037/ ... A survey of experienced professionals (revisited)" (PDF). Professional Psychology: Research and Practice. 28 (2): 137-145. doi: ... It has been observed that there is considerable variability among professionals in following professional guidelines, leading ... Professional Psychology: Research and Practice. 42 (2): 121-129. doi:10.1037/a0022506. PMC 3100552. PMID 21625392. Sackett, ...
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Professional Psychology: Research and Practice. 38 (6): 603-612. doi:10.1037/0735-7028.38.6.603. ISSN 1939-1323. Neff, K.D.; ... Some cited effective workplace changes include encouraging professionals to take some time off, ensuring that professionals eat ... Professional Psychology: Research and Practice. 42 (4): 301-307. CiteSeerX 10.1.1.362.4676. doi:10.1037/a0024482. ISSN 1939- ... and student affairs professionals. Non-professionals, such as family members and other informal caregivers of people who have a ...
Professional Psychology: Research and Practice. American Psychological Association. 33 (3): 242-248. doi:10.1037/0735-7028.33. ... professional associations and the media to expose these practices and to promote respect for diversity. The World Health ... When the term ex-gay was introduced to professional literature in 1980, E. Mansell Pattison defined it as describing a person ... Because of this, major mental health professional organizations discourage and caution individuals against attempting to change ...
"National Professional Practice Assessment® > Required Professional Capabilities > I am a CHRP > Certified Human Resources ... The National Professional Practice Assessment (NPPA) is the second and final exam that CHRP candidates must complete in order ... The National Professional Practice Assessment is no longer used to assess human resources experience. In Canada, the Certified ... The exam writer is then asked to select from four possible answers the most effective action the HR professional should take to ...
EY Asia-Pacific Professional Practice Director, based in Singapore. ... EY Asia-Pacific Professional Practice Director Experienced audit leader working closely with Assurance professionals all over ... He became EY Asia-Pacific Professional Practice Director in July 2021 and was previously EY Global Assurance Quality Enablement ... Quality Enablement Leaders and Professional Practice improve and monitor quality initiatives.. He has also served on some of ...
The Professional Development Practices listed here are based on research and best practice and provide the best conditions for ... The CDC Professional Development Practices listed here are based on research and best practice and provide the best conditions ... Training and Professional Developmentplus icon *Professional Development 101 and 201. *e-Learning Series: Training Tools for ... Professional Development Follow-Up Support. *How to Build a Training Cadre: A Step-by-Step Processplus icon *Phase 1: ...
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EDUC 2002 - Professional Practice & Research. North Terrace Campus - Semester 2 - 2014. 2024. 2023. 2022. 2021. 2020. 2019. ... Engage in reflective and self-directed practice as stated in Aitsls (2011) Standard 6: Engage in Professional Learning. ... Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned ... How is educational practice influenced by research?. Examine newspapers reporting of a current educational or other issue- ...
If you have any questions about this Privacy Policy, the practices of this site, your dealings with our Website or Services, or ... Your information may also be shared to parties who support our business, such as professional advisors as well as web-hosting ... We are not responsible for the data collection and use practices of such other sites. This Policy applies solely to the ... Fortunately, you can become broadly compliant by following some basic best practices. If you tackle the steps in...more ...
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Task Force Report 3. Report of the Task Force on Continuous Personal, Professional, and Practice Development in Family Medicine ... Is Making Smoking Status a Vital Sign Sufficient to Increase Cessation Support Actions in Clinical Practice? Raymond Boyle and ...
If you have any questions about this Privacy Policy, the practices of this site, your dealings with our Website or Services, or ... Your information may also be shared to parties who support our business, such as professional advisors as well as web-hosting ... We are not responsible for the data collection and use practices of such other sites. This Policy applies solely to the ... Tom Fox, the Voice of Compliance brings to you, the compliance professional, the compliance stories you need to...more ...
IMA Statement of Ethical Professional Practice While specifically developed for IMA members to guide member conduct, the ... In applying the Standards of Ethical Professional Practice, the member may encounter unethical issues or behavior. In these ... A commitment to ethical professional practice includes overarching principles that express our values and standards that guide ... anonymous helpline that the member may call to request how key elements of the IMA Statement of Ethical Professional Practice ...
Ed.D. Professional Practice Dissertation Option for Education Practitioners:. Choose an action research pathway that allows you ... The Professional Practice Dissertation is an important addition to our celebrated School of Education offerings," said Dr. ... Regent University School of Education Launches Professional Practice Dissertation Option. June 20, 2022 ... Regent University School of Education is pleased to announce the launch of a Professional Practice Dissertation (PPD) for its ...
