Private Sector: That distinct portion of the institutional, industrial, or economic structure of a country that is controlled or owned by non-governmental, private interests.Public Sector: The area of a nation's economy that is tax-supported and under government control.Hospitals, Private: A class of hospitals that includes profit or not-for-profit hospitals that are controlled by a legal entity other than a government agency. (Hospital Administration Terminology, AHA, 2d ed)Private Practice: Practice of a health profession by an individual, offering services on a person-to-person basis, as opposed to group or partnership practice.Privatization: Process of shifting publicly controlled services and/or facilities to the private sector.Job Satisfaction: Personal satisfaction relative to the work situation.Health Care Sector: Economic sector concerned with the provision, distribution, and consumption of health care services and related products.Public-Private Sector Partnerships: An organizational enterprise between a public sector agency, federal, state or local, and a private sector entity. Skills and assets of each sector are shared to deliver a service or facility for the benefit or use of the general public.Developing Countries: Countries in the process of change with economic growth, that is, an increase in production, per capita consumption, and income. The process of economic growth involves better utilization of natural and human resources, which results in a change in the social, political, and economic structures.Job Description: Statement of the position requirements, qualifications for the position, wage range, and any special conditions expected of the employee.Delivery of Health Care: The concept concerned with all aspects of providing and distributing health services to a patient population.Entrepreneurship: The organization, management, and assumption of risks of a business or enterprise, usually implying an element of change or challenge and a new opportunity.Health Care Reform: Innovation and improvement of the health care system by reappraisal, amendment of services, and removal of faults and abuses in providing and distributing health services to patients. It includes a re-alignment of health services and health insurance to maximum demographic elements (the unemployed, indigent, uninsured, elderly, inner cities, rural areas) with reference to coverage, hospitalization, pricing and cost containment, insurers' and employers' costs, pre-existing medical conditions, prescribed drugs, equipment, and services.Hospitals, Public: Hospitals controlled by various types of government, i.e., city, county, district, state or federal.Financing, Government: Federal, state, or local government organized methods of financial assistance.Hospitals, Voluntary: Private, not-for-profit hospitals that are autonomous, self-established, and self-supported.Organizations: Administration and functional structures for the purpose of collectively systematizing activities for a particular goal.Health Policy: Decisions, usually developed by government policymakers, for determining present and future objectives pertaining to the health care system.Government: The complex of political institutions, laws, and customs through which the function of governing is carried out in a specific political unit.Health Services Accessibility: The degree to which individuals are inhibited or facilitated in their ability to gain entry to and to receive care and services from the health care system. Factors influencing this ability include geographic, architectural, transportational, and financial considerations, among others.United StatesFinancing, Organized: All organized methods of funding.IndiaHealth Expenditures: The amounts spent by individuals, groups, nations, or private or public organizations for total health care and/or its various components. These amounts may or may not be equivalent to the actual costs (HEALTH CARE COSTS) and may or may not be shared among the patient, insurers, and/or employers.Hospitals, Proprietary: Hospitals owned and operated by a corporation or an individual that operate on a for-profit basis, also referred to as investor-owned hospitals.Government Agencies: Administrative units of government responsible for policy making and management of governmental activities.Health Facilities: Institutions which provide medical or health-related services.Insurance, Health: Insurance providing coverage of medical, surgical, or hospital care in general or for which there is no specific heading.Interinstitutional Relations: The interactions between representatives of institutions, agencies, or organizations.Contract Services: Outside services provided to an institution under a formal financial agreement.Pharmacies: Facilities for the preparation and dispensing of drugs.Health Facilities, Proprietary: Health care institutions operated by private groups or corporations for a profit.Quality of Health Care: The levels of excellence which characterize the health service or health care provided based on accepted standards of quality.Healthcare Financing: Methods of generating, allocating, and using financial resources in healthcare systems.Drugs, Essential: Drugs considered essential to meet the health needs of a population as well as to control drug costs.National Health Programs: Components of a national health care system which administer specific services, e.g., national health insurance.Investments: Use for articles on the investing of funds for income or profit.Public Health Administration: Management of public health organizations or agencies.Workplace: Place or physical location of work or employment.Government Regulation: Exercise of governmental authority to control conduct.Politics: Activities concerned with governmental policies, functions, etc.Commerce: The interchange of goods or commodities, especially on a large scale, between different countries or between populations within the same country. It includes trade (the buying, selling, or exchanging of commodities, whether wholesale or retail) and business (the purchase and sale of goods to make a profit). (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed, p411, p2005 & p283)Facility Regulation and Control: Formal voluntary or governmental procedures and standards required of hospitals and health or other facilities to improve operating efficiency, and for the protection of the consumer.Economic Competition: The effort of two or more parties to secure the business of a third party by offering, usually under fair or equitable rules of business practice, the most favorable terms.Universal Coverage: Health insurance coverage for all persons in a state or country, rather than for some subset of the population. It may extend to the unemployed as well as to the employed; to aliens as well as to citizens; for pre-existing conditions as well as for current illnesses; for mental as well as for physical conditions.Social Marketing: Use of marketing principles also used to sell products to consumers to promote ideas, attitudes and behaviors. Design and use of programs seeking to increase the acceptance of a social idea or practice by target groups, not for the benefit of the marketer, but to benefit the target audience and the general society.Contraceptive Agents: Chemical substances that prevent or reduce the probability of CONCEPTION.Health Care Surveys: Statistical measures of utilization and other aspects of the provision of health care services including hospitalization and ambulatory care.Policy Making: The decision process by which individuals, groups or institutions establish policies pertaining to plans, programs or procedures.Research Support as Topic: Financial support of research activities.Employee Incentive Plans: Programs designed by management to motivate employees to work more efficiently with increased productivity, and greater employee satisfaction.National Health Insurance, United StatesHealth Benefit Plans, Employee: Health insurance plans for employees, and generally including their dependents, usually on a cost-sharing basis with the employer paying a percentage of the premium.Competitive Bidding: Pricing statements presented by more than one party for the purpose of securing a contract.Health Planning: Planning for needed health and/or welfare services and facilities.Acupuncture: The occupational discipline of the traditional Chinese methods of ACUPUNCTURE THERAPY for treating disease by inserting needles along specific pathways or meridians.CambodiaState Medicine: A system of medical care regulated, controlled and financed by the government, in which the government assumes responsibility for the health needs of the population.Malaria: A protozoan disease caused in humans by four species of the PLASMODIUM genus: PLASMODIUM FALCIPARUM; PLASMODIUM VIVAX; PLASMODIUM OVALE; and PLASMODIUM MALARIAE; and transmitted by the bite of an infected female mosquito of the genus ANOPHELES. Malaria is endemic in parts of Asia, Africa, Central and South America, Oceania, and certain Caribbean islands. It is characterized by extreme exhaustion associated with paroxysms of high FEVER; SWEATING; shaking CHILLS; and ANEMIA. Malaria in ANIMALS is caused by other species of plasmodia.