Services designed for HEALTH PROMOTION and prevention of disease.
A cabinet department in the Executive Branch of the United States Government concerned with administering those agencies and offices having programs pertaining to health and human services.
Organized services to provide health care to women. It excludes maternal care services for which MATERNAL HEALTH SERVICES is available.
The degree to which individuals are inhibited or facilitated in their ability to gain entry to and to receive care and services from the health care system. Factors influencing this ability include geographic, architectural, transportational, and financial considerations, among others.
Planning for needed health and/or welfare services and facilities.
The purposes, missions, and goals of an individual organization or its units, established through administrative processes. It includes an organization's long-range plans and administrative philosophy.
The term "United States" in a medical context often refers to the country where a patient or study participant resides, and is not a medical term per se, but relevant for epidemiological studies, healthcare policies, and understanding differences in disease prevalence, treatment patterns, and health outcomes across various geographic locations.
Behaviors expressed by individuals to protect, maintain or promote their health status. For example, proper diet, and appropriate exercise are activities perceived to influence health status. Life style is closely associated with health behavior and factors influencing life style are socioeconomic, educational, and cultural.
Encouraging consumer behaviors most likely to optimize health potentials (physical and psychosocial) through health information, preventive programs, and access to medical care.
A medical specialty primarily concerned with prevention of disease (PRIMARY PREVENTION) and the promotion and preservation of health in the individual.
Services for the diagnosis and treatment of disease and the maintenance of health.
Organized services to provide mental health care.
Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.
Health services required by a population or community as well as the health services that the population or community is able and willing to pay for.
The level of health of the individual, group, or population as subjectively assessed by the individual or by more objective measures.
The integration of epidemiologic, sociological, economic, and other analytic sciences in the study of health services. Health services research is usually concerned with relationships between need, demand, supply, use, and outcome of health services. The aim of the research is evaluation, particularly in terms of structure, process, output, and outcome. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)
The concept concerned with all aspects of providing and distributing health services to a patient population.
Organized services to provide health care for children.
Statistical measures of utilization and other aspects of the provision of health care services including hospitalization and ambulatory care.
Diagnostic, therapeutic and preventive health services provided for individuals in the community.
The seeking and acceptance by patients of health service.
Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.
Care which provides integrated, accessible health care services by clinicians who are accountable for addressing a large majority of personal health care needs, developing a sustained partnership with patients, and practicing in the context of family and community. (JAMA 1995;273(3):192)
Organized services to provide health care to adolescents, ages ranging from 13 through 18 years.
Health care services related to human REPRODUCTION and diseases of the reproductive system. Services are provided to both sexes and usually by physicians in the medical or the surgical specialties such as REPRODUCTIVE MEDICINE; ANDROLOGY; GYNECOLOGY; OBSTETRICS; and PERINATOLOGY.
Health services, public or private, in rural areas. The services include the promotion of health and the delivery of health care.
The levels of excellence which characterize the health service or health care provided based on accepted standards of quality.
Services for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases in the aged and the maintenance of health in the elderly.
Decisions, usually developed by government policymakers, for determining present and future objectives pertaining to the health care system.
A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.
Public attitudes toward health, disease, and the medical care system.
Innovation and improvement of the health care system by reappraisal, amendment of services, and removal of faults and abuses in providing and distributing health services to patients. It includes a re-alignment of health services and health insurance to maximum demographic elements (the unemployed, indigent, uninsured, elderly, inner cities, rural areas) with reference to coverage, hospitalization, pricing and cost containment, insurers' and employers' costs, pre-existing medical conditions, prescribed drugs, equipment, and services.
Insurance providing coverage of medical, surgical, or hospital care in general or for which there is no specific heading.
Health services, public or private, in urban areas. The services include the promotion of health and the delivery of health care.
Organized services to provide health care to expectant and nursing mothers.
Diagnostic, therapeutic and preventive mental health services provided for individuals in the community.
Specific practices for the prevention of disease or mental disorders in susceptible individuals or populations. These include HEALTH PROMOTION, including mental health; protective procedures, such as COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CONTROL; and monitoring and regulation of ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTANTS. Primary prevention is to be distinguished from SECONDARY PREVENTION and TERTIARY PREVENTION.
Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).
Preferentially rated health-related activities or functions to be used in establishing health planning goals. This may refer specifically to PL93-641.
Organized periodic procedures performed on large groups of people for the purpose of detecting disease.
Health services for employees, usually provided by the employer at the place of work.
The state wherein the person is well adjusted.
The organization and administration of health services dedicated to the delivery of health care.
Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.
Education that increases the awareness and favorably influences the attitudes and knowledge relating to the improvement of health on a personal or community basis.
Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.
A system of medical care regulated, controlled and financed by the government, in which the government assumes responsibility for the health needs of the population.
Components of a national health care system which administer specific services, e.g., national health insurance.
Systematic and thorough inspection of the patient for physical signs of disease or abnormality.
Institutions which provide medical or health-related services.
Health care programs or services designed to assist individuals in the planning of family size. Various methods of CONTRACEPTION can be used to control the number and timing of childbirths.
The amounts spent by individuals, groups, nations, or private or public organizations for total health care and/or its various components. These amounts may or may not be equivalent to the actual costs (HEALTH CARE COSTS) and may or may not be shared among the patient, insurers, and/or employers.
Management of public health organizations or agencies.
Men and women working in the provision of health services, whether as individual practitioners or employees of health institutions and programs, whether or not professionally trained, and whether or not subject to public regulation. (From A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, 1976)
The state of the organism when it functions optimally without evidence of disease.
A constituent organization of the DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES concerned with protecting and improving the health of the nation.
A medical specialty concerned with the provision of continuing, comprehensive primary health care for the entire family.
Health care provided to specific cultural or tribal peoples which incorporates local customs, beliefs, and taboos.
Community health and NURSING SERVICES providing coordinated multiple services to the patient at the patient's homes. These home-care services are provided by a visiting nurse, home health agencies, HOSPITALS, or organized community groups using professional staff for care delivery. It differs from HOME NURSING which is provided by non-professionals.
The concept covering the physical and mental conditions of women.
A health care system which combines physicians, hospitals, and other medical services with a health plan to provide the complete spectrum of medical care for its customers. In a fully integrated system, the three key elements - physicians, hospital, and health plan membership - are in balance in terms of matching medical resources with the needs of purchasers and patients. (Coddington et al., Integrated Health Care: Reorganizing the Physician, Hospital and Health Plan Relationship, 1994, p7)
Great Britain is not a medical term, but a geographical name for the largest island in the British Isles, which comprises England, Scotland, and Wales, forming the major part of the United Kingdom.
Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.
Those actions designed to carry out recommendations pertaining to health plans or programs.
Studies designed to assess the efficacy of programs. They may include the evaluation of cost-effectiveness, the extent to which objectives are met, or impact.
The concept pertaining to the health status of inhabitants of the world.
Planning for the equitable allocation, apportionment, or distribution of available health resources.
A division of the UNITED STATES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE that is responsible for the public health and the provision of medical services to NATIVE AMERICANS in the United States, primarily those residing on reservation lands.
The optimal state of the mouth and normal functioning of the organs of the mouth without evidence of disease.
Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.
Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.
Psychiatric illness or diseases manifested by breakdowns in the adaptational process expressed primarily as abnormalities of thought, feeling, and behavior producing either distress or impairment of function.
Services designed to promote, maintain, or restore dental health.
Generally refers to the amount of protection available and the kind of loss which would be paid for under an insurance contract with an insurer. (Slee & Slee, Health Care Terms, 2d ed)
The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.
The status of health in rural populations.
Visits made by patients to health service providers' offices for diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up.
The activities and endeavors of the public health services in a community on any level.
The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.
Planning for health resources at a regional or multi-state level.
The promotion and maintenance of physical and mental health in the work environment.
A situation in which the level of living of an individual, family, or group is below the standard of the community. It is often related to a specific income level.
Research aimed at assessing the quality and effectiveness of health care as measured by the attainment of a specified end result or outcome. Measures include parameters such as improved health, lowered morbidity or mortality, and improvement of abnormal states (such as elevated blood pressure).
Variation in rates of disease occurrence and disabilities between population groups defined by socioeconomic characteristics such as age, ethnicity, economic resources, or gender and populations identified geographically or similar measures.
Activities and programs intended to assure or improve the quality of care in either a defined medical setting or a program. The concept includes the assessment or evaluation of the quality of care; identification of problems or shortcomings in the delivery of care; designing activities to overcome these deficiencies; and follow-up monitoring to ensure effectiveness of corrective steps.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but 'England' is not a medical term and does not have a medical definition. England is a country that is part of the United Kingdom, known for its rich history, cultural heritage, and contributions to medical science. However, in a medical context, it may refer to the location of a patient, healthcare provider, or research study, but it is not a term with a specific medical meaning.
A province of Canada lying between the provinces of Manitoba and Quebec. Its capital is Toronto. It takes its name from Lake Ontario which is said to represent the Iroquois oniatariio, beautiful lake. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p892 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p391)
An approach of practicing medicine with the goal to improve and evaluate patient care. It requires the judicious integration of best research evidence with the patient's values to make decisions about medical care. This method is to help physicians make proper diagnosis, devise best testing plan, choose best treatment and methods of disease prevention, as well as develop guidelines for large groups of patients with the same disease. (from JAMA 296 (9), 2006)
Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but "California" is a place, specifically a state on the western coast of the United States, and not a medical term or concept. Therefore, it doesn't have a medical definition.
Economic sector concerned with the provision, distribution, and consumption of health care services and related products.
Available manpower, facilities, revenue, equipment, and supplies to produce requisite health care and services.
Health care services provided to patients on an ambulatory basis, rather than by admission to a hospital or other health care facility. The services may be a part of a hospital, augmenting its inpatient services, or may be provided at a free-standing facility.
The inspection of one's breasts, usually for signs of disease, especially neoplastic disease.
The smallest continent and an independent country, comprising six states and two territories. Its capital is Canberra.
Facilities which administer the delivery of health care services to people living in a community or neighborhood.
Health care provided to individuals.
An infant during the first month after birth.
Differences in access to or availability of medical facilities and services.
The giving of advice and assistance to individuals with educational or personal problems.
Radiographic examination of the breast.
Outside services provided to an institution under a formal financial agreement.
Diagnostic procedures, such as laboratory tests and x-rays, routinely performed on all individuals or specified categories of individuals in a specified situation, e.g., patients being admitted to the hospital. These include routine tests administered to neonates.
Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.
The availability of HEALTH PERSONNEL. It includes the demand and recruitment of both professional and allied health personnel, their present and future supply and distribution, and their assignment and utilization.
Federal, state, or local government organized methods of financial assistance.
A geographic area defined and served by a health program or institution.
The status of health in urban populations.
Planning that has the goals of improving health, improving accessibility to health services, and promoting efficiency in the provision of services and resources on a comprehensive basis for a whole community. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988, p299)
The interactions between physician and patient.
Preventive health services provided for students. It excludes college or university students.
The process of leaving one's country to establish residence in a foreign country.
Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.
The inhabitants of a city or town, including metropolitan areas and suburban areas.
Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)
The science of controlling or modifying those conditions, influences, or forces surrounding man which relate to promoting, establishing, and maintaining health.
The teaching or training of patients concerning their own health needs.
Any type of research that employs nonnumeric information to explore individual or group characteristics, producing findings not arrived at by statistical procedures or other quantitative means. (Qualitative Inquiry: A Dictionary of Terms Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 1997)
The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.
A group of people with a common cultural heritage that sets them apart from others in a variety of social relationships.
Health services for college and university students usually provided by the educational institution.
Application of marketing principles and techniques to maximize the use of health care resources.
The practice of sending a patient to another program or practitioner for services or advice which the referring source is not prepared to provide.
Systematic identification of a population's needs or the assessment of individuals to determine the proper level of services needed.
An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.
Telephone surveys are conducted to monitor prevalence of the major behavioral risks among adults associated with premature MORBIDITY and MORTALITY. The data collected is in regard to actual behaviors, rather than on attitudes or knowledge. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) established the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) in 1984.
A specialized agency of the United Nations designed as a coordinating authority on international health work; its aim is to promote the attainment of the highest possible level of health by all peoples.
That distinct portion of the institutional, industrial, or economic structure of a country that is controlled or owned by non-governmental, private interests.
The branch of dentistry concerned with the prevention of disease and the maintenance and promotion of oral health.
A method of data collection and a QUALITATIVE RESEARCH tool in which a small group of individuals are brought together and allowed to interact in a discussion of their opinions about topics, issues, or questions.
Typical way of life or manner of living characteristic of an individual or group. (From APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)
Services specifically designed, staffed, and equipped for the emergency care of patients.
The degree to which the individual regards the health care service or product or the manner in which it is delivered by the provider as useful, effective, or beneficial.
Educational attainment or level of education of individuals.
A management function in which standards and guidelines are developed for the development, maintenance, and handling of forms and records.
Those physicians who have completed the education requirements specified by the American Academy of Family Physicians.
Geographic area in which a professional person practices; includes primarily physicians and dentists.
The area of a nation's economy that is tax-supported and under government control.
Directions or principles presenting current or future rules of policy for assisting health care practitioners in patient care decisions regarding diagnosis, therapy, or related clinical circumstances. The guidelines may be developed by government agencies at any level, institutions, professional societies, governing boards, or by the convening of expert panels. The guidelines form a basis for the evaluation of all aspects of health care and delivery.
A method of comparing the cost of a program with its expected benefits in dollars (or other currency). The benefit-to-cost ratio is a measure of total return expected per unit of money spent. This analysis generally excludes consideration of factors that are not measured ultimately in economic terms. Cost effectiveness compares alternative ways to achieve a specific set of results.
Activities concerned with governmental policies, functions, etc.
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The physical condition of human reproductive systems.
Collection of pooled secretions of the posterior vaginal fornix for cytologic examination.

Perspectives from micronutrient malnutrition elimination/eradication programmes. (1/1341)

Micronutrient malnutrition cannot be eradicated, but the elimination and control of iron, vitamin A and iodine deficiencies and their health-related consequences as public health problems are currently the targets of global programmes. Remarkable progress is occurring in the control of goitre and xerophthalmia, but iron-deficiency anaemia (IDA) has been less responsive to prevention and control efforts. Subclinical consequences of micronutrient deficiencies, i.e. "hidden hunger", include compromised immune functions that increase the risk of morbidity and mortality, impaired cognitive development and growth, and reduced reproductive and work capacity and performance. The implications are obvious for human health and national and global economic and social development. Mixes of affordable interventions are available which, when appropriately adapted to resource availability and context, are proven to be effective. These include both food-based interventions, particularly fortification programmes, such as salt iodization, and use of concentrated micronutrient supplements. A mix of accompanying programmes for infection control, community participation, including education, communication and information exchange, and private sector involvement are lessons learned for overcoming deterrents and sustaining progress towards elimination.  (+info)

Perspectives from the dracunculiasis eradication programme. (2/1341)

After a slow beginning in association with the International Drinking Water Supply and Sanitation Decade (1981-1990), the global Dracunculiasis Eradication Programme has reduced the incidence of dracunculiasis by nearly 97%, from an estimated 3.2 million cases in 1986 to less than 100,000 cases in 1997. Over half of the remaining cases are in Sudan. In addition, the programme has already produced many indirect benefits such as improved agricultural production and school attendance, extensive provision of clean drinking-water, mobilization of endemic communities, and improved care of infants. Most workers in the campaign have other responsibilities in their communities or ministries of health besides dracunculiasis eradication.  (+info)

The cost effectiveness of strategies for the treatment of intestinal parasites in immigrants. (3/1341)

BACKGROUND: Currently, more than 600,000 immigrants enter the United States each year from countries where intestinal parasites are endemic. At entry persons with parasitic infections may be asymptomatic, and stool examinations are not a sensitive method of screening for parasitosis. Albendazole is a new, broad-spectrum antiparasitic drug, which was approved recently by the Food and Drug Administration. International trials have shown albendazole to be safe and effective in eradicating many parasites. In the United States there is now disagreement about whether to screen all immigrants for parasites, treat all immigrants presumptively, or do nothing unless they have symptoms. METHODS: We compared the costs and benefits of no preventive intervention (watchful waiting) with those of universal screening or presumptive treatment with 400 mg of albendazole per day for five days. Those at risk were defined as immigrants to the United States from Asia, the Middle East, sub-Saharan Africa, Eastern Europe, and Latin America and the Caribbean. Cost effectiveness was expressed both in terms of the cost of treatment per disability-adjusted life-year (DALY) averted (one DALY is defined as the loss of one year of healthy life to disease) and in terms of the cost per hospitalization averted. RESULTS: As compared with watchful waiting, presumptive treatment of all immigrants at risk for parasitosis would avert at least 870 DALYs, prevent at least 33 deaths and 374 hospitalizations, and save at least $4.2 million per year. As compared with watchful waiting, screening would cost $159,236 per DALY averted. CONCLUSIONS: Presumptive administration of albendazole to all immigrants at risk for parasitosis would save lives and money. Universal screening, with treatment of persons with positive stool examinations, would save lives but is less cost effective than presumptive treatment.  (+info)

Community-level HIV intervention in 5 cities: final outcome data from the CDC AIDS Community Demonstration Projects. (4/1341)

OBJECTIVES: This study evaluated a theory-based community-level intervention to promote progress toward consistent condom and bleach use among selected populations at increased risk for HIV infection in 5 US cities. METHODS: Role-model stories were distributed, along with condoms and bleach, by community members who encouraged behavior change among injection drug users, their female sex partners, sex workers, non-gay-identified men who have sex with men, high-risk youth, and residents in areas with high sexually transmitted disease rates. Over a 3-year period, cross-sectional interviews (n = 15,205) were conducted in 10 intervention and comparison community pairs. Outcomes were measured on a stage-of-change scale. Observed condom carrying and intervention exposure were also measured. RESULTS: At the community level, movement toward consistent condom use with main (P < .05) and nonmain (P < .05) partners, as well as increased condom carrying (P < .0001), was greater in intervention than in comparison communities. At the individual level, respondents recently exposed to the intervention were more likely to carry condoms and to have higher stage-of-change scores for condom and bleach use. CONCLUSIONS: The intervention led to significant communitywide progress toward consistent HIV risk reduction.  (+info)

Methadone treatment by general practitioners in Amsterdam. (5/1341)

In Amsterdam, a three-tiered program exists to deal with drug use and addiction. General practitioners form the backbone of the system, helping to deal with the majority of addicts, who are not criminals and many of whom desire to be free of addiction. Distinctions are made between drugs with "acceptable" and "unacceptable" risks, and between drug use and drug-related crime; patients who fall into the former categories are treated in a nonconfrontational, nonstigmatizing manner; such a system helps prevent the majority of patients from passing into unacceptable, criminalized categories. The overall program has demonstrated harm reduction both for patients and for the city of Amsterdam.  (+info)

Stroke: the global burden. (6/1341)

Stroke is a major global health problem. It is a major cause of mortality, morbidity and disability in developed and increasingly in less developed countries. Worldwide, it is the leading cause of healthy years lost in late adulthood, and evidence indicates that the burden of stroke, particularly in terms of morbidity and disability, will almost certainly increase in the foreseeable future. This review aims to generate a better understanding of the present and projected future global burden of stroke, with particular emphasis on the non-established market economy countries (NEMEC). The first part summarizes and interprets the currently available evidence on stroke mortality, incidence, case-fatality and related disability rates from both established and non-established market economy countries. The second part reviews the main risk factors for stroke. For the modifiable factors, it examines current prevalence rates in NEMEC with a view towards identifying patterns that are relevant for predicting future rates of the disease. Reversing the consequences of stroke is difficult, thus primary prevention is of utmost importance. The potential for prevention is illustrated by the experience of Japan, which in the last two decades has seen substantial declines in stroke mortality--mostly due to reductions in dietary salt intake. The last section discusses potential strategies and approaches to effective stroke prevention and highlights other areas that need to be addressed if stroke management in the coming decades is to be effective.  (+info)

R(7/1341)

esearch note: does cost recovery for curative care affect preventive care utilization?  (+info)

Implementing a nationwide insecticide-impregnated bednet programme in The Gambia. (8/1341)

Earlier studies in The Gambia suggested that the use of impregnated bednets might prove to be a useful malaria control strategy. Based on the results of these studies, in 1992 the Government of The Gambia was encouraged to initiate a National Impregnated Bednet Programme (NIBP) as part of the National Malaria Control Programme Strategy. This paper describes the implementation process/procedure of the NIBP. Evaluation results showed that, overall, 83% of the bednets surveyed has been impregnated, and 77% of children under the age of five years and 78% of women of childbearing age were reported to be sleeping under impregnated bednets.  (+info)

Preventive health services refer to measures taken to prevent diseases or injuries rather than curing them or treating their symptoms. These services include screenings, vaccinations, and counseling aimed at preventing or identifying illnesses in their earliest stages. Examples of preventive health services include:

1. Screenings for various types of cancer (e.g., breast, cervical, colorectal)
2. Vaccinations against infectious diseases (e.g., influenza, pneumococcal pneumonia, human papillomavirus)
3. Counseling on lifestyle modifications to reduce the risk of chronic diseases (e.g., smoking cessation, diet and exercise counseling, alcohol misuse screening and intervention)
4. Screenings for cardiovascular disease risk factors (e.g., cholesterol levels, blood pressure, body mass index)
5. Screenings for mental health conditions (e.g., depression)
6. Preventive medications (e.g., aspirin for primary prevention of cardiovascular disease in certain individuals)

Preventive health services are an essential component of overall healthcare and play a critical role in improving health outcomes, reducing healthcare costs, and enhancing quality of life.