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Audit and feedback generally leads to small but potentially important improvements in professional practice. The effectiveness ... Audit and feedback: effects on professional practice and healthcare outcomes Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2012 Jun 13;(6): ... Background: Audit and feedback is widely used as a strategy to improve professional practice either on its own or as a ... Objectives: To assess the effects of audit and feedback on the practice of healthcare professionals and patient outcomes and to ...
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This subject represents 24 days of a 72 day clinical program. Students develop entry level skills in the assessment and management of clients with a variety of acquired and developmental communication and swallowing disorders with either the adult or paediatric caseloads. This experience may be undertaken internally at the La Trobe communication clinic or in external agencies (which may be in a rural or remote facility). Student participate in a range of speech pathology activates under the supervision of a qualified speech pathologist. Clinical Education forms and the clinic handbook will be available on LMS. ...
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Osborne states its Test Yourself MCSE practice exam books will help you ace the Windows 2000 exams. Will they? ... Practice, Practice - Then Pass? Osborne states its Test Yourself MCSE practice exam books will help you ace the Windows 2000 ... Osborne/McGraw-Hill Windows 2000 MCSE Practice Exam Books. Test Yourself MCSE Windows 2000 Professional (Exam 70-210) Test ... The Test Yourself volumes help build basic knowledge while the study guides feature practice exam questions and exam tips. Make ...
  • Professional Fashion Practice builds on your experiences in Part 1 and 2, by providing a focus through which you can begin to synthesise your skills, ideas and working methods into ambitious fashion outcomes. (southampton.ac.uk)
  • To assess the effects of audit and feedback on the practice of healthcare professionals and patient outcomes and to examine factors that may explain variation in the effectiveness of audit and feedback. (nih.gov)
  • Randomised trials of audit and feedback (defined as a summary of clinical performance over a specified period of time) that reported objectively measured health professional practice or patient outcomes. (nih.gov)
  • For the primary outcome(s) in each study, we calculated the median absolute risk difference (RD) (adjusted for baseline performance) of compliance with desired practice compliance for dichotomous outcomes and the median percent change relative to the control group for continuous outcomes. (nih.gov)
  • After excluding studies at high risk of bias, there were 82 comparisons from 49 studies featuring dichotomous outcomes, and the weighted median adjusted RD was a 4.3% (interquartile range (IQR) 0.5% to 16%) absolute increase in healthcare professionals' compliance with desired practice. (nih.gov)
  • In a nutshell, PLCs entail whole-staff involvement in a process of intensive reflection upon instructional practices and desired student benchmarks, as well as monitoring of outcomes to ensure success. (educationworld.com)
  • The Labor Management Institute has worked with organizations of all sizes in many industries over the last 30 years to analyze time and attendance management practices and finds correlations in both worked and nonworked time that contribute to the abuse of labor hours in the form of extra and unnecessary overtime, conflicts in practice and policies , cost overruns to budget and adverse outcomes to employees and customers. (adp.com)
  • Further research is needed to understand the effects of nurse managers' practice environments on staff and patient outcomes. (cdc.gov)
  • It does this by developing your skills of reflective practice, by enhancing your knowledge of leading-edge areas of business, and by providing an opportunity to develop your capabilities in practice-based research by means of a major research project. (mdx.ac.uk)
  • The DProf provides a structured framework for critically understanding your work-based activity, and equips you to operate as a reflective professional practitioner. (mdx.ac.uk)
  • Teach the Personal Research Project in South Australian High Schools, Engage in reflective and self-directed practice as stated in Aitsl's (2011) Standard 6: Engage in Professional Learning. (edu.au)
  • introduces techniques for reflective practice and critical thinking as catalysts for on-going professional development and career progression. (mdx.ac.uk)
  • You will be introduced to theory on reflective practice, pedagogy, modes of learning, networking / connectivism, and communication to position yourself in terms of your own learning approach and trajectory of your professional practice. (mdx.ac.uk)
  • The PPD is an action-oriented, systematic approach to investigation and reflective practice. (regent.edu)
  • To addresses this gap, this chapter introduces a strength-based reflective practice model for teachers that integrates the Values in Action classification of character strengths with Brookfield's four lenses for reflective practice, which consists of: (1) the students' eyes, (2) colleagues' perceptions, (3) personal experience, and (4) theory. (springer.com)
  • How can character strengths be integrated into reflective practice to enhance effective learning and teaching? (springer.com)
  • I describe relevant aspects of Peterson and Seligman's ( 2004 ) Values in Action (VIA) strengths classification, surfacing the underlying assumptions of positive education pedagogy, and point to the critical role of reflective practice. (springer.com)
  • Then, illustrating how character strengths can be integrated into reflective practice to enhance effective learning and teaching, I propose a strengths-based model that integrates the VIA across all stages of Brookfield's four-lens reflective practice model. (springer.com)