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Legislation as Topic: The enactment of laws and ordinances and their regulation by official organs of a nation, state, or other legislative organization. It refers also to health-related laws and regulations in general or for which there is no specific heading.Health Care Costs: The actual costs of providing services related to the delivery of health care, including the costs of procedures, therapies, and medications. It is differentiated from HEALTH EXPENDITURES, which refers to the amount of money paid for the services, and from fees, which refers to the amount charged, regardless of cost.Health Services Research: The integration of epidemiologic, sociological, economic, and other analytic sciences in the study of health services. Health services research is usually concerned with relationships between need, demand, supply, use, and outcome of health services. The aim of the research is evaluation, particularly in terms of structure, process, output, and outcome. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Health Personnel: Men and women working in the provision of health services, whether as individual practitioners or employees of health institutions and programs, whether or not professionally trained, and whether or not subject to public regulation. (From A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, 1976)Health Services Needs and Demand: Health services required by a population or community as well as the health services that the population or community is able and willing to pay for.Antimalarials: Agents used in the treatment of malaria. They are usually classified on the basis of their action against plasmodia at different stages in their life cycle in the human. (From AMA, Drug Evaluations Annual, 1992, p1585)United States Department of Veterans Affairs: A cabinet department in the Executive Branch of the United States Government concerned with overall planning, promoting, and administering programs pertaining to VETERANS. It was established March 15, 1989 as a Cabinet-level position.Artemisinins: A group of SESQUITERPENES and their analogs that contain a peroxide group (PEROXIDES) within an oxepin ring (OXEPINS).Public Health: Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.Financing, Personal: Payment by individuals or their family for health care services which are not covered by a third-party payer, either insurance or medical assistance.Employment: The state of being engaged in an activity or service for wages or salary.Drug Industry: That segment of commercial enterprise devoted to the design, development, and manufacture of chemical products for use in the diagnosis and treatment of disease, disability, or other dysfunction, or to improve function.Health Manpower: The availability of HEALTH PERSONNEL. It includes the demand and recruitment of both professional and allied health personnel, their present and future supply and distribution, and their assignment and utilization.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Fees and Charges: Amounts charged to the patient as payer for health care services.Poverty: A situation in which the level of living of an individual, family, or group is below the standard of the community. It is often related to a specific income level.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Cooperative Behavior: The interaction of two or more persons or organizations directed toward a common goal which is mutually beneficial. An act or instance of working or acting together for a common purpose or benefit, i.e., joint action. (From Random House Dictionary Unabridged, 2d ed)Hospitals, Veterans: Hospitals providing medical care to veterans of wars.Health Services: Services for the diagnosis and treatment of disease and the maintenance of health.Occupational Health: The promotion and maintenance of physical and mental health in the work environment.Occupational Diseases: Diseases caused by factors involved in one's employment.United States Dept. of Health and Human Services: A cabinet department in the Executive Branch of the United States Government concerned with administering those agencies and offices having programs pertaining to health and human services.Cost Control: The containment, regulation, or restraint of costs. Costs are said to be contained when the value of resources committed to an activity is not considered excessive. This determination is frequently subjective and dependent upon the specific geographic area of the activity being measured. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Health Services Administration: The organization and administration of health services dedicated to the delivery of health care.Physicians: Individuals licensed to practice medicine.Quality Assurance, Health Care: Activities and programs intended to assure or improve the quality of care in either a defined medical setting or a program. The concept includes the assessment or evaluation of the quality of care; identification of problems or shortcomings in the delivery of care; designing activities to overcome these deficiencies; and follow-up monitoring to ensure effectiveness of corrective steps.Workload: The total amount of work to be performed by an individual, a department, or other group of workers in a period of time.Job Application: Process of applying for employment. It includes written application for employment or personal appearance.Federal Government: The level of governmental organization and function at the national or country-wide level.Rural Health Services: Health services, public or private, in rural areas. The services include the promotion of health and the delivery of health care.Healthcare Disparities: Differences in access to or availability of medical facilities and services.Drug Costs: The amount that a health care institution or organization pays for its drugs. It is one component of the final price that is charged to the consumer (FEES, PHARMACEUTICAL or PRESCRIPTION FEES).Public Policy: A course or method of action selected, usually by a government, from among alternatives to guide and determine present and future decisions.Stress, Psychological: Stress wherein emotional factors predominate.Efficiency, Organizational: The capacity of an organization, institution, or business to produce desired results with a minimum expenditure of energy, time, money, personnel, materiel, etc.Patient Acceptance of Health Care: The seeking and acceptance by patients of health service.Maternal Health Services: Organized services to provide health care to expectant and nursing mothers.Kenya: A republic in eastern Africa, south of ETHIOPIA, west of SOMALIA with TANZANIA to its south, and coastline on the Indian Ocean. Its capital is Nairobi.Models, Organizational: Theoretical representations and constructs that describe or explain the structure and hierarchy of relationships and interactions within or between formal organizational entities or informal social groups.Organizational Innovation: Introduction of changes which are new to the organization and are created by management.BrazilUrban Health Services: Health services, public or private, in urban areas. The services include the promotion of health and the delivery of health care.World Health Organization: A specialized agency of the United Nations designed as a coordinating authority on international health work; its aim is to promote the attainment of the highest possible level of health by all peoples.Burnout, Professional: An excessive stress reaction to one's occupational or professional environment. It is manifested by feelings of emotional and physical exhaustion coupled with a sense of frustration and failure.Rwanda: A republic in eastern Africa, south of UGANDA, east of DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF THE CONGO, west of TANZANIA. Its capital is Kigali. It was formerly part of the Belgian trust territory of Ruanda-Urund.South Africa: A republic in southern Africa, the southernmost part of Africa. It has three capitals: Pretoria (administrative), Cape Town (legislative), and Bloemfontein (judicial). Officially the Republic of South Africa since 1960, it was called the Union of South Africa 1910-1960.Organizational Case Studies: Descriptions and evaluations of specific health care organizations.Organizational Objectives: The purposes, missions, and goals of an individual organization or its units, established through administrative processes. It includes an organization's long-range plans and administrative philosophy.PakistanSalaries and Fringe Benefits: The remuneration paid or benefits granted to an employee.Foreign Medical Graduates: Physicians who hold degrees from medical schools in countries other than the ones in which they practice.World Health: The concept pertaining to the health status of inhabitants of the world.Rural Population: The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.VietnamAmbulatory Care Facilities: Those facilities which administer health services to individuals who do not require hospitalization or institutionalization.Sri LankaOccupational Health Services: Health services for employees, usually provided by the employer at the place of work.Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Medicare: Federal program, created by Public Law 89-97, Title XVIII-Health Insurance for the Aged, a 1965 amendment to the Social Security Act, that provides health insurance benefits to persons over the age of 65 and others eligible for Social Security benefits. It consists of two separate but coordinated programs: hospital insurance (MEDICARE PART A) and supplementary medical insurance (MEDICARE PART B). (Hospital Administration Terminology, AHA, 2d ed and A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, US House of Representatives, 1976)Personnel Turnover: A change or shift in personnel due to reorganization, resignation, or discharge.Program Evaluation: Studies designed to assess the efficacy of programs. They may include the evaluation of cost-effectiveness, the extent to which objectives are met, or impact.Consumer Satisfaction: Customer satisfaction or dissatisfaction with a benefit or service received.Occupational Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents that occurs as a result of one's occupation.Health Resources: Available manpower, facilities, revenue, equipment, and supplies to produce requisite health care and services.Income: Revenues or receipts accruing from business enterprise, labor, or invested capital.Uganda: A republic in eastern Africa, south of SUDAN and west of KENYA. Its capital is Kampala.Physician's Practice Patterns: Patterns of practice related to diagnosis and treatment as especially influenced by cost of the service requested and provided.Industry: Any enterprise centered on the processing, assembly, production, or marketing of a line of products, services, commodities, or merchandise, in a particular field often named after its principal product. Examples include the automobile, fishing, music, publishing, insurance, and textile industries.Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).Malaysia: A parliamentary democracy with a constitutional monarch in southeast Asia, consisting of 11 states (West Malaysia) on the Malay Peninsula and two states (East Malaysia) on the island of BORNEO. It is also called the Federation of Malaysia. Its capital is Kuala Lumpur. Before 1963 it was the Union of Malaya. It reorganized in 1948 as the Federation of Malaya, becoming independent from British Malaya in 1957 and becoming Malaysia in 1963 as a federation of Malaya, Sabah, Sarawak, and Singapore (which seceded in 1965). The form Malay- probably derives from the Tamil malay, mountain, with reference to its geography. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p715 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p329)International Cooperation: The interaction of persons or groups of persons representing various nations in the pursuit of a common goal or interest.Qualitative Research: Any type of research that employs nonnumeric information to explore individual or group characteristics, producing findings not arrived at by statistical procedures or other quantitative means. (Qualitative Inquiry: A Dictionary of Terms Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 1997)Zambia: A republic in southern Africa, south of DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF THE CONGO and TANZANIA, and north of ZIMBABWE. Its capital is Lusaka. It was formerly called Northern Rhodesia.Attitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.Great BritainFamily Planning Services: Health care programs or services designed to assist individuals in the planning of family size. Various methods of CONTRACEPTION can be used to control the number and timing of childbirths.Social Responsibility: The obligations and accountability assumed in carrying out actions or ideas on behalf of others.Leadership: The function of directing or controlling the actions or attitudes of an individual or group with more or less willing acquiescence of the followers.Health Promotion: Encouraging consumer behaviors most likely to optimize health potentials (physical and psychosocial) through health information, preventive programs, and access to medical care.Cost-Benefit Analysis: A method of comparing the cost of a program with its expected benefits in dollars (or other currency). The benefit-to-cost ratio is a measure of total return expected per unit of money spent. This analysis generally excludes consideration of factors that are not measured ultimately in economic terms. Cost effectiveness compares alternative ways to achieve a specific set of results.Community Health Services: Diagnostic, therapeutic and preventive health services provided for individuals in the community.Tanzania: A republic in eastern Africa, south of UGANDA and north of MOZAMBIQUE. Its capital is Dar es Salaam. It was formed in 1964 by a merger of the countries of TANGANYIKA and ZANZIBAR.Power (Psychology): The exertion of a strong influence or control over others in a variety of settings--administrative, social, academic, etc.Canada: The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.Africa South of the Sahara: All of Africa except Northern Africa (AFRICA, NORTHERN).Costs and Cost Analysis: Absolute, comparative, or differential costs pertaining to services, institutions, resources, etc., or the analysis and study of these costs.Hospitals: Institutions with an organized medical staff which provide medical care to patients.Lactones: Cyclic esters of hydroxy carboxylic acids, containing a 1-oxacycloalkan-2-one structure. Large cyclic lactones of over a dozen atoms are MACROLIDES.History, 21st Century: Time period from 2001 through 2100 of the common era.Child Health Services: Organized services to provide health care for children.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Risk Adjustment: The use of severity-of-illness measures, such as age, to estimate the risk (measurable or predictable chance of loss, injury or death) to which a patient is subject before receiving some health care intervention. This adjustment allows comparison of performance and quality across organizations, practitioners, and communities. (from JCAHO, Lexikon, 1994)Personnel Management: Planning, organizing, and administering all activities related to personnel.Cost Savings: Reductions in all or any portion of the costs of providing goods or services. Savings may be incurred by the provider or the consumer.Nursing, Private Duty: The practice of nursing by a registered or licensed nurse to care for a specific patient in a health facility or in the home.Outcome Assessment (Health Care): Research aimed at assessing the quality and effectiveness of health care as measured by the attainment of a specified end result or outcome. Measures include parameters such as improved health, lowered morbidity or mortality, and improvement of abnormal states (such as elevated blood pressure).AfricaResearch: Critical and exhaustive investigation or experimentation, having for its aim the discovery of new facts and their correct interpretation, the revision of accepted conclusions, theories, or laws in the light of newly discovered facts, or the practical application of such new or revised conclusions, theories, or laws. (Webster, 3d ed)Prenatal Care: Care provided the pregnant woman in order to prevent complications, and decrease the incidence of maternal and prenatal mortality.Diffusion of Innovation: The broad dissemination of new ideas, procedures, techniques, materials, and devices and the degree to which these are accepted and used.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Social Class: A stratum of people with similar position and prestige; includes social stratification. Social class is measured by criteria such as education, occupation, and income.Quality Indicators, Health Care: Norms, criteria, standards, and other direct qualitative and quantitative measures used in determining the quality of health care.Primary Health Care: Care which provides integrated, accessible health care services by clinicians who are accountable for addressing a large majority of personal health care needs, developing a sustained partnership with patients, and practicing in the context of family and community. (JAMA 1995;273(3):192)Guideline Adherence: Conformity in fulfilling or following official, recognized, or institutional requirements, guidelines, recommendations, protocols, pathways, or other standards.Personnel Loyalty: Dedication or commitment shown by employees to organizations or institutions where they work.Unemployment: The state of not being engaged in a gainful occupation.Malawi: A republic in southern Africa east of ZAMBIA and MOZAMBIQUE. Its capital is Lilongwe. It was formerly called Nyasaland.Drug Utilization: The utilization of drugs as reported in individual hospital studies, FDA studies, marketing, or consumption, etc. This includes drug stockpiling, and patient drug profiles.Urban Population: The inhabitants of a city or town, including metropolitan areas and suburban areas.Immunization Programs: Organized services to administer immunization procedures in the prevention of various diseases. The programs are made available over a wide range of sites: schools, hospitals, public health agencies, voluntary health agencies, etc. They are administered to an equally wide range of population groups or on various administrative levels: community, municipal, state, national, international.