InkPrintingCyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor p16: A product of the p16 tumor suppressor gene (GENES, P16). It is also called INK4 or INK4A because it is the prototype member of the INK4 CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASE INHIBITORS. This protein is produced from the alpha mRNA transcript of the p16 gene. The other gene product, produced from the alternatively spliced beta transcript, is TUMOR SUPPRESSOR PROTEIN P14ARF. Both p16 gene products have tumor suppressor functions.BooksJournalism, Medical: The collection, writing, and editing of current interest material on topics related to biomedicine for presentation through the mass media, including newspapers, magazines, radio, or television, usually for a public audience such as health care consumers.Dermatoglyphics: The study of the patterns of ridges of the skin of the fingers, palms, toes, and soles.Library Surveys: Collection and analysis of data pertaining to operations of a particular library, library system, or group of independent libraries, with recommendations for improvement and/or ordered plans for further development.Copyright: It is a form of protection provided by law. In the United States this protection is granted to authors of original works of authorship, including literary, dramatic, musical, artistic, and certain other intellectual works. This protection is available to both published and unpublished works. (from Circular of the United States Copyright Office, 6/30/2008)Mass Media: Instruments or technological means of communication that reach large numbers of people with a common message: press, radio, television, etc.Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor p15: An INK4 cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor containing four ANKYRIN-LIKE REPEATS. INK4B is often inactivated by deletions, mutations, or hypermethylation in HEMATOLOGIC NEOPLASMS.ReadingJournalism: The collection, preparation, and distribution of news and related commentary and feature materials through such media as pamphlets, newsletters, newspapers, magazines, radio, motion pictures, television, and books. While originally applied to the reportage of current events in printed form, specifically newspapers, with the advent of radio and television the use of the term has broadened to include all printed and electronic communication dealing with current affairs.Libraries, MedicalCopying Processes: Reproduction of data in a new location or other destination, leaving the source data unchanged, although the physical form of the result may differ from that of the source.Library Materials: Print and non-print materials collected, processed, and stored by libraries. They comprise books, periodicals, pamphlets, reports, microforms, maps, manuscripts, motion pictures, and all other forms of audiovisual records. (Harrod, The Librarians' Glossary, 4th ed, p497)Tumor Suppressor Protein p14ARF: A gene product of the p16 tumor suppressor gene (GENES, P16). It antagonizes the function of MDM2 PROTEIN (which regulates P53 TUMOR SUPPRESSOR PROTEIN by targeting it for degradation). p14ARF is produced from the beta mRNA transcript of the p16 gene. The other gene product, produced from the alternatively spliced alpha transcript, is CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASE INHIBITOR P16. Both p16 gene products have tumor suppressor functions.Periodicals as Topic: A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.Libraries, Digital: Libraries in which a major proportion of the resources are available in machine-readable format, rather than on paper or MICROFORM.Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor p18: An INK4 cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor containing five ANKYRIN-LIKE REPEATS. Aberrant expression of this protein has been associated with deregulated EPITHELIAL CELL growth, organ enlargement, and a variety of NEOPLASMS.Library Collection Development: Development of a library collection, including the determination and coordination of selection policy, assessment of needs of users and potential users, collection use studies, collection evaluation, identification of collection needs, selection of materials, planning for resource sharing, collection maintenance and weeding, and budgeting.Cellophane: A generic name for film produced from wood pulp by the viscose process. It is a thin, transparent sheeting of regenerated cellulose, moisture-proof and sometimes dyed, and used chiefly as food wrapping or as bags for dialysis. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed & McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor p19: An INK4 cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor containing five ANKYRIN REPEATS. Aberrant expression of this protein has been associated with TESTICULAR CANCER.Inflation, Economic: An increase in the volume of money and credit relative to available goods resulting in a substantial and continuing rise in the general price level.Forensic Anthropology: Scientific study of human skeletal remains with the express purpose of identification. This includes establishing individual identity, trauma analysis, facial reconstruction, photographic superimposition, determination of time interval since death, and crime-scene recovery. Forensic anthropologists do not certify cause of death but provide data to assist in determination of probable cause. This is a branch of the field of physical anthropology and qualified individuals are certified by the American Board of Forensic Anthropology. (From Am J Forensic Med Pathol 1992 Jun;13(2):146)Forensic Dentistry: The application of dental knowledge to questions of law.Interlibrary LoansPublishing: "The business or profession of the commercial production and issuance of literature" (Webster's 3d). It includes the publisher, publication processes, editing and editors. Production may be by conventional printing methods or by electronic publishing.Vision, Low: Vision considered to be inferior to normal vision as represented by accepted standards of acuity, field of vision, or motility. Low vision generally refers to visual disorders that are caused by diseases that cannot be corrected by refraction (e.g., MACULAR DEGENERATION; RETINITIS PIGMENTOSA; DIABETIC RETINOPATHY, etc.).Teaching Materials: Instructional materials used in teaching.Genes, p16: Tumor suppressor genes located on human chromosome 9 in the region 9p21. This gene is either deleted or mutated in a wide range of malignancies. (From Segen, Current Med Talk, 1995) Two alternatively spliced gene products are encoded by p16: CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASE INHIBITOR P16 and TUMOR SUPPRESSOR PROTEIN P14ARF.Radio: The transmission and reception of electric impulses or signals by means of electric waves without a connecting wire, or the use of these waves for the wireless transmission of electric impulses into which sound is converted. (From Webster's 3d)Advertising as Topic: The act or practice of calling public attention to a product, service, need, etc., especially by paid announcements in newspapers, magazines, on radio, or on television. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Textbooks as Topic: Books used in the study of a subject that contain a systematic presentation of the principles and vocabulary of a subject.Peer Review, Research: The evaluation by experts of the quality and pertinence of research or research proposals of other experts in the same field. Peer review is used by editors in deciding which submissions warrant publication, by granting agencies to determine which proposals should be funded, and by academic institutions in tenure decisions.Vision Tests: A series of tests used to assess various functions of the eyes.Lip: Either of the two fleshy, full-blooded margins of the mouth.Allied Health Occupations: Occupations of medical personnel who are not physicians, and are qualified by special training and, frequently, by licensure to work in supporting roles in the health care field. These occupations include, but are not limited to, medical technology, physical therapy, physician assistant, etc.Dissent and Disputes: Differences of opinion or disagreements that may arise, for example, between health professionals and patients or their families, or against a political regime.Online Systems: Systems where the input data enter the computer directly from the point of origin (usually a terminal or workstation) and/or in which output data are transmitted directly to that terminal point of origin. (Sippl, Computer Dictionary, 4th ed)Cell Aging: The decrease in the cell's ability to proliferate with the passing of time. Each cell is programmed for a certain number of cell divisions and at the end of that time proliferation halts. The cell enters a quiescent state after which it experiences CELL DEATH via the process of APOPTOSIS.Internet: A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.Technology, Radiologic: The application of scientific knowledge or technology to the field of radiology. The applications center mostly around x-ray or radioisotopes for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes but the technological applications of any radiation or radiologic procedure is within the scope of radiologic technology.Libraries: Collections of systematically acquired and organized information resources, and usually providing assistance to users. (ERIC Thesaurus, http://www.eric.ed.gov/ accessed 2/1/2008)Microcomputers: Small computers using LSI (large-scale integration) microprocessor chips as the CPU (central processing unit) and semiconductor memories for compact, inexpensive storage of program instructions and data. They are smaller and less expensive than minicomputers and are usually built into a dedicated system where they are optimized for a particular application. "Microprocessor" may refer to just the CPU or the entire microcomputer.Bibliometrics: The use of statistical methods in the analysis of a body of literature to reveal the historical development of subject fields and patterns of authorship, publication, and use. Formerly called statistical bibliography. (from The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 4: Cyclin-dependent kinase 4 is a key regulator of G1 PHASE of the CELL CYCLE. It partners with CYCLIN D to phosphorylate RETINOBLASTOMA PROTEIN. CDK4 activity is inhibited by CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASE INHIBITOR P16.Social Marketing: Use of marketing principles also used to sell products to consumers to promote ideas, attitudes and behaviors. Design and use of programs seeking to increase the acceptance of a social idea or practice by target groups, not for the benefit of the marketer, but to benefit the target audience and the general society.Forensic Sciences: Disciplines that apply sciences to law. Forensic sciences include a wide