  • I contend that a strength-based model is a missing piece in the puzzle needed to support reflective practice and will enhance teacher's professional practice in positive education. (springer.com)
  • Why study the DProf Professional Practice at Middlesex University? (mdx.ac.uk)
  • Why study Professional Arts Practice at Middlesex University? (mdx.ac.uk)
  • Results of search for 'su:{Professional practice. (who.int)
  • Through our Nursing Professional Practice Model, we provide our nurses with the support and tools they need to succeed and excel at every stage of their career. (tgh.org)
  • Developed by nurses for nurses, TGH's Nursing Professional Practice Model serves as the framework of our nursing practice, aligning and integrating its mission and values with our overall hospital mission and values. (tgh.org)
  • As an expression of TGH's nursing practice philosophy and values, our Nursing Professional Practice Model describes the various aspects of nursing in a way that brings significance to our nurses' daily work, provides them with clarity of purpose and strengthens their professional identity. (tgh.org)
  • Recognition and rewards - We provide our nurses with meaningful recognition of their exemplary practice and promote their professional advancement. (tgh.org)
  • In addition to driving our nursing strategic plan, our Nursing Professional Practice Model establishes clear goals and expectations for our nurses, describing how they communicate, collaborate, lead and develop professionally. (tgh.org)
  • TGH's Nursing Professional Practice Model reflects our dedication to supporting our nurses in the vital work they perform every day. (tgh.org)
  • Indicators include the number and density of a wide range of health personnel (such as physicians, nurses, midwives, dentists, pharmacists and health care assistants), according to three different concepts (those practising, professionally active and licensed to practice). (who.int)
  • Professional nurses, licensed to practice, total number Indicator code: profnurs.lic A professional nurse licensed to practice has completed a programme of nursing education and is qualified and authorized in his/her country to practice nursing. (who.int)
  • They include practising and other (non-practising) nurses. (who.int)
  • Inclusion - Clinical nurse - District nurse - Nurse anaesthetist - Nurse educator - Nurse practitioner - Public health nurse - Specialist nurse Exclusion - Midwife (unless they work most of the time as nurses) - Paramedical practitioner - University lecturer - Vocational education teacher - Associate professional nurse - Associate professional midwife - Nursing aide Note: The number should be at the end of the calendar year. (who.int)
  • The nurses' accounts of information practices are further analyzed as expressions of their use of discourses as tools in the promotion of specific interests as to what the nursing profession should be. (lu.se)
  • The analysis shows how the science-oriented medical discourse and the holistically oriented nursing discourse are two tools employed in the nurses' accounts of their information practices. (lu.se)
  • Johannisson, J & Sundin, O 2007, ' Putting discourse to work: Information practices and the professional project of nurses ', Library Quarterly , vol. 77, nr. 2, s. 199-218. (lu.se)
  • Hospital work environments that support the professional practice of nurses are critical to patient safety. (cdc.gov)
  • Nurse managers are responsible for creating these professional practice environments for staff nurses, yet little is known about the environments needed to support nurse managers. (cdc.gov)
  • Is Making Smoking Status a Vital Sign Sufficient to Increase Cessation Support Actions in Clinical Practice? (annfammed.org)
  • This is based on the belief that healthcare professionals are prompted to modify their practice when given performance feedback showing that their clinical practice is inconsistent with a desirable target. (nih.gov)
  • This review and meta-analysis assessed which patient engagement strategies improve clinician adherence to recommended clinical practice. (ahrq.gov)
  • Two strategies had moderate impact: enhancing the information elicited from patients and educating patients about best clinical practice. (ahrq.gov)
  • powerful arenas for learning patient safety practices and facilitating transference to clinical practice. (ahrq.gov)
  • Two hours later, at a joint symposium by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP)/The Obesity Society, attendees will get a behind-the-scenes look at the making of the new AAP Obesity Clinical Practice Guideline for children and adolescents with obesity. (medscape.com)
  • It focuses on developing professional capacity, organizational improvement and the implementation of change, looking at theoretical frameworks and concepts, recent research studies, and case examples of effective practice. (sagepub.com)
  • This is a secondary analysis of 2 cross-sectional studies of organizational characteristics that influence nurse manager practice. (cdc.gov)
  • The nurse managers in this analysis reported characteristics of their practice environments that limit their role effectiveness and may negatively impact organizational performance. (cdc.gov)
  • and organizational and professional practices and processes. (cdc.gov)
  • New students who enroll in at least two courses in the Professional Practice in Civil Engineering Infrastructure Certificate program in Fall 2023 or Spring 2024 are eligible to receive the Professional Practice in Civil Infrastructure one-time scholarship, enabling them to take two courses for the price of one. (uwm.edu)
  • For the third phase of the programme of study, you will undertake a major research project that focuses on the work you are undertaking in your organisation as senior professionals, typically in a change leadership role. (mdx.ac.uk)