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Population Surveillance: Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.Forecasting: The prediction or projection of the nature of future problems or existing conditions based upon the extrapolation or interpretation of existing scientific data or by the application of scientific methodology.Insurance Coverage: Generally refers to the amount of protection available and the kind of loss which would be paid for under an insurance contract with an insurer. (Slee & Slee, Health Care Terms, 2d ed)Referral and Consultation: The practice of sending a patient to another program or practitioner for services or advice which the referring source is not prepared to provide.EnglandOwnership: The legal relation between an entity (individual, group, corporation, or-profit, secular, government) and an object. The object may be corporeal, such as equipment, or completely a creature of law, such as a patent; it may be movable, such as an animal, or immovable, such as a building.Career Mobility: The upward or downward mobility in an occupation or the change from one occupation to another.Drug Combinations: Single preparations containing two or more active agents, for the purpose of their concurrent administration as a fixed dose mixture.Patient Satisfaction: The degree to which the individual regards the health care service or product or the manner in which it is delivered by the provider as useful, effective, or beneficial.Accidents, Occupational: Unforeseen occurrences, especially injuries in the course of work-related activities.Work: Productive or purposeful activities.Health Plan Implementation: Those actions designed to carry out recommendations pertaining to health plans or programs.Biomedical Research: Research that involves the application of the natural sciences, especially biology and physiology, to medicine.Tuberculosis: Any of the infectious diseases of man and other animals caused by species of MYCOBACTERIUM.Professional Autonomy: The quality or state of being independent and self-directing, especially in making decisions, enabling professionals to exercise judgment as they see fit during the performance of their jobs.Health Education: Education that increases the awareness and favorably influences the attitudes and knowledge relating to the improvement of health on a personal or community basis.Multivariate Analysis: A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.
140,000 jobs created or safeguarded; 160,000 people assisted to improve their skills; £2 billion of private sector investment ... which have created or safeguarded 12,161 jobs in the West Midlands. The Agency also led the region's response to major economic ... 100 million the largest single project investment by any RDA and expected to create 10,000 jobs and generate £2 billion in ... ", "Highly Commended" and "Most Improved Organisation" 2010 - Overall award winner ("large public sector" category) Projects ...
... the private sector is still lagging behind with citizens only representing 0.34% of the private sector workforce. While there ... The real estate sector have a positive impact on development, job opportunities, investments and tourism as estate projects ... London Mellahi, K. (2007). The effect of regulations on HRM: private sector firms in Saudi Arabia. International Journal of ... Overall, however, uptake in the private sector remains low regardless of significant investments in education, which have ...
"NI Public Sector Jobs (Unadjusted) - June 2011". Public-Private Sector Tables. Department of Enterprise, Trade and Investment. ... "NI Employee Jobs - Public Sector - December 2007 - June 2011". Northern Ireland Quarterly Employment Survey Historical Data. ... As of June 2011, the Northern Ireland Civil Service employed 26,889 staff (out of a total public sector employment of 218,577 ... The public sector constituted 31.3% of the region's workforce. The Civil Service Commissioners for Northern Ireland are not ...
... the private sector is still lagging behind with citizens only representing 0.34% of the private sector workforce. In the UAE ... And due to government social security payments, many locals would rather not go to work in menial jobs. However, unemployment ... Mellahi, K. (2007). The effect of regulations on HRM: private sector firms in Saudi Arabia. International Journal of Human ... Overall, uptake in the private sector remains low regardless of significant investments in education, which have reached record ...
"Guj govt helps 13,079 get private sector jobs". Financial Express. 10 April 2012. Archived from the original on 10 April 2012. ... Directorate of Employment and Training played a catalytic role by interacting with private sector industries on the job ... During this week, Narendra Modi, Chief Minister of Gujarat, handed job appointment letters to 65,000 youths. The event was ... This information was communicated to the youth in search of jobs through print media, electronic media and publicity pamphlets ...
In the private sector, such jobs are rare; permanent employment is far more common in the public sector, where profit and loss ... Permanent employees are often eligible to switch job positions within their companies. Even when employment is "at will", ... defined as lifetime job contract. The term originally was workers' "lifetime commitment" to companies, which was coined by ... permanent employees of large companies are generally protected from abrupt job termination by severance policies, like advance ...
Private sector: In rural areas, private sector participation is supported under the PADEAR strategy. For instance, the private ... Local artisans take over odd jobs. In urban areas, no private participation of SONEB is anticipated. However, in Cotonou the ... Like in other countries, the Beninese water supply sector is divided into an urban and a rural sector. However, in the ... sanitation and support to the private sector. The total budget is about US$65 million (DKK 306.4 million). The French ...
Logging creates jobs for about 2,000 private sector workers. For comparison, thirty-three million people visit the National ... making it the largest private forest owner in the state. Logging practices have altered a large portion of native forests, ... and the cumulative impact of large private landowners using harmful logging practices across huge tracts of land in the Sierra ... or the Z'Berg-Nejedly Forest Practice Act was enacted in 1973 to regulate private timberland holdings. Logging on privately ...
In September 2010, the private sector added 64,000 jobs.[needs update] Proponents of benefits extension point out that ... But in a labour market like this it's not going to make them more likely to find a job because the jobs aren't there." ... "You can make more money on unemployment than you can going down and getting one of those jobs that is an honest job, but it ... The Economic Policy Institute's March 2010 report cites an average of five applicants for each job opening. Job postings with ...
Due to Nazi anti-Jewish policies, she was forced to leave the university; she took on various jobs in the private sector. In ...
People with jobs in the public / private organised sector. Typically requiring formal education, this segment includes public ... They also work in the nonfarm sector, in mines, small shops, on construction sites and as part of the urban work force. Those ... They operate in the cottage or household sectors, in tiny units, which may be family-owned and worked, or may even have some ... on the job training' systems. The processes of skill acquisition tend to break social and cultural barriers, as people work ...
Between 1985 and 2002, private sector jobs increased 59%. The economy shifted from an agriculture to a knowledge economy, ... Expenditure cuts included reductions in public sector pay levels, reductions in the number of public sector employees through ... but the state sector amounted to a large part of that. Public sector employment was a third of the total workforce by 1980. ... which was mainly driven by strong improvements in the export sector - while private consumption remained subdued. The economic ...