range of disciplines, such as FORENSIC TOXICOLOGY; FORENSIC ANTHROPOLOGY; FORENSIC MEDICINE; FORENSIC DENTISTRY; and others.Information Storage and Retrieval: Organized activities related to the storage, location, search, and retrieval of information.Public Opinion: The attitude of a significant portion of a population toward any given proposition, based upon a measurable amount of factual evidence, and involving some degree of reflection, analysis, and reasoning.Consumer Health Information: Information intended for potential users of medical and healthcare services. There is an emphasis on self-care and preventive approaches as well as information for community-wide dissemination and use.Health Education: Education that increases the awareness and favorably influences the attitudes and knowledge relating to the improvement of health on a personal or community basis.IllinoisCosmetics: Substances intended to be applied to the human body for cleansing, beautifying, promoting attractiveness, or altering the appearance without affecting the body's structure or functions. Included in this definition are skin creams, lotions, perfumes, lipsticks, fingernail polishes, eye and facial makeup preparations, permanent waves, hair colors, toothpastes, and deodorants, as well as any material intended for use as a component of a cosmetic product. (U.S. Food & Drug Administration Center for Food Safety & Applied Nutrition Office of Cosmetics Fact Sheet (web page) Feb 1995)Book SelectionCD-ROM: An optical disk storage system for computers on which data can be read or from which data can be retrieved but not entered or modified. A CD-ROM unit is almost identical to the compact disk playback device for home use.Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 6: Cyclin-dependent kinase 6 associates with CYCLIN D and phosphorylates RETINOBLASTOMA PROTEIN during G1 PHASE of the CELL CYCLE. It helps regulate the transition to S PHASE and its kinase activity is inhibited by CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASE INHIBITOR P18.Cyclin-Dependent Kinases: Protein kinases that control cell cycle progression in all eukaryotes and require physical association with CYCLINS to achieve full enzymatic activity. Cyclin-dependent kinases are regulated by phosphorylation and dephosphorylation events.Information Services: Organized services to provide information on any questions an individual might have using databases and other sources. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Health Promotion: Encouraging consumer behaviors most likely to optimize health potentials (physical and psychosocial) through health information, preventive programs, and access to medical care.MEDLARS: A computerized biomedical bibliographic storage and retrieval system operated by the NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE. MEDLARS stands for Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System, which was first introduced in 1964 and evolved into an online system in 1971 called MEDLINE (MEDLARS Online). As other online databases were developed, MEDLARS became the name of the entire NLM information system while MEDLINE became the name of the premier database. MEDLARS was used to produce the former printed Cumulated Index Medicus, and the printed monthly Index Medicus, until that publication ceased in December 2004.Computer Communication Networks: A system containing any combination of computers, computer terminals, printers, audio or visual display devices, or telephones interconnected by telecommunications equipment or cables: used to transmit or receive information. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Fees and Charges: Amounts charged to the patient as payer for health care services.Tumor Suppressor Proteins: Proteins that are normally involved in holding cellular growth in check. Deficiencies or abnormalities in these proteins may lead to unregulated cell growth and tumor development.Retinoblastoma Protein: Product of the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor gene. It is a nuclear phosphoprotein hypothesized to normally act as an inhibitor of cell proliferation. Rb protein is absent in retinoblastoma cell lines. It also has been shown to form complexes with the adenovirus E1A protein, the SV40 T antigen, and the human papilloma virus E7 protein.TennesseePamphlets: Printed publications usually having a format with no binding and no cover and having fewer than some set number of pages. They are often devoted to a single subject.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 9: A specific pair of GROUP C CHROMSOMES of the human chromosome classification.Telephone: An instrument for reproducing sounds especially articulate speech at a distance. (Webster, 3rd ed)Cell Cycle Proteins: Proteins that control the CELL DIVISION CYCLE. This family of proteins includes a wide variety of classes, including CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASES, mitogen-activated kinases, CYCLINS, and PHOSPHOPROTEIN PHOSPHATASES as well as their putative substrates such as chromatin-associated proteins, CYTOSKELETAL PROTEINS, and TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS.Journal Impact Factor: A quantitative measure of the frequency on average with which articles in a journal have been cited in a given period of time.DNA Methylation: Addition of methyl groups to DNA. DNA methyltransferases (DNA methylases) perform this reaction using S-ADENOSYLMETHIONINE as the methyl group donor.Information Dissemination: The circulation or wide dispersal of information.Patient Education as Topic: The teaching or training of patients concerning their own health needs.KentuckyDatabases, Factual: Extensive collections, reputedly complete, of facts and data garnered from material of a specialized subject area and made available for analysis and application. The collection can be automated by various contemporary methods for retrieval. The concept should be differentiated from DATABASES, BIBLIOGRAPHIC which is restricted to collections of bibliographic references.Pathology: A specialty concerned with the nature and cause of disease as expressed by changes in cellular or tissue structure and function caused by the disease process.Library Services: Services offered to the library user. They include reference and circulation.Genes, Tumor Suppressor: Genes that inhibit expression of the tumorigenic phenotype. They are normally involved in holding cellular growth in check. When tumor suppressor genes are inactivated or lost, a barrier to normal proliferation is removed and unregulated growth is possible.Librarians: Specialists in the management of a library or the services rendered by a library, bringing professional skills to administration, organization of material and personnel, interpretation of bibliothecal rules, the development and maintenance of the library's collection, and the provision of information services.Comprehension: The act or fact of grasping the meaning, nature, or importance of; understanding. (American Heritage Dictionary, 4th ed) Includes understanding by a patient or research subject of information disclosed orally or in writing.United StatesNanomedicine: The branch of medicine concerned with the application of NANOTECHNOLOGY to the prevention and treatment of disease. It involves the monitoring, repair, construction, and control of human biological systems at the molecular level, using engineered nanodevices and NANOSTRUCTURES. (From Freitas Jr., Nanomedicine, vol 1, 1999).ComputersHotlines: A direct communication system, usually telephone, established for instant contact. It is designed to provide special information and assistance through trained personnel and is used for counseling, referrals, and emergencies such as poisonings and threatened suicides.Carrier Proteins: Transport proteins that carry specific substances in the blood or across cell membranes.Language: A verbal or nonverbal means of communicating ideas or feelings.Proteins: Linear POLYPEPTIDES that are synthesized on RIBOSOMES and may be further modified, crosslinked, cleaved, or assembled into complex proteins with several subunits. The specific sequence of AMINO ACIDS determines the shape the polypeptide will take, during PROTEIN FOLDING, and the function of the protein.Faculty, Medical: The teaching staff and members of the administrative staff having academic rank in a medical school.Collodion: A nitrocellulose solution in ether and alcohol. Collodion has a wide range of uses in industry including applications in the manufacture of photographic film, in fibers, in lacquers, and in engraving and lithography. In medicine it is used as a drug solvent and a wound sealant.Facility Design and Construction: Architecture, exterior and interior design, and construction of facilities other than hospitals, e.g., dental schools, medical schools, ambulatory care clinics, and specified units of health care facilities. The concept also includes architecture, design, and construction of specialized contained, controlled, or closed research environments including those of space labs and stations.Organizational Case Studies: Descriptions and evaluations of specific health care organizations.Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).Gene Deletion: A genetic rearrangement through loss of segments of DNA or RNA, bringing sequences which are normally separated into close proximity. This deletion may be detected using cytogenetic techniques and can also be inferred from the phenotype, indicating a deletion at one specific locus.Vision, Ocular: The process in which light signals are transformed by the PHOTORECEPTOR CELLS into electrical signals which can then be transmitted to the brain.Patient Care Planning: Usually a written medical and nursing care program designed for a particular patient.Polycomb Repressive Complex 1: A multisubunit polycomb protein complex with affinity for CHROMATIN that contains methylated HISTONE H3. It contains an E3 ubiquitin ligase activity that is specific for HISTONE H2A and works in conjunction with POLYCOMB REPRESSIVE COMPLEX 2 to effect EPIGENETIC REPRESSION.Costs and Cost Analysis: Absolute, comparative, or differential costs pertaining to services, institutions, resources, etc., or the analysis and study of these costs.Phonetics: The science or study of speech sounds and their production, transmission, and reception, and their analysis, classification, and transcription. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Evaluation Studies as Topic: Studies determining the effectiveness or value of processes, personnel, and equipment, or the material on conducting such studies. For drugs and devices, CLINICAL TRIALS AS TOPIC; DRUG EVALUATION; and DRUG EVALUATION, PRECLINICAL are available.Cell Cycle: The complex series of phenomena, occurring between the end of one CELL DIVISION and the end of the next, by which cellular material is duplicated and then divided between two daughter cells. The cell cycle includes INTERPHASE, which includes G0 PHASE; G1 PHASE; S PHASE; and G2 PHASE, and CELL DIVISION PHASE.Software: Sequential operating programs and data which instruct the functioning of a digital computer.Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor p21: A cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor that mediates TUMOR SUPPRESSOR PROTEIN P53-dependent CELL CYCLE arrest. p21 interacts with a range of CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASES and associates with PROLIFERATING CELL NUCLEAR ANTIGEN and CASPASE 3.Consumer Satisfaction: Customer satisfaction or dissatisfaction with a benefit or service received.Psychophysics: The science dealing with the correlation of the physical characteristics of a stimulus, e.g., frequency or intensity, with the response to the stimulus, in order to assess the psychologic factors involved in the relationship.Organizational Objectives: The purposes, missions, and goals of an individual organization or its units, established through administrative processes. It includes an organization's long-range plans and administrative philosophy.Tumor Suppressor Protein p53: Nuclear phosphoprotein encoded by the p53 gene (GENES, P53) whose normal function is to control CELL PROLIFERATION and APOPTOSIS. A mutant or absent p53 protein has been found in LEUKEMIA; OSTEOSARCOMA; LUNG CANCER; and COLORECTAL CANCER.Computer-Assisted Instruction: A self-learning technique, usually online, involving interaction of the student with programmed instructional materials.Speech: Communication through a system of conventional vocal symbols.Tobacco Industry: The aggregate business enterprise of agriculture, manufacture, and distribution related to tobacco and tobacco-derived products.Ink Blot Tests: Projective tests utilizing ink blots to which a subject responds. They are used in personality diagnosis.User-Computer Interface: The portion of an interactive computer program that issues messages to and receives commands from a user.Databases, Bibliographic: Extensive collections, reputedly complete, of references and citations to books, articles, publications, etc., generally on a single subject or specialized subject area. Databases can operate through automated files, libraries, or computer disks. The concept should be differentiated from DATABASES, FACTUAL which is used for collections of data and facts apart from bibliographic references to them.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Nanotechnology: The development and use of techniques to study physical phenomena and construct structures in the nanoscale size range or smaller.Cyclins: A large family of regulatory proteins that function as accessory subunits to a variety of CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASES. They generally function as ENZYME ACTIVATORS that drive the CELL CYCLE through transitions between phases. A subset of cyclins may also function as transcriptional regulators.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Database Management Systems: Software designed to store, manipulate, manage, and control data for specific uses.Tattooing: The indelible marking of TISSUES, primarily SKIN, by pricking it with NEEDLES to imbed various COLORING AGENTS. Tattooing of the CORNEA is done to colorize LEUKOMA spots.Proto-Oncogene Proteins: Products of proto-oncogenes. Normally they do not have oncogenic or transforming properties, but are involved in the regulation or differentiation of cell growth. They often have protein kinase activity.Program Evaluation: Studies designed to assess the efficacy of programs. They may include the evaluation of cost-effectiveness, the extent to which objectives are met, or impact.Polymorphism, Single-Stranded Conformational: Variation in a population's DNA sequence that is detected by determining alterations in the conformation of denatured DNA fragments. Denatured DNA fragments are allowed to renature under conditions that prevent the formation of double-stranded DNA and allow secondary structure to form in single stranded fragments. These fragments are then run through polyacrylamide gels to detect variations in the secondary structure that is manifested as an alteration in migration through the gels.Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor p27: A cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor that coordinates the activation of CYCLIN and CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASES during the CELL CYCLE. It interacts with active CYCLIN D complexed to CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASE 4 in proliferating cells, while in arrested cells it binds and inhibits CYCLIN E complexed to CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASE 2.Radiographic Image Enhancement: Improvement in the quality of an x-ray image by use of an intensifying screen, tube, or filter and by optimum exposure techniques. Digital processing methods are often employed.G1 Phase: The period of the CELL CYCLE preceding DNA REPLICATION in S PHASE. Subphases of G1 include "competence" (to respond to growth factors), G1a (entry into G1), G1b (progression), and G1c (assembly). Progression through the G1 subphases is effected by limiting growth factors, nutrients, or inhibitors.DNA, Neoplasm: DNA present in neoplastic tissue.Nanoparticles: Nanometer-sized particles that are nanoscale in three dimensions. They include nanocrystaline materials; NANOCAPSULES; METAL NANOPARTICLES; DENDRIMERS, and QUANTUM DOTS. The uses of nanoparticles include DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEMS and cancer targeting and imaging.Occipital Lobe: Posterior portion of the CEREBRAL HEMISPHERES responsible for processing visual sensory information. It is located posterior to the parieto-occipital sulcus and extends to the preoccipital notch.Visual Acuity: Clarity or sharpness of OCULAR VISION or the ability of the eye to see fine details. Visual acuity depends on the functions of RETINA, neuronal transmission, and the interpretative ability of the brain. Normal visual acuity is expressed as 20/20 indicating that one can see at 20 feet what should normally be seen at that distance. Visual acuity can also be influenced by brightness, color, and contrast.Health Behavior: Behaviors expressed by individuals to protect, maintain or promote their health status. For example, proper diet, and appropriate exercise are activities perceived to influence health status. Life style is closely associated with health behavior and factors influencing life style are socioeconomic, educational, and cultural.Genes, p53: Tumor suppressor genes located on the short arm of human chromosome 17 and coding for the phosphoprotein p53.Self Efficacy: Cognitive mechanism based on expectations or beliefs about one's ability to perform actions necessary to produce a given effect. It is also a theoretical component of behavior change in various therapeutic treatments. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 1994)Cyclin D1: Protein encoded by the bcl-1 gene which plays a critical role in regulating the cell cycle. Overexpression of cyclin D1 is the result of bcl-1 rearrangement, a t(11;14) translocation, and is implicated in various neoplasms.Promoter Regions, Genetic: DNA sequences which are recognized (directly or indirectly) and bound by a DNA-dependent RNA polymerase during the initiation of transcription. Highly conserved sequences within the promoter include the Pribnow box in bacteria and the TATA BOX in eukaryotes.Form Perception: The sensory discrimination of a pattern shape or outline.Speech Perception: The process whereby an utterance is decoded into a representation in terms of linguistic units (sequences of phonetic segments which combine to form lexical and grammatical morphemes).Gene Silencing: Interruption or suppression of the expression of a gene at transcriptional or translational levels.Polymerase Chain Reaction: In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Attitude to Health: Public attitudes toward health, disease, and the medical care system.Cell Transformation, Neoplastic: Cell changes manifested by escape from control mechanisms, increased growth potential, alterations in the cell surface, karyotypic abnormalities, morphological and biochemical deviations from the norm, and other attributes conferring the ability to invade, metastasize, and kill.Databases, Protein: Databases containing information about PROTEINS such as AMINO ACID SEQUENCE; PROTEIN CONFORMATION; and other properties.Immunohistochemistry: Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in neoplastic tissue.Sequence Alignment: The arrangement of two or more amino acid or base sequences from an organism or organisms in such a way as to align areas of the sequences sharing common properties. The degree of relatedness or homology between the sequences is predicted computationally or statistically based on weights assigned to the elements aligned between the sequences. This in turn can serve as a potential indicator of the genetic relatedness between the organisms.Communication: The exchange or transmission of ideas, attitudes, or beliefs between individuals or groups.Fibroblasts: Connective tissue cells which secrete an extracellular matrix rich in collagen and other macromolecules.Particle Size: Relating to the size of solids.Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia: A malignancy arising in uterine cervical epithelium and confined thereto, representing a continuum of histological changes ranging from well-differentiated CIN 1 (formerly, mild dysplasia) to severe dysplasia/carcinoma in situ, CIN 3. The lesion arises at the squamocolumnar cell junction at the transformation zone of the endocervical canal, with a variable tendency to develop invasive epidermoid carcinoma, a tendency that is enhanced by concomitant human papillomaviral infection. (Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)Genes, Retinoblastoma: Tumor suppressor genes located on human chromosome 13 in the region 13q14 and coding for a family of phosphoproteins with molecular weights ranging from 104 kDa to 115 kDa. One copy of the wild-type Rb gene is necessary for normal retinal development. Loss or inactivation of both alleles at this locus results in retinoblastoma.Mass Screening: Organized periodic procedures performed on large groups of people for the purpose of detecting disease.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.CpG Islands: Areas of increased density of the dinucleotide sequence cytosine--phosphate diester--guanine. They form stretches of DNA several hundred to several thousand base pairs long. In humans there are about 45,000 CpG islands, mostly found at the 5' ends of genes. They are unmethylated except for those on the inactive X chromosome and some associated with imprinted genes.Tumor Cells, Cultured: Cells grown in vitro from neoplastic tissue. If they can be established as a TUMOR CELL LINE, they can be propagated in cell culture indefinitely.Genes, ras: Family of retrovirus-associated DNA sequences (ras) originally isolated from Harvey (H-ras, Ha-ras, rasH) and Kirsten (K-ras, Ki-ras, rasK) murine sarcoma viruses. Ras genes are widely conserved among animal species and sequences corresponding to both H-ras and K-ras genes have been detected in human, avian, murine, and non-vertebrate genomes. The closely related N-ras gene has been detected in human neuroblastoma and sarcoma cell lines. All genes of the family have a similar exon-intron structure and each encodes a p21 protein.Computer Graphics: The process of pictorial communication, between human and computers, in which the computer input and output have the form of charts, drawings, or other appropriate pictorial representation.Cell Division: The fission of a CELL. It includes CYTOKINESIS, when the CYTOPLASM of a cell is divided, and CELL NUCLEUS DIVISION.Drug Carriers: Forms to which substances are incorporated to improve the delivery and the effectiveness of drugs. Drug carriers are used in drug-delivery systems such as the controlled-release technology to prolong in vivo drug actions, decrease drug metabolism, and reduce drug toxicity. Carriers are also used in designs to increase the effectiveness of drug delivery to the target sites of pharmacological actions. Liposomes, albumin microspheres, soluble synthetic polymers, DNA complexes, protein-drug conjugates, and carrier erythrocytes among others have been employed as biodegradable drug carriers.Pattern Recognition, Visual: Mental process to visually perceive a critical number of facts (the pattern), such as characters, shapes, displays, or designs.Cyclin D: A cyclin subtype that is specific for CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASE 4 and CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASE 6. Unlike most cyclins, cyclin D expression is not cyclical, but rather it is expressed in response to proliferative signals. Cyclin D may therefore play a role in cellular responses to mitogenic signals.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Loss of Heterozygosity: The loss of one allele at a specific locus, caused by a deletion mutation; or loss of a chromosome from a chromosome pair, resulting in abnormal HEMIZYGOSITY. It is detected when heterozygous markers for a locus appear monomorphic because one of the ALLELES was deleted.Uterine Cervical Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the UTERINE CERVIX.Neoplasms: New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.Exercise: Physical activity which is usually regular and done with the intention of improving or maintaining PHYSICAL FITNESS or HEALTH. Contrast with PHYSICAL EXERTION which is concerned largely with the physiologic and metabolic response to energy expenditure.Survivors: Persons who have experienced a prolonged survival after serious disease or who continue to live with a usually life-threatening condition as well as family members, significant others, or individuals surviving traumatic life events.Educational Status: Educational attainment or level of education of individuals.Carcinoma, Squamous Cell: A carcinoma derived from stratified SQUAMOUS EPITHELIAL CELLS. It may also occur in sites where glandular or columnar epithelium is normally present. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Cell Proliferation: All of the processes involved in increasing CELL NUMBER including CELL DIVISION.IndiaData Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Repressor Proteins: Proteins which maintain the transcriptional quiescence of specific GENES or OPERONS. Classical repressor proteins are DNA-binding proteins that are normally bound to the OPERATOR REGION of an operon, or the ENHANCER SEQUENCES of a gene until a signal occurs that causes their release.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Smoking: Inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning TOBACCO.Amino Acid Motifs: Commonly observed structural components of proteins formed by simple combinations of adjacent secondary structures. A commonly observed structure may be composed of a CONSERVED SEQUENCE which can be represented by a CONSENSUS SEQUENCE.Polycomb-Group Proteins: A family of proteins that play a role in CHROMATIN REMODELING. They are best known for silencing HOX GENES and the regulation of EPIGENETIC PROCESSES.African Americans: Persons living in the United States having origins in any of the black groups of Africa.Melanoma: A malignant neoplasm derived from cells that are capable of forming melanin, which may occur in the skin of any part of the body, in the eye, or, rarely, in the mucous membranes of the genitalia, anus, oral cavity, or other sites. It occurs mostly in adults and may originate de novo or from a pigmented nevus or malignant lentigo. Melanomas frequently metastasize widely, and the regional lymph nodes, liver, lungs, and brain are likely to be involved. The incidence of malignant skin melanomas is rising rapidly in all parts of the world. (Stedman, 25th ed; from Rook et al., Textbook of Dermatology, 4th ed, p2445)Cells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.Patient Compliance: Voluntary cooperation of the patient in following a prescribed regimen.Breast Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the human BREAST.Visual Perception: The selecting and organizing of visual stimuli based on the individual's past experience.Gene Expression Regulation: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control (induction or repression) of gene action at the level of transcription or translation.Sepia: A genus of cuttlefish in the family Sepiidae. They live in tropical, subtropical and temperate waters in most oceans.Nuclear Proteins: Proteins found in the nucleus of a cell. Do not confuse with NUCLEOPROTEINS which are proteins conjugated with nucleic acids, that are not necessarily present in the nucleus.RNA, Messenger: RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.Ki-67 Antigen: A CELL CYCLE and tumor growth marker which can be readily detected using IMMUNOCYTOCHEMISTRY methods. Ki-67 is a nuclear antigen present only in the nuclei of cycling cells.Cell Line, Tumor: A cell line derived from cultured tumor cells.Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 2: A key regulator of CELL CYCLE progression. It partners with CYCLIN E to regulate entry into S PHASE and also interacts with CYCLIN A to phosphorylate RETINOBLASTOMA PROTEIN. Its activity is inhibited by CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASE INHIBITOR P27 and CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASE INHIBITOR P21.Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction: A variation of the PCR technique in which cDNA is made from RNA via reverse transcription. The resultant cDNA is then amplified using standard PCR protocols.Homozygote: An individual in which both alleles at a given locus are identical.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Mice, Knockout: Strains of mice in which certain GENES of their GENOMES have been disrupted, or "knocked-out". To produce knockouts, using RECOMBINANT DNA technology, the normal DNA sequence of the gene being studied is altered to prevent synthesis of a normal gene product. Cloned cells in which this DNA alteration is successful are then injected into mouse EMBRYOS to produce chimeric mice. The chimeric mice are then bred to yield a strain in which all the cells of the mouse contain the disrupted gene. Knockout mice are used as EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL MODELS for diseases (DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL) and to clarify the functions of the genes.Exons: The parts of a transcript of a split GENE remaining after the INTRONS are removed. They are spliced together to become a MESSENGER RNA or other functional RNA.Tumor Markers, Biological: Molecular products metabolized and secreted by neoplastic tissue and characterized biochemically in cells or body fluids. They are indicators of tumor stage and grade as well as useful for monitoring responses to treatment and predicting recurrence. Many chemical groups are represented including hormones, antigens, amino and nucleic acids, enzymes, polyamines, and specific cell membrane proteins and lipids.Papillomaviridae: A family of small, non-enveloped DNA viruses infecting birds and most mammals, especially humans. They are grouped into multiple genera, but the viruses are highly host-species specific and tissue-restricted. They are commonly divided into hundreds of papillomavirus "types", each with specific gene function and gene control regions, despite sequence homology. Human papillomaviruses are found in the genera ALPHAPAPILLOMAVIRUS; BETAPAPILLOMAVIRUS; GAMMAPAPILLOMAVIRUS; and MUPAPILLOMAVIRUS.Enzyme Inhibitors: Compounds or agents that combine with an enzyme in such a manner as to prevent the normal substrate-enzyme combination and the catalytic reaction.Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor Proteins: A group of cell cycle proteins that negatively regulate the activity of CYCLIN/CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASE complexes. They inhibit CELL CYCLE progression and help control CELL PROLIFERATION following GENOTOXIC STRESS as well as during CELL DIFFERENTIATION.Pongamia: A plant genus of the family FABACEAE. Members contain karanjin. Some species of this genus have been reclassified to other genera of FABACEAE including Callerya, DERRIS and MILLETTIA.Research Design: A plan for collecting and utilizing data so that desired information can be obtained with sufficient precision or so that an hypothesis can be tested properly.
Detroit: Visible Ink, 1998. Print. Cole, B. (1976). John Coltrane. New York: Schirmer Books. DeVito, Chris, and Lewis Porter. " ... Print. Larkin, Colin. The Virgin Encyclopedia of Jazz. London: Virgin in Association with Muze UK, 2004. Print. Murphy, Frank ... Print. Editors of Encyclopædia Britannica. "Ornette Coleman , Biography - American Musician." Encyclopædia Britannica Online. ...
History Ink. Retrieved 24 May 2014. Taylor, Joseph (1898). History and Government of Washington. Becktold Print. and Book Mfg. ...
Printing with UV curable inks provides the ability to print on a very wide variety of substrates such as plastics, paper, ... "HD White Aluminum Metal Prints". canvasndecor.ca. Retrieved 2018-01-21. "What is UV Curing?". Arrow Inks. Retrieved October 27 ... "Packaging and Print Media , PACKAGiNG & Print Media , UV LED … what's it all about?". packagingmag.co.za. Retrieved 2015-12-30 ... It is used in the screen printing process where the UV curing systems are used to cure screen-printed products, which range ...
Ink print. 1839-1842. Eastport and Passamaquoddy Bay, 1839 American Scenery by N. P. Willis, 1840 Interior of the house of a ... Bartlett Prints, 1837-1842, a finding aid to a New York State Library collection of copies of some of Bartlett's prints. ... Engravings by Bartlett Bartlett Prints in the collection of the Niagara Falls Public Library (Ont.) William H. ...
Print. Diffrient, Niels. Confessions of a Generalist. Danbury, Conn.: Generalist Ink, LLC, 2012. Print. Lutz, Brian. Eero ... Generalist Ink, LLC) Diffrient, Niels. Humanscale: Manual. Cambridge, Mass: MIT Press, 1974. Print. Diffrient, Niels, Mildred S ... Print. Pedersen, Martin C. "Niels Diffrient." Metropolis: Architecture Design 32.8 (2013): 88. Biography Reference Bank (H.W. ...
Apps, E. A. (1958). Printing Ink Technology. London: Leonard Hill Books ltd. p. 86. "Carnauba Wax Background Paper" (PDF). ...
Printing Inks Offset inks, gravure inks, flexo inks, can coatings, news inks, packaging adhesives and printing supplies. Fine ... integrating DIC's domestic printing ink business and DNP's printing ink business DIC is divided in 4 business units: Printing ... 1908 Founded as Kawamura Ink Manufactory 1937 Incorporated Dainippon Printing Ink Manufacturing 1950 Listed on the Tokyo Stock ... incorporated as Dainippon Printing Ink Manufacturing in 1937 and renamed to Dainippon Ink and Chemicals (DIC) in 1962 before ...
146 watercolours, gouache, pen and ink. 107 drawings pen and ink, pencil. 41 photographs b&w. 4 paintings tempera. 1 print ...
Printing Ink Technology. London: Leonard Hill [Books] Limited. p. 101. Fairhall, Lawrence T. (1957). Industrial Toxicology. ...
It has been used as a flushing aid in the printing ink industry. In regards to occupational exposures, the National Institute ... Apps, E. A. (1958). Printing Ink Technology. London: Leonard Hill [Books] Limited. pp. ix. ...
New York :Mercury Ink/Simon Pulse, 2011. Print.. ...
35th annual Gallery of Superb Printing competition, 2009. Multiple Gold Ink Awards. 22nd annual printing competition, 2009. ... and acquired Roda Print and Workable Printing Limited in Hong Kong. In addition, CGI acquired several other printing firms and ... Printing Industries of America. Premiere Print Awards, 2009. Gold Awards - International Association of Printing House ... As a result, CGI formed a strategic alliance with both Roda Print in London and Workable in Hong Kong. Roda Print was known for ...
... and ink cartridge refills (hook); and cameras (bait) and prints (hook). A variant of this model is Adobe, a software developer ...
Ink, Inc., Holly Johnson Gallery, Dallas, Texas; Prints By Gallery Artists, Gallery Joe, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; On/Off The ... New Prints/Winter, International Print Center, New York City; Walking the Line, Stamp Student Union Gallery, University of ... Ink!, Gallery Joe, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Etch-A-Sketch, The Drawing Show, Kenise Barnes Fine Art, Larchmont, New York; ... International Print Exhibition, USA & Japan (traveling), Tokyo Metropolitan Museum of Art 2007 G Fine Art, Washington, D.C. ( ...
Print. Paine, Kassidy "News : I&I Tractor Club Honors Sherry Schaefer" Half Century of Progress Show. Half Century of Progress ... In 2008 she took a giant step and formed her own publishing company, 3-Point Ink, LLC, in Nokomis, IL. At the same time, she ... It is published out of Greenville, Illinois, by 3-Point Ink, LLC. Founded in 2008, Heritage Iron Magazine is published by 3- ... 2011, from http://www.halfcenturyofprogress.org/news/1-1.php 3-Point Ink. (2010, December 25). 3-Point Ink About Sherry. ...
History Ink. Retrieved 12 March 2016. Major Ship Fire Extinguished by CO2 - Seattle, Washington. U.S. Government Printing ...
Saltwater in the Ink: Voices from the Australian Seas. Melbourne: Australian Scholarly Publishing, 2010. Print. The Argus, 9 ... Print. Pg 126 Niall, Brenda. Martin Boyd: A Life. Carlton, Victoria: Melbourne University Press, 1990. Print. Pgs. 74-76 Niall ... Print. Davison, Graeme. The Rise and Fall of Marvellous Melbourne. Melbourne: Melbourne University Press, 2004. Print. De ... Print. Niall, Brenda. The Boyds. Melbourne: Melbourne University Publishing, 2007. Print. Pg. 150 Sleight, 2009. 07.7. Niall, ...
Art historians are also divided in their estimates of the print's age. Clark believes the print to be from 1797-1798 based on ... Canton, MI: Visible Ink Press, 2008. Museum Angewandte Kunst. "Utagawa Toyokuni: Old Eijudō Hibino at Seventy-one (Portrait of ... Nishimuraya's store is immortalized in the 1787 print Scene of Print Buyers at the Shop of Nishimuraya Yohachi (Eijudou) on New ... Print from same collection According to Marks, by the time of his death at age 57, Toyokuni had produced more than 90 print ...
"Welcome to Margo's World: The Prints of Margo Humphrey". That's Inked Up. Retrieved November 25, 2012. Edmunds, Allan L., ed. ( ... Humphrey has received many awards and honors including: The James D. Pheland Award from the World Print Council National ... Humphrey has worked with significant printmaking ateliers including the Rutgers Center for Innovative Print and Paper, the Bob ... was one of the earliest African-American woman artists to be recognized for lithographic works and the first to have her prints ...
2012). "Secret Ink: Tattoo's Place in Contemporary American Culture". Journal of American Culture (Print). 35 (2): 153-65. doi: ... inspiring television shows such as A&E's Inked and TLC's Miami Ink and LA Ink. In addition, many celebrities have made tattoos ... Studies have revealed that Ötzi had 61 carbon-ink tattoos consisting of 19 groups of lines simple dots and lines on his lower ... In August 2013, William Mullane of London was tattooed with a portrait of his late father which used ink mixed with a small ...
... second printing ed.). Ann Arbor, Michigan: Popular Culture, Ink. p. 299. ISBN 1-56075-029-4. Canfield, Dave (1989). "Interviews ... First printing ed.). Peabody, Massachusetts: Hendrickson Publishers. p. 786. ISBN 1-56563-679-1. "Hard News". HM Magazine (86 ...
... second printing ed.). Ann Arbor, Michigan: Popular Culture, Ink. p. 360. ISBN 1-56075-029-4. Van Pelt, Doug (March-April 2000 ... First printing ed.). Peabody, Massachusetts: Hendrickson Publishers. pp. 996-997. ISBN 1-56563-679-1. Callaway, Chris ( ...
Hale, Mark (1993). "1162 Guiffria". Headbangers (First edition, second printing ed.). Ann Arbor, Michigan: Popular Culture, Ink ...
Printed one-sided with black ink. On the first page of the document, the author's name and contact information appears in the ...
... second printing ed.). Ann Arbor, Michigan: Popular Culture, Ink. p. 59. ISBN 1-56075-029-4. Hinds, Andy. "Speed Metal Symphony ...
This belief was based on his misunderstanding of the chemical properties of lemon juice as an invisible ink.[3] ...
Modified ink method was applied. The materials used were printers duplicating ink from Kores, cardboard roller, gauze pads and ... The palm was rolled on cardboard roller with paper, taking care that the cupped regions of the palm were printed properly. ... A small quantity of ink was applied over the palm with a gauze piece and smeared thoroughly and uniformly. A sheet of paper was ... Dermatoglyphics were obtained by printing method. Parameters studied were a-b ridge count, main line index and palmar angles ...
Figure 2. A. A typical dark ink tattoo with large ink particles (100 nm in size). B. A typical nanosecond laser will use a ... Mulholland in Print Media. *Dr. Mulholland On Blogs. *Dr. Krajden On TV ... Figure 9. PicoSure on Black Ink. Black, yellow and red tattoo ink are difficult to remove particles. Here are the PicoSure ... PicoSure delivers laser energy that specifically targets tattoo ink, resulting in the successful shattering of just the ink ...
The first U.S. patent for food printing, as it applied to edible ink printing, was filed by George J. Krubert of the Keebler ... Inkjet or bubblejet printers can be converted to print using edible ink, and cartridges of edible ink are commercially ... Edible printer inks have now become prevalent and are used in conjunction with special ink printers. Ink that is not ... Edible ink printing is the process of creating preprinted images with edible food colors onto various confectionery products ...