  • The programme enables you to extend your prior qualifications to gain an honours degree related to your specific area of practice in Early Years, Primary Education or Education and Training. (bucks.ac.uk)
  • Our Professional Practice programme gives you the opportunity to choose your specialism for your future career after your experience of the core curriculum in year one. (bucks.ac.uk)
  • This programme offers you the opportunity to review your current practice and evaluate new approaches, ensuring that you are equipped to meet the challenges of working in an ever changing physiotherapy profession with confidence. (plymouth.ac.uk)
  • Our Professional Practice Postgraduate MA programme provides a flexible, bespoke work-based route to a postgraduate qualification. (lancaster.ac.uk)
  • A key role is played in your capability enhancement by the capstone research project, which enables senior practitioners to improve their professional practice by undertaking rigorous research into that practice. (mdx.ac.uk)
  • Designed to encourage critical analysis and debate, this volume will be a useful resource for graduate and professional development courses in educational leadership and for practitioners. (sagepub.com)
  • This top-up degree is designed to enable practitioners in Early Years, Primary Education and wider Education and Training environments to meet Continuing Professional Development (CPD) needs and to develop expertise in the practice setting. (bucks.ac.uk)
  • 3.1 This practice separately outlines criteria and implementation approaches for the training, continuing education, and professional development of forensic science practitioners. (astm.org)
  • 1.1 This practice provides foundational requirements for the training, continuing education, and professional development of forensic science practitioners to include training criteria toward competency, documentation, and implementation of training, and continuous professional development. (astm.org)
  • Content analysis of the free text comments from 127 nurse managers was used to illustrate the 8 domains of nurse managers' practice environments. (cdc.gov)
  • Critical Essay on 'The Value of Community Practice' or 'The shift in Social Practice' with reflection and supported documentation from your experience if relevant. (bangor.ac.uk)
  • You will develop skills of reflection, critical thinking, ethical considerations of practice, research design and practice-based research activities. (mdx.ac.uk)
  • The model aims to provide a method for critical self-reflection, thereby helping to enable effective professional practice. (springer.com)
  • If you are applying by examination because you do not hold an active CPA permit to practice in any other jurisdiction, you may apply only after you have passed both the CPA Examination and the AICPA Ethics Examination. (delaware.gov)
  • For information about the required course, see Professional Ethics: AICPA's Comprehensive Course or call AICPA directly at (888) 777-7077. (delaware.gov)
  • 3. The Engineering Profession and Society: considers the nature of engineering, its social impact, professional conduct, responsibilities and ethics, sustainability, and a student's future as a professional engineer with particular reference to the development of a personal ePortfolio. (edu.au)
  • Much is said about professional ethics. (bvsalud.org)
  • How well prepared is the student to confront the practice of ethics, and how much qualified is to debate with himself before making the right decision. (bvsalud.org)
  • These sessions aim to promote learners' personal, academic and professional development through self-assessment, target-setting and preparation for Higher Education and future career paths. (acm.ac.uk)
  • Some learners may be based on campus while carrying out their professional practice work. (gmit.ie)
  • Learners can complete 26 weeks focused on an industry project or professional placement, or can complete a semester long project and a semester long professional practice. (gmit.ie)
  • The National Professional Practice Assessment (NPPA) is the second and final exam that CHRP candidates must complete in order to obtain the Certified Human Resources Professional (CHRP) certification. (wikipedia.org)
  • The critical incident assessment provides the exam writer with a description of a practical situation that an HR professional may encounter. (wikipedia.org)
  • The exam writer is then asked to select from four possible answers the most effective action the HR professional should take to deal with the situation. (wikipedia.org)
  • To prepare to take the exam to earn the Certified Executive Compensation Professional (CECP®) designation, we encourage you to first take one of our two practice exams. (worldatwork.org)
  • Osborne states its Test Yourself MCSE practice exam books will help you ace the Windows 2000 exams. (mcpmag.com)
  • Osborne has adopted the marketing technique used by other Win2K MCSE certification publishers, for example, Sybex, of creating two distinct sets of exam-preparation tools - one a book series that essentially amounts to a set of paper-based practice exams (Test Yourself series), and the other a more fleshed-out book set designed to build knowledge (MCSE Study Guide series). (mcpmag.com)
  • The Test Yourself volumes help build basic knowledge while the study guides feature practice exam questions and exam tips. (mcpmag.com)
  • Osborne also provides a license and key code with each Test Yourself book that lets you download a corresponding software-based practice exam, called ExamSim, from www.certification press.com. (mcpmag.com)
  • New graduates from an accredited program in a non-regulated jurisdiction are automatically eligible for the first write attempt at the HPTC entry-to-practice respiratory therapy exam. (csrt.com)
  • New graduates who have failed their first attempt at the HPTC exam, must have their eligibility for subsequent attempts verified by the CSRT before they write the entry-to-practice respiratory therapy HPTC exam. (csrt.com)