He believed that the private sector should be allowed to thrive; only certain sectors, like utilities, should be public. He ... His startup capital was 180 Egyptian Pounds he had saved up from his earlier job. Osman was the only owner and employee. He ... The Persian Gulf area was experiencing a huge boom in the construction sector, largely related to the oil boom. Osman was able ... Osman argued that the "owner of any private project is interested in expanding it along with his wealth, and expansion of the ...
Jones, Athena (8 October 2010). "Obama touts private sector job growth". NBC News via MSNBC. Retrieved 8 October 2010. ... Silverleib, Alan (8 October 2010). "Obama notes private sector job growth, rips GOP". CNN. Retrieved 8 October 2010. Abdur- ... Additionally excluded are trips to Camp David, the country residence of the President, and to the private home of the Obama ... "Remarks by the President in a Discussion on Jobs and the Economy in Charlotte, North Carolina". whitehouse.gov. 2 April 2010. " ...
"Government Tasked on Creating Capacity for Youth Jobs by Private Sector". Zuma List. Retrieved 14 April 2014. "Job creation: FG ... "The private sector should be given more autonomy to direct matters that deal directly with youth empowerment and job creation. ... Making sure that government upholds conducive ways and capacities for the private sector to empower and create jobs for the ... With SMEs forming about 65 per cent of the private sector operations, one can only imagine what the effects of the new move by ...
On 10 August 2007, the Mayawati government introduced 30 per cent reservation in jobs in the private sector. A quota for ... "PM should have gone into reservation in private sector: Mayawati". The Hindu. 30 November 2015. "Govt clears quota bill, to be ... "Mayawati wants dalit quota in judiciary and private sector". The Times of India. 1 October 2011. "Modi govt privatising ... "Mayawati proposes 30% reservation in private sector". ZEE NEWS. 11 August 2007. "Supreme Court upholds High court's decision to ...
A majority of these jobs were in Guam's growing private sector. During Ada's first term, private sector employment outstripped ... Twenty years later the shipyard was privatized but the jobs were still there. In the election of 1978 Ada was asked by Sen. ... He traveled to Washington, D.C., and presented Guam's case to forestall the closure of SRF, saving hundreds of local jobs. ... Despite a decrease in federal spending, Guam's economy doubled and some 25,000 new jobs were created. ...
Industry jobs refer to private sector jobs at for-profit corporations. In the case of biomedical scientists, employment is ... Job growth for the profession has been forecasted as follows: According to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), the 2010- ... Researchers in industry tend to have less intellectual freedom in their research than those in the academic sector, owing to ... Positions in industry tend to pay higher salaries than those at academic institutions, but job security compared to tenured ...
Some are also employed in the government and private sector jobs. Maulsinga School Area of Maulsinga. ...
A majority of these jobs were in Guam's growing private sector. During Ada's first term, private sector employment outstripped ... Many of them took jobs with the government of Guam as administrators and later became senators. Camacho also kept on other able ... The Public Utilities Commission also set utility rates, and the Guam Telephone Authority was sold to a private company in 2005 ... The party focuses on tax refunds for the working class, education, job growth, and improving the military. The Republican Party ...
We've had four years where we've produced no private-sector jobs. Most people are working harder for less money than they were ... financial-sector-driven policy regime". In the 2016 U.S. presidential candidates debate, Hillary Clinton accused Donald Trump ...
"Aspin announces creation of 13 new private sector jobs for Temagami". North Bay Nipissing News. Metroland Media Group Ltd. 2 ... "Aspin announces creation of 13 new private sector jobs for Temagami". North Bay Nipissing News. Metroland Media Group Ltd. 2 ...
Private sector jobs made up 71 percent of the total workforce. The average private sector salary was $34,088 and the average ... 792 jobs), Accommodation and Food (6,541 jobs), Accommodation (3755 jobs), Food Services and Drink (2,766 jobs). A large ... The retail trade sector, which also serves many tourists, averaged another 5,913 jobs. Other categories which also include some ... Analysts reviewing the economy often point to the closure of the HOVENSA oil refinery, the islands' largest private sector ...
No jobs in the private sector had been created since 2012. 18,000 jobs in the food industry were lost, and the country fell ... 4,000,000 of workers in the private sector were not fully legally employed, and 51% of the people in the country had employment ...
"Manchester seeks the 'job I was born for'". Timmins Daily Press, May 30, 2014. "Timmins mayor transitioning to private sector ... and would instead be taking a private sector job with mining company Lake Shore Gold. "About Mayor Tom Laughren". Timmins ...
Union workers in the private sector average 10-30% higher pay than non-union in America after controlling for individual, job, ... Trade union density was 14.1% in the private sector and 56.5% in the public sector.[54] ... One of the aims of IF Metall is to transform jobs into "good jobs", also called "developing jobs".[48] Swedish system is ... Private sector unions faced plant closures in many manufacturing industries and demands to reduce wages and increase ...
Nor would public sector jobs be cut as they have in Swaziland, another country struggling to come to terms with its heavy ... while the private sector is not generating enough skilled positions. Employers, meanwhile, complain of poor education quality ... No reliable sources of food and water, no permanent places to live, no jobs, and a government that has been slow to respond to ... He said cuts in the executives spending would begin to take effect and result in job losses.. He suggested that unless the ...
Enterprises and entrepreneurs in the private sector in Chinese transitional society. International Review of Sociology, 10(1): ... The program has lifted 11 million out of poverty, offered training to 2.78 million workers, and created 1.87 million jobs ( ... Prize or price? Corporate social responsibility commitment and sales performance in the Chinese private sector. Management and ... and offers opportunities for small and private entrepreneurs. As of 2009, 3,350 private enterprises had invested in 4,764 ...
... where young firms have been shown to be a more important source of net job creation than incumbent firms. The Entrepreneurship ...
... govcon NACIE National Advisory Council on Innovation and Entrepreneurship nonprofit organizations Penny Pritzker Private-Sector ... innovation and job-driven workforce training, all of which are critical to American competitiveness," said Commerce Secretary ... nonprofit and academic sectors to serve as NACIE members. ...
... private employers hired staff at the fastest pace in 13 months in December, data from a payrolls processor showed Wednesday, ... Analysts are looking for 196,000 jobs to have been added in December, and a rise in private payrolls of 195,000. Both numbers ... a measure of the labor market that is more comprehensive and includes both public and private sector employment. ... Companies added 238,000 jobs last month after an upwardly revised 229,000 in November, the ADP National Employment Report ...
Private-sector hiring was better-than-expected in January, the latest indication that the U.S. labor market remains solid even ... Private Sector Added 205,000 Jobs in January. Published July 06, 2016. Economic IndicatorsDow Jones Newswires ... Private-sector hiring was better-than-expected in January, the latest indication that the U.S. labor market remains solid even ... Monthly gains in private payrolls continues to be powered by the service sector, which represents most of the economy's ...