Mix white glue with a small amount of water if you are using ink jet prints or pages from magazines. Thin the glue until it ... You can decoupage images printed with an ink jet printer by lightly coating the image with a base coat of white glue mixed with ... Since any image will have the tendency to run when wet, its best to use images printed with a laser printer. ... How to Decoupage Ink Prints How to Decoupage Ink Prints By Maya Merrick eHow ...
Photographic prints are the perfect choice for self-framing or adding to a portfolio. All orders are custom made and most ship ... High quality Ink inspired Photographic Prints by independent artists and designers from around the world. ... Pablo Picasso Line Art cute pig Artwork Sketch black and white Hand Drawn ink Silhouette HD High Quality Photographic Print. By ... Watercolour & Ink Fashion Illustration Titled I Love Louboutin Photographic Print. By Eleni Fall into London ...
Simply scan in your tastiest artwork and you can produce an edible color print to place on top of a cake. No computer is ... consists of a flatbed scanner connected directly to a modified Canon BJC-4400 ink-jet printer. ... required, but you can use your Mac to produce printed artwork to scan into the system. Digital cake decorating is nothing new, ...
Photographic prints are the perfect choice for self-framing or adding to a portfolio. All orders are custom made and most ship ... High quality Ink Red inspired Photographic Prints by independent artists and designers from around the world. ... High quality Ink Red inspired Photographic Prints by independent artists and designers from around the world. Photographic ... prints are the perfect choice for self-framing or adding to a portfolio. All orders are custom made and most ship worldwide ...
... impressed the media by offering a new way to print pictures without ink. By rethinking printing, ZINK, a spinoff of Polaroid, ... "If you look at any printer that prints with ink, youd see that a fair amount of space is taken up by ink cartridges, ink ... Printing without Ink. Startup ZINK Imaging is giving inkless printing a new look. ... impressed the media by offering a new way to print pictures without ink. By rethinking printing, ZINK, a spinoff of Polaroid, ...
Shop spot ink metal prints from thousands of artists from around the world. Our metal wall art produces vibrant colors and ...
All about Fine printing inks by L. Robert. LibraryThing is a cataloging and social networking site for booklovers ...
This ink is ideal for screen printing on cotton, polyester, blends, linen, rayon and other synthetic fibers, as well as ... This ink is ideal for screen printing on cotton, polyester, blends, linen, rayon and other synthetic fibers, as well as ... This ink is ideal for screen printing on cotton, polyester, blends, linen, rayon and other synthetic fibers, as well as ... This ink is ideal for screen printing on cotton, polyester, blends, linen, rayon and other synthetic fibers, as well as ...
Title: JM Screen Printing Inks, Author: Indu Kumar Vasudevan, Name: JM Screen Printing Inks, Length: 13 pages, Page: 1, ... JM Coatings + inks specializes in Metallic Gold, Silver, Glitter and Pearlescent Inks in abundant range for screen printing, ... has been developed as one of the leading manufacturers in screen printing and pad printing ink systems. To provide excellent ... With the same applications and printing techniques to Mirror Ink, the Chameleon Ink brings your products to another high-end, ...
PRINT Magazine Winter 2017/2018 , Regional Design Awards Issue. *The winners of the PRINT Regional Design Awaards ... In this roundup, Print breaks down the elite group of typographers who have made lasting contributions to American type. Enter ...
Image: ink stain image by Dmitri MIkitenko from Fotolia.com). An ink stain can make the most professional printed cards look ... Fortunately, ink mistakes are much easier to remove from card stock than from thinner paper. Common methods of ink removal ... Removing ink stains from printed cards will ensure they look professional. ( ... Gently scrape at the ink stain with fine sandpaper to scratch the ink off the surface of the cardstock. You may need to repeat ...
... a type of ink that flows smoothly, dries quickly, and is of a consistency able to hold enough color to make printed matter ... legible: used to transfer the image on a press plate to the printing surface. See more. ... They were executed in printing-ink by means of the ordinary printing-press.. Old Time Wall Papers. Katherine Abbott Sanborn ... The printing-ink has a tendency to keep off moths and other small insects.. Miss Leslies Ladys New Receipt-Book. Eliza Leslie ...
The face of the ink jet head is provided with ejection openings from which inks containing coloring materials are ejected. The ... An ink jet printing apparatus includes a mechanism for cleaning the face of an ink jet head by wiping the face with a wiper to ... A printing head for ejecting inks ejects inks directly to a printing medium from its fine nozzles (hereinafter referred to ... 6. An ink jet printing apparatus as claimed in claim 1. , wherein the inks comprise pigmented inks. ...
Offers two years of HP Instant Ink in the box alongside print, fax, scan and copy features and simple wireless printing. ($199) ... Ink costs money, big money, especially if you print a lot.. If you read between the lines on HPs fall printer announcement, ... HPs Instant Ink: Printing as a Service?. Hewlett-Packards new line of personal and small business inkjet printers are IoT- ... What do you think of the new HP Instant Ink plans? Is your business ready for Printing Supplies as a Service? Talk Back and Let ...
... print enhancements such as white inks are expected to grow by 27 percent a year and provide a huge opportunity for print ... This suite of specialty dry inks offers plenty of runway for innovation by print providers, creatives, marketers and brand ... Innovating With Dry Metallic Ink. Introduced in 2015, these inks are still relatively new to the market and Xerox is the only ... Did you know that one of prints best business opportunities today is with digital printing enhancements that go beyond ...
Thereafter, ink is supplied. By this, operator may check alarm for ink supply and perform ink supply at a predetermined time ... Also, while the flag is set, predetermined number of lines capable of printing is performed. ... when a flag indicative of the ink amount in a sub-tank less than or equal to a predetermined amount, an alarm is generated. ... In an ink remaining amount checking routine to be performed at every one line of printing, ...
Source a Large Selection of Dry Ink Printing Products at screen printing inks ,offset printing ink ,printing ink from China ... China Dry Ink Printing Suppliers and Manufacturers Directory - ... printing inks offset printing ink printing ink ink printing ink ... Packaging & Printing Printing Inks Card Printing Paper & Paperboard Printing Packaging Printing Packaging Boxes ... Quick Dry Offset Printing Ink , Ocbestjet Uv Ink Quick Dry Offset Printing Ink For Printer For Epson 1390 Tx800 L800 Printing ...
... this ink prints in bold color and dries to a rich, satiny finish. ... ground and milled to the perfect consistency for block printing ... Excludes gift cards, previous purchases, custom invitations, canvas prints & photo center purchases. Limit one coupon of each ...
We can offer a combined technology solution with a tool that facilitates the laying down of organic semiconductor inks with ... "We can offer a combined technology solution with a tool that facilitates the laying down of organic semiconductor inks with ... it has developed a method for significantly increasing the performance of the organic semiconducting inks used for printing ... Vermont company shows 5-fold improvement in printable electronic devices made with modified semiconductor inks, awarded patent ...
The document refers to the Nestlé Packaging Safety and Compliance Program and specifically addresses printing inks, lacquers, ... "Nestlé is one of the largest food brand owners in the world, and does a significant amount of digital printing around the globe ... Our customers are now able to pursue and quote on those Nestlé print jobs when they are using DigiPrime 4431, DigiPrime 050, ... Michelmans family of DigiPrime and Michem In-Line primers are used by digital press owners to improve ink receptivity, rub ...
An ink jet print cartridge liquid toner container (14) is refillable at a service station (60) in a printer (50). Liquid toner ... Ink, ink-jet ink, ink-tank, ink-jet cartridge, ink supply device, method for introducing ink to ink tank and image recording ... Ink, ink-jet ink, ink tank, ink-jet cartridge, ink supply device, method for introducing ink to ink tank and image recording ... Ink, ink-jet ink, ink tank, ink-jet cartridge, ink supply device, method for introducing ink to ink tank and image recording ...
About 25% of these are printing inks, 17% are ink cartridges, and 2% are ink refill kits. A wide variety of epson ink options ... are available to you, such as sublimation ink, solvent based ink, and water based ink. ... ink toyo ink bulk ink inkjet ink edible ink epson ultrachrome ink epson r230 ink lyson inks marabu ink dtg ink ovi ink hansol ... Printing Type Digital Printing Transfer Printing Offset Printing Gravure Printing Screen Printing Flexo Printing ...
  • PicoSure delivers laser energy that specifically targets tattoo ink, resulting in the successful shattering of just the ink particles without harming the surrounding tissue. (spamedica.com)
  • With nanosecond pulsed technology the lasers created both a photothermal injury to the tattoo ink particle and a photoaccoustic or shock wave effect. (spamedica.com)
  • Prior to the last 10-15 years of artistic tattoo design, most tattoos were black ink and could be removed relatively effectively with Q-switched nanosecond pulsed 1064-nanometer, (Nd YAG lasers) or 755-nanometer Alexandrite lasers. (spamedica.com)
  • The problems of these common, older generation nanosecond tattoo removal lasers are that many colours of ink, specifically the yellow colours or orange, blue, yellow, purple and light green are difficult to remove with these traditional nanosecond laser machines. (spamedica.com)
  • Did you know that one of print's best business opportunities today is with digital printing enhancements that go beyond traditional CMYK, such as coatings, metallics, white inks, spot colours and gamut extenders? (xerox.com)
  • The document refers to the Nestlé Packaging Safety and Compliance Program and specifically addresses printing inks, lacquers, coatings and varnishes used on Nestlé packaging materials. (prweb.com)
  • Michelman is a global developer and manufacturer of environmentally friendly advanced materials for industry, offering solutions for the coatings, printing & packaging and industrial manufacturing markets. (prweb.com)
  • The company's surface modifiers, additives and polymers are used by leading manufacturers around the world to enhance performance attributes and add value in applications including wood and floor care products, metal and industrial coatings, paints, varnishes, inks, fibers and composites. (prweb.com)
  • Michelman is also well-known as an innovator in the development of barrier and functional coatings, as well as digital printing press primers that are used in the production of consumer and industrial packaging and paper products, labels, and commercially printed materials. (prweb.com)
  • Inkjet printing, ink filling, and applying coatings are just some of the applications where degassing or debubbling may help lessen yield loss and other production process interruptions. (3m.com)
  • Possible sources of migratable compounds in inks and coatings include UV photo-initiators, mineral oils, and resins. (sgs.com)
  • The softer thermoplastic coatings have a surface that can be solvated by an ink, while the harder crosslinked finish of a thermoset coating is difficult for an ink to adhere to (Figure 3) . (screenweb.com)
  • The polymer emulsion compositions display superior printability properties in inks and other coatings formulated with them, yet are stable at elevated temperatures for long periods of time. (patentgenius.com)
  • In this report, the global Copperplate Printing Ink market is valued at USD XX million in 2017 and is expected to reach USD XX million by the end of 2025, growing at a CAGR of XX% between 2017 and 2025. (reportsnreports.com)
  • Calling this a "massive opportunity," Keypoint Intelligence-InfoTrends reported more than half of the print providers surveyed said they plan to take full advantage in 2018 by acquiring some sort of digital printing enhancement device 1 . (xerox.com)
  • Pigments are colorants in the form of powders or dyes that are dispersed in the resin system, giving the ink its color and opacity. (screenweb.com)
  • Researchers have now introduced a rapid and facile method to fabricate a foldable capacitive touch pad using silver nanowire inks. (nanowerk.com)
  • The international research team has published their findings in the November 3, 2014 online edition of ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces ( 'Direct Writing on Paper of Foldable Capacitive Touch Pads with Silver Nanowire Inks' ). (nanowerk.com)
  • c) Fabrication of the paper-based touchpad involving direct writing silver nanowire ink, flashlight sintering and tape coating. (nanowerk.com)
  • Hu and his collaborators developed a technique that uses a 2D programmed printing machine with postdeposition sintering using a camera flash light to harden the deposited silver nanowire ink. (nanowerk.com)
  • Here, composite electrodes without cracks were printed on polyimide substrate using binder-free silver nanoparticle based inks with zero-dimensional (activated carbon), one-dimensional (silver nanowire and carbon nanotube) or two-dimensional (graphene) fillers. (mdpi.com)
  • Digital CMYK offers the lowest cost option, with fast turnarounds and variable printing capabilities using a CMYK mix to represent the metallic colour, but without sparkle and shine. (xerox.com)
  • However, this method is the most expensive metallic solution, doesn't permit variable printing and requires longer lead times for its time-consuming, labour-intensive processes. (xerox.com)
  • Digital metallic dry inks balance the strengths of traditional and digital approaches to deliver what many find to be the best value. (xerox.com)
  • These recently developed inks incorporate flecks of metal to deliver outstanding image quality with a true metallic appearance. (xerox.com)
  • Introduced in 2015, these inks are still relatively new to the market and Xerox is the only vendor offering gold and silver metallic as well as clear dry ink in the same press. (xerox.com)
  • Artist John Mollison boosted the impact and realism of his popular military aircraft drawings by printing them digitally with silver metallic and clear dry ink embellishments on a Xerox Colour Press 800i at Mailway Printers , Sioux Falls, S.D. (xerox.com)
  • The creative team at Orchard Print Services Limited, Daventry, U.K., has developed an expanded metallic palette by mixing metallic inks with various colours to create shades of silver, gold and even bronze. (xerox.com)
  • The Xerox Colour 800i and 1000i Presses feature an optional fifth print station that allows you to apply one of three available specialty dry inks, which includes Clear (perfect for spot or flood effects), Metallic Gold or Metallic Silver. (xerox.com)
  • Xerox® Specialty Dry Inks - including Metallic, White, and Clear - help you outshine your competition by adding incredible value to your digital prints. (xerox.com)
  • It's easier than ever to create stunning, premium effects that deliver impactful results with Clear Dry Ink (available on the Xerox® Iridesse™ Production Press , Xerox® Color 800i/1000i Presses , and Xerox® iGen® 5 Press ), White Dry Ink (available on the Xerox Iridesse Production Press and Xerox iGen 5 Press), and Metallic Dry Inks (offered exclusively for the Xerox Iridesse Production Press and Xerox Color 800i/1000i Presses). (xerox.com)
  • The newest Specialty Dry Inks let you migrate more jobs to digital, creating silver and gold metallic effects with images, artwork, logos, text, seals, and personalized communications. (xerox.com)
  • Bring the eye-catching value of metallic inks to personalized communications to add even more pop to your jobs. (xerox.com)
  • Orchard Print drives growth with creative use of metallic dry inks. (xerox.com)
  • A printing head for ejecting inks ejects inks directly to a printing medium from its fine nozzles (hereinafter referred to collectively as ejection openings, liquid passages connecting with the ejection openings, elements for generating energy to be used for ejecting the inks unless otherwise specifically indicated). (google.com)
  • 7. A printing apparatus as claimed in claim 6, wherein the printing head generates a bubble in the ink utilizing heat energy and ejects ink associating with generation of the bubble. (google.com)
  • Experienced suppliers to the Screen and Digital Printing Industry. (startlocal.com.au)
  • With no global legislation available, and ill-defined terminology in the scientific community, formulating ink used in packaging becomes a challenge for suppliers and users who are concerned with potential migration of harmful components. (sgs.com)
  • The ink formulation comprises the following components: 1) a mixing varnish comprising a phenolic-modified co-solvent-type polyamide resin, 2) a nitrocellulose compound varnish, 3) a non-aqueous solvent mixture, 4) a non-aqueous solution of a metal salt of propionic acid and 5) specialty additives, and wherein all components present in the formulation are stable in the presence of an oxidizing agent. (google.ca)
  • Our plastisol white inks gives the screen printers of any size the widest range of options to print on any substrate. (unionink.com)
  • As an innovator the company was being one of the pioneers to launch several specialty inks in Mirror, Laser Hologram and Chameleon effects by enjoying favorable recognitions to the market. (issuu.com)
  • Electronic devices made of organic or amorphous inorganic semiconductor materials, especially those made of "printable" semiconductor inks, have poor performance when compared to conventional silicon electronics. (prweb.com)
  • We can offer a combined technology solution with a tool that facilitates the laying down of organic semiconductor inks with embedded particles as well as semiconducting particles including so-called hybrid inks at high rates," said George Powch, Versatilis CEO. (prweb.com)
  • Printed electronic circuits will become more efficient in future with new semiconductor inks from BASF. (basf.com)
  • Because of their technical properties, the semiconductor inks we have offered so far have already proved successful in our customers' applications,' explains Dr. Heike Pfistner, Marketing Organic Electronics at BASF New Business GmbH. (basf.com)
  • The mobility of the charge carriers is an important criterion and is decisive for the use of the semiconductor inks in a range of applications. (basf.com)
  • The printable semiconductor inks and new process technologies open up a range of options in this respect. (basf.com)
  • Edible paper may be printed on by a standard printer and, upon application to a moist surface, dissolves while maintaining a high resolution. (wikipedia.org)
  • Gently scrape at the ink stain with fine sandpaper to scratch the ink off the surface of the cardstock. (ehow.com)
  • a type of ink that flows smoothly, dries quickly, and is of a consistency able to hold enough color to make printed matter legible: used to transfer the image on a press plate to the printing surface. (dictionary.com)
  • 3. A printing apparatus as claimed in claim 1, further comprising a capping means for covering a surface of the printing head opposite to the printing medium. (google.com)
  • DigiPrime 050 is formulated for in-line use specifically on the HP Indigo 20000 digital press and imparts a print-receptive surface to films for flexible packaging and label applications. (prweb.com)
  • Therefore, electrical signals sent to the dot elements cause heating of the thermal dots which cause the ink within the grooves to bubble and spray out of the grooves to a printing surface. (google.ca)
  • They also hope to experiment with different chemical modifications to produce a diversity of ink "colors," each producing surface patterns with different properties, Vajtai said. (innovations-report.com)
  • The stamp is then loaded with a special "ink" and is pressed onto the metal surface to be printed. (innovations-report.com)
  • The ink sticks to the metal surface and reproduces the microstructure of the stamp in a monomolecular layer. (innovations-report.com)
  • Each type of surface requires a different type of ink to stick to it: precious and coinage metals need ink molecules that can be bound by means of a metal-sulfur bond. (innovations-report.com)
  • The individual components of the ink are selectively transferred to their corresponding surface without interfering with each other. (innovations-report.com)
  • When compared to a chemically reactive or "baked" ink film, the surface of the air-dried ink film will be softer and susceptible to scratching and scuffing. (screenweb.com)
  • To put this in perspective, the thickest single ink layers printed in ordinary production (measuring thickness as the height of the ink film above the surface of the substrate) are usually glitter inks printed on transfer paper. (unionink.com)
  • The dyes in the ink change to a gas when they contact the heated substrate, then they pass into the surface of the substrate actually changing the substrate's color. (screenweb.com)
  • Once the substrate cools, the ink is permanently sealed into the surface. (screenweb.com)
  • Deeper cells do not typically release ink as well and finer engravings provide greater cell wall surface area for the ink to adhere to. (flexoexchange.com)
  • With sublimation ink you can use transfer technology transfer picture to T-shirt, mug caps, textile, outdoor advertising and other special things. (alibaba.com)
  • Union Ink supplies the best textile printing plastisols in the market, period. (unionink.com)
  • These inks have been innovatively designed to bring out the strengths and benefits of silicone chemistry to your textile screen printing operation. (unionink.com)
  • Textile screen-printing has traditionally been a two-dimensional art. (unionink.com)
  • Using puff ink also severely limited your ability to render accurate details.Recently several ink and emulsion manufacturers, working with a small group of textile screen printers, have developed a system that adds a reliable, controllable Up capability to T-shirt design. (unionink.com)
  • The cluster of procedures that comprise this system will enable the textile screen printer to print single layers of ink 500-600 microns thick, perhaps even thicker. (unionink.com)
  • Three-dimensional printing enables the textile screen printer to provide printed ink layers with vertical edges as sharp and detailed as die cut or even laser cut plastic sheets. (unionink.com)
  • As an aside, although I must commend the men and women who developed three dimensional printing for devising the most innovative T-shirt decorating process since process color on textile was systematized back in the 1980's, I must say that their language skills leave something to be desired. (unionink.com)
  • To satisfy the environmental regulations, Power Industrial China Ltd. sustainably spends her full effort in developing Waterborne Inks, Halogen Free Inks and hazard free formulations for various industries such as electronic and packaging. (issuu.com)
  • This invention relates to non-aqueous coating and ink formulations for use on flexible film or paper packages for food, which require aseptic packaging conditions. (google.ca)
  • Ink manufacturers, faced with these demands, have happily done what they could to accommodate their clients and have come out with new, 'improved' ink formulations. (flexoexchange.com)
  • Edible ink printing is the process of creating preprinted images with edible food colors onto various confectionery products such as cookies , cakes , or pastries . (wikipedia.org)
  • The $999 Digital Cake Decorator, from Lumina Office Products (408/ 487-0400, http://www.luminapcc.com ), consists of a flatbed scanner connected directly to a modified Canon BJC-4400 ink-jet printer. (macworld.com)
  • Business projects: ink, ink cartridges, continuous ink system, chip decryption card etc series products. (alibaba.com)
  • This kind of printer ink/toner products are designed to provide you with high-quality prints at all times. (startlocal.com.au)
  • This artwork is 100% exclusive to us, meaning you won't find it anywhere else.Ranked among the world's most influential design firms, Charles S. Anderson Design created Pop Ink products using CSA Images. (art.com)
  • Although food and drug packaging is often printed with colorful labels, there is limited knowledge about the migration of printed ink components into the products. (sgs.com)
  • The market is going through a sluggish growth path and more focus on the development of on innovative and trendy products such as the environment-friendly water-based and UV-cured printing inks over solvent-based products is expected to be the key distinguishing factor in the next few years. (transparencymarketresearch.com)
  • We doesn't provide Printing Inks products or service, please contact them directly and verify their companies info carefully. (chinabagsnet.com)
  • That is why it is important to keep the press at a constant temperature to minimize fluctuations in ink viscosity, which could lead to fluctuations in print quality and unacceptable print products. (graphicartsmag.com)
  • Our technical know-how can help you to enhance your end-products to meet the changing ecological and technical requirements of the printing industry. (azelis.com)
  • As a result, the electrical resistance of the inkjet-printed lines on polymer -coated polyimide films (8 Ω) was improved threefold over that of lines printed on pristine polyimide films (24 Ω). (rsc.org)
  • This is a similar improvement to inkjet-printed lines that were heated gradually (7 Ω), which is one of the methods that can reduce convection flow. (rsc.org)
  • Durability tests were conducted and electrical resistance was measured on inkjet-printed lines on polymer -coated polyimide films. (rsc.org)
  • In order to further reduce the cost for introducing the Ni contact layer, using inkjet printed Ni nanoparticle ink to form the contact layer is also studied. (parc.com)
  • The researchers printed different samples, some of which show sensitivity to the vapors of several chemicals, which also could make them useful as gas sensors. (innovations-report.com)
  • Researchers at BASF have succeeded in improving the composition of the individual semiconductor ink components to double the mobility of the charge carriers in the printed circuits. (basf.com)
  • The researchers led by Dirk Burdinski have now developed a universally applicable ink. (innovations-report.com)
  • Researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have now developed a method to erase the ink used for 3D printing ( Angewandte Chemie , 'Cleaving Direct Laser Written Microstructures on Demand' ). (nanowerk.com)
  • As 3D printing has become a mainstream technology, industry and academic researchers have been investigating printable structures that can fold themselves into useful three-dimensional (3D) shapes when heated or immersed in water. (materialstoday.com)
  • In a paper in Applied Materials and Interfaces , a team led by researchers from the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) reports something new: a printable structure that begins to fold itself up as soon as it's peeled off the printing platform. (materialstoday.com)
  • The key to the researchers' design is a new printer-ink material that expands after it solidifies, which is unusual. (materialstoday.com)
  • While trying to develop an ink that yielded more flexible printed components, the CSAIL researchers inadvertently hit upon one that expanded slightly after it hardened. (materialstoday.com)
  • aims to bring together leading academic scientists, researchers and research scholars to exchange and share their experiences and research results on all aspects of Biocomposite Inks for 3D Printing. (waset.org)
  • For example, just this year, researchers in Belgium printed a new jawbone for a woman. (summitdaily.com)
  • When polydimethylsiloxane stamps are loaded with this ink, both types of metals can be structured. (innovations-report.com)
  • Baking inks come in two forms: a standard two-component ink with a different catalyst, or a specially formulated ink designed for use on glass, ceramics, and some metals. (screenweb.com)
  • 2. The ink jet printer of claim 1, wherein the liquid toner container is at least partially filled with a liquid toner-retaining foam piece. (google.co.uk)
  • 3. The ink jet printer of claim 1, further including a vent to atmosphere in the wall of the liquid toner container. (google.co.uk)
  • See pricing info, deals and product reviews for Canon CLI-581C XXL Printing Ink Toner, Cyan (blister 1 each) at Staples.co.uk. (staples.co.uk)
  • Traditional foil stamping delivers the most lustrous shine print affords and the industry's top flop index-a measure of the reflectivity that enables sparkle and shine. (xerox.com)
  • Developing an ink that can be erased again was one of the big challenges in direct laser writing, Professor Christopher Barner-Kowollik of KIT s Institute for Chemical Technology and Polymer Chemistry says. (nanowerk.com)
  • The ink that produces the most forceful expansion includes several long polymers and one much shorter polymer, made up of the monomer isooctyl acrylate. (materialstoday.com)
  • Polymer emulsion compositions for use in printing inks and printing inks made from the compositions are provided. (patentgenius.com)