  • As the CSRT does not currently provide a process for evaluation of competency and educational equivalency, graduates of international respiratory therapy programs are not eligible to attempt the Health Professionals Testing Canada (HPTC) national certification exam for the purposes of obtaining the CSRT RRT credential. (csrt.com)
  • VIRGINIA BEACH, VA (June 20, 2022) - Regent University School of Education is pleased to announce the launch of a Professional Practice Dissertation (PPD) for its Ed.D. K-12 School Leadership and Advanced Educational Leadership concentrations. (regent.edu)
  • View and download the most recent policy data and analysis on Measures of Professional Practice in West Virginia from the State of the States 2022: Teacher and Principal Evaluation Policies report . (nctq.org)
  • This pathway is designed to increase your skills and specialisms within early years practice. (bucks.ac.uk)
  • Understand how the learning specialist role can provide a career pathway for highly skilled teachers who want to stay in the classroom and work with other teachers to improve their practice. (vic.gov.au)
  • You are expected to develop a more focused and resolved approach to your practice as well as performing more complex skills with confidence, evaluating your work and developing ideas from inception to realisation. (southampton.ac.uk)
  • You will analyse and evaluate your ideas and practice to acquire the skills needed to develop your work. (southampton.ac.uk)
  • On Professional Practice" examines how professional responsibility principles apply to our work. (americanbar.org)
  • The state also provided that in conjunction with a grant from the Southern Regional Educational Board (SREB) and review of the Educator Evaluation System, it is forming a work group with the West Virginia Center for Professional Development to address the inter-rater reliability and training issues, which will ensure that evaluators are implementing the system with fidelity and rater validity and reliability. (nctq.org)
  • It is hoped that the Groups will support and enhance the professional development and lifelong learning of Chartered Geographers, and those working towards the accreditation, by building stronger links between all geographers within specific sectors or fields of work. (rgs.org)
  • This presentation explores creative approaches to scholarship in social work practice , along with practical examples from the experience of one recent MSW graduate. (socialworker.com)
  • NOTE for individuals who want to practice in regulated provinces (Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Newfoundland/Labrador, Prince Edward Island): Individuals who plan to move to a province where the profession is regulated must contact the appropriate regulatory body for their specific requirements to work in that province. (csrt.com)
  • Develop professional practice in project work - quality, deadlines, budgets etc. (gmit.ie)
  • Professional learning is most effective when it is identified collaboratively by school leaders and teachers as they reflect on how their work contributes to the school's improvement goals. (vic.gov.au)
  • This webinar is hosted by both CDC's COCA program and the Office for State, Tribal, Local, and Territorial Health to join clinicians and public health professionals in a discussion on how they can work together in coordinating a more robust response to the opioid overdose epidemic. (cdc.gov)
  • The ultimate goal of professional development (PD) is the effective implementation of skills and strategies that enhance knowledge and transfer of learning. (cdc.gov)
  • The CDC Professional Development Practices listed here are based on research and best practice and provide the best conditions for implementation to occur. (cdc.gov)
  • For more details on the specific types of PD and how they should be developed and implemented, refer to the e-learning course, Professional Development 101 . (cdc.gov)
  • Myriad Professional Identities: The Challenge for Leading Professional Development in the Further Education Context? (sagepub.com)
  • Validation and professional development through accrediting prior learning. (mdx.ac.uk)
  • I consider myself to be an advocate for the development of a coherent information architecture (IA) practice. (uxmatters.com)
  • Called "the most powerful professional development and change strategy available," PLCs, when done well, lead to reliable growth in student learning. (educationworld.com)
  • The focus of PLCs is ongoing "job-embedded learning," rather than one-shot professional development sessions facilitated by outsiders, who have little accountability regarding whether staff learning is successfully applied. (educationworld.com)
  • Explore a large range of continuing professional development (CPD) modules aligned to a number of specialities including neurology, musculoskeletal and respiratory. (plymouth.ac.uk)
  • Please contact the Professional Development Unit Admissions Team to discuss your options. (plymouth.ac.uk)
  • Professional Practice Groups bring together people with an interest in a thematic or sectoral area of professional geographical practice for networking and professional development. (rgs.org)
  • The standard also describes measures to maintain competency through continuing education/professional development. (astm.org)
  • 3.3.2.1 Licensing and certifying bodies in a number of fields typically impose continuing education and professional development requirements on their license or certificate holders. (astm.org)
  • Constituency development involves four practice elements (Hatcher et al. (cdc.gov)
  • Students will carry out data collection and analysis in their project, ensuring use of methods such as triangulation to explore how practice can develop in response to literature and primary data. (mdx.ac.uk)
  • It is designed to help you develop your theoretical knowledge and expertise and enable enhanced practice and career progression. (bucks.ac.uk)