... private employers added fewer jobs than expected in September and mortgage applications remained near flat in the latest week, ... U.S. private employers added 166,000 jobs last month, according to payroll processor ADPs National Employment Report. ... Economists in a Reuters poll had expected a gain of 180,000 jobs. Augusts private payrolls gains were revised to 159,000 from ... NEW YORK (Reuters) - U.S. private employers added fewer jobs than expected in September and mortgage applications remained near ...
... while the dominant services sector grew slightly, data showed on Wednesday. ... The pace of job losses in the private sector slowed in January as employers reported the smallest payroll decline in nearly two ... The pace of job losses in the private sector slowed in January as employers reported the smallest payroll decline in nearly two ... A report by ADP Employer Services showed the United States lost 22,000 private sector jobs last month, smaller than the 61,000 ...
The private sector added 216,000 jobs in the month, ADP said Wednesday, roughly in line with forecasts for 218,000 jobs. ... Private sector adds 216,000 jobs in February. By Annalyn Censky @CNNMoney March 7, 2012: 1:47 PM ET. ... Private employers added 216,000 jobs in the month, ADP said, roughly in line with forecasts for 218,000 jobs gained. ... including 225,000 from the private sector and a loss of government jobs. ...
... though job growth remained sluggish and fell short of economists expectations as the goods-producing sector shed payrolls. ... In May, the goods-producing sector cut 3,000 jobs, compared to a gain of 138,000 in the service sector. ... which includes both public and private sector employment. That report is expected to show job growth increased only slightly, ... Private employers added 135,000 jobs in May, the ADP National Employment Report showed on Wednesday, missing forecasts for a ...
... private employers unexpectedly shed jobs in September, reinforcing the belief that the U.S. Federal Reserve will embark on ... U.S. private employers unexpectedly shed jobs in September, reinforcing the belief that the U.S. Federal Reserve will embark on ... ADPs national employment report on Wednesday said U.S. private employer payrolls fell by 39,000 jobs in September. By contrast ... This does not bode particularly well for private sector employment in Fridays employment situation report although some of the ...
Some 90% of the jobs that the plan intends to create will be in... Politics News Summaries. , Newser ... Some 90% of the jobs that the plan intends to create will be in the private sector, many of them in the green-energy industry, ... "And theyll be the kind of jobs that wont just put people to work in the short term," he added, "but position our economy to ... creating or saving up to 4.1 million jobs. But that would still leave the unemployment rate at about 7%, the report says, a ...
... less than the 61,000 jobs lost in December, a report by a private employment service said on Wednesday. ... The pace of job losses in the private sector slowed in January as employers reported the smallest payroll decline in nearly two ... The pace of job losses in the private sector slowed in January as employers reported the smallest payroll decline in nearly two ... A report by ADP Employer Services showed the United States lost 22,000 private sector jobs last month, smaller than the 61,000 ...
... but public sector jobs nosedived, leading to a net loss of almost 100,000 jobs in September 2010. ... New government report shows that private sector jobs are up, ... Private sector jobs are up! But thats not the whole story... * ... New government report shows that private sector jobs are up, but public sector jobs nosedived, leading to a net loss of almost ... The important curve here is the blue one, showing the total number of private sector jobs in the US: climbing since mid-2009. ...
Private sector employment increased by 118,000 jobs from October to November, according to the November ADP National Employment ... ROSELAND, NJ--(Marketwire - Dec 5, 2012) - Private sector employment increased by 118,000 jobs from October to November, ... ADP National Employment Report: Private Sector Employment Increased by 118,000 Jobs in November. ... Goods-producing employment rose by 4,000 jobs in November as gains in construction jobs of 23,000 more than offset the 16,000 ...
... adding 53,000 jobs, slightly more than the 49,000 in February. The 191,000 U.S. private sector jobs added in March is slightly ... Mark Zandi, chief economist of Moodys Analytics, said, The job market is coming out from its deep winter slumber. GDP RISES, ... PERSONAL CONSUMPTION GROWTH ACCELERATESAMERICAS SERVICES SECTOR ACCELERATESCORE CAPEX UNEXPECTEDLY FALLS ... The payroll-processing firm estimates 191,000 workers were hired to private-sector jobs in March, below Wall Streets 195,000 ...
... announced plans to leave the agency for a new position in the private sector. ...
... propel job creation, and be of benefit to the countrys growing number of poor, according to a World Bank report released today ... Boosting Private Sectors Investment in Innovation Could Help South Africa Create Jobs and Reduce Poverty ... In such an environment, South Africa can turn to encouraging private innovation as one of several ways in which to improve ... "Given South Africas untapped potential for absorbing and adapting foreign technologies, private R&D can be turned into a more ...
... even as the private sector bleeds jobs in the current recession:. While the private sector has shed 6.9 million jobs since the ... Government jobs are always more stable than private sector jobs during downturns, but their ability to weather the current deep ... As Private Sector Bleeds Jobs, Government Gets a Pass (for now). By Leonard Gilroy. August 20, 2009 ... How on earth will we be able to right the economic ship if were growing jobs in the sector of the economy that is utterly ...
Private sector growth is responsible for this increase, as new public sector jobs remain less than half the level of a year ago ... particularly in the private sector: "UK employers seem to be in job-creation mode, according to the latest Reed Job Index, with ... Private sector leads January rise in job opportunities. By Personnel Today on 31 Jan 2011 in Economics, government & business, ... JOBS. Post a job. Why advertise with us?. HR Administrator. HR Advisor. HR Business Partner. HR Consultant. HR Director. HR ...
Private-sector employers added 184,000 jobs to the U.S. economy in October, while the national unemployment rate nudged up to ... as the manufacturing sector added 13,000 jobs after several consecutive months of recording the largest single-sector job loss. ... Private-sector employers added 184,000 jobs to the U.S. economy in October, while the national unemployment rate nudged up to ... Private sector adds 184K jobs, but jobless rate inches upward. By , November 2, 2012 at 1:20 PM ...
Wisconsin added 24,305 private sector jobs from March 2012-March 2013. The rate of growth places it 34th ... Wisconsin #34 in Private Sector Job Creation By Marge Pitrof • Sep 26, 2013 ... According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Wisconsin added 24,305 private sector jobs from March 2012-March 2013. The ... Since the start of 2011, Wisconsin has added 62,000 private sector jobs, after losing more than 130,000 during the recession. ...
The private sector added 2.36 million jobs in June vs. 3.06 million in May and 3.0 million expected. ... The Private Sector Added 2.3 Million Jobs in June, May Figures Revised up by 5.7 Million. ... The Private Sector Added 2.3 Million Jobs in June, May Figures Revised up by 5.7 Million. ... The latest ADP employment report shows that the private sector gained 2,369,000 jobs in June. May figures saw a huge upward ...