The United States Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) is not a medical term per se, but it is a government organization that oversees and provides funding for many public health initiatives, services, and institutions in the United States. Here's a brief definition:

The HHS is a cabinet-level department in the US federal government responsible for protecting the health of all Americans and providing essential human services. It achieves this by promoting effective and efficient delivery of high-quality healthcare, conducting critical medical research through its agencies, such as the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and enforcing public health laws and regulations, including those related to food safety, through its agencies, such as the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Additionally, HHS oversees the Medicare and Medicaid programs, which provide healthcare coverage for millions of elderly, disabled, and low-income Americans.

Women's health services refer to medical services that are specifically designed, focused on, or tailored to the unique physiological and psychological needs of women, throughout various stages of their lives. These services encompass a wide range of healthcare areas including:

1. Gynecology and obstetrics - covering routine preventive care, family planning, prenatal and postnatal care, as well as management of gynecological conditions like menstrual disorders, sexually transmitted infections (STIs), and reproductive system cancers (e.g., cervical, ovarian, and endometrial cancer).
2. Breast health - including breast cancer screening, diagnostics, treatment, and survivorship care, as well as education on breast self-examination and risk reduction strategies.
3. Mental health - addressing women's mental health concerns such as depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), eating disorders, and perinatal mood disorders, while also considering the impact of hormonal changes, life events, and societal expectations on emotional wellbeing.
4. Sexual health - providing care for sexual concerns, dysfunctions, and sexually transmitted infections (STIs), as well as offering education on safe sexual practices and promoting healthy relationships.
5. Cardiovascular health - addressing women's specific cardiovascular risks, such as pregnancy-related complications, and managing conditions like hypertension and high cholesterol to prevent heart disease, the leading cause of death for women in many countries.
6. Bone health - focusing on prevention, diagnosis, and management of osteoporosis and other bone diseases that disproportionately affect women, particularly after menopause.
7. Menopause care - providing support and treatment for symptoms related to menopause, such as hot flashes, sleep disturbances, and mood changes, while also addressing long-term health concerns like bone density loss and heart disease risk.
8. Preventive care - offering routine screenings and vaccinations specific to women's health needs, including cervical cancer screening (Pap test), breast cancer screening (mammography), human papillomavirus (HPV) testing, and osteoporosis screening.
9. Education and counseling - empowering women with knowledge about their bodies, sexual and reproductive health, and overall wellbeing through evidence-based resources and support.
10. Integrative care - addressing the whole person, including mental, emotional, and spiritual wellbeing, by incorporating complementary therapies like acupuncture, mindfulness, and yoga into treatment plans as appropriate.

Health services accessibility refers to the degree to which individuals and populations are able to obtain needed health services in a timely manner. It includes factors such as physical access (e.g., distance, transportation), affordability (e.g., cost of services, insurance coverage), availability (e.g., supply of providers, hours of operation), and acceptability (e.g., cultural competence, language concordance).

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), accessibility is one of the key components of health system performance, along with responsiveness and fair financing. Improving accessibility to health services is essential for achieving universal health coverage and ensuring that everyone has access to quality healthcare without facing financial hardship. Factors that affect health services accessibility can vary widely between and within countries, and addressing these disparities requires a multifaceted approach that includes policy interventions, infrastructure development, and community engagement.

Health planning is a systematic process of creating strategies, policies, and goals to improve the health of a population and ensure the provision of adequate and accessible healthcare services. It involves assessing the health needs of the community, establishing priorities, developing interventions, and implementing and evaluating programs to address those needs. The ultimate goal of health planning is to optimize the health status of the population, reduce health disparities, and make efficient use of resources in the healthcare system. This process typically involves collaboration among various stakeholders, including healthcare professionals, policymakers, community members, and advocacy groups.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Organizational Objectives" is not a term that has a specific medical definition. It is a general management and business concept. Organizational objectives are the goals or targets that an organization aims to achieve through its operations and functions. These can include financial objectives like profitability and growth, as well as non-financial objectives related to areas like quality, innovation, social responsibility, and employee satisfaction.

In a healthcare setting, organizational objectives might include improving patient outcomes, increasing patient satisfaction, reducing costs, implementing new treatments or technologies, enhancing community health, and maintaining ethical standards.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "United States" is a geopolitical entity, specifically the name of the country consisting of 50 states, and it is not a medical term or concept. Therefore, I can't provide a medical definition for it. If you have any questions related to health, medicine, or biology, I would be happy to try to help answer those!

Health behavior can be defined as a series of actions and decisions that individuals take to protect, maintain or promote their health and well-being. These behaviors can include activities such as engaging in regular exercise, eating a healthy diet, getting sufficient sleep, practicing safe sex, avoiding tobacco and excessive alcohol consumption, and managing stress.

Health behaviors are influenced by various factors, including knowledge and attitudes towards health, beliefs and values, cultural norms, social support networks, environmental factors, and individual genetic predispositions. Understanding health behaviors is essential for developing effective public health interventions and promoting healthy lifestyles to prevent chronic diseases and improve overall quality of life.

Health promotion is the process of enabling people to increase control over their health and its determinants, and to improve their health. It moves beyond a focus on individual behavior change to include social and environmental interventions that can positively influence the health of individuals, communities, and populations. Health promotion involves engaging in a wide range of activities, such as advocacy, policy development, community organization, and education that aim to create supportive environments and personal skills that foster good health. It is based on principles of empowerment, participation, and social justice.

Preventive medicine, also known as preventive medicine or prophylaxis, refers to measures taken to prevent diseases or injuries rather than curing them or treating their symptoms. This can include various strategies such as vaccination, regular screenings and check-ups, early detection and intervention for medical issues, lifestyle modifications, and environmental changes.

The goal of preventive medicine is to protect, promote, and maintain health and well-being and to prevent disease, disability, and death. It is a proactive approach to healthcare that focuses on keeping people healthy and minimizing the negative impact of diseases or injuries when they do occur. Preventive medicine can be practiced by various healthcare professionals, including physicians, nurses, physician assistants, and public health practitioners.

Health services refer to the delivery of healthcare services, including preventive, curative, and rehabilitative services. These services are typically provided by health professionals such as doctors, nurses, and allied health personnel in various settings, including hospitals, clinics, community health centers, and long-term care facilities. Health services may also include public health activities such as health education, surveillance, and health promotion programs aimed at improving the health of populations. The goal of health services is to promote and restore health, prevent disease and injury, and improve the quality of life for individuals and communities.

Mental health services refer to the various professional health services designed to treat and support individuals with mental health conditions. These services are typically provided by trained and licensed mental health professionals, such as psychiatrists, psychologists, social workers, mental health counselors, and marriage and family therapists. The services may include:

1. Assessment and diagnosis of mental health disorders
2. Psychotherapy or "talk therapy" to help individuals understand and manage their symptoms
3. Medication management for mental health conditions
4. Case management and care coordination to connect individuals with community resources and support
5. Psychoeducation to help individuals and families better understand mental health conditions and how to manage them
6. Crisis intervention and stabilization services
7. Inpatient and residential treatment for severe or chronic mental illness
8. Prevention and early intervention services to identify and address mental health concerns before they become more serious
9. Rehabilitation and recovery services to help individuals with mental illness achieve their full potential and live fulfilling lives in the community.

Socioeconomic factors are a range of interconnected conditions and influences that affect the opportunities and resources a person or group has to maintain and improve their health and well-being. These factors include:

1. Economic stability: This includes employment status, job security, income level, and poverty status. Lower income and lack of employment are associated with poorer health outcomes.
2. Education: Higher levels of education are generally associated with better health outcomes. Education can affect a person's ability to access and understand health information, as well as their ability to navigate the healthcare system.
3. Social and community context: This includes factors such as social support networks, discrimination, and community safety. Strong social supports and positive community connections are associated with better health outcomes, while discrimination and lack of safety can negatively impact health.
4. Healthcare access and quality: Access to affordable, high-quality healthcare is an important socioeconomic factor that can significantly impact a person's health. Factors such as insurance status, availability of providers, and cultural competency of healthcare systems can all affect healthcare access and quality.
5. Neighborhood and built environment: The physical conditions in which people live, work, and play can also impact their health. Factors such as housing quality, transportation options, availability of healthy foods, and exposure to environmental hazards can all influence health outcomes.

Socioeconomic factors are often interrelated and can have a cumulative effect on health outcomes. For example, someone who lives in a low-income neighborhood with limited access to healthy foods and safe parks may also face challenges related to employment, education, and healthcare access that further impact their health. Addressing socioeconomic factors is an important part of promoting health equity and reducing health disparities.

Health services needs refer to the population's requirement for healthcare services based on their health status, disease prevalence, and clinical guidelines. These needs can be categorized into normative needs (based on expert opinions or clinical guidelines) and expressed needs (based on individuals' perceptions of their own healthcare needs).

On the other hand, health services demand refers to the quantity of healthcare services that consumers are willing and able to pay for, given their preferences, values, and financial resources. Demand is influenced by various factors such as price, income, education level, and cultural beliefs.

It's important to note that while needs represent a population's requirement for healthcare services, demand reflects the actual utilization of these services. Understanding both health services needs and demand is crucial in planning and delivering effective healthcare services that meet the population's requirements while ensuring efficient resource allocation.

Health status is a term used to describe the overall condition of an individual's health, including physical, mental, and social well-being. It is often assessed through various measures such as medical history, physical examination, laboratory tests, and self-reported health assessments. Health status can be used to identify health disparities, track changes in population health over time, and evaluate the effectiveness of healthcare interventions.

Health services research (HSR) is a multidisciplinary field of scientific investigation that studies how social factors, financing systems, organizational structures and processes, health technologies, and personal behaviors affect access to healthcare, the quality and cost of care, and ultimately, our health and well-being. The goal of HSR is to inform policy and practice, improve system performance, and enhance the health and well-being of individuals and communities. It involves the use of various research methods, including epidemiology, biostatistics, economics, sociology, management science, political science, and psychology, to answer questions about the healthcare system and how it can be improved.

Examples of HSR topics include:

* Evaluating the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of different healthcare interventions and technologies
* Studying patient-centered care and patient experiences with the healthcare system
* Examining healthcare workforce issues, such as shortages of primary care providers or the impact of nurse-to-patient ratios on patient outcomes
* Investigating the impact of health insurance design and financing systems on access to care and health disparities
* Analyzing the organization and delivery of healthcare services in different settings, such as hospitals, clinics, and long-term care facilities
* Identifying best practices for improving healthcare quality and safety, reducing medical errors, and eliminating wasteful or unnecessary care.

The "delivery of health care" refers to the process of providing medical services, treatments, and interventions to individuals in order to maintain, restore, or improve their health. This encompasses a wide range of activities, including:

1. Preventive care: Routine check-ups, screenings, immunizations, and counseling aimed at preventing illnesses or identifying them at an early stage.
2. Diagnostic services: Tests and procedures used to identify and understand medical conditions, such as laboratory tests, imaging studies, and biopsies.
3. Treatment interventions: Medical, surgical, or therapeutic treatments provided to manage acute or chronic health issues, including medications, surgeries, physical therapy, and psychotherapy.
4. Acute care services: Short-term medical interventions focused on addressing immediate health concerns, such as hospitalizations for infections, injuries, or complications from medical conditions.
5. Chronic care management: Long-term care and support provided to individuals with ongoing medical needs, such as those living with chronic diseases like diabetes, heart disease, or cancer.
6. Rehabilitation services: Programs designed to help patients recover from illnesses, injuries, or surgeries, focusing on restoring physical, cognitive, and emotional function.
7. End-of-life care: Palliative and hospice care provided to individuals facing terminal illnesses, with an emphasis on comfort, dignity, and quality of life.
8. Public health initiatives: Population-level interventions aimed at improving community health, such as disease prevention programs, health education campaigns, and environmental modifications.

The delivery of health care involves a complex network of healthcare professionals, institutions, and systems working together to ensure that patients receive the best possible care. This includes primary care physicians, specialists, nurses, allied health professionals, hospitals, clinics, long-term care facilities, and public health organizations. Effective communication, coordination, and collaboration among these stakeholders are essential for high-quality, patient-centered care.

Child health services refer to a range of medical and supportive services designed to promote the physical, mental, and social well-being of children from birth up to adolescence. These services aim to prevent or identify health problems early, provide treatment and management for existing conditions, and support healthy growth and development.

Examples of child health services include:

1. Well-child visits: Regular checkups with a pediatrician or other healthcare provider to monitor growth, development, and overall health.
2. Immunizations: Vaccinations to protect against infectious diseases such as measles, mumps, rubella, polio, and hepatitis B.
3. Screening tests: Blood tests, hearing and vision screenings, and other diagnostic tests to identify potential health issues early.
4. Developmental assessments: Evaluations of a child's cognitive, emotional, social, and physical development to ensure they are meeting age-appropriate milestones.
5. Dental care: Preventive dental services such as cleanings, fluoride treatments, and sealants, as well as restorative care for cavities or other dental problems.
6. Mental health services: Counseling, therapy, and medication management for children experiencing emotional or behavioral challenges.
7. Nutrition counseling: Education and support to help families make healthy food choices and promote good nutrition.
8. Chronic disease management: Coordinated care for children with ongoing medical conditions such as asthma, diabetes, or cerebral palsy.
9. Injury prevention: Programs that teach parents and children about safety measures to reduce the risk of accidents and injuries.
10. Public health initiatives: Community-based programs that promote healthy lifestyles, provide access to healthcare services, and address social determinants of health such as poverty, housing, and education.

Health care surveys are research tools used to systematically collect information from a population or sample regarding their experiences, perceptions, and knowledge of health services, health outcomes, and various other health-related topics. These surveys typically consist of standardized questionnaires that cover specific aspects of healthcare, such as access to care, quality of care, patient satisfaction, health disparities, and healthcare costs. The data gathered from health care surveys are used to inform policy decisions, improve healthcare delivery, identify best practices, allocate resources, and monitor the health status of populations. Health care surveys can be conducted through various modes, including in-person interviews, telephone interviews, mail-in questionnaires, or online platforms.

Community health services refer to a type of healthcare delivery that is organized around the needs of a specific population or community, rather than individual patients. These services are typically focused on preventive care, health promotion, and improving access to care for underserved populations. They can include a wide range of services, such as:

* Primary care, including routine check-ups, immunizations, and screenings
* Dental care
* Mental health and substance abuse treatment
* Public health initiatives, such as disease prevention and health education programs
* Home health care and other supportive services for people with chronic illnesses or disabilities
* Health services for special populations, such as children, the elderly, or those living in rural areas

The goal of community health services is to improve the overall health of a population by addressing the social, economic, and environmental factors that can impact health. This approach recognizes that healthcare is just one factor in determining a person's health outcomes, and that other factors such as housing, education, and income also play important roles. By working to address these underlying determinants of health, community health services aim to improve the health and well-being of entire communities.

Patient acceptance of health care refers to the willingness and ability of a patient to follow and engage in a recommended treatment plan or healthcare regimen. This involves understanding the proposed medical interventions, considering their potential benefits and risks, and making an informed decision to proceed with the recommended course of action.

The factors that influence patient acceptance can include:

1. Patient's understanding of their condition and treatment options
2. Trust in their healthcare provider
3. Personal beliefs and values related to health and illness
4. Cultural, linguistic, or socioeconomic barriers
5. Emotional responses to the diagnosis or proposed treatment
6. Practical considerations, such as cost, time commitment, or potential side effects

Healthcare providers play a crucial role in facilitating patient acceptance by clearly communicating information, addressing concerns and questions, and providing support throughout the decision-making process. Encouraging shared decision-making and tailoring care plans to individual patient needs and preferences can also enhance patient acceptance of health care.

Public health is defined by the World Health Organization (WHO) as "the art and science of preventing disease, prolonging life and promoting human health through organized efforts of society." It focuses on improving the health and well-being of entire communities, populations, and societies, rather than individual patients. This is achieved through various strategies, including education, prevention, surveillance of diseases, and promotion of healthy behaviors and environments. Public health also addresses broader determinants of health, such as access to healthcare, housing, food, and income, which have a significant impact on the overall health of populations.

Primary health care is defined by the World Health Organization (WHO) as:

"Essential health care that is based on practical, scientifically sound and socially acceptable methods and technology made universally accessible to individuals and families in the community through their full participation and at a cost that the community and country can afford. It forms an integral part both of the country's health system, of which it is the central function and main focus, and of the overall social and economic development of the community. It is the first level of contact of individuals, the family and community with the national health system bringing health care as close as possible to where people live and work, and constitutes the first element of a continuing health care process."

Primary health care includes a range of services such as preventive care, health promotion, curative care, rehabilitation, and palliative care. It is typically provided by a team of health professionals including doctors, nurses, midwives, pharmacists, and other community health workers. The goal of primary health care is to provide comprehensive, continuous, and coordinated care to individuals and families in a way that is accessible, affordable, and culturally sensitive.

Adolescent health services refer to medical and related services that are specifically designed to meet the unique physical, mental, emotional, and social needs of young people between the ages of 10-24 years. These services encompass a broad range of interventions, including preventive care, acute and chronic disease management, reproductive health care, mental health services, substance use treatment, and health promotion and education. The goal of adolescent health services is to support young people in achieving optimal health and well-being as they navigate the complex transitions of adolescence and early adulthood. Such services may be provided in a variety of settings, including primary care clinics, schools, community health centers, and specialized youth clinics.

Reproductive health services refer to the provision of health care services that aim to enhance reproductive health and well-being. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), reproductive health is a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being in all matters relating to the reproductive system and its functions and processes.

Reproductive health services may include:

1. Family planning: This includes counseling, education, and provision of contraceptives to prevent unintended pregnancies and promote planned pregnancies.
2. Maternal and newborn health: This includes antenatal care, delivery services, postnatal care, and newborn care to ensure safe pregnancy and childbirth.
3. Sexual health: This includes counseling, testing, and treatment for sexually transmitted infections (STIs), including HIV/AIDS, and education on sexual health and responsible sexual behavior.
4. Infertility services: This includes diagnosis and treatment of infertility, including assisted reproductive technologies such as in vitro fertilization (IVF).
5. Abortion services: This includes safe abortion services, post-abortion care, and counseling to prevent unsafe abortions and reduce maternal mortality and morbidity.
6. Menstrual health: This includes providing access to menstrual hygiene products, education on menstrual health, and treatment of menstrual disorders.
7. Adolescent reproductive health: This includes providing age-appropriate sexual and reproductive health education, counseling, and services to adolescents.

Reproductive health services aim to promote sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR), which include the right to access information, education, and services; the right to make informed choices about one's own body and reproduction; and the right to be free from discrimination, coercion, and violence in relation to one's sexuality and reproduction.