  • What you will study on the DProf Professional Practice? (mdx.ac.uk)
  • Recognising the contribution of practice and experience in the arts industry to academic study. (mdx.ac.uk)
  • It will guide students through establishing research aims and questions, exploring a variety of methodological approaches and data collections tools, examine best ethical practices, engage with a variety of analytical methods and explore key scholarship to inform a proposed research study. (mdx.ac.uk)
  • Koonce added, "We are already getting feedback that dissertation candidates are excited about the option to study their unique problems of practice to improve what they do every day. (regent.edu)
  • Across studies the median effect size was weighted by number of health professionals involved in each study. (nih.gov)
  • You'll study contemporary issues in early years, leadership and management in early years, and you can choose to explore children's literature in practice, supporting emotional wellbeing, and learning and teaching with technology. (bucks.ac.uk)
  • In addition you'll study core modules on research, professional frameworks and practice. (bucks.ac.uk)
  • You'll study contemporary issues in education, leadership and management in education institutions and you can choose to explore literature in practice, emotional wellbeing, and learning and teaching with technology. (bucks.ac.uk)
  • In my opinion, the separation between the practice tests and study guides shouldn't exist, as simulated exams and knowledge-building books are designed to achieve the same goal - help you pass the Win2K MCSE exams. (mcpmag.com)
  • This cross-sectional, exploratory study aimed to determine pharmaceutical representatives' beliefs and practices about their professional practice in Sudan. (who.int)
  • This study aims to review literature relevant to the subject and to provide the dentist with information on the evaluation of cases of failure of endodontic treatment, to have legal security in undertaking their activities without the professional being exposed to litigation. (bvsalud.org)
  • introduces competences in inquiry techniques, particularly qualitative research frameworks and methodologies in practice-based paradigms. (mdx.ac.uk)
  • Our DProf is designed for busy senior managers and executives who want to gain new insights and perspectives into leadership and management based on critical exploration of their own evolving professional practice. (mdx.ac.uk)
  • Check this space regularly for insights, analysis, and best practices to help you succeed. (imanet.org)
  • It enables candidates to find effective solutions to problems they face daily, helping successful educational leaders engage in inquiry while empowering them to improve their practice or resolve complex issues. (regent.edu)
  • This article contributes to discourse-oriented, information-seeking research by showing how discourses, from a neopragmatist perspective, can be explored as tools that people employ when they actively engage in information practices in varied social contexts. (lu.se)
  • This professional practice note supports teachers and school leaders to embed Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultural inclusion, as an enabling foundation for learning in all Victorian government schools. (vic.gov.au)
  • Despite its prevalence as a quality improvement strategy, there remains uncertainty regarding both the effectiveness of audit and feedback in improving healthcare practice and the characteristics of audit and feedback that lead to greater impact. (nih.gov)
  • practicing proper hand implementing strategies by school characteristics. (cdc.gov)
  • From 2023, students in Plymouth can train and practice their professional healthcare skills in an inspiring purpose-built environment, InterCity Place . (plymouth.ac.uk)
  • Healthcare professionals' encounters with ethnic minority patients: the critical incident approach. (ahrq.gov)
  • He became EY Asia-Pacific Professional Practice Director in July 2021 and was previously EY Global Assurance Quality Enablement Leader. (ey.com)
  • The Pedagogical Model resource describes continua of practice across each domain and teachers can use the Model as an instructional reference. (vic.gov.au)
  • It is the professional equivalent of the academic PhD (Doctor of Philosophy), but designed specifically to support participants in undertaking practice-based research into their workplace activities. (mdx.ac.uk)
  • Much of this review is retrospective, in that it considers your personal and professional learning leading up to this course, and your research competence to date. (mdx.ac.uk)
  • This module aims to equip students with all the necessary elements to undertake a professional practice-based research project. (mdx.ac.uk)
  • The aim of module is to allow students to conduct a uniquely designed research project that will help with developed personal professional practice. (mdx.ac.uk)
  • A terminal degree focused on applied research and a practice-oriented curriculum. (regent.edu)
  • The past few years have brought numerous advances in positive education theory, research, and practice. (springer.com)
  • AMLE Research Summary - Professional Learning Communities (2012). (educationworld.com)
  • Information contained on the website with respect to modules is correct at the time of publication, but changes may be necessary, for example as a result of student feedback, Professional Statutory and Regulatory Bodies' (PSRB) requirements, staff changes, and new research. (lancaster.ac.uk)
  • Audit and feedback is widely used as a strategy to improve professional practice either on its own or as a component of multifaceted quality improvement interventions. (nih.gov)
  • White ( 2009 , 2015 ) claimed that it is a blend of evidence-based learning from the science of positive psychology and best practices in learning and teaching, whereas White and Murray ( 2015 ) argued that it is "an umbrella term that is used to describe empirically validated interventions and programs from positive psychology that have an impact on student wellbeing" (p. 2). (springer.com)