The effects have been particularly harsh for Africas private sector jobs, putting at risk development and transformation ... Without such support, there will be no private sector to lead the recovery and pull Africa out of the recession. ... it is all too often neglecting or insufficiently supporting the private sector. This note argues that additional liquidity and ... Africa is facing a series of shocks that are leaving many jobs and livelihoods at risk. By early February 2020, and without a ...
Tags: Bureau of Labor Statisticsjobjob growthprivate-sector jobRick Scott ... BLS data shows a gain of 21,900 jobs in December for a total of 238,900 nonfarm, private-sector jobs for 2015. That total takes ... December extends Florida private-sector job growth streak to 10 months. Published on January 27, 2016. in Statewide/Top ... Florida extended its streak of leading large states in private-sector job growth to 10 months, according to data released by ...
  • These incubator graduates have the potential to create jobs, revitalize neighborhoods, commercialize new technologies, and strengthen local and national economies. (bimtech.ac.in)
  • The report, based on an analysis of federal jobs data, found that state and local governments steadily added jobs for eight months after the recession began in December 2007, with their employment peaking last August. (reason.org)
  • State and local governments have since lost 55,000 jobs, but from the beginning of the recession through last month they gained a net of 110,000 jobs, the report found, in part because of the federal stimulus program. (reason.org)
  • Government jobs are always more stable than private sector jobs during downturns, but their ability to weather the current deep recession startled Donald J. Boyd, the senior fellow at the institute who wrote the report. (reason.org)
  • The disparity between employment trends in each sector is stark, and taxpayers should be questioning their elected leaders on why it's fair for government employees get a pass in the recession while the private sector gets hammered. (reason.org)
  • Since the start of 2011, Wisconsin has added 62,000 private sector jobs, after losing more than 130,000 during the recession. (wuwm.com)
  • Without such support, there will be no private sector to lead the recovery and pull Africa out of the recession. (uneca.org)
  • Its diversified yet focused portfolio of business offers a robust mix of recession-proof products and services catering primarily to the domestic government and consumer markets, resilient sectors which are expected to benefit from fiscal stimulus packages and steady domestic demand despite the economic headwinds going forward. (blogspot.com)
  • Are Public Sector Jobs Recession-Proof? (nber.org)
  • In recent days, exceptionally weak reports on U.S. economic output in the first half of the year, the manufacturing sector and consumer spending have deepened fears of recession. (washingtonpost.com)
  • Baker estimates that the labor force, which is made up of those with jobs or who are looking for work, is 6 million larger today than at the start of the recession. (latimes.com)
  • Job losses caused by the Great Recession refers to jobs that have been lost worldwide within people since the start of the Great Recession. (wikipedia.org)
  • Since the start of the recession, 8.8 million jobs have been lost, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the U.S., jobs paying between $14 and $21 per hour made up about 60% those lost during the recession, but such mid-wage jobs have comprised only about 27% of jobs gained during the recovery through mid-2012. (wikipedia.org)
  • While the automotive sector is slowly recalling workers back to work, grocery stores and restaurants have slashed hours in the face of the global recession. (wikipedia.org)
  • PRETORIA, September 19, 2017 - Harnessing South Africa's largely untapped potential for innovation could increase the economy's productivity, propel job creation, and be of benefit to the country's growing number of poor, according to a World Bank report released today. (worldbank.org)
  • In August 2017, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation commissioned a rapid review of the South Asia regional portfolio of BMGF/DFID comprising of city projects working on various aspects of public-private partnerships in the delivery of urban sanitation services. (susana.org)
  • With selections such as the Global Alliance for Improved Nutrition's Lawrence Haddad last year and African Development Bank President Akinwumi Ayodeji Adesina in 2017, critics say the prize seems to be validating a private sector role in the effort to improve global nutrition. (devex.com)
  • The Turkish outstanding private sector loans received from abroad fell in September compared to the end of 2017, the Central Bank announced on Nov. 15. (hurriyetdailynews.com)
  • Superior Fresh opened in August 2017 through a university-private industry collaboration with UW-Stevens Point. (wispolitics.com)
  • Additionally, any WARN notices provided after March 17, 2020, must state: "If you have lost your job or been laid off temporarily, you may be eligible for Unemployment Insurance (UI). (btlaw.com)
  • For context, high level analysis suggests that there was approximately 730,000 fewer payroll jobs in STP-enabled businesses on 2 May 2020 than on 14 March 2020. (abs.gov.au)
  • With layoffs surging, a significant expansion of unemployment benefits for the millions who will lose jobs as a result of the coronavirus outbreak was included in an economic relief bill nearing final approval in Congress. (cbs42.com)
  • The estimates are considered experimental and use an index to provide an indication of movements in total jobs and total wages (rather than level estimates), for the purpose of assessing the economic impact of the COVID-19 coronavirus on employees. (abs.gov.au)
  • One of the components of the American Jobs Act that Obama continues to demand that Republicans pass would invest $35 billion in federal funds to keep cops, firefighters, and teachers on the job. (commondreams.org)
  • Job opportunities across the country rose in January, with some sectors offering their highest number of vacancies in over a year, according to data released today. (personneltoday.com)
  • Businesses with 49 or fewer employees added 19,000 jobs in November. (yahoo.com)
  • Small business of 49 staff or fewer added 937,000 jobs in June. (goldprice.org)
  • Mr Buchanan, headteacher at Ashford School in Kent, will tell conference delegates: "We know that our colleagues in state schools often do a fantastic job with fewer resources, larger classes, more curriculum constraints and significantly different challenges and we do not presume to patronise them by suggesting we can necessarily run their schools better than they can. (aol.co.uk)
  • Yet today, these protections cover less than half of all spending, and too often, even the jobs covered by existing protections pay poverty wages. (americanprogressaction.org)
  • We find no evidence that highly-educated individuals are penalized by taking jobs in the public sector, either with respect to wages or pension wealth. (nber.org)
  • This release provides indicative information on the economic impact of the COVID-19 coronovirus on employees, including changes in payroll jobs, changes in total wages paid, and changes in average weekly wages per job. (abs.gov.au)
  • To produce indicative real time estimates of wages and jobs, the calendarisation method is used to convert STP data from a cash basis to an accrual basis. (abs.gov.au)
  • The payroll-processing firm estimates 191,000 workers were hired to private-sector jobs in March, below Wall Street's 195,000 consensus forecast. (timesunion.com)
  • The Republican nominee for president believes we can "help the American people" by laying off, not just public-sector workers in general, but specifically cops, firefighters, and teachers. (commondreams.org)
  • Central to their argument against this type of investment is to keep the focus on public sector workers as a class, arguing that they are bilking the taxpayer and are to blame for the economic plight of struggling Americans. (commondreams.org)
  • In this third report, we extend these findings with additional comprehensive data that illuminate the scale on which federal purchasing heavily supports private employers while leaving millions of their workers in low-paying jobs or well-short of a middle-class living standard. (demos.org)
  • At least 21 million people-8 million workers and their families-rely on low-wage jobs in the federally-supported economy, that is, jobs with firms that receive a significant portion of their revenue from federal funds. (demos.org)
  • While workers on jobs funded through federal contracting dollars enjoy numerous wage and benefit protections, these policies usually do not apply to jobs funded through federal grants, loans, loan guarantees, and tax incentives. (americanprogressaction.org)
  • Allows an employee injured on the job while under the influence of marijuana to recover workers' compensation benefits. (btlaw.com)
  • However, there are no statistically discernible differences between state and local workers and their private sector counterparts, ceteris paribus. (nber.org)
  • As a proportion of the hourly private-sector wage, the hourly equivalent public-private differentials are about 17.2 percent, 13.4 percent, and 12.6 percent for federal, state, and local workers, respectively. (nber.org)
  • How are Virginia public-sector workers faring? (epi.org)
  • Are single mothers finding jobs without displacing other workers? (bls.gov)
  • Construction and manufacturing pay above the average hourly earnings for all private-sector workers, as does the health services category. (latimes.com)
  • Africa is facing a series of shocks that are leaving many jobs and livelihoods at risk. (uneca.org)
  • Through USAID -funded End NTDs in Africa program, we are supporting Ghana's health service and USAID's Neglected Tropical Disease Program in the country to mobilize resources from private sources, reducing their reliance on donor funding and sustaining programs to control and eliminate NTDs. (devex.com)
  • One of his signature programs at AfDB is " Feed Africa ," which envisions a transformation "led by the private sector and enabled by the public sector. (devex.com)
  • With this idea in mind, and the powerful belief that " brilliance is evenly distributed, but opportunity is not ," Andela , founded four years ago, began recruiting recent graduates in Africa with the mission of connecting them to job opportunities in high-tech companies. (worldbank.org)
  • The report finds that South Africa's 6% dip in overall economic productivity from 2011 to 2016 was due, at least in part, to a sharp drop, estimated by some at 40%, in private research and development (R&D) expenditure since 2009. (worldbank.org)
  • The effects have been particularly harsh for Africa's private sector jobs, putting at risk development and transformation achievements made over the past 10 years. (uneca.org)
  • Husbands' job loss and wives' labor force participation during economic downturns: are all recessions the same? (bls.gov)
  • The Institute for Supply Management said its index of the vast services sector rose to 50.5 last month from 49.8 in December. (ibtimes.com)
  • The United States lost jobs during every month in 2008 and in 11 of 12 months in 2009. (ibtimes.com)
  • U.S. private employers unexpectedly shed jobs in September, reinforcing the belief that the U.S. Federal Reserve will embark on another round of monetary policy stimulus to support the economic recovery as early as next month. (ibtimes.com)
  • Abstracting from the storm, the job market turned in a good performance during the month. (yahoo.com)
  • The 191,000 U.S. private sector jobs added in March is slightly above the twelve-month average," said Carlos Rodriguez, president and chief executive officer of ADP. (timesunion.com)
  • But Naroff said he expects that pace to spike to nearly 250,000 jobs a month in the first half of 2013, since "businesses will be hiring at normal pace - which arguably may only be a slightly better pace of 175,000 jobs - but then they will also make up for the hiring they didn't do in the last four months of 2012. (njbiz.com)
  • May figures saw a huge upward revision to 3.06 million jobs added compared 2,760,000 jobs lost as originally reported the month before. (goldprice.org)
  • The former Lovells private equity team has had a bumper month. (thelawyer.com)
  • WASHINGTON -- It took more than four years, but the economy last month finally recovered all the millions of private-sector jobs lost in the last downturn. (latimes.com)
  • The Greater Jacksonville business community is committed to providing job opportunities to veterans. (coj.net)
  • Established in 2003, is a Florida-based, Service Disabled Veteran-Owned (SDVOB), 8(a)/small disadvantaged business (SDB) certified firm, providing technology, education, engineering, training, and management services for both the public and private sector throughout the United States and abroad. (coj.net)
  • Private Agricultural Sector Support (PASS: www.pass.ac.tz) is a non-bank financial organisation that has a vision of facilitating provision of business development and financial services and credit guarantee to commercial farmers and agri-businesses that operate as small and medium scale enterprises (SM Es) in Tanzania. (dreamjobstz.com)
  • Many private sector actors recognize engagement with the public sector has business value and promotes social benefits. (devex.com)
  • private sector advances business interests, aligning CSR investment to commercial opportunities. (devex.com)
  • Working directly with the NTDP, we provided mentoring and capacity support to identify stakeholders, develop business cases, facilitate introductions to private sector players, and strengthen internal controls so that private sector actors can trust that funds will be managed effectively and results will be achieved. (devex.com)
  • But the truth is, the shift to clean energy already is creating tens of thousands of jobs in every part of our country, as the business owners, investors and others who belong to the nonpartisan business group Environmental Entrepreneurs (E2) can tell you. (huffingtonpost.com)
  • STP data includes both business and job level tax information and superannuation information. (abs.gov.au)
  • According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics , Wisconsin added 24,305 private sector jobs from March 2012-March 2013. (wuwm.com)
  • However, despite the increase in job numbers, salary levels offer a far more sober picture. (personneltoday.com)
  • The average salary for jobs posted on the site in January 2011 is £33,039, unchanged from the December 2010 figure - this is down 1% in real terms since the index began. (personneltoday.com)
  • Real-term salary increases appear in just 10 out of the 35 job sectors analysed, with areas such as retail, training, banking, hospitality, marketing and accountancy leading the way. (personneltoday.com)
  • Appendix A lists a SAS™ program to provide value labels for the Industry and Occupation groups designated for the Sample Person's current, longest, and "asthma" jobs (Note that military occupations are not permissible entries for NHANES current job data because the survey covers only the civilian, non-institutionalized population. (cdc.gov)
  • Please note that military occupations are not permissible entries for NHANES Current Job data because for NHANES, only the civilian, non-institutionalized population is eligible to participate in the survey. (cdc.gov)
  • However, civilian employees of the armed forces are included in the NHANES survey sample and military occupations are valid entries for the survey participant's longest job data. (cdc.gov)
  • In NHANES, data for exposure to workplace tobacco smoke is collected only for the participant's Current Job. (cdc.gov)
  • Al Ahli Bank of Kuwait (ABK) recently announced the successful conclusion of its participation in the Gulf University for Science and Technology's (GUST) 18th job fair, under the patronage of Sheikha Al Zain Al Sabah, which was held at the university campus on the 9th & 10th March, 2016. (arabtimesonline.com)