Rural health services refer to the healthcare delivery systems and facilities that are located in rural areas and are designed to meet the unique health needs of rural populations. These services can include hospitals, clinics, community health centers, mental health centers, and home health agencies, as well as various programs and initiatives aimed at improving access to care, addressing health disparities, and promoting health and wellness in rural communities.

Rural health services are often characterized by longer travel distances to healthcare facilities, a greater reliance on primary care and preventive services, and a higher prevalence of certain health conditions such as chronic diseases, injuries, and mental health disorders. As a result, rural health services must be tailored to address these challenges and provide high-quality, affordable, and accessible care to rural residents.

In many countries, rural health services are supported by government policies and programs aimed at improving healthcare infrastructure, workforce development, and telehealth technologies in rural areas. These efforts are critical for ensuring that all individuals, regardless of where they live, have access to the healthcare services they need to maintain their health and well-being.

Quality of health care is a term that refers to the degree to which health services for individuals and populations increase the likelihood of desired health outcomes and are consistent with current professional knowledge. It encompasses various aspects such as:

1. Clinical effectiveness: The use of best available evidence to make decisions about prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and care. This includes considering the benefits and harms of different options and making sure that the most effective interventions are used.
2. Safety: Preventing harm to patients and minimizing risks associated with healthcare. This involves identifying potential hazards, implementing measures to reduce errors, and learning from adverse events to improve systems and processes.
3. Patient-centeredness: Providing care that is respectful of and responsive to individual patient preferences, needs, and values. This includes ensuring that patients are fully informed about their condition and treatment options, involving them in decision-making, and providing emotional support throughout the care process.
4. Timeliness: Ensuring that healthcare services are delivered promptly and efficiently, without unnecessary delays. This includes coordinating care across different providers and settings to ensure continuity and avoid gaps in service.
5. Efficiency: Using resources wisely and avoiding waste, while still providing high-quality care. This involves considering the costs and benefits of different interventions, as well as ensuring that healthcare services are equitably distributed.
6. Equitability: Ensuring that all individuals have access to quality healthcare services, regardless of their socioeconomic status, race, ethnicity, gender, age, or other factors. This includes addressing disparities in health outcomes and promoting fairness and justice in healthcare.

Overall, the quality of health care is a multidimensional concept that requires ongoing evaluation and improvement to ensure that patients receive the best possible care.

"Health services for the aged" is a broad term that refers to medical and healthcare services specifically designed to meet the unique needs of elderly individuals. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), health services for the aged should be "age-friendly" and "person-centered," meaning they should take into account the physical, mental, and social changes that occur as people age, as well as their individual preferences and values.

These services can include a range of medical and healthcare interventions, such as:

* Preventive care, including vaccinations, cancer screenings, and other routine check-ups
* Chronic disease management, such as treatment for conditions like diabetes, heart disease, or arthritis
* Rehabilitation services, such as physical therapy or occupational therapy, to help elderly individuals maintain their mobility and independence
* Palliative care and end-of-life planning, to ensure that elderly individuals receive compassionate and supportive care in their final days
* Mental health services, including counseling and therapy for conditions like depression or anxiety
* Social services, such as transportation assistance, meal delivery, or home care, to help elderly individuals maintain their quality of life and independence.

Overall, the goal of health services for the aged is to promote healthy aging, prevent disease and disability, and provide high-quality, compassionate care to elderly individuals, in order to improve their overall health and well-being.

Health policy refers to a set of decisions, plans, and actions that are undertaken to achieve specific healthcare goals within a population. It is formulated by governmental and non-governmental organizations with the objective of providing guidance and direction for the management and delivery of healthcare services. Health policies address various aspects of healthcare, including access, financing, quality, and equity. They can be designed to promote health, prevent disease, and provide treatment and rehabilitation services to individuals who are sick or injured. Effective health policies require careful consideration of scientific evidence, ethical principles, and societal values to ensure that they meet the needs of the population while being fiscally responsible.

Health surveys are research studies that collect data from a sample population to describe the current health status, health behaviors, and healthcare utilization of a particular group or community. These surveys may include questions about various aspects of health such as physical health, mental health, chronic conditions, lifestyle habits, access to healthcare services, and demographic information. The data collected from health surveys can be used to monitor trends in health over time, identify disparities in health outcomes, develop and evaluate public health programs and policies, and inform resource allocation decisions. Examples of national health surveys include the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) and the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS).

An "attitude to health" is a set of beliefs, values, and behaviors that an individual holds regarding their own health and well-being. It encompasses their overall approach to maintaining good health, preventing illness, seeking medical care, and managing any existing health conditions.

A positive attitude to health typically includes:

1. A belief in the importance of self-care and taking responsibility for one's own health.
2. Engaging in regular exercise, eating a balanced diet, getting enough sleep, and avoiding harmful behaviors such as smoking and excessive alcohol consumption.
3. Regular check-ups and screenings to detect potential health issues early on.
4. Seeking medical care when necessary and following recommended treatment plans.
5. A willingness to learn about and implement new healthy habits and lifestyle changes.
6. Developing a strong support network of family, friends, and healthcare professionals.

On the other hand, a negative attitude to health may involve:

1. Neglecting self-care and failing to take responsibility for one's own health.
2. Engaging in unhealthy behaviors such as sedentary lifestyle, poor diet, lack of sleep, smoking, and excessive alcohol consumption.
3. Avoidance of regular check-ups and screenings, leading to delayed detection and treatment of potential health issues.
4. Resistance to seeking medical care or following recommended treatment plans.
5. Closed-mindedness towards new healthy habits and lifestyle changes.
6. Lack of a support network or reluctance to seek help from others.

Overall, an individual's attitude to health can significantly impact their physical and mental well-being, as well as their ability to manage and overcome any health challenges that may arise.

Health care reform refers to the legislative efforts, initiatives, and debates aimed at improving the quality, affordability, and accessibility of health care services. These reforms may include changes to health insurance coverage, delivery systems, payment methods, and healthcare regulations. The goals of health care reform are often to increase the number of people with health insurance, reduce healthcare costs, and improve the overall health outcomes of a population. Examples of notable health care reform measures in the United States include the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and Medicare for All proposals.

Health Insurance is a type of insurance that covers the whole or a part of the risk of a person incurring medical expenses, spreading the risk over a large number of persons. By purchasing health insurance, insured individuals pay a premium to an insurance company, which then pools those funds with other policyholders' premiums to pay for the medical care costs of individuals who become ill or injured. The coverage can include hospitalization, medical procedures, prescription drugs, and preventive care, among other services. The goal of health insurance is to provide financial protection against unexpected medical expenses and to make healthcare services more affordable.

Urban health services refer to the provision of healthcare and public health programs in urban areas, designed to meet the unique needs and challenges of urban populations. These services encompass a wide range of facilities, professionals, and interventions that aim to improve the health and well-being of people living in urban environments. They often address issues such as infectious diseases, chronic conditions, mental health, environmental hazards, and social determinants of health that are prevalent or amplified in urban settings. Examples of urban health services include hospital systems, community health centers, outreach programs, and policy initiatives focused on improving the health of urban populations.

Maternal health services refer to the preventative, diagnostic, and treatment-based healthcare services provided during pregnancy, childbirth, and postnatal period. These services aim to ensure the best possible health outcomes for mothers throughout their reproductive years, including family planning, preconception care, antenatal care, delivery, postpartum care, and management of chronic conditions or complications that may arise during pregnancy and childbirth.

The World Health Organization (WHO) outlines several critical components of maternal health services:

1. Antenatal care: Regular check-ups to monitor the mother's and fetus's health, identify potential risks, provide essential interventions, and offer counseling on nutrition, breastfeeding, and birth preparedness.
2. Delivery care: Skilled attendance during childbirth, including normal vaginal delivery and assisted deliveries (forceps or vacuum extraction), and access to emergency obstetric care for complications such as hemorrhage, eclampsia, obstructed labor, and sepsis.
3. Postnatal care: Continuum of care for mothers and newborns during the first six weeks after childbirth, focusing on recovery, early detection and management of complications, immunization, family planning, and psychosocial support.
4. Family planning: Access to modern contraceptive methods, counseling on fertility awareness, and safe abortion services where legal, to enable women to plan their pregnancies and space their children according to their reproductive intentions.
5. Management of chronic conditions: Comprehensive care for pregnant women with pre-existing or pregnancy-induced medical conditions such as hypertension, diabetes, HIV/AIDS, and mental health disorders.
6. Preconception care: Identification and management of risk factors before conception to optimize maternal and fetal health outcomes.
7. Prevention and management of gender-based violence: Screening, counseling, and referral services for women experiencing intimate partner violence or sexual violence during pregnancy and childbirth.
8. Health promotion and education: Community-based interventions to raise awareness about the importance of maternal health, promote positive health behaviors, and reduce barriers to accessing healthcare services.

Maternal health services should be accessible, affordable, acceptable, and equitable for all women, regardless of their age, race, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, or geographical location. Adequate investment in maternal health infrastructure, human resources, and service delivery models is essential to achieve universal health coverage and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) by 2030.

Community Mental Health Services (CMHS) refer to mental health care services that are provided in community settings, as opposed to traditional hospital-based or institutional care. These services are designed to be accessible, comprehensive, and coordinated, with the goal of promoting recovery, resilience, and improved quality of life for individuals with mental illnesses.

CMHS may include a range of services such as:

1. Outpatient care: Including individual and group therapy, medication management, and case management services provided in community clinics or healthcare centers.
2. Assertive Community Treatment (ACT): A team-based approach to providing comprehensive mental health services to individuals with severe and persistent mental illnesses who may have difficulty engaging in traditional outpatient care.
3. Crisis intervention: Including mobile crisis teams, emergency psychiatric evaluations, and short-term residential crisis stabilization units.
4. Supported housing and employment: Services that help individuals with mental illnesses to live independently in the community and to obtain and maintain competitive employment.
5. Prevention and early intervention: Programs that aim to identify and address mental health issues before they become more severe, such as suicide prevention programs, bullying prevention, and early psychosis detection and treatment.
6. Peer support: Services provided by individuals who have personal experience with mental illness and can offer support, guidance, and advocacy to others who are struggling with similar issues.
7. Family education and support: Programs that provide information, resources, and support to family members of individuals with mental illnesses.

The goal of CMHS is to provide accessible, comprehensive, and coordinated care that meets the unique needs of each individual and helps them to achieve their recovery goals in the community setting.

Primary prevention in a medical context refers to actions taken to prevent the development of a disease or injury before it occurs. This is typically achieved through measures such as public health education, lifestyle modifications, and vaccinations. The goal of primary prevention is to reduce the risk of a disease or injury by addressing its underlying causes. Examples of primary prevention strategies include smoking cessation programs to prevent lung cancer, immunizations to prevent infectious diseases, and safety regulations to prevent accidents and injuries.

"Health Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices" (HKAP) is a term used in public health to refer to the knowledge, beliefs, assumptions, and behaviors that individuals possess or engage in that are related to health. Here's a brief definition of each component:

1. Health Knowledge: Refers to the factual information and understanding that individuals have about various health-related topics, such as anatomy, physiology, disease processes, and healthy behaviors.
2. Attitudes: Represent the positive or negative evaluations, feelings, or dispositions that people hold towards certain health issues, practices, or services. These attitudes can influence their willingness to adopt and maintain healthy behaviors.
3. Practices: Encompass the specific actions or habits that individuals engage in related to their health, such as dietary choices, exercise routines, hygiene practices, and use of healthcare services.

HKAP is a multidimensional concept that helps public health professionals understand and address various factors influencing individual and community health outcomes. By assessing and addressing knowledge gaps, negative attitudes, or unhealthy practices, interventions can be designed to promote positive behavior change and improve overall health status.

Health Priorities are key areas of focus in healthcare that receive the greatest attention, resources, and efforts due to their significant impact on overall population health. These priorities are typically determined by evaluating various health issues and factors such as prevalence, severity, mortality rates, and social determinants of health. By addressing health priorities, healthcare systems and public health organizations aim to improve community health, reduce health disparities, and enhance the quality of life for individuals. Examples of health priorities may include chronic diseases (such as diabetes or heart disease), mental health, infectious diseases, maternal and child health, injury prevention, and health promotion through healthy lifestyles.

Medical mass screening, also known as population screening, is a public health service that aims to identify and detect asymptomatic individuals in a given population who have or are at risk of a specific disease. The goal is to provide early treatment, reduce morbidity and mortality, and prevent the spread of diseases within the community.

A mass screening program typically involves offering a simple, quick, and non-invasive test to a large number of people in a defined population, regardless of their risk factors or symptoms. Those who test positive are then referred for further diagnostic tests and appropriate medical interventions. Examples of mass screening programs include mammography for breast cancer detection, PSA (prostate-specific antigen) testing for prostate cancer, and fecal occult blood testing for colorectal cancer.

It is important to note that mass screening programs should be evidence-based, cost-effective, and ethically sound, with clear benefits outweighing potential harms. They should also consider factors such as the prevalence of the disease in the population, the accuracy and reliability of the screening test, and the availability and effectiveness of treatment options.

Occupational Health Services (OHS) refer to a branch of healthcare that focuses on the prevention and management of health issues that arise in the workplace or are caused by work-related factors. These services aim to promote and maintain the highest degree of physical, mental, and social well-being of workers in all occupations.

OHS typically includes:

1. Health surveillance and screening programs to identify early signs of work-related illnesses or injuries.
2. Occupational health education and training for employees and managers on topics such as safe lifting techniques, hazard communication, and bloodborne pathogens exposure control.
3. Ergonomic assessments and interventions to reduce the risk of musculoskeletal disorders and other work-related injuries.
4. Development and implementation of policies and procedures to address workplace health and safety issues.
5. Case management and return-to-work programs for employees who have been injured or become ill on the job.
6. Medical monitoring and treatment of work-related injuries and illnesses, including rehabilitation and disability management services.
7. Collaboration with employers to identify and address potential health hazards in the workplace, such as chemical exposures, noise pollution, or poor indoor air quality.

Overall, Occupational Health Services play a critical role in protecting the health and safety of workers, reducing the burden of work-related illnesses and injuries, and promoting a healthy and productive workforce.

Mental health is a state of well-being in which an individual realizes his or her own abilities, can cope with the normal stresses of life, can work productively and fruitfully, and is able to make a contribution to his or her community. It involves the emotional, psychological, and social aspects of an individual's health. Mental health is not just the absence of mental illness, it also includes positive characteristics such as resilience, happiness, and having a sense of purpose in life.

It is important to note that mental health can change over time, and it is possible for an individual to experience periods of good mental health as well as periods of poor mental health. Factors such as genetics, trauma, stress, and physical illness can all contribute to the development of mental health problems. Additionally, cultural and societal factors, such as discrimination and poverty, can also impact an individual's mental health.

Mental Health professionals like psychiatrists, psychologists, social workers and other mental health counselors use different tools and techniques to evaluate, diagnose and treat mental health conditions. These include therapy or counseling, medication, and self-help strategies.

Health Services Administration (HSA) is not a medical term per se, but rather a field of study and practice within healthcare management. Here's a definition that encompasses its meaning:

Health Services Administration (HSA) refers to the planning, directing, coordinating, and supervising of health services in hospitals, clinics, nursing homes, public health agencies, and other medical facilities. It involves managing financial resources, developing organizational policies, ensuring quality assurance, maintaining regulatory compliance, and promoting efficient delivery of healthcare services to improve patient outcomes and overall population health. HSA professionals may hold titles such as hospital administrator, clinical director, or healthcare executive.

A cross-sectional study is a type of observational research design that examines the relationship between variables at one point in time. It provides a snapshot or a "cross-section" of the population at a particular moment, allowing researchers to estimate the prevalence of a disease or condition and identify potential risk factors or associations.

In a cross-sectional study, data is collected from a sample of participants at a single time point, and the variables of interest are measured simultaneously. This design can be used to investigate the association between exposure and outcome, but it cannot establish causality because it does not follow changes over time.

Cross-sectional studies can be conducted using various data collection methods, such as surveys, interviews, or medical examinations. They are often used in epidemiology to estimate the prevalence of a disease or condition in a population and to identify potential risk factors that may contribute to its development. However, because cross-sectional studies only provide a snapshot of the population at one point in time, they cannot account for changes over time or determine whether exposure preceded the outcome.

Therefore, while cross-sectional studies can be useful for generating hypotheses and identifying potential associations between variables, further research using other study designs, such as cohort or case-control studies, is necessary to establish causality and confirm any findings.

Health education is the process of providing information and strategies to individuals and communities about how to improve their health and prevent disease. It involves teaching and learning activities that aim to empower people to make informed decisions and take responsible actions regarding their health. Health education covers a wide range of topics, including nutrition, physical activity, sexual and reproductive health, mental health, substance abuse prevention, and environmental health. The ultimate goal of health education is to promote healthy behaviors and lifestyles that can lead to improved health outcomes and quality of life.

A questionnaire in the medical context is a standardized, systematic, and structured tool used to gather information from individuals regarding their symptoms, medical history, lifestyle, or other health-related factors. It typically consists of a series of written questions that can be either self-administered or administered by an interviewer. Questionnaires are widely used in various areas of healthcare, including clinical research, epidemiological studies, patient care, and health services evaluation to collect data that can inform diagnosis, treatment planning, and population health management. They provide a consistent and organized method for obtaining information from large groups or individual patients, helping to ensure accurate and comprehensive data collection while minimizing bias and variability in the information gathered.

"State Medicine" is not a term that has a widely accepted or specific medical definition. However, in general terms, it can refer to the organization, financing, and delivery of healthcare services and resources at the national or regional level, overseen and managed by the government or state. This can include public health initiatives, regulation of healthcare professionals and institutions, and the provision of healthcare services through publicly funded programs.

In some contexts, "State Medicine" may also refer to the practice of using medical treatments or interventions as a means of achieving political or social objectives, such as reducing crime rates or improving economic productivity. However, this usage is less common and more controversial.

National health programs are systematic, large-scale initiatives that are put in place by national governments to address specific health issues or improve the overall health of a population. These programs often involve coordinated efforts across various sectors, including healthcare, education, and social services. They may aim to increase access to care, improve the quality of care, prevent the spread of diseases, promote healthy behaviors, or reduce health disparities. Examples of national health programs include immunization campaigns, tobacco control initiatives, and efforts to address chronic diseases such as diabetes or heart disease. These programs are typically developed based on scientific research, evidence-based practices, and public health data, and they may be funded through a variety of sources, including government budgets, grants, and private donations.

A physical examination is a methodical and systematic process of evaluating a patient's overall health status. It involves inspecting, palpating, percussing, and auscultating different parts of the body to detect any abnormalities or medical conditions. The primary purpose of a physical examination is to gather information about the patient's health, identify potential health risks, diagnose medical conditions, and develop an appropriate plan for prevention, treatment, or further evaluation.

During a physical examination, a healthcare provider may assess various aspects of a patient's health, including their vital signs (such as blood pressure, heart rate, temperature, and respiratory rate), height, weight, body mass index (BMI), and overall appearance. They may also examine different organ systems, such as the cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal, neurological, musculoskeletal, and genitourinary systems, to identify any signs of disease or abnormalities.

Physical examinations are an essential part of preventive healthcare and are typically performed during routine check-ups, annual physicals, and when patients present with symptoms or concerns about their health. The specific components of a physical examination may vary depending on the patient's age, sex, medical history, and presenting symptoms.

Health facilities, also known as healthcare facilities, are organizations that provide health services, treatments, and care to individuals in need of medical attention. These facilities can include various types of establishments such as hospitals, clinics, doctor's offices, dental practices, long-term care facilities, rehabilitation centers, and diagnostic imaging centers.

Health facilities are designed to offer a range of services that promote health, prevent illness, diagnose and treat medical conditions, and provide ongoing care for patients with chronic illnesses or disabilities. They may also offer educational programs and resources to help individuals maintain their health and well-being.

The specific services offered by health facilities can vary widely depending on the type and size of the facility, as well as its location and target population. However, all health facilities are required to meet certain standards for safety, quality, and patient care in order to ensure that patients receive the best possible treatment and outcomes.

Family planning services refer to comprehensive healthcare programs and interventions that aim to help individuals and couples prevent or achieve pregnancies, according to their desired number and spacing of children. These services typically include:

1. Counseling and education: Providing information about various contraceptive methods, their effectiveness, side effects, and appropriate use. This may also include counseling on reproductive health, sexually transmitted infections (STIs), and preconception care.
2. Contraceptive services: Making a wide range of contraceptive options available to clients, including barrier methods (condoms, diaphragms), hormonal methods (pills, patches, injectables, implants), intrauterine devices (IUDs), and permanent methods (tubal ligation, vasectomy).
3. Screening and testing: Offering STI screening and testing, as well as cervical cancer screening for eligible clients.
4. Preconception care: Providing counseling and interventions to help women achieve optimal health before becoming pregnant, including folic acid supplementation, management of chronic conditions, and avoidance of harmful substances (tobacco, alcohol, drugs).
5. Fertility services: Addressing infertility issues through diagnostic testing, counseling, and medical or surgical treatments when appropriate.
6. Menstrual regulation: Providing manual vacuum aspiration or medication to safely and effectively manage incomplete miscarriages or unwanted pregnancies within the first trimester.
7. Pregnancy options counseling: Offering unbiased information and support to help individuals make informed decisions about their pregnancy, including parenting, adoption, or abortion.
8. Community outreach and education: Engaging in community-based initiatives to increase awareness of family planning services and promote reproductive health.
9. Advocacy: Working to remove barriers to accessing family planning services, such as policy changes, reducing stigma, and increasing funding for programs.

Family planning services are an essential component of sexual and reproductive healthcare and contribute significantly to improving maternal and child health outcomes, reducing unintended pregnancies, and empowering individuals to make informed choices about their reproductive lives.

Health expenditures refer to the total amount of money spent on health services, goods, and resources in a given period. This can include expenses for preventive care, medical treatments, medications, long-term care, and administrative costs. Health expenditures can be made by individuals, corporations, insurance companies, or governments, and they can be measured at the national, regional, or household level.

Health expenditures are often used as an indicator of a country's investment in its healthcare system and can reflect the overall health status of a population. High levels of health expenditures may indicate a strong commitment to healthcare, but they can also place a significant burden on individuals, businesses, and governments. Understanding patterns and trends in health expenditures is important for policymakers, healthcare providers, and researchers who are working to improve the efficiency, effectiveness, and accessibility of healthcare services.

Public Health Administration refers to the leadership, management, and coordination of public health services and initiatives at the local, state, or national level. It involves overseeing and managing the development, implementation, and evaluation of policies, programs, and services aimed at improving the health and well-being of populations. This may include addressing issues such as infectious disease control, chronic disease prevention, environmental health, emergency preparedness and response, and health promotion and education.

Public Health Administration requires a strong understanding of public health principles, leadership and management skills, and the ability to work collaboratively with a variety of stakeholders, including community members, healthcare providers, policymakers, and other organizations. The ultimate goal of Public Health Administration is to ensure that public health resources are used effectively and efficiently to improve the health outcomes of populations and reduce health disparities.

"Health personnel" is a broad term that refers to individuals who are involved in maintaining, promoting, and restoring the health of populations or individuals. This can include a wide range of professionals such as:

1. Healthcare providers: These are medical doctors, nurses, midwives, dentists, pharmacists, allied health professionals (like physical therapists, occupational therapists, speech therapists, dietitians, etc.), and other healthcare workers who provide direct patient care.

2. Public health professionals: These are individuals who work in public health agencies, non-governmental organizations, or academia to promote health, prevent diseases, and protect populations from health hazards. They include epidemiologists, biostatisticians, health educators, environmental health specialists, and health services researchers.

3. Health managers and administrators: These are professionals who oversee the operations, finances, and strategic planning of healthcare organizations, such as hospitals, clinics, or public health departments. They may include hospital CEOs, medical directors, practice managers, and healthcare consultants.

4. Health support staff: This group includes various personnel who provide essential services to healthcare organizations, such as medical records technicians, billing specialists, receptionists, and maintenance workers.

5. Health researchers and academics: These are professionals involved in conducting research, teaching, and disseminating knowledge related to health sciences, medicine, public health, or healthcare management in universities, research institutions, or think tanks.

The World Health Organization (WHO) defines "health worker" as "a person who contributes to the promotion, protection, or improvement of health through prevention, treatment, rehabilitation, palliation, health promotion, and health education." This definition encompasses a wide range of professionals working in various capacities to improve health outcomes.

The World Health Organization (WHO) defines health as "a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity." This definition emphasizes that health is more than just the absence of illness, but a positive state of well-being in which an individual is able to realize their own potential, cope with normal stresses of life, work productively, and contribute to their community. It recognizes that physical, mental, and social factors are interconnected and can all impact a person's overall health. This definition also highlights the importance of addressing the social determinants of health, such as poverty, education, housing, and access to healthcare, in order to promote health and prevent disease.

The United States Public Health Service (USPHS) is not a medical term per se, but I can certainly provide a definition and overview of it in the context of public health and healthcare.

The USPHS is a division of the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and is responsible for promoting and protecting the health of the nation, particularly focusing on preventing and controlling infectious diseases and other health threats. The USPHS is composed of eight uniformed service components: the Surgeon General's Office, the Commissioned Corps, the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), the Indian Health Service (IHS), and the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).

The Commissioned Corps of the USPHS is a group of uniformed healthcare professionals who are appointed by the President and commissioned as officers. They serve in various capacities within the federal government, including research, clinical care, health policy, and emergency response. The Surgeon General serves as the head of the USPHS and is responsible for providing advice to the President and HHS Secretary on matters related to public health.

The USPHS plays a critical role in responding to public health emergencies, such as natural disasters, infectious disease outbreaks, and bioterrorism attacks. They also work to address health disparities and promote health equity by providing healthcare services to underserved populations, including American Indians and Alaska Natives through the IHS. Additionally, the USPHS supports research and surveillance efforts aimed at understanding and addressing various public health issues, such as tobacco use, substance abuse, and mental health.

Family practice, also known as family medicine, is a medical specialty that provides comprehensive and continuous care to patients of all ages, genders, and stages of life. Family physicians are trained to provide a wide range of services, including preventive care, diagnosis and treatment of acute and chronic illnesses, management of complex medical conditions, and providing health education and counseling.

Family practice emphasizes the importance of building long-term relationships with patients and their families, and takes into account the physical, emotional, social, and psychological factors that influence a person's health. Family physicians often serve as the primary point of contact for patients within the healthcare system, coordinating care with other specialists and healthcare providers as needed.

Family practice is a broad and diverse field, encompassing various areas such as pediatrics, internal medicine, obstetrics and gynecology, geriatrics, and behavioral health. The goal of family practice is to provide high-quality, patient-centered care that meets the unique needs and preferences of each individual patient and their family.

Health services for Indigenous people refer to medical and healthcare provision that is specifically designed, delivered, and organized to meet the unique cultural, historical, and social needs of indigenous populations. These services aim to address the health disparities and inequalities that often exist between indigenous and non-indigenous populations. They are typically community-based and involve traditional healing practices, as well as modern medical interventions. Indigenous health services may also incorporate cultural safety training for healthcare providers to ensure respectful and appropriate care.

Home care services, also known as home health care, refer to a wide range of health and social services delivered at an individual's residence. These services are designed to help people who have special needs or disabilities, those recovering from illness or surgery, and the elderly or frail who require assistance with activities of daily living (ADLs) or skilled nursing care.

Home care services can include:

1. Skilled Nursing Care: Provided by registered nurses (RNs), licensed practical nurses (LPNs), or licensed vocational nurses (LVNs) to administer medications, wound care, injections, and other medical treatments. They also monitor the patient's health status, provide education on disease management, and coordinate with other healthcare professionals.
2. Therapy Services: Occupational therapists, physical therapists, and speech-language pathologists help patients regain strength, mobility, coordination, balance, and communication skills after an illness or injury. They develop personalized treatment plans to improve the patient's ability to perform daily activities independently.
3. Personal Care/Assistance with Activities of Daily Living (ADLs): Home health aides and personal care assistants provide assistance with bathing, dressing, grooming, toileting, and other personal care tasks. They may also help with light housekeeping, meal preparation, and shopping.
4. Social Work Services: Provided by licensed social workers who assess the patient's psychosocial needs, connect them to community resources, and provide counseling and support for patients and their families.
5. Nutritional Support: Registered dietitians evaluate the patient's nutritional status, develop meal plans, and provide education on special diets or feeding techniques as needed.
6. Telehealth Monitoring: Remote monitoring of a patient's health status using technology such as video conferencing, wearable devices, or mobile apps to track vital signs, medication adherence, and symptoms. This allows healthcare providers to monitor patients closely and adjust treatment plans as necessary without requiring in-person visits.
7. Hospice Care: End-of-life care provided in the patient's home to manage pain, provide emotional support, and address spiritual needs. The goal is to help the patient maintain dignity and quality of life during their final days.
8. Respite Care: Temporary relief for family caregivers who need a break from caring for their loved ones. This can include short-term stays in assisted living facilities or hiring professional caregivers to provide in-home support.

Women's health is a branch of healthcare that focuses on the unique health needs, conditions, and concerns of women throughout their lifespan. It covers a broad range of topics including menstruation, fertility, pregnancy, menopause, breast health, sexual health, mental health, and chronic diseases that are more common in women such as osteoporosis and autoimmune disorders. Women's health also addresses issues related to gender-based violence, socioeconomic factors, and environmental impacts on women's health. It is aimed at promoting and maintaining the physical, emotional, and reproductive well-being of women, and preventing and treating diseases and conditions that disproportionately affect them.

The term "Integrated Delivery of Healthcare" refers to a coordinated and seamless approach to providing healthcare services, where different providers and specialists work together to provide comprehensive care for patients. This model aims to improve patient outcomes by ensuring that all aspects of a person's health are addressed in a holistic and coordinated manner.

Integrated delivery of healthcare may involve various components such as:

1. Primary Care: A primary care provider serves as the first point of contact for patients and coordinates their care with other specialists and providers.
2. Specialty Care: Specialists provide care for specific medical conditions or diseases, working closely with primary care providers to ensure coordinated care.
3. Mental Health Services: Mental health providers work alongside medical professionals to address the mental and emotional needs of patients, recognizing that mental health is an essential component of overall health.
4. Preventive Care: Preventive services such as screenings, vaccinations, and health education are provided to help prevent illnesses and promote overall health and well-being.
5. Chronic Disease Management: Providers work together to manage chronic diseases such as diabetes, heart disease, and cancer, using evidence-based practices and coordinated care plans.
6. Health Information Technology: Electronic health records (EHRs) and other health information technologies are used to facilitate communication and coordination among providers, ensuring that all members of the care team have access to up-to-date patient information.
7. Patient Engagement: Patients are actively engaged in their care, with education and support provided to help them make informed decisions about their health and treatment options.

The goal of integrated delivery of healthcare is to provide high-quality, cost-effective care that meets the unique needs of each patient, while also improving overall population health.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but the term "Great Britain" is not a medical concept or condition. It is a geographical and political term referring to the largest island in the British Isles, on which the majority of England, Scotland, and Wales are located. It's also used to refer to the political union of these three countries, which is called the United Kingdom. Therefore, it doesn't have a medical definition.

I'm happy to help, but it seems there might be some confusion in your question. "Interviews" is a broad topic that isn't typically a medical term or subject. However, interviews can certainly be a part of medical settings and procedures, such as job interviews for healthcare positions, patient interviews during medical consultations, or research interviews in clinical studies.

In the context of medical education, an interview might refer to the process by which medical schools evaluate applicants for admission, known as the medical school interview. This is a critical component of the application process and typically involves one-on-one conversations between the applicant and an admissions committee member or a series of multiple mini-interviews (MMIs) with various evaluators.

If you could provide more context or clarify what you mean by "Interviews as Topic" in a medical setting, I'd be happy to help further!

Health plan implementation is not a medical term per se, but rather a term used in the context of healthcare management and administration. It refers to the process of putting into action the plans, strategies, and policies of a health insurance or healthcare benefit program. This includes activities such as:

1. Designing and structuring health benefits and coverage options
2. Developing provider networks and reimbursement rates
3. Establishing procedures for claims processing and utilization management
4. Implementing care management programs to improve health outcomes and reduce costs
5. Communicating the plan details to members and providers
6. Ensuring compliance with relevant laws, regulations, and accreditation standards

The goal of health plan implementation is to create a well-functioning healthcare benefit program that meets the needs of its members while managing costs and ensuring quality care.

Program Evaluation is a systematic and objective assessment of a healthcare program's design, implementation, and outcomes. It is a medical term used to describe the process of determining the relevance, effectiveness, and efficiency of a program in achieving its goals and objectives. Program evaluation involves collecting and analyzing data related to various aspects of the program, such as its reach, impact, cost-effectiveness, and quality. The results of program evaluation can be used to improve the design and implementation of existing programs or to inform the development of new ones. It is a critical tool for ensuring that healthcare programs are meeting the needs of their intended audiences and delivering high-quality care in an efficient and effective manner.

"World Health" is not a term that has a specific medical definition. However, it is often used in the context of global health, which can be defined as:

"The area of study, research and practice that places a priority on improving health and achieving equity in health for all people worldwide. It emphasizes trans-national health issues, determinants, and solutions; involves many disciplines within and beyond the health sciences and engages stakeholders from across sectors and societies." (World Health Organization)

Therefore, "world health" could refer to the overall health status and health challenges faced by populations around the world. It encompasses a broad range of factors that affect the health of individuals and communities, including social, economic, environmental, and political determinants. The World Health Organization (WHO) plays a key role in monitoring and promoting global health, setting international standards and guidelines, and coordinating responses to global health emergencies.

Health care rationing refers to the deliberate limitation or restriction of medical services, treatments, or resources provided to patients based on specific criteria or guidelines. These limitations can be influenced by various factors such as cost-effectiveness, scarcity of resources, evidence-based medicine, and clinical appropriateness. The primary goal of health care rationing is to ensure fair distribution and allocation of finite medical resources among a population while maximizing overall health benefits and minimizing harm.

Rationing can occur at different levels within the healthcare system, including individual patient care decisions, insurance coverage policies, and governmental resource allocation. Examples of rationing include prioritizing certain treatments based on their proven effectiveness, restricting access to high-cost procedures with limited clinical benefits, or setting age limits for specific interventions.

It is important to note that health care rationing remains a controversial topic due to ethical concerns about potential disparities in care and the balance between individual patient needs and societal resource constraints.

The Indian Health Service (IHS) is a federal health program within the United States Department of Health and Human Services. Its mission is to raise the physical, mental, social, and spiritual health of American Indians and Alaska Natives to the highest level. The IHS provides comprehensive health services through a network of hospitals, clinics, and health stations on or near reservations, as well as in urban areas. It also funds and supports health programs operated by tribes and tribal organizations. Services include medical and public health care, referrals for advanced care, community health education, and environmental health and sanitation services.

Oral health is the scientific term used to describe the overall health status of the oral and related tissues, including the teeth, gums, palate, tongue, and mucosal lining. It involves the absence of chronic mouth and facial pain, oral and pharyngeal (throat) cancers, oral soft tissue lesions, birth defects such as cleft lip and palate, and other diseases and disorders that affect the oral cavity.

Good oral health also means being free of decay, gum disease, and other oral infections that can damage the teeth, gums, and bones of the mouth. It is essential to maintain good oral hygiene through regular brushing, flossing, and dental check-ups to prevent dental caries (cavities) and periodontal disease (gum disease).

Additionally, oral health is closely linked to overall health and well-being. Poor oral health has been associated with various systemic diseases, including diabetes, cardiovascular disease, respiratory infections, and stroke. Therefore, maintaining good oral health can contribute to improved general health and quality of life.

The "attitude of health personnel" refers to the overall disposition, behavior, and approach that healthcare professionals exhibit towards their patients or clients. This encompasses various aspects such as:

1. Interpersonal skills: The ability to communicate effectively, listen actively, and build rapport with patients.
2. Professionalism: Adherence to ethical principles, confidentiality, and maintaining a non-judgmental attitude.
3. Compassion and empathy: Showing genuine concern for the patient's well-being and understanding their feelings and experiences.
4. Cultural sensitivity: Respecting and acknowledging the cultural backgrounds, beliefs, and values of patients.
5. Competence: Demonstrating knowledge, skills, and expertise in providing healthcare services.
6. Collaboration: Working together with other healthcare professionals to ensure comprehensive care for the patient.
7. Patient-centeredness: Focusing on the individual needs, preferences, and goals of the patient in the decision-making process.
8. Commitment to continuous learning and improvement: Staying updated with the latest developments in the field and seeking opportunities to enhance one's skills and knowledge.

A positive attitude of health personnel contributes significantly to patient satisfaction, adherence to treatment plans, and overall healthcare outcomes.

Logistic models, specifically logistic regression models, are a type of statistical analysis used in medical and epidemiological research to identify the relationship between the risk of a certain health outcome or disease (dependent variable) and one or more independent variables, such as demographic factors, exposure variables, or other clinical measurements.

In contrast to linear regression models, logistic regression models are used when the dependent variable is binary or dichotomous in nature, meaning it can only take on two values, such as "disease present" or "disease absent." The model uses a logistic function to estimate the probability of the outcome based on the independent variables.

Logistic regression models are useful for identifying risk factors and estimating the strength of associations between exposures and health outcomes, adjusting for potential confounders, and predicting the probability of an outcome given certain values of the independent variables. They can also be used to develop clinical prediction rules or scores that can aid in decision-making and patient care.

A mental disorder is a syndrome characterized by clinically significant disturbance in an individual's cognition, emotion regulation, or behavior. It's associated with distress and/or impaired functioning in social, occupational, or other important areas of life, often leading to a decrease in quality of life. These disorders are typically persistent and can be severe and disabling. They may be related to factors such as genetics, early childhood experiences, or trauma. Examples include depression, anxiety disorders, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and personality disorders. It's important to note that a diagnosis should be made by a qualified mental health professional.

Dental health services refer to medical care and treatment provided for the teeth and mouth. This can include preventative care, such as dental cleanings and exams, as well as restorative treatments like fillings, crowns, and root canals. Dental health services may also include cosmetic procedures, such as teeth whitening or orthodontic treatment to straighten crooked teeth. In addition to these services, dental health professionals may provide education on oral hygiene and the importance of maintaining good dental health. These services are typically provided by dentists, dental hygienists, and other dental professionals in a variety of settings, including private dental practices, community health clinics, and hospitals.

Insurance coverage, in the context of healthcare and medicine, refers to the financial protection provided by an insurance policy that covers all or a portion of the cost of medical services, treatments, and prescription drugs. The coverage is typically offered by health insurance companies, employers, or government programs such as Medicare and Medicaid.

The specific services and treatments covered by insurance, as well as the out-of-pocket costs borne by the insured individual, are determined by the terms of the insurance policy. These terms may include deductibles, copayments, coinsurance, and coverage limits or exclusions. The goal of insurance coverage is to help individuals manage the financial risks associated with healthcare expenses and ensure access to necessary medical services.

I apologize, but "Canada" is not a medical term or concept. It is a country located in North America, known for its vast wilderness, multicultural cities, and significant natural resources. If you have any questions related to healthcare or medical terms, I would be happy to help answer those!

Rural health is a branch of healthcare that focuses on the unique health challenges and needs of people living in rural areas. The World Health Organization (WHO) defines rural health as "the state of complete physical, mental and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity, in the rural population."

Rural populations often face disparities in healthcare access and quality compared to their urban counterparts. Factors such as geographic isolation, poverty, lack of transportation, and a shortage of healthcare providers can contribute to these disparities. Rural health encompasses a broad range of services, including primary care, prevention, chronic disease management, mental health, oral health, and emergency medical services.

The goal of rural health is to improve the health outcomes of rural populations by addressing these unique challenges and providing high-quality, accessible healthcare services that meet their needs. This may involve innovative approaches such as telemedicine, mobile health clinics, and community-based programs to reach people in remote areas.

In the context of medical terminology, "office visits" refer to patients' appointments or consultations with healthcare professionals in their respective offices or clinics. These visits may include various services such as physical examinations, diagnosis, treatment planning, prescribing medications, providing referrals, and offering counseling or education on health-related topics. Office visits can be for routine checkups, follow-up appointments, or addressing acute or chronic medical concerns. It is important to note that office visits do not include services provided in a hospital setting, emergency department, or other healthcare facilities.

Public health practice is a multidisciplinary approach that aims to prevent disease, promote health, and protect communities from harmful environmental and social conditions through evidence-based strategies, programs, policies, and interventions. It involves the application of epidemiological, biostatistical, social, environmental, and behavioral sciences to improve the health of populations, reduce health disparities, and ensure equity in health outcomes. Public health practice includes a wide range of activities such as disease surveillance, outbreak investigation, health promotion, community engagement, program planning and evaluation, policy analysis and development, and research translation. It is a collaborative and systems-based approach that involves partnerships with various stakeholders, including communities, healthcare providers, policymakers, and other organizations to achieve population-level health goals.

Prevalence, in medical terms, refers to the total number of people in a given population who have a particular disease or condition at a specific point in time, or over a specified period. It is typically expressed as a percentage or a ratio of the number of cases to the size of the population. Prevalence differs from incidence, which measures the number of new cases that develop during a certain period.

Regional health planning is a process that involves the systematic assessment, analysis, and prioritization of healthcare needs for a defined geographic population in a specific region. It aims to develop and implement strategies, programs, and services to address those needs in a coordinated and efficient manner. This collaborative approach often involves various stakeholders, such as healthcare providers, public health officials, community leaders, and advocates, working together to improve the overall health and well-being of the population in that region.

The medical definition of 'Regional Health Planning' can be outlined as follows:

1. Systematic assessment: A comprehensive evaluation of the healthcare needs, resources, and infrastructure within a specific region, taking into account demographic, epidemiological, and socioeconomic factors that influence health outcomes.
2. Analysis: The examination of data and information gathered during the assessment to identify gaps, priorities, and opportunities for improvement in healthcare services and delivery.
3. Prioritization: The process of ranking healthcare needs and issues based on their urgency, impact, and feasibility of intervention, to ensure that resources are allocated effectively and efficiently.
4. Strategy development: The creation of evidence-based, data-driven plans and interventions aimed at addressing the prioritized health needs and improving the overall health of the regional population.
5. Collaboration: The active engagement and partnership of various stakeholders, including healthcare providers, public health officials, community leaders, and advocates, in the planning, implementation, and evaluation of regional health initiatives.
6. Coordination: The alignment and integration of healthcare services, programs, and policies across different levels and sectors to ensure seamless care and avoid duplication of efforts.
7. Continuous improvement: The ongoing monitoring and evaluation of regional health programs and interventions to assess their effectiveness, make adjustments as needed, and incorporate new evidence and best practices into future planning efforts.

Occupational health is a branch of medicine that focuses on the physical, mental, and social well-being of workers in all types of jobs. The goal of occupational health is to prevent work-related injuries, illnesses, and disabilities, while also promoting the overall health and safety of employees. This may involve identifying and assessing potential hazards in the workplace, implementing controls to reduce or eliminate those hazards, providing education and training to workers on safe practices, and conducting medical surveillance and screenings to detect early signs of work-related health problems.

Occupational health also involves working closely with employers, employees, and other stakeholders to develop policies and programs that support the health and well-being of workers. This may include promoting healthy lifestyles, providing access to mental health resources, and supporting return-to-work programs for injured or ill workers. Ultimately, the goal of occupational health is to create a safe and healthy work environment that enables employees to perform their jobs effectively and efficiently, while also protecting their long-term health and well-being.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "poverty" is not a medical condition or term. It is a social condition defined by the World Bank as "pronounced deprivation in well-being," and measured through indicators such as income, consumption, and access to basic services. Poverty can have significant impacts on health outcomes and healthcare access, but it is not considered a medical diagnosis. If you have any questions related to health or medicine, I'd be happy to try my best to help answer them!

Health status disparities refer to differences in the health outcomes that are observed between different populations. These populations can be defined by various sociodemographic factors such as race, ethnicity, sex, gender identity, sexual orientation, age, disability, income, education level, and geographic location. Health status disparities can manifest as differences in rates of illness, disease prevalence or incidence, morbidity, mortality, access to healthcare services, and quality of care received. These disparities are often the result of systemic inequities and social determinants of health that negatively impact certain populations, leading to worse health outcomes compared to other groups. It is important to note that health status disparities are preventable and can be addressed through targeted public health interventions and policies aimed at reducing health inequities.

Quality Assurance in the context of healthcare refers to a systematic approach and set of activities designed to ensure that health care services and products consistently meet predetermined standards of quality and safety. It includes all the policies, procedures, and processes that are put in place to monitor, assess, and improve the quality of healthcare delivery.

The goal of quality assurance is to minimize variability in clinical practice, reduce medical errors, and ensure that patients receive evidence-based care that is safe, effective, timely, patient-centered, and equitable. Quality assurance activities may include:

1. Establishing standards of care based on best practices and clinical guidelines.
2. Developing and implementing policies and procedures to ensure compliance with these standards.
3. Providing education and training to healthcare professionals to improve their knowledge and skills.
4. Conducting audits, reviews, and evaluations of healthcare services and processes to identify areas for improvement.
5. Implementing corrective actions to address identified issues and prevent their recurrence.
6. Monitoring and measuring outcomes to evaluate the effectiveness of quality improvement initiatives.

Quality assurance is an ongoing process that requires continuous evaluation and improvement to ensure that healthcare delivery remains safe, effective, and patient-centered.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "England" is not a medical term or concept. It is one of the four constituent countries that make up the United Kingdom, along with Wales, Scotland, and Northern Ireland. England is located in the southern part of Great Britain, which is the largest island of the British Isles.

If you have any questions related to medicine or healthcare, I would be happy to try to help answer them for you!

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Ontario" is not a medical term. It is the name of a province in Canada, similar to how "California" is the name of a state in the United States. If you have any questions related to medical terminology or health conditions, I would be happy to try and help answer those for you!

Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM) is a medical approach that combines the best available scientific evidence with clinical expertise and patient values to make informed decisions about diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of diseases. It emphasizes the use of systematic research, including randomized controlled trials and meta-analyses, to guide clinical decision making. EBM aims to provide the most effective and efficient care while minimizing variations in practice, reducing errors, and improving patient outcomes.

Population surveillance in a public health and medical context refers to the ongoing, systematic collection, analysis, interpretation, and dissemination of health-related data for a defined population over time. It aims to monitor the health status, identify emerging health threats or trends, and evaluate the impact of interventions within that population. This information is used to inform public health policy, prioritize healthcare resources, and guide disease prevention and control efforts. Population surveillance can involve various data sources, such as vital records, disease registries, surveys, and electronic health records.

"California" is a geographical location and does not have a medical definition. It is a state located on the west coast of the United States, known for its diverse landscape including mountains, beaches, and forests. However, in some contexts, "California" may refer to certain medical conditions or situations that are associated with the state, such as:

* California encephalitis: a viral infection transmitted by mosquitoes that is common in California and other western states.
* California king snake: a non-venomous snake species found in California and other parts of the southwestern United States, which can bite and cause allergic reactions in some people.
* California roll: a type of sushi roll that originated in California and is made with avocado, cucumber, and crab meat, which may pose an allergy risk for some individuals.

It's important to note that these uses of "California" are not medical definitions per se, but rather descriptive terms that refer to specific conditions or situations associated with the state.

The Health Care Sector is a segment of the economy that includes companies and organizations that provide goods and services to treat patients with medical conditions, as well as those that work to maintain people's health through preventative care and health education. This sector includes hospitals, clinics, physician practices, dental practices, pharmacies, home health care agencies, nursing homes, laboratories, and medical device manufacturers, among others.

The Health Care Sector is often broken down into several subsectors, including:

1. Providers of healthcare services, such as hospitals, clinics, and physician practices.
2. Payers of healthcare costs, such as insurance companies and government agencies like Medicare and Medicaid.
3. Manufacturers of healthcare products, such as medical devices, pharmaceuticals, and biotechnology products.
4. Distributors of healthcare products, such as wholesalers and pharmacy benefit managers.
5. Providers of healthcare information technology, such as electronic health record systems and telemedicine platforms.

The Health Care Sector is a significant contributor to the economy in many countries, providing employment opportunities and contributing to economic growth. However, it also faces significant challenges, including rising costs, an aging population, and increasing demands for access to high-quality care.

Health resources refer to the personnel, facilities, equipment, and supplies that are used in the delivery of healthcare services. This includes:

1. Human resources: Healthcare professionals such as doctors, nurses, pharmacists, and allied health professionals.

2. Physical resources: Hospitals, clinics, laboratories, and other healthcare facilities.

3. Technological resources: Medical equipment and technology used for diagnosis and treatment, such as MRI machines, CT scanners, and electronic health records.

4. Financial resources: Funding for healthcare services, including public and private insurance, government funding, and out-of-pocket payments.

5. Informational resources: Research findings, evidence-based practices, and health education materials that inform healthcare decision-making.

The adequate availability, distribution, and utilization of these health resources are crucial for ensuring access to quality healthcare services and improving population health outcomes.

Ambulatory care is a type of health care service in which patients are treated on an outpatient basis, meaning they do not stay overnight at the medical facility. This can include a wide range of services such as diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up care for various medical conditions. The goal of ambulatory care is to provide high-quality medical care that is convenient, accessible, and cost-effective for patients.

Examples of ambulatory care settings include physician offices, community health centers, urgent care centers, outpatient surgery centers, and diagnostic imaging facilities. Patients who receive ambulatory care may have a variety of medical needs, such as routine checkups, chronic disease management, minor procedures, or same-day surgeries.

Overall, ambulatory care is an essential component of modern healthcare systems, providing patients with timely and convenient access to medical services without the need for hospitalization.

Breast self-examination (BSE) is a procedure in which an individual manually checks their own breasts for any changes or abnormalities. The goal of BSE is to detect breast cancer or other breast abnormalities as early as possible. It involves looking at and feeling the breasts for any lumps, thickenings, or other changes in size, shape, or appearance.

The American Cancer Society recommends that women become familiar with how their breasts normally look and feel and report any changes to their healthcare provider. However, they do not recommend regular monthly BSE as a routine screening tool for breast cancer, as it has not been shown to reduce the risk of dying from breast cancer or improve survival rates. Instead, they recommend regular mammograms and clinical breast exams as the most effective ways to detect breast cancer early.

It's important to note that while BSE can help women become more familiar with their breasts and detect changes early, it should not replace regular medical check-ups and mammograms. Any concerns or changes in the breasts should be reported to a healthcare provider as soon as possible for further evaluation.

I apologize for any confusion, but "Australia" is not a medical term or concept. It is the world's largest island and smallest continent, located in the Southern Hemisphere, surrounded by the Pacific and Indian Oceans. It is composed of many diverse ecosystems, including deserts, rainforests, and coastal areas, and is home to a wide variety of unique plant and animal species.

If you have any questions related to medical terminology or health-related topics, I would be happy to try and help answer them for you!

Community Health Centers (CHCs) are primary care facilities that provide comprehensive and culturally competent health services to medically underserved communities, regardless of their ability to pay. CHCs are funded through various sources, including the federal government's Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA). They aim to reduce health disparities and improve health outcomes for vulnerable populations by providing access to high-quality preventive and primary care services.

CHCs offer a range of services, such as medical, dental, and behavioral health care, as well as enabling services like case management, transportation, and language interpretation. They operate on a sliding fee scale basis, ensuring that patients pay based on their income and ability to pay. CHCs also engage in community outreach and education to promote health awareness and prevention.

Personal health services refer to healthcare services that are tailored to an individual's specific needs, preferences, and goals. These services can include preventive care, such as vaccinations and screenings, as well as medical treatments for acute and chronic conditions. Personal health services may be provided by a variety of healthcare professionals, including doctors, nurses, physician assistants, and allied health professionals.

The goal of personal health services is to promote the overall health and well-being of the individual, taking into account their physical, mental, emotional, and social needs. This approach recognizes that each person is unique and requires a customized plan of care to achieve their optimal health outcomes. Personal health services may be delivered in a variety of settings, including hospitals, clinics, private practices, and long-term care facilities.

A newborn infant is a baby who is within the first 28 days of life. This period is also referred to as the neonatal period. Newborns require specialized care and attention due to their immature bodily systems and increased vulnerability to various health issues. They are closely monitored for signs of well-being, growth, and development during this critical time.

Healthcare disparities refer to differences in the quality, accessibility, and outcomes of healthcare that are systematically related to social or economic disadvantage. These disparities may exist between different racial, ethnic, socioeconomic, gender, sexual orientation, geographic, or disability status groups. They can result from a complex interplay of factors including provider bias, patient-provider communication, health system policies, and structural racism, among others. Healthcare disparities often lead to worse health outcomes and reduced quality of life for disadvantaged populations.

Counseling is a therapeutic intervention that involves a trained professional working with an individual, family, or group to help them understand and address their problems, concerns, or challenges. The goal of counseling is to help the person develop skills, insights, and resources that will allow them to make positive changes in their thoughts, feelings, and behaviors, and improve their overall mental health and well-being.

Counseling can take many forms, depending on the needs and preferences of the individual seeking help. Some common approaches include cognitive-behavioral therapy, psychodynamic therapy, humanistic therapy, and solution-focused brief therapy. These approaches may be used alone or in combination with other interventions, such as medication or group therapy.

The specific goals and techniques of counseling will vary depending on the individual's needs and circumstances. However, some common objectives of counseling include:

* Identifying and understanding the underlying causes of emotional or behavioral problems
* Developing coping skills and strategies to manage stress, anxiety, depression, or other mental health concerns
* Improving communication and relationship skills
* Enhancing self-esteem and self-awareness
* Addressing substance abuse or addiction issues
* Resolving conflicts and making difficult decisions
* Grieving losses and coping with life transitions

Counseling is typically provided by licensed mental health professionals, such as psychologists, social workers, marriage and family therapists, and professional counselors. These professionals have completed advanced education and training in counseling techniques and theories, and are qualified to provide a range of therapeutic interventions to help individuals, families, and groups achieve their goals and improve their mental health.

Mammography is defined as a specialized medical imaging technique used to create detailed X-ray images of the breast tissue. It's primarily used as a screening tool to detect early signs of breast cancer in women who have no symptoms or complaints, as well as a diagnostic tool for further evaluation of abnormalities detected by other imaging techniques or during a clinical breast exam.

There are two primary types of mammography: film-screen mammography and digital mammography. Film-screen mammography uses traditional X-ray films to capture the images, while digital mammography utilizes digital detectors to convert X-rays into electronic signals, which are then displayed on a computer screen. Digital mammography offers several advantages over film-screen mammography, including lower radiation doses, improved image quality, and the ability to manipulate and enhance the images for better interpretation.

Mammography plays a crucial role in reducing breast cancer mortality by enabling early detection and treatment of this disease. Regular mammography screenings are recommended for women over a certain age (typically starting at age 40 or 50, depending on individual risk factors) to increase the chances of detecting breast cancer at an early stage when it is most treatable.

I am not a medical professional, but I can tell you that the term "contract services" is more commonly used in business and healthcare administration than in clinical medicine. It generally refers to an agreement between a healthcare provider or organization and another entity for the delivery of specific medical services over a defined period of time. The contract outlines the scope, expectations, and compensation for these services.

For example, a hospital may have a contract with a staffing agency to provide nursing personnel on a temporary basis. Or, an insurance company might have a contract with a network of healthcare providers to deliver medical care to their policyholders at agreed-upon rates. These arrangements can help ensure consistent quality and cost control in the delivery of healthcare services.

'Diagnostic tests, routine' is a medical term that refers to standard or commonly used tests that are performed to help diagnose, monitor, or manage a patient's health condition. These tests are typically simple, non-invasive, and safe, and they may be ordered as part of a regular check-up or when a patient presents with specific symptoms.

Routine diagnostic tests may include:

1. Complete Blood Count (CBC): A test that measures the number of red and white blood cells, platelets, and hemoglobin in the blood. It can help diagnose conditions such as anemia, infection, and inflammation.
2. Urinalysis: A test that examines a urine sample for signs of infection, kidney disease, or other medical conditions.
3. Blood Chemistry Tests: Also known as a chemistry panel or comprehensive metabolic panel, this test measures various chemicals in the blood such as glucose, electrolytes, and enzymes to evaluate organ function and overall health.
4. Electrocardiogram (ECG): A test that records the electrical activity of the heart, which can help diagnose heart conditions such as arrhythmias or heart attacks.
5. Chest X-ray: An imaging test that creates pictures of the structures inside the chest, including the heart, lungs, and bones, to help diagnose conditions such as pneumonia or lung cancer.
6. Fecal Occult Blood Test (FOBT): A test that checks for hidden blood in the stool, which can be a sign of colon cancer or other gastrointestinal conditions.
7. Pap Smear: A test that collects cells from the cervix to check for abnormalities that may indicate cervical cancer or other gynecological conditions.

These are just a few examples of routine diagnostic tests that healthcare providers may order. The specific tests ordered will depend on the patient's age, sex, medical history, and current symptoms.

"Age factors" refer to the effects, changes, or differences that age can have on various aspects of health, disease, and medical care. These factors can encompass a wide range of issues, including:

1. Physiological changes: As people age, their bodies undergo numerous physical changes that can affect how they respond to medications, illnesses, and medical procedures. For example, older adults may be more sensitive to certain drugs or have weaker immune systems, making them more susceptible to infections.
2. Chronic conditions: Age is a significant risk factor for many chronic diseases, such as heart disease, diabetes, cancer, and arthritis. As a result, age-related medical issues are common and can impact treatment decisions and outcomes.
3. Cognitive decline: Aging can also lead to cognitive changes, including memory loss and decreased decision-making abilities. These changes can affect a person's ability to understand and comply with medical instructions, leading to potential complications in their care.
4. Functional limitations: Older adults may experience physical limitations that impact their mobility, strength, and balance, increasing the risk of falls and other injuries. These limitations can also make it more challenging for them to perform daily activities, such as bathing, dressing, or cooking.
5. Social determinants: Age-related factors, such as social isolation, poverty, and lack of access to transportation, can impact a person's ability to obtain necessary medical care and affect their overall health outcomes.

Understanding age factors is critical for healthcare providers to deliver high-quality, patient-centered care that addresses the unique needs and challenges of older adults. By taking these factors into account, healthcare providers can develop personalized treatment plans that consider a person's age, physical condition, cognitive abilities, and social circumstances.

"Health manpower" is a term that refers to the number and type of healthcare professionals (such as doctors, nurses, allied health professionals, and support staff) who are available to provide healthcare services in a particular area or system. It's an important consideration in healthcare planning and policy, as the availability and distribution of health manpower can have a significant impact on access to care, quality of care, and health outcomes.

Therefore, medical definition of 'Health Manpower' could be: "The composition and distribution of healthcare professionals who are available to deliver healthcare services, including their skills, training, and experience. Health manpower is an essential component of healthcare systems and is influenced by factors such as population needs, workforce supply, and government policies."

'Government Financing' in the context of healthcare refers to the role of government in funding healthcare services, programs, and infrastructure. This can be achieved through various mechanisms such as:

1. Direct provision of healthcare services: The government operates and funds its own hospitals, clinics, and other healthcare facilities, where it employs healthcare professionals to deliver care.
2. Public insurance programs: The government establishes and manages health insurance programs, like Medicare and Medicaid in the United States, which provide coverage for specific populations and reimburse healthcare providers for services delivered to enrollees.
3. Tax subsidies and incentives: Governments may offer tax breaks or other financial incentives to encourage private investments in healthcare infrastructure, research, and development.
4. Grants and loans: Government agencies can provide funding to healthcare organizations, researchers, and educational institutions in the form of grants and loans for specific projects, programs, or initiatives.
5. Public-private partnerships (PPPs): Governments collaborate with private entities to jointly fund and manage healthcare services, facilities, or infrastructure projects.

Government financing plays a significant role in shaping healthcare systems and ensuring access to care for vulnerable populations. The extent of government involvement in financing varies across countries, depending on their political, economic, and social contexts.

Urban health is a branch of public health that focuses on the unique health challenges and disparities faced by urban populations. It encompasses the physical, mental, and social well-being of people living in urban areas, which are characterized by high population density, diverse cultural and socioeconomic backgrounds, and unique environmental exposures.

Urban health addresses a range of issues, including infectious diseases, chronic conditions, injuries, violence, and mental health disorders, as well as the social determinants of health such as housing, education, income, and access to healthcare services. It also considers the impact of urbanization on health, including the effects of pollution, noise, crowding, and lack of green spaces.

The goal of urban health is to promote health equity and improve the overall health outcomes of urban populations by addressing these challenges through evidence-based interventions, policies, and programs that are tailored to the unique needs of urban communities.

Community health planning is a systematic and continuous process that involves assessing the health needs and resources of a defined population, setting priorities for health improvement, and developing and implementing action plans to achieve those priorities. It is a collaborative effort between various stakeholders, including community members, healthcare providers, public health professionals, and other relevant organizations. The goal of community health planning is to improve the overall health and well-being of the community by addressing the social, environmental, and economic factors that impact health. This process typically involves the following steps:

1. Needs assessment: Identifying the health needs and priorities of the community through data collection and analysis, including demographic information, health status indicators, and healthcare utilization patterns.
2. Resource assessment: Identifying the available resources in the community, such as healthcare facilities, public health programs, and community-based organizations that can be leveraged to address the identified needs.
3. Priority setting: Determining the most pressing health issues that need to be addressed based on the needs and resource assessments. This involves engaging stakeholders in a participatory process to identify shared priorities.
4. Plan development: Developing an action plan that outlines specific strategies, activities, and timelines for addressing the identified priorities. The plan should also include indicators for measuring progress and evaluating outcomes.
5. Implementation: Putting the action plan into practice by engaging community members, healthcare providers, and other stakeholders in implementing the strategies and activities outlined in the plan.
6. Evaluation: Monitoring and evaluating the progress of the action plan to ensure that it is achieving the desired outcomes and making adjustments as needed.

Community health planning is an essential component of public health practice because it helps to ensure that resources are allocated effectively, priorities are aligned with community needs, and interventions are tailored to the unique characteristics of the population being served.

Physician-patient relations, also known as doctor-patient relationships, refer to the interaction and communication between healthcare professionals and their patients. This relationship is founded on trust, respect, and understanding, with the physician providing medical care and treatment based on the patient's needs and best interests. Effective physician-patient relations involve clear communication, informed consent, shared decision-making, and confidentiality. A positive and collaborative relationship can lead to better health outcomes, improved patient satisfaction, and increased adherence to treatment plans.

School health services refer to the health programs and services provided within schools by qualified healthcare professionals or specialists. These services aim to improve the overall well-being, academic success, and development of students by addressing both their physical and mental health needs. Examples of school health services include:

1. Health screenings: Routine vision, hearing, dental, and other health screenings to identify any potential issues early on.
2. Immunizations: Ensuring students are up-to-date with required immunizations and providing education about the importance of vaccinations.
3. Chronic disease management: Helping students manage chronic conditions such as asthma, diabetes, or epilepsy through individualized care plans and coordination with healthcare providers.
4. Mental health services: Providing counseling, therapy, and support for students dealing with emotional or behavioral challenges, including anxiety, depression, or trauma.
5. Health education: Teaching students about various health topics, such as nutrition, hygiene, sexual health, substance abuse prevention, and safety practices.
6. Case management: Coordinating care and providing resources for students with complex medical needs or social determinants of health challenges.
7. First aid and emergency care: Providing immediate medical attention in case of injuries or illnesses that occur during school hours.
8. Referrals to community resources: Connecting students and families with local healthcare providers, support services, and other resources as needed.

The goal of school health services is to create a safe, healthy, and supportive learning environment that promotes the overall well-being of all students.

Emigration is the process of leaving one's country of origin or habitual residence to settle in another country. It involves giving up the rights and privileges associated with citizenship in the country of origin and acquiring new rights and responsibilities as a citizen or resident of the destination country. Emigrants are people who choose to leave their native land to live elsewhere, often driven by factors such as economic opportunities, political instability, or conflict.

Immigration, on the other hand, is the process of entering and settling in a new country with the intention of becoming a permanent resident or citizen. Immigrants are individuals who come from another country to live in a new place, often seeking better job opportunities, education, or quality of life. They must comply with the immigration laws and regulations of the host country and may be required to undergo medical examinations, background checks, and other screening processes before being granted permission to enter and reside in the country.

In summary, emigration refers to leaving one's home country, while immigration refers to entering and settling in a new country.

Data collection in the medical context refers to the systematic gathering of information relevant to a specific research question or clinical situation. This process involves identifying and recording data elements, such as demographic characteristics, medical history, physical examination findings, laboratory results, and imaging studies, from various sources including patient interviews, medical records, and diagnostic tests. The data collected is used to support clinical decision-making, inform research hypotheses, and evaluate the effectiveness of treatments or interventions. It is essential that data collection is performed in a standardized and unbiased manner to ensure the validity and reliability of the results.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Urban Population" is not a medical term. It is a demographic term used to describe the portion of a country's population that lives in areas classified as urban. The United Nations defines an urban area as a city, town, or other agglomeration with a population of 20,000 or more. However, the specific definition can vary by country and organization.

In contrast, medical terms typically refer to conditions, diseases, symptoms, treatments, or healthcare-related concepts. If you have any questions related to health or medicine, I'd be happy to help if I can!

A chronic disease is a long-term medical condition that often progresses slowly over a period of years and requires ongoing management and care. These diseases are typically not fully curable, but symptoms can be managed to improve quality of life. Common chronic diseases include heart disease, stroke, cancer, diabetes, arthritis, and COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease). They are often associated with advanced age, although they can also affect children and younger adults. Chronic diseases can have significant impacts on individuals' physical, emotional, and social well-being, as well as on healthcare systems and society at large.

Environmental health is a branch of public health that focuses on the study of how environmental factors, including physical, chemical, and biological factors, impact human health and disease. It involves the assessment, control, and prevention of environmental hazards in order to protect and promote human health and well-being.

Environmental health encompasses a wide range of issues, such as air and water quality, food safety, waste management, housing conditions, occupational health and safety, radiation protection, and climate change. It also involves the promotion of healthy behaviors and the development of policies and regulations to protect public health from environmental hazards.

The goal of environmental health is to create safe and healthy environments that support human health and well-being, prevent disease and injury, and promote sustainable communities. This requires a multidisciplinary approach that involves collaboration between various stakeholders, including policymakers, researchers, healthcare providers, community organizations, and the public.

Patient education, as defined by the US National Library of Medicine's Medical Subject Headings (MeSH), is "the teaching or training of patients concerning their own health needs. It includes the patient's understanding of his or her condition and the necessary procedures for self, assisted, or professional care." This encompasses a wide range of activities and interventions aimed at helping patients and their families understand their medical conditions, treatment options, self-care skills, and overall health management. Effective patient education can lead to improved health outcomes, increased patient satisfaction, and better use of healthcare resources.

Qualitative research is a methodological approach in social sciences and healthcare research that focuses on understanding the meanings, experiences, and perspectives of individuals or groups within a specific context. It aims to gather detailed, rich data through various techniques such as interviews, focus groups, observations, and content analysis. The findings from qualitative research are typically descriptive and exploratory, providing insights into processes, perceptions, and experiences that may not be captured through quantitative methods.

In medical research, qualitative research can be used to explore patients' experiences of illness, healthcare providers' perspectives on patient care, or the cultural and social factors that influence health behaviors. It is often used in combination with quantitative methods to provide a more comprehensive understanding of complex health issues.

A rural population refers to people who live in areas that are outside of urban areas, typically defined as having fewer than 2,000 residents and lacking certain infrastructure and services such as running water, sewage systems, and paved roads. Rural populations often have less access to healthcare services, education, and economic opportunities compared to their urban counterparts. This population group can face unique health challenges, including higher rates of poverty, limited access to specialized medical care, and a greater exposure to environmental hazards such as agricultural chemicals and industrial pollutants.

An ethnic group is a category of people who identify with each other based on shared ancestry, language, culture, history, and/or physical characteristics. The concept of an ethnic group is often used in the social sciences to describe a population that shares a common identity and a sense of belonging to a larger community.

Ethnic groups can be distinguished from racial groups, which are categories of people who are defined by their physical characteristics, such as skin color, hair texture, and facial features. While race is a social construct based on physical differences, ethnicity is a cultural construct based on shared traditions, beliefs, and practices.

It's important to note that the concept of ethnic groups can be complex and fluid, as individuals may identify with multiple ethnic groups or switch their identification over time. Additionally, the boundaries between different ethnic groups can be blurred and contested, and the ways in which people define and categorize themselves and others can vary across cultures and historical periods.

'Student Health Services' is a department or facility within educational institutions, particularly colleges and universities, that provide primary care medical services to students. They are often staffed by healthcare professionals including physicians, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, nurses, and mental health counselors. The services offered may include diagnosis and treatment of acute and chronic illnesses, preventive care, immunizations, sexual health services, mental health counseling, and health education. Student Health Services aim to promote the overall well-being of students and help them maintain good health while pursuing their academic goals.

"Marketing of Health Services" refers to the application of marketing principles and strategies to promote, sell, and deliver health care services to individuals, families, or communities. This can include activities such as advertising, public relations, promotions, and sales to increase awareness and demand for health services, as well as researching and analyzing consumer needs and preferences to tailor health services to better meet those needs. The ultimate goal of marketing in health services is to improve access to and utilization of high-quality health care while maintaining ethical standards and ensuring patient satisfaction.

**Referral:**
A referral in the medical context is the process where a healthcare professional (such as a general practitioner or primary care physician) sends or refers a patient to another healthcare professional who has specialized knowledge and skills to address the patient's specific health condition or concern. This could be a specialist, a consultant, or a facility that provides specialized care. The referral may involve transferring the patient's care entirely to the other professional or may simply be for a consultation and advice.

**Consultation:**
A consultation in healthcare is a process where a healthcare professional seeks the opinion or advice of another professional regarding a patient's medical condition. This can be done in various ways, such as face-to-face meetings, phone calls, or written correspondence. The consulting professional provides their expert opinion to assist in the diagnosis, treatment plan, or management of the patient's condition. The ultimate decision and responsibility for the patient's care typically remain with the referring or primary healthcare provider.

A needs assessment in a medical context is the process of identifying and evaluating the health needs of an individual, population, or community. It is used to determine the resources, services, and interventions required to address specific health issues and improve overall health outcomes. This process often involves collecting and analyzing data on various factors such as demographics, prevalence of diseases, access to healthcare, and social determinants of health. The goal of a needs assessment is to ensure that resources are allocated effectively and efficiently to meet the most pressing health needs and priorities.

Medical Definition:

"Risk factors" are any attribute, characteristic or exposure of an individual that increases the likelihood of developing a disease or injury. They can be divided into modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors. Modifiable risk factors are those that can be changed through lifestyle choices or medical treatment, while non-modifiable risk factors are inherent traits such as age, gender, or genetic predisposition. Examples of modifiable risk factors include smoking, alcohol consumption, physical inactivity, and unhealthy diet, while non-modifiable risk factors include age, sex, and family history. It is important to note that having a risk factor does not guarantee that a person will develop the disease, but rather indicates an increased susceptibility.

The Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) is not a medical term per se, but it is a public health surveillance system that collects state data on preventive health practices and risk behaviors linked to chronic diseases, injuries, and preventable infectious diseases. It is operated by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in collaboration with state health departments.

The BRFSS survey includes a standardized questionnaire that gathers information on various health-related behaviors, such as tobacco use, alcohol consumption, physical activity, dietary habits, sexual behavior, and use of preventive services like cancer screenings and vaccinations. The system also collects data on demographic characteristics, including age, sex, race/ethnicity, education level, and income.

The BRFSS survey is conducted via telephone interviews with a representative sample of non-institutionalized adults aged 18 years and older in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, and U.S. territories. The data collected through this system are used to monitor trends in health-related behaviors over time, identify populations at high risk for chronic diseases and injuries, develop and evaluate public health interventions, and set priorities for public health action.

The World Health Organization (WHO) is not a medical condition or term, but rather a specialized agency of the United Nations responsible for international public health. Here's a brief description:

The World Health Organization (WHO) is a specialized agency of the United Nations that acts as the global authority on public health issues. Established in 1948, WHO's primary role is to coordinate and collaborate with its member states to promote health, prevent diseases, and ensure universal access to healthcare services. WHO is headquartered in Geneva, Switzerland, and has regional offices around the world. It plays a crucial role in setting global health standards, monitoring disease outbreaks, and providing guidance on various public health concerns, including infectious diseases, non-communicable diseases, mental health, environmental health, and maternal, newborn, child, and adolescent health.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but the term "Private Sector" is not a medical definition. It is an economic and sociopolitical term that refers to businesses and organizations which are not owned or controlled by the government. They can be privately owned and operated for profit, such as corporations, partnerships, and sole proprietorships, or they can be non-profit organizations, such as charities and advocacy groups. The private sector is distinct from the "Public Sector," which includes entities that are owned and controlled by the government, like public schools, hospitals, and other services provided by the state.

Preventive dentistry is a branch of dental medicine that focuses on preventing the occurrence or progression of oral diseases and maintaining optimal oral health. It encompasses a set of practices, behaviors, and interventions aimed at preserving the integrity and functionality of teeth and gums through early detection, intervention, and patient education.

The primary goal of preventive dentistry is to minimize the risk of dental caries (tooth decay), periodontal disease (gum disease), oral cancer, and other oral health conditions. This is achieved through a combination of professional dental care, personal oral hygiene habits, and lifestyle modifications.

Professional dental care includes regular dental examinations, cleanings, fluoride treatments, and sealants to protect tooth surfaces from decay. Patient education plays a crucial role in preventive dentistry, as it empowers individuals to take an active part in their oral health by teaching them proper brushing and flossing techniques, nutritional counseling, and the importance of regular dental visits.

Preventive dentistry also emphasizes the significance of risk assessment and early intervention for high-risk populations, such as children, elderly individuals, and those with medical conditions that may impact oral health. By promoting a proactive approach to dental care, preventive dentistry aims to improve overall quality of life, reduce healthcare costs, and enhance patient satisfaction.

"Focus groups" is a term from the field of social science research, rather than medicine. It does not have a specific medical definition. However, focus groups are sometimes used in medical research to gather data and insights from a small group of people on a specific topic or product. This can include gathering feedback on patient experiences, testing prototypes of medical devices or treatments, or exploring attitudes and perceptions related to health issues. The goal is to gain a deeper understanding of the perspectives and needs of the target population through facilitated group discussion.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "life style" is not a term that has a specific medical definition. It generally refers to the way an individual or group lives, including their habits, behaviors, and preferences in areas such as diet, exercise, recreation, and stress management. Some lifestyle factors can have a significant impact on health outcomes and risk for certain diseases. However, it is not a medical term with a specific clinical meaning.

Emergency Medical Services (EMS) is a system that provides immediate and urgent medical care, transportation, and treatment to patients who are experiencing an acute illness or injury that poses an immediate threat to their health, safety, or life. EMS is typically composed of trained professionals, such as emergency medical technicians (EMTs), paramedics, and first responders, who work together to assess a patient's condition, administer appropriate medical interventions, and transport the patient to a hospital or other medical facility for further treatment.

The goal of EMS is to quickly and effectively stabilize patients in emergency situations, prevent further injury or illness, and ensure that they receive timely and appropriate medical care. This may involve providing basic life support (BLS) measures such as cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), controlling bleeding, and managing airway obstructions, as well as more advanced interventions such as administering medications, establishing intravenous lines, and performing emergency procedures like intubation or defibrillation.

EMS systems are typically organized and managed at the local or regional level, with coordination and oversight provided by public health agencies, hospitals, and other healthcare organizations. EMS providers may work for private companies, non-profit organizations, or government agencies, and they may be dispatched to emergencies via 911 or other emergency response systems.

In summary, Emergency Medical Services (EMS) is a critical component of the healthcare system that provides urgent medical care and transportation to patients who are experiencing acute illnesses or injuries. EMS professionals work together to quickly assess, stabilize, and transport patients to appropriate medical facilities for further treatment.

Patient satisfaction is a concept in healthcare quality measurement that reflects the patient's perspective and evaluates their experience with the healthcare services they have received. It is a multidimensional construct that includes various aspects such as interpersonal mannerisms of healthcare providers, technical competence, accessibility, timeliness, comfort, and communication.

Patient satisfaction is typically measured through standardized surveys or questionnaires that ask patients to rate their experiences on various aspects of care. The results are often used to assess the quality of care provided by healthcare organizations, identify areas for improvement, and inform policy decisions. However, it's important to note that patient satisfaction is just one aspect of healthcare quality and should be considered alongside other measures such as clinical outcomes and patient safety.

Educational status refers to the level or stage of education that a person has reached. It can be used to describe an individual's educational background, achievements, and qualifications. Educational status can be categorized in various ways, including by level (e.g., elementary school, high school, college, graduate school), years of schooling completed, or type of degree earned (e.g., bachelor's, master's, doctoral).

In medical settings, educational status may be used as a demographic variable to describe the characteristics of a patient population or to identify potential disparities in health outcomes based on education level. Research has shown that higher levels of education are often associated with better health outcomes, including lower rates of chronic diseases and improved mental health. Therefore, understanding a patient's educational status can help healthcare providers tailor their care and education strategies to meet the unique needs and challenges of each individual.

"Forms and Records Control" is not a recognized medical term or concept. However, in a broader healthcare context, "Records Control" typically refers to the systematic management and maintenance of patient records to ensure their accuracy, confidentiality, and accessibility. This includes establishing policies and procedures for creating, storing, retrieving, using, and disposing of records in compliance with applicable laws and regulations.

"Forms," on the other hand, are standardized documents used in healthcare settings to collect and record patient information. "Forms Control" may refer to the management and tracking of these forms to ensure they are up-to-date, compliant with relevant regulations, and accessible to authorized personnel. This can include developing and implementing processes for creating, revising, approving, distributing, and retiring healthcare forms.

In summary, "Forms and Records Control" in a healthcare context could be interpreted as the combined management of standardized forms used to collect patient information and the systematic maintenance of those records to ensure accuracy, confidentiality, and compliance with applicable laws and regulations.

"Family Physicians" are medical doctors who provide comprehensive primary care to individuals and families of all ages. They are trained to diagnose and treat a wide range of medical conditions, from minor illnesses to complex diseases. In addition to providing acute care, family physicians also focus on preventive medicine, helping their patients maintain their overall health and well-being through regular checkups, screenings, and immunizations. They often serve as the patient's main point of contact within the healthcare system, coordinating care with specialists and other healthcare professionals as needed. Family physicians may work in private practices, community health centers, hospitals, or other healthcare settings.

"Professional Practice Location" is a term commonly used in the medical field to refer to the specific geographic location where a healthcare professional, such as a doctor or nurse, practices their profession. This can include a hospital, clinic, private practice, or other healthcare facility. The professional practice location is often considered when evaluating a healthcare provider's qualifications and experience, as well as when determining issues such as licensing and reimbursement for medical services. It may also be relevant in the context of malpractice claims, as the standard of care that a provider is expected to meet can vary based on their professional practice location.

A Public Sector, in the context of healthcare, refers to the portion of a country's health system that is managed and funded by the government. This sector provides medical services through state-owned hospitals, clinics, and other healthcare facilities, as well as through publicly financed programs such as Medicare and Medicaid in the United States or the National Health Service (NHS) in the United Kingdom. The public sector aims to ensure that all citizens have access to necessary medical care, regardless of their ability to pay. It is often funded through taxes and is accountable to the public for its performance.

Practice guidelines, also known as clinical practice guidelines, are systematically developed statements that aim to assist healthcare professionals and patients in making informed decisions about appropriate health care for specific clinical circumstances. They are based on a thorough evaluation of the available scientific evidence, consensus of expert opinion, and consideration of patient preferences. Practice guidelines can cover a wide range of topics, including diagnosis, management, prevention, and treatment options for various medical conditions. They are intended to improve the quality and consistency of care, reduce unnecessary variations in practice, and promote evidence-based medicine. However, they should not replace clinical judgment or individualized patient care.

Cost-benefit analysis (CBA) is a systematic process used to compare the costs and benefits of different options to determine which one provides the greatest net benefit. In a medical context, CBA can be used to evaluate the value of medical interventions, treatments, or policies by estimating and monetizing all the relevant costs and benefits associated with each option.

The costs included in a CBA may include direct costs such as the cost of the intervention or treatment itself, as well as indirect costs such as lost productivity or time away from work. Benefits may include improved health outcomes, reduced morbidity or mortality, and increased quality of life.

Once all the relevant costs and benefits have been identified and quantified, they are typically expressed in monetary terms to allow for a direct comparison. The option with the highest net benefit (i.e., the difference between total benefits and total costs) is considered the most cost-effective.

It's important to note that CBA has some limitations and can be subject to various biases and assumptions, so it should be used in conjunction with other evaluation methods to ensure a comprehensive understanding of the value of medical interventions or policies.

I must clarify that I'm a helpful assistant and not a doctor, but I can tell you that 'politics' is not a term used in medicine. Politics refers to the activities associated with the governance of a country or area, especially the debate or conflict among individuals or groups having or hoping to achieve power. If you have any medical questions, feel free to ask!

I'm not aware of any medical definition for the term "Boston." It is a city in the state of Massachusetts, USA, and is widely known for its cultural institutions, such as Boston Symphony Orchestra, Boston Ballet, and The Museum of Fine Arts. Additionally, it is home to many renowned medical institutions, including Massachusetts General Hospital, Brigham and Women's Hospital, and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. However, "Boston" does not have a specific meaning or definition in the medical field.

Reproductive health, as defined by the World Health Organization (WHO), is "a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being in all matters relating to the reproductive system and its functions and processes. It implies that people are able to have a satisfying and safe sex life, the capability to reproduce, and the freedom to decide if, when, and how often to do so. It also includes their right to access information and services that enable them to do this."

This definition emphasizes not only the biological aspects of reproduction but also the social and personal dimensions of sexuality and reproductive health. It recognizes that individuals have the right to make informed choices about their reproductive lives, and it highlights the importance of access to information and services in realizing these rights.

A vaginal smear, also known as a Pap test or Pap smear, is a medical procedure in which a sample of cells is collected from the cervix (the lower part of the uterus that opens into the vagina) and examined under a microscope. The purpose of this test is to detect abnormal cells, including precancerous changes, that may indicate the presence of cervical cancer or other conditions such as infections or inflammation.

During the procedure, a speculum is inserted into the vagina to allow the healthcare provider to visualize the cervix. A spatula or brush is then used to gently scrape cells from the surface of the cervix. The sample is spread onto a microscope slide and sent to a laboratory for analysis.

Regular Pap smears are recommended for women as part of their routine healthcare, as they can help detect abnormalities at an early stage when they are more easily treated. The frequency of Pap smears may vary depending on age, medical history, and other factors. It is important to follow the recommendations of a healthcare provider regarding the timing and frequency of Pap smears.

... the Guide to Clinical Preventive Services. In July 1990, the Department of Health and Human Services reconstituted the Task ... "Grade Definitions". US Preventive Services Task Force. "USPSTF A and B Recommendations by Date". US Preventive Services Task ... US Preventive Services Task Force (November 2009). "Screening for breast cancer: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force ... Preventive Services Task Force works". Reuters - via Yahoo News. "Methods and Processes". US Preventive Services Task Force. ...
The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force has categorized and rated preventive health services as either A or B, as to which ... Not only has the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force provided graded preventive health services that are appropriate for ... Furthermore, preventive health services are often described as one entity though they comprise a myriad of different services, ... Preventive care can lead to improved health outcomes and cost savings potential. Services such as health assessments/screenings ...
Occupational Safety and Health; Preventive Services; Trade Secrets and Unfair Competition; Wage and Hour Law. The firm has ...
... preventive care and health education for all ages and both sexes. Secondary care medical services are provided by medical ... biostatistics and health services. environmental health, community health, behavioral health, and occupational health are also ... Applications of the public health system include the areas of maternal and child health, health services administration, ... Public health branch focused on environmental impacts on human health Healing - Process of the restoration of health Health ...
Sacramento, California: State of California Department of Health Services, Center for Health Statistics. "Elizabeth D. Sherwood ... After departing public service, she became a founding principal of the Harvard-Stanford Preventive Defense Project from 1997- ... "Preventive Defense Project". cisac.fsi.stanford.edu. Retrieved October 26, 2022. Sanger, David E. (July 8, 2014). "Obama to ... From 1997 to 2008, she was a Founding Principal of the Harvard-Stanford Preventive Defense Project. She was also a Senior ...
b. Personnel Services Support. (1) Method of marking and handling EPWs. (2) Religious Services. c. Army Health System Support ... 4) Preventive Medicine. a. Command. (1) Location of Commander. (2) Succession of Command. b. Control. (1) Command Posts. (2) ... formerly Service and Support, currently referred to as Admin & Logistics by the US Marine Corps), and Command and Control. ...
... (HOPE) is a Pakistan NGO which provides the poor with service in the sectors of health and ... For the health care services, HOPE runs several medical centers, providing primary health care services for those who cannot ... Some other services are also involved: nutrition support for malnourished mothers and children, distribution of water-purifying ... Official website (Medical and health organisations based in Pakistan, Organisations based in Karachi, Child-related ...
It offers its continual health services to the population living in the municipalities of: Kočani, Češinovo-Obleševo, Zrnovci ... Children's health preventive department; General Surgery department; KARIL, Gynaecology and Midwifery with new-born children's ... The Hospital was founded in 1924 as a Health Centre for malaria. In 1949 General and Dental ambulances were built and in 1952 ... Its specialist-consultative services the Hospital has been offered in the following ambulances and departments: Ophthalmology ...
Connecting the population to needed health and social services that support the whole person, including preventive services ... "Applying Health Services Research to Public Health Practice: An Emerging Priority". Health Services Research. 44 (5p2): 1775- ... Bringing the essential public health services to life. J Public Health Manag Pract. 2021; 27(1):97-98. Public Health National ... 10 Essential Public Health Services Futures Initiative Task Force. 10 Essential Public Health Services. September 9, 2020. ...
To provide curative health care at primary, secondary and tertiary level. To provide preventive health care. To provide ... It is an organized service like administrative services or engineering services. The officers of this service are responsible ... The Indian Railway Health Service (IRHS) is an organized central Group A civil service of the Government of India under ... The Indian Railway Medical Service (IRMS) has been renamed as Indian Railway Health Service (IRHS) from 15 January 2020 because ...
Department of Health and Human Services. Archived from the original on 16 May 2016. Retrieved 20 February 2016. World Health ... The Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) Study". American Journal of Preventive Medicine. 14 (4): 245-58. doi:10.1016/S0749-3797 ... Department of Health and Human Services. Children's Bureau. "The federal government has one main law to prevent child abuse. No ... Child Maltreatment 2008 Archived 5 July 2010 at the Wayback Machine, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, p. 55. " ...
"Cost-Effectiveness of Gargling for the Prevention of Upper Respiratory Tract Infections". BMC Health Services Research. 2008 (8 ... "Prevention of Upper Respiratory Infections by Gargling: A Randomized Trial". American Journal of Preventive Medicine. 2005 (29 ...
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, National Institutes of health. "Surgery as a Preventive measure". National Cancer ... U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, National Institutes of Health. "NCI Dictionary of Cancer Terms". National Cancer ... Under the context of preventive surgery, depending on the stage of the illness or whether the patient has had an illness a ... Prophylactic surgery (also known as preventive surgery or risk-reducing surgery), is a form of surgery whose purpose is to ...
"Health Services Management in Turkey: Failure or Success?". International Journal of Preventive Medicine. 10: 30. doi:10.4103/ ... Both the National Health Plan and the National Health Program were aimed to provide health insurance to citizens for a fee, ... The "First 10-Year National Health Plan", the first written health plan of Turkey, was adopted at the Supreme Health Council in ... The Maternal and Child Health Section was established at the Ministry of Health in 1952. A Maternal and Child Health ...
... is a branch of medicine dealing with providing health services in areas of prevention, promotion ... While other fields of medicines deal with individual health, preventive medicines deal with community health. Preventive and ... preventive and promotion in the field of health sector. Preventive and social medicine has been designed at the community level ... Manage and assess health related to environmental or occupational factors. The field of preventive medicine covers a wide range ...
Principal health psychologist: A principal health psychologist could, for example lead the health psychology service within one ... Belloc, N., & Breslow, L. (1972). Relationship of physical health status and health practices. Preventive Medicine, 1(3), 409- ... Consultant health psychologist: A consultant health psychologist will take a lead for health psychology within public health, ... health. Health psychologists take a biopsychosocial approach. In other words, health psychologists understand health to be the ...
Strategic objective C.2. Strengthen preventive programmes that promote women's health. Actions to be taken. Strategic objective ... and adequate health care services are essential to achieve the goals set out in Mexico. The third world conference on women was ... health-care services that respond to their needs, and their equal participation in political life and decision-making in all ... a selection of 200 works adorned the walls of the art gallery at the United States Department of Health and Human Services in ...
Preventive Services Task Force suggests providers especially regularly screen women of childbearing age for IPV. The best care ... VA also provides some home health care through its Skilled Home Health Care Services (SHHC) and Homemakers and Home Health Aide ... mental health services, travel and lodging reimbursement, and access to health insurance if they are not already under a health ... Mental health services in 2006 were evaluated as a part of the Mental Health Strategic Plan. The report concluded: "Quality of ...
Women's Preventive Services Guidelines HRSA, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services "Women's Preventive Services Coverage ... Health and Human Services (February 10, 2012). "Group Health Plans and Health Insurance Issuers Relating to Coverage of ... H.R. 3590 Enrolled, section 1001 (adding section 2714 to the Public Health Service Act): "A group health plan and a health ... laboratory services; preventive and wellness services and chronic disease management; and pediatric services, including oral ...
... for services to Pacific health and tertiary education. "Department of Preventive and Social Medicine staff profiles". www.otago ... Sopoaga serves as Health Advisor for the New Zealand High Commission in Samoa and has assisted in the establishment of a ... She intended to return to Samoa after completing her studies, however due to an underlying health issue, Sopoaga was advised to ... She completed a PhD in 2021 with a thesis titled "Folauga" - Pacific health, well-being and success in higher education. ...
United States Department of Health and Human Services. National Cancer Institute at the National Institutes of Health. 25 ... European Journal of Preventive Cardiology. 23 (18): 1970-1981. doi:10.1177/2047487316654026. ISSN 2047-4873. PMID 27256827. ... Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. PMID 28636307. {{cite journal}}: Cite journal requires ,journal= ( ... The World Health Organization has classified smokeless tobacco products as human carcinogenic compounds, in particular tobacco- ...
For services to Public Health. Simon William Geoffrey Jenkin. For services to Education. John Peter Jenkins. For services to ... For services to Preventive Medicine. Edna Chivers-Beesley, Senior Civil Servant, Ministry of Defence. Rekha Bhakoo, Headteacher ... For services to Animal Welfare. Francis Patrick Rocks, Health Service Manager, Mid-Ulster. For services to the community in ... Trevor Butler Vaughan, Service Awards Manager, London Ambulance Service NHS Trust. For services to Health and to the Police. ...
... and preventive, promotive as well as curative health services. Tanzania's average annual rate of reduction of child mortality ... Many health problems in pregnant women can be prevented, detected, and treated during antenatal care visits with trained health ... The World Health Organization recommends a minimum of four antenatal care (ANC) visits. The Tanzania Demographic and Health ... Given the absence of PNC guidelines in Tanzania, the Reproductive and Child Health Section (RCHS) of the Ministry of Health and ...
Cleland K, Peipert JF, Westhoff C, Spear S, Trussell J (May 2011). "Family planning as a cost-saving preventive health service ... Title X of the Public Health Service Act, is a US government program dedicated to providing family planning services for those ... Such services helped women prevent an estimated 1.94 million unintended pregnancies and 810,000 abortions. More than 3 out of ... But funding for Title X as a percentage of total public funding to family planning client services has steadily declined from ...
... and preventive, promotive as well as curative health services. Tanzania's average annual rate of reduction of child mortality ... Many health problems in pregnant women can be prevented, detected and treated during antenatal care visits with trained health ... Given the absence of PNC guidelines in Tanzania, the Reproductive and Child Health Section (RCHS) of the Ministry of Health and ... Similarly, in an effort to improve maternal and child health, Tanzania's government has declared maternal and child health ...
Cleland K, Peipert JF, Westhoff C, Spear S, Trussell J (May 2011). "Family planning as a cost-saving preventive health service ... eds.). Pharmacology for Health in Asia : Proceedings of Asian Congress of Pharmacology, 15-19 January 1985, New Delhi, India. ... "Contraception , Reproductive Health , CDC". www.cdc.gov. 2020-08-13. Retrieved 2021-11-18. "Copper IUD (ParaGard) - Mayo Clinic ... Contraception saves money for the public health system and insurers.[relevant?] Failure rates may be calculated by either the ...
Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health home page. School of Medicine. University of Navarra The SUN cohort study ... U.S. Department of Health & Human Services (9 August 2016). "The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Workshop: "Toward ... of the Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health at University of Navarra at the Medical School. He was also the ... He is the co-PI together with Frank B. Hu of two on-going grants funded by the US National Institutes of Health (NIH). In 2022 ...
"Pregnancy Health: Exercise Programs to Prevent Gestational Hypertension". The Guide to Community Preventive Services (The ... Maternal health care and care of the fetus starts with prenatal health. The World Health Organization suggests that the first ... Maternal health is the health of women during pregnancy, childbirth, and the postpartum period. In most cases, maternal health ... Division of Reproductive Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, U.S. Department of Health ...
... outpatient and preventive healthcare services. In addition, the hospital offers free educational health programs, seminars, and ... General services include general medical, surgical, obstetrical and gynecological care. Specialized services include cardiology ... UNC Lenoir Health Care is a not-for-profit hospital located in Kinston, North Carolina. The hospital is licensed for 261 beds ...
Mental health services in Egypt 1920 to 1990. Read at the Regional WPA symposium, Budapest, May 1991. 130. Mental health ... Issues in Preventive Psychiatry" (Prevention of Deontological Mistakes: The Role of Ethical Codes) Eds. G.N. Christodoulou, D. ... Mental Health services in the Arab world. Eastern Mediterranean Health Journal, Vol. 5, No.2, 1999 201. Prevention of ... Mental Health Services in the Arab World. World Psychiatry, 2012, 11; 52-54 277. Quality of Life and Personality Dimensions in ...
"Recognized Leader in Health Disparities Veronica Mallett, MD to Join The More in Common Alliance". Primarily Caring. 2 (2): 8. ... 2023-06-09). "Lifetime Interpersonal Violence or Abuse and Diabetes Rates by Sex and Race". American Journal of Preventive ... 2023-01-11). "Association of Psychosocial Factors on COVID-19 Testing among YWCA Service Recipients". International Journal of ... "Health-Related Quality of Life in Women Before Surgical Treatment for Stress Urinary Incontinence". Journal of Pelvic Medicine ...
... and TB preventive services without copayment, co-insurance, or deductible. ... New private health plans and Medicare are required to cover certain HIV/AIDS, viral hepatitis, STD, ... Coverage of Certain Preventive Services Under the Affordable Care Act; U.S. Department of Health & Human Services. July 2015 ... Non-grandfathered private health insurance plans -Section 2713 of the Public Health Service (PHS) Act, as added by the ...
For adults, the required services are recommended by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF), the Advisory Committee ... requires new private health insurance plans to cover many recommended preventive services without any patient cost-sharing. ... www.kff.org/report-section/preventive-service-tracker-health-promotion/ class=see-more light-beige no-float inline-readmore, ... and the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) based on recommendations issued by the,span class=readmore- ...
... www.kff.org/report-section/preventive-service-tracker-sexual-health/ ... The independent source for health policy research, polling, and news, KFF is a nonprofit organization based in San Francisco, ... Preventive Service Tracker - Sexual Health. Preventive Service Tracker - Sexual Health. Published: Sep 21, 2023 ...
... preventive health care service - Featured Topics from the National Center for Health Statistics ... A Blog of the National Center for Health Statistics - ... National Mens Health Week, preventive health care service ... Marriage, Cohabitation, and Mens Use of Preventive Health Care Services. In honor of National Mens Health Week and Fathers ... Tags health care visit, health insurance, health insurance coverage, married men, ...
Priorities for Americas health: capitalizing on life-saving, cost-effective preventive services [presentation] Presentation ...
147.130 Coverage of preventive health services.. (a) Services-(1) In general. Beginning at the time described in paragraph (b) ... 3) Rapid coverage of preventive services for coronavirus. In the case of a qualifying coronavirus preventive service described ... or setting for coverage of a recommended preventive health service. (5) Services not described. Nothing in this section ... providing that these rules regarding coverage of preventive health services do not apply to grandfathered health plans). ...
... offering tertiary healthcare service & technologies for outpatient & inpatient. ... The screening services includes physical examinations and consultation by Wellness doctors, lab tests, ECG, Stress ECG, ... We also provide consultation and screening services to corporates, on such as on-site screening for blood test screening, lead ... We provide a one-stop health screening centre by offering medical advices in a comfortable environment with comprehensive range ...
... mental health interventions are summarized here. The following six preventive services are recommended for consideration by ... Sharon Dorfman (au). A review of the literature on preventive interventions to promote mental health, & on the use of tobacco, ... counseling for smokers, especially those who are pregnant; targeted short-term mental health therapy; self-care educ. for ... 54 articles from 1964 to 1999 that demonstrate positive outcomes from preventive substance abuse & ...
The ACA Preventive Services Coverage Requirement. Under the ACA, most insured and self-insured group health plans are required ... Practically, most group health plan sponsors will be unlikely to scale back coverage for preventive services in any meaningful ... United States: Federal Court Blocks Enforcement Of Some Aca Preventive Health Service Requirements: What Plan Sponsors Should ... The court also concluded that the preventive health services requirement to cover PrEP (with antiretroviral therapy for people ...
... and incentives on the take-up of preventive health services by black men. ... Matching Provider Race to Increase Take-up of Preventive Health Services among Black Men in the United States Researchers:. ... For Black men, seeing a Black male doctor significantly boosted demand for all preventive health services, and especially for ... The participant was then shown a list of services and told that their assigned doctor would provide all preventive services ...
Information about womens health services covered with Molina Healthcare benefits, including pregnancy care, birth control, ... To learn more about womens preventive services, read our Member Handbook.. Benefits & Rewards. Did you know that you can get ... Please call Member Services at (800) 578-0603 to learn more about this service or for a referral. TTY for Deaf and Hard of ... You can go to any OB/GYN doctor in the Passport Health Plan by Molina Healthcare network as well as receive Certified Nurse ...
Interrupted time series study over six years in a remote primary health care (PHC) service involving Aboriginal adults ... Following the intervention, there were significant improvements in the recorded delivery of preventive care services for CVD ( ... improvement in the recorded delivery of preventive care services for CVD, intensification of treatment for CVD, and ... the proportion of guideline scheduled CVD preventive care services delivered, (ii) mean CVD medications prescribed and ...
McNamara, Dan G. (1982). Preventive health services: the physicians role. 97(3). McNamara, Dan G. "Preventive health services ... The Insure Project On Lifecycle Preventive Health Services Cite CITE. Title : The Insure Project On Lifecycle Preventive Health ... on Lifecycle Preventive Health Services is a 3-year study to determine the feasibility of implementing preventive services in ... McNamara, Dan G. "Preventive health services: the physicians role" vol. 97, no. 3, 1982. Export RIS Citation Information.. ...
Division 2. Department Of Social Services -Department Of Health Services. Subdivision 6. Preventive Medical Services. Chapter 9 ...
Preventive Services Chart. Learn about codes; who is covered; frequency; and what the Medicare patient pays. ... Advance Health Equity. This educational tool helps you properly provide and bill Medicare preventive services. The term " ... How can I help them remember when theyre due for their next preventive service?. We offer a Preventive Services Checklist so ... they can track their preventive services.. When can CMS add new Medicare preventive services?. We may add preventive services ...
The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force works to improve the health of people nationwide.. The U.S. Preventive Services Task ... Focus only on preventive services offered in primary care settings or services that are referable by a primary care clinician ... makes evidence-based recommendations about preventive services such as screenings, behavioral counseling, and preventive ... Understanding How the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) Works PDF, 2.1 MB. Presentation that provides overview ...
US Preventive Services Task Force. Automobile injury-selected risk factors and prevention in the health care setting. ... Following a mandate from the US Preventive Services Task Force, in this article we describe the magnitude of the automobile ... In addition, physicians and other health professionals are urged to consider promoting nonclinical automobile injury prevention ... and review reports of interventions by health professionals to promote the use of child restraint devices, the only area in ...
... but do not cover the broad spectrum of preventive services and behaviors that can improve the health of older adults, ... particularly older women who are vulnerable to poorer health and lesser utilization of preventive services. This study aimed to ... The Preventive Services Use Self-Efficacy (PRESS) Scale was developed by an expert panel at the University of Pittsburgh Center ... Participants who accessed a preventive service had higher self-efficacy scores in the corresponding sub-scale than those who ...
Submission Instructions: The form should be submitted to Occupational Health Services. Please print out and fax the completed ... Preventive Medicine. Immunizations. *Hepatitis B. *Rubella (German measles). *Rubeola (measles). *MMR (mumps, measles, rubeola) ... The vision of the Occupational Health as a part of Health Safety and Environment (HSE) is a recognized partner of the Johns ... Johns Hopkins Health Plans at Live Well Clinic. 7231 Parkway Dr., Suite: 100. Hanover, MD 21076. Phone: 410-424-4886. Fax: 410- ...
Coronavirus Updates - Click here to learn about Choctaw Health Centers services and response to COVID-19. ... and practices about health by promoting, supporting and assisting the Choctaw Health Center with health care delivery at the ... The goal of the Public Health Services department is to enable MS Band of Choctaw Indian Tribal members to achieve optimal ... clinic clerk and outreach services through community health technicians. Audiology: hearing screenings and exams by an ...
Employers should consider these opportunities when wanting to provide preventive care services. ... If a screening test is recommended by the United States Preventive Services Taskforce (USPSTF), Health Resources and Service ... Mobile clinics provide a convenient solution that allows patients better access to preventive health services across more ... 21 , Health Resources and Services Administration. Womens Preventive Services Guidelines. December 2022. https://www.hrsa.gov/ ...
of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, National Center for Health Statistics, 1995Availability: Items available ... Preventive Services Task Force. by U.S. Preventive Services Task Force.. Material type: Text; Format: print Publication details ... Results of search for su:{Preventive health services} Refine your search. *. Availability. * Limit to currently available ... Urban health services : fifth report of the Expert Committee on Public Health Administration [meeting held in Geneva from 15 to ...
... Health insurance is an essential tool that provides ... Many health insurance policies offer preventive healthcare services, such as annual health check-ups, vaccinations, and ... Health insurance also provides individuals with access to quality healthcare services. With health insurance, individuals can ... Health insurance also provides individuals with peace of mind. Knowing that they are covered by health insurance, individuals ...
... the Guide to Clinical Preventive Services. In July 1990, the Department of Health and Human Services reconstituted the Task ... "Grade Definitions". US Preventive Services Task Force. "USPSTF A and B Recommendations by Date". US Preventive Services Task ... US Preventive Services Task Force (November 2009). "Screening for breast cancer: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force ... Preventive Services Task Force works". Reuters - via Yahoo News. "Methods and Processes". US Preventive Services Task Force. ...
Migrant children only receive preventive services free of charge, Categories: Collecting key data on all children ... Migrant children only receive preventive services free of charge Migrant children only receive preventive services free of ... Migrant children receive all health care services free of charge Migrant children only receive emergency services free of ... Data and Digital Health Unit Division of Country Health Policies and Systems. World Health Organization Regional Office for ...
Preventive Health Services for Adults. Most health plans must cover a set of preventive services like shots and screening tests ... Free preventive services. All Marketplace plans and many other plans must cover the following list of preventive services ... Health BenefitsHealth Insurance Plans Available on the MarketplaceSummary of Benefits and CoveragePreventive health services ... How Marketplace Plans Set Your Health Insurance PremiumsComprehensive coverage for womens preventive carePick your health ...
Results for health and safety services with industrial air pollution control for the food industry applications from CTP and ... CTP - Preventive Maintenance Services. The most efficient way to protect your system from unexpected equipment downtime is by ... Health and Safety Services with Industrial Air Pollution Control for the Food Industry applications * ... regular preventive maintenance services. CTP offers maintenance contracts in accordance with your specific application and ...
Health Care Administration & Operations Public Health Presentation. Aug 9, 2016 Pediatric Clinical Preventive Services. .PDF , ... Pediatric Health Care Services. .PDF , 248.58 KB Pediatric Health Care Services briefing to the Defense Health Board, Nov. 1, ... Health Services Headquarters Marine Corps. .PDF , 1.55 MB Defense Health Board briefing about the Health Services Headquarters ... Decision Brief Pediatric Health Care Services. .PDF , 653.66 KB Defense Health Board briefing about Pediatric Health Care ...
... radio discussions with community health workers and community leaders, and use of social and behavior change communication ... Action - Infant and Young Child Nutrition (IYCN) Project - Preventive malaria treatment - Women of reproductive age (WRA). ... Preventive treatment of malaria in women was reported to the Global Nutrition Policy Review (GNPR) 2009-2010 ...
  • Evidence-based items or services that have an "A" or "B" recommendation rating from the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF). (cdc.gov)
  • For adults, the required services are recommended by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force ( USPSTF ), the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices ( ACIP ), and the Health Resources and Services Administration ( HRSA ) based on recommendations issued by the Women's Preventive Services Initiative . (kff.org)
  • While visiting the provider, the individual is screened for cholesterol abnormalities, which has in effect a rating of A or B in the current recommendations of the United States Preventive Services Task Force with respect to the individual. (cornell.edu)
  • The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force works to improve the health of people nationwide. (uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org)
  • The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF or Task Force) makes evidence-based recommendations about preventive services such as screenings, behavioral counseling, and preventive medications. (uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org)
  • Patients can trust that the services recommended by the Task Force are beneficial to their overall health. (uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org)
  • The Task Force uses gold standard methods to systematically review the evidence on preventive services. (uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org)
  • US Preventive Services Task Force. (kaiserpermanente.org)
  • Following a mandate from the US Preventive Services Task Force, in this article we describe the magnitude of the automobile injury problem, identify injury risk factors that might be reduced by clinically based preventive programs, and review reports of interventions by health professionals to promote the use of child restraint devices, the only area in which we found published evaluations. (kaiserpermanente.org)
  • Guide to clinical preventive services : an assessment of the effectiveness of 169 interventions, report of the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. (who.int)
  • by U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. (who.int)
  • To help doctors and patients decide together whether a preventive service is right for a person's needs, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force develops recommendations based on a review of high-quality scientific evidence, and publishes its recommendations on its Web site and/or in a peer-reviewed journal. (uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org)
  • On this page you will find easy-to-understand information on the Task Force and on health topics for which the Task Force has released a recommendation. (uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org)
  • These materials are designed to inform people about Task Force recommendations and are not intended to replace advice from a health professional. (uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org)
  • The findings and conclusions on this page are those of the Community Preventive Services Task Force and do not necessarily represent those of CDC. (thecommunityguide.org)
  • The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) is an independent, volunteer group of national experts in prevention and evidence-based medicine that makes recommendations about clinical preventive services such as screening tests, counseling services, and preventive medications. (ahrq.gov)
  • From September 1990-September 1993, the Department of Family Medicine at the Medical University of South Carolina conducted a demonstration project designed to develop, implement, and evaluate a comprehensive, computer-based preventive services delivery and educational system, based on the recommendations in the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) Report. (nih.gov)
  • These reviews are published as U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendations on the Task Force Web site and in a peer-reviewed journal. (uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org)
  • A and B grade recommendations are services that the Task Force most highly recommends implementing for preventive care and that are also relevant for implementing the Affordable Care Act. (uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org)
  • PHS departments share the responsibility of patient & community screenings for health problems, health education, prevention and follow-up of medical care through several programs. (choctawhealthcenter.org)
  • Many employers have implemented initiatives targeting employee subpopulations with common chronic diseases, which can serve as additional touchpoints for patient education on preventive screenings. (businessgrouphealth.org)
  • For example, advocating for kidney disease screenings for those enrolled in a diabetes management program with health plans and other vendor partners can lead to better coordination of care and ultimately better chances of early detection. (businessgrouphealth.org)
  • The USPSTF evaluates scientific evidence to determine whether medical screenings, counseling, and preventive medications work for adults and children who have no symptoms. (wikipedia.org)
  • Preventative services generally include: wellness physicals or tests/screenings done on a yearly basis, such as mammograms, eye exams, pap smear, prostate screening, etc. (knoxvillehospital.org)
  • Get routine health screenings. (medlineplus.gov)
  • And you often do not have to pay a copay for health screenings, vaccines, and annual well visits. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Democratic Senator Jacky Rosen of Nevada, and Republican John Thune of South Dakota, introduced legislation to promote the use of preventive health care services, like physicals, mammograms, and other cancer screenings, and routine examinations. (wsaw.com)
  • Whether it is cancer screenings, annual physicals, or flu shots and vaccines, preventive health care can have a positive impact on health outcomes and we should do all we can to enhance access to these services. (wsaw.com)
  • The new screenings expand Signify Health's suite of services designed to support the early detection, diagnosis, and management of some of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality among people covered under Medicare Advantage. (signifyhealth.com)
  • By offering these new screenings in the home, we hope to make these important screenings more easily accessible and improve the health trajectory for those we are privileged to serve. (signifyhealth.com)
  • Closing the KED care gap and increasing in-home eGFR screenings can help health plans improve quality performance, yield financial incentives and improve member satisfaction. (signifyhealth.com)
  • The Defense Health Agency established new age recommendations for screenings. (health.mil)
  • Colorectal cancer screening, and preventive screenings in general, are important for overall wellness and healthy living. (health.mil)
  • The COVID-19 public health emergency (PHE) ended on May 11, 2023. (cms.gov)
  • DALLAS & NEW YORK, August 1, 2023 - Signify Health , a CVS Health company (NYSE: CVS), today announced the addition of a comprehensive in-home kidney health evaluation to its Diagnostic and Preventive Services offering . (signifyhealth.com)
  • Whether you get your insurance through a job, the government, or by buying it on the healthcare.gov website, new changes could affect your health and your wallet in 2023. (newswise.com)
  • A review of the literature on preventive interventions to promote mental health, & on the use of tobacco, alcohol & the misuse of licit & illicit drugs. (dianepublishing.net)
  • 54 articles from 1964 to 1999 that demonstrate positive outcomes from preventive substance abuse & mental health interventions are summarized here. (dianepublishing.net)
  • The partnerships allow to reduce the gap between classroom learning and practice of public health strengthening public health workforce curriculum, evidence-based instruction, service delivery and quality of community interventions. (elpasotexas.gov)
  • We conducted a comparative effectiveness review on the effectiveness and harms of telehealth interventions for women 's reproductive health and intimate partner violence (IPV) services. (bvsalud.org)
  • Outcomes were also similar between telehealth interventions to replace or supplement IPV services and comparators for repeat IPV, depression , posttraumatic stress disorder , fear of partner, coercive control, self - efficacy , and safety behaviors (low SOE). (bvsalud.org)
  • Telehealth interventions for contraceptive care and IPV services demonstrate equivalent clinical and patient-reported outcomes versus in- person care, although few studies are available. (bvsalud.org)
  • Through this program, a modest amount of resources helped local, state, and federal health agencies take an organized, planned approach to community-based interventions. (cdc.gov)
  • This tracker presents information on preventive services recommended for adults, by condition, including a summary of the recommendation, the target population, the effective date of coverage, and related federal coverage clarifications. (kff.org)
  • See the list of covered preventive care covered for all adults, pregnant women or women who may become pregnant, women, and children. (knoxvillehospital.org)
  • All adults should visit their health care provider from time to time, even when they are healthy. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Preventive care benefits for adults. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Medicare - Under the ACA, USPSTF services with a Grade "A" or "B" must be covered without cost sharing if the Secretary determines they are a) reasonable and necessary for the prevention or early detection of an illness or disability, and b) appropriate for individuals entitled to benefits under part A or enrolled under part B preventive care recommendations. (cdc.gov)
  • Traditional Medicaid plans - Section 4106 provides that states who elect to cover all USPSTF Grade "A" or "B" recommended preventive services, as well as ACIP recommended vaccines and their administration, without cost-sharing shall receive a one percentage point increase in the federal medical assistance percentage (FMAP) for those services. (cdc.gov)
  • The USPSTF Published Recommendations webpage has more preventive services information. (cms.gov)
  • If a screening test is recommended by the United States Preventive Services Taskforce (USPSTF), Health Resources and Service Administration (HRSA), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) or another federal agency only for specific patient populations, patients who do not meet the screening criteria will have to pay their share of out-of-pocket costs if they choose to receive the screening. (businessgrouphealth.org)
  • American health insurance groups are required to cover, at no charge to the patient, any service that the USPSTF recommends, regardless of how much it costs or how small the benefit is. (wikipedia.org)
  • AHRQ has funded three Research Centers for Excellence in Clinical Preventive Services focusing on the delivery of preventive services in the clinical setting. (ahrq.gov)
  • My Health Finder helps patients find personalized recommendations on clinical preventive services based on answering three basic questions. (uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org)
  • Prevention TaskForce is designed to help primary care clinicians identify the right clinical preventive services for their patients. (uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org)
  • Recommended services included in the HRSA-supported Women's Preventive Services Guidelines, including all Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved contraceptives, sterilization procedures, and patient education and counseling for women with reproductive capacity, as prescribed by a health care provider. (cdc.gov)
  • To learn more about women's preventive services, read our Member Handbook . (passporthealthplan.com)
  • Telehealth for Women's Preventive Services for Reproductive Health and Intimate Partner Violence: a Comparative Effectiveness Review. (bvsalud.org)
  • Member States of the European Region of WHO have adopted the European strategy for Child and Adolescent Health and Development 2015-2020. (who.int)
  • The dataset is based on selected aspects reported by Member States in the baseline survey on the implementation of the European child and adolescent health strategy 2015-2020 as well as data from the WHO country profiles on child and adolescent health. (who.int)
  • 2020. Health equity. (cdc.gov)
  • 2020. Health communication and health information technology. (cdc.gov)
  • A CPR-based preventive services system coupled with an adaptable physician education about and delivery of preventive services. (nih.gov)
  • an ideal solution to improving the education about and delivery of preventive services. (nih.gov)
  • This blog covers topics to help ensure that you maintain optimal oral health. (bobcavin.com)
  • The connection between oral health and overall health in pets is scientifically well-established. (uintavet.com)
  • oral health problems can have far-reaching consequences. (uintavet.com)
  • Special dental diets formulated to promote oral health can be effective in reducing plaque and tartar accumulation. (uintavet.com)
  • Oral health problems can cause chronic pain and discomfort for pets. (uintavet.com)
  • A study published in the Journal of Veterinary Dentistry demonstrated a clear association between good oral health and increased lifespan in pets. (uintavet.com)
  • Armed with these factual insights, pet owners can recognize the gravity of oral health in their furry friends' lives. (uintavet.com)
  • Resources for patient education and clinical resources to help integrate oral health into your practice. (cdc.gov)
  • Resources and guidance to improve the oral health of children. (cdc.gov)
  • A fact sheet on the impact of oral health on overall health and learning. (cdc.gov)
  • The Affordable Care Act (ACA) includes several provisions aimed at improving coverage of, and access to, certain preventive health services. (cdc.gov)
  • Non-grandfathered private health insurance plans -Section 2713 of the Public Health Service (PHS) Act, as added by the Affordable Care Act and incorporated into ERISA (The Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974) and the Code, requires that non-grandfathered group health plans and health insurance issuers offering non-grandfathered group or individual health insurance coverage provide coverage of certain specified preventive services without cost sharing. (cdc.gov)
  • The Affordable Care Act (ACA) requires new private health insurance plans to cover many recommended preventive services without any patient cost-sharing. (kff.org)
  • For more information, see the fact sheet Preventive Services Covered by Private Health Plans under the Affordable Care Act . (kff.org)
  • With the revamped Medicare policy on preventive services - for which the Affordable Care Act contains provisions that have allowed Medicare to cover many new preventive services at no charge to the patient - it is important that every medical provider know which services are covered, and when they can be billed. (healthcarebiller.com)
  • Together we can advance health equity and help eliminate health disparities for all minority and underserved groups. (cms.gov)
  • Each center is conducting three research projects seeking solutions to the problems of underuse, overuse, and disparities in use of preventive services. (ahrq.gov)
  • based on the research and data analysis of a comprehensive community health assessment, addressing healthcare disparities in support of a high quality of life for all. (elpasotexas.gov)
  • Prevounce creates wellness that works for everyone, with practice-specific, software-based programs that make preventive care, chronic care management, and remote patient monitoring easier to prep for, perform, document, and bill. (prevounce.com)
  • Evidence-based practice is the use of the best available evidence together with a clinician's expertise and a patient's values and preferences in making health care decisions. (ahrq.gov)
  • Insufficient attention has been paid to the role that modern information systems can play in improving the delivery of and education about preventive services in family medicine training and practice sites. (nih.gov)
  • Practice audits from February 1992-July 1993 showed increased adherence with all seven counseling services, 10 of 15 screening services, and one of five immunization services. (nih.gov)
  • What are the implications for public health practice? (cdc.gov)
  • It is a win-win from a medical practice perspective, as the patient's receive optimal care, and the provider can receive reimbursement for the valuable services rendered. (healthcarebiller.com)
  • In this article we'll be focusing on the second experience your client will have of your practice, Preventative Health Questionnaires . (veterinaryit.services)
  • This service is a real value ad for the customer and shows that your practice will go above and beyond to care for their pet. (veterinaryit.services)
  • A fresh look at updated screening guidelines and evolving testing methods to assist employers in evaluating ways to improve their members' screening compliance and reduce hidden cost barriers to accessing preventive care. (businessgrouphealth.org)
  • High: Consistent results from well-designed studies in representative populations that assess the effect of the service on health outcomes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Promoting maternal health, from before conception through birth, can improve health outcomes for women and their babies. (thecommunityguide.org)
  • Clinical decision support can effectively improve patient outcomes and lead to higher-quality health care. (ahrq.gov)
  • A comprehensive kidney evaluation can reduce the risk of kidney-related cardiovascular events and delay the progression to kidney failure, improving overall health outcomes. (signifyhealth.com)
  • Our solutions support value-based payment programs by aligning financial incentives around outcomes, providing tools to health plans and healthcare organizations designed to assess and manage risk and identify actionable opportunities for improved patient outcomes, coordination and cost-savings. (signifyhealth.com)
  • Both East Baltimore and Homewood Occupational Health supports all levels of Johns Hopkins Medical and University Institutions in the pursuit of a quality work environment that is free from recognized health, safety, and environment risks and is in compliance with applicable regulations. (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • The vision of the Occupational Health as a part of Health Safety and Environment (HSE) is a recognized partner of the Johns Hopkins Institution management team. (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • Submission Instructions: The form should be submitted to Occupational Health Services. (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • In settings with a low likelihood of TB exposure, the deferment of routine serial testing should be considered in consultation with public health and occupational health authorities. (cdc.gov)
  • We provide a one-stop health screening centre by offering medical advices in a comfortable environment with comprehensive range of health screening services to suit the needs of men and women of all ages. (pah.com.my)
  • We also provide consultation and screening services to corporates, on such as on-site screening for blood test screening, lead test blood screening, hepatitis screening, smoke cessation class, etc. (pah.com.my)
  • Employers in partnership with navigators, engagement programs, health plans and other partners should conduct periodic simple but targeted communication campaigns based on claims data to drive appropriate and timely preventive screening utilization. (businessgrouphealth.org)
  • The risk of surprise or balance bills increases for screening tests that require ancillary services, such as anesthesia for colonoscopies. (businessgrouphealth.org)