  • Patient-mediated interventions to improve professional practice. (ahrq.gov)
  • The NPPA assesses one's understanding of the Required Professional Capabilities (RPCs) as they relate to experiential knowledge. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Routine Veterinary Practice Subcommittee reports to Standards Committee and is asked to provide a summary of its decisions to the Committee. (rcvs.org.uk)
  • Medical practice at the crossroads : report / by the Standing Committee on Medicine of the Health Council of the Netherlands. (who.int)
  • a) Once eligibility has been determined, the candidate must make the first attempt at writing the HPTC entry-to-practice respiratory therapy examination within eighteen (18) months of their Graduation from an Accreditation Canada (or the Council on Accreditation for Respiratory Therapy Education (CoARTE) prior to September 1, 2019) accredited Respiratory Therapy program. (csrt.com)
  • An awareness of ethical, social and cultural issues within a global context and their importance in the exercise of professional skills and responsibilities. (edu.au)
  • If ethical practice is difficult, more is when values, laws, etc. come into controversy together with situations that human beings experience. (bvsalud.org)
  • 1.2 This practice outlines minimum training criteria and provides general information, approaches, and resources for all disciplines. (astm.org)
  • 2017). Measures of Professional Practice: West Virginia results. (nctq.org)
  • You will be introduced to tools for reflecting on your prior learning and critically analysing your current practice in order to situate yourself within a broader map of the arts industry with confidence in your skills set and competencies. (mdx.ac.uk)
  • Through Jay's leadership, the organization has received recognition from multiple stakeholders for improvements in quality and, internally, for improvements in operations, which have helped Assurance Leadership, Quality Enablement Leaders and Professional Practice improve and monitor quality initiatives. (ey.com)
  • A commitment to the highest standards of professional endeavour and the ability to take a leadership role in the community. (edu.au)
  • To date, positive education has no agreed conceptual framework or model to guide teachers to theorise and critically self-reflect on what they do and how they have an impact based on existing theories of professional practice (White & Murray, 2015 ). (springer.com)
  • 3.2 This practice provides a framework for extending learning opportunities to promote and achieve higher standards of professional practice in forensic science. (astm.org)
  • The VTLM provides a framework to review student achievement, reflect on current teaching practices and put in place effective strategies to extend every student's learning. (vic.gov.au)
  • In the main analyses, a total of 108 comparisons from 70 studies compared any intervention in which audit and feedback was a core, essential component to usual care and evaluated effects on professional practice. (nih.gov)
  • Through this model, perhaps positive education can become a pedagogy that has found its practice. (springer.com)
  • IMA's professional certification programs, such as the Certified Management Accountant program and Certified in Strategy and Competitive Analysis program, help you grow your expertise and advance your career in the accounting and finance profession. (imanet.org)
  • The Health Professionals Testing Canada (HPTC) (previously the Canadian Board for Respiratory Care - CBRC) offers two sittings every year of the National Certification Examination in respiratory therapy. (csrt.com)
  • 3.3.1 This practice does not address proficiency testing programs or specific requirements of professional certification and licensure bodies, although the foundational requirements addressed may be essential elements for such programs. (astm.org)
  • 3.3.2 This practice is not intended to supersede requirements from professional certification and licensure bodies. (astm.org)
  • LEED is a certification system for green buildings, and environmental rating systems play an important role in helping to promote and implement green and sustainable practices. (cdc.gov)
  • This professional practice note provides guidance for teachers and school leaders on formative assessment: what it is and how to build it into regular classroom practice. (vic.gov.au)
  • This module normally involves a year long professional practice and/or project a design company, department or other organisation involved in design. (gmit.ie)
  • As in the preceding practice modules you will be encouraged to make links between methods, skills and practices that you have explored and developed. (southampton.ac.uk)
  • The course enables you to gain skills that helps you enhance your practice with children, young people, adults and their families. (bucks.ac.uk)
  • This group brings together risk-focused professionals from across disaster risk reduction, re/insurance, humanitarian, governmental and academic sectors, to promote best practice and uncover latent geographical knowledge, skills and practice they have in common. (rgs.org)
  • Did you know outside of learning discipline-specific skills , students most want to practice, connect and collaborate and perform. (acm.ac.uk)
  • The National Professional Practice Assessment is no longer used to assess human resources experience. (wikipedia.org)
  • Since we're all contributors in one form or another, you may find it interesting to assess how you're currently contributing and where you could add further value to your field of practice in the future. (uxmatters.com)
  • The state should ensure that teacher evaluations are well-structured to appropriately assess professional practice. (nctq.org)
  • A professional learning community (PLC) involves much more than a staff meeting or group of teachers getting together to discuss a book they've read. (educationworld.com)
  • This is THE practice exams course to give you the winning edge . (udemy.com)
  • These practice exams have been co-authored by Stephane Maarek and Abhishek Singh who bring their collective experience of passing 18 AWS Certifications to the table. (udemy.com)
  • At the end of the books that focus on the Win2K MCSE core exams (exams 70-210, 70-215, 70-216, 70-217), there's a 40- to 50-question multiple-choice practice test. (mcpmag.com)
  • The Professional Teaching and Learning Cycle: Introduction (2008). (educationworld.com)
  • Professional practice notes support schools and their staff to deliver evidence-informed teaching and school improvement initiatives. (vic.gov.au)
  • Professional practice days for teachers are provided to release teachers from their scheduled duties to focus on the improved delivery of high quality teaching and learning. (vic.gov.au)
  • This professional practice note provides advice to school leaders and teachers on applying High Impact Teaching Strategies (HITS) to areas of the Victorian Curriculum F-10 to support effective literacy learning. (vic.gov.au)
  • This professional practice note provides advice to support school leaders and teachers in the integration of metacognitive strategies in everyday teaching. (vic.gov.au)
  • As an AWS Certified Solutions Architect Professional, what would you recommend to improve the reliability of the solution as well as eliminate the redundant processing of video files? (udemy.com)
  • Professional relationships - We establish interdisciplinary partnerships, foster professional rapport and facilitate effective communication. (tgh.org)
  • This professional practice note provides advice to support school leaders and teachers in understanding how the practice principles facilitate effective literacy learning across all areas of the Victorian Curriculum F-10. (vic.gov.au)
  • Coursework can be tailored to meet the need of working professionals using evening, hybrid (in-person/online) and fully online courses, after consultation with the certificate program coordinator. (uwm.edu)
  • Earning the Professional Practice in Civil Engineering Infrastructure Certificate also means that you're halfway to your master's degree, if you choose. (uwm.edu)
  • This professional practice note provides school leaders with an insight into purposeful collaboration structures within and across schools. (vic.gov.au)
  • Priorities at the interface of health care, medical practice and medical education : report of the Global Conference on International Collaboration on Medical Education and Practice, 12-15 June 1994, Rockford, Illinois, U.S.A. (who.int)
  • There is also a need for better regulation of standards of conduct to be followed by professionals, authorities and professional bodies. (bvsalud.org)
  • Thus, the need is confirmed to place greater emphasis on recording the documentation of each patient in order to protect against potential suits and to have better regulation of standards of conduct to be followed by professionals, authorities and professional bodies. (bvsalud.org)
  • You may be a health or social care professional with a first degree or with a related academic degree. (plymouth.ac.uk)
  • a) An application for the Canadian entry-to-practice respiratory therapy examination must be submitted to the Health Professionals Testing Canada (HPTC). (csrt.com)
  • It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety, health, and environmental practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. (astm.org)
  • Professional control of health services and challenges to such control / editor, Julius A. Roth. (who.int)
  • The role of health professionals in tobacco control. (who.int)
  • Additionally, Ghana's mental health service system faces inadequate qualified mental health professionals. (who.int)
  • My practice as a mental health professional has changed tremendously. (who.int)
  • Since then, many safety and health professionals have become familiar with the concept and implemented it in their projects, but there still are those who have not yet had a chance to implement PtD principles. (cdc.gov)
  • Because senior professionals have achieved a significant amount of both formal and informal learning, sometimes over many years, the DProf provides an opportunity to make a claim for academic credits against relevant prior learning. (mdx.ac.uk)
  • The Professional Practice Dissertation is an important addition to our celebrated School of Education offerings," said Dr. William L. Hathaway, executive vice president for Academic Affairs. (regent.edu)
  • Performing artists holding a Trinity Diploma, HND or equivalent professional experience. (mdx.ac.uk)
  • We make sure you get the professional support you need, backed up with insight from experienced lecturers. (bucks.ac.uk)
  • Our course offers you a course that helps you reach your professional and personal goals within the world of education, with the support of professional lecturers and insight from people who have been there. (bucks.ac.uk)
  • See how our team of experienced professionals can provide ongoing support for HR, payroll, and more-allowing you to focus on other aspects of your business. (adp.com)
  • This professional practice note provides a range of high impact strategies to support school leaders and teachers to build intellectual rigour with all students, including those exceeding the expected level. (vic.gov.au)
  • The UK is honoured to have partnered with WHO to promote attitudes and practices that respect dignity and rights, and holistic, person-centred care and support. (who.int)
  • A PPD addresses the current reality of a problem of practice and identifies questions for analysis, a solutions argument with recommendations, action plans, impediments to implementation, and action communications. (regent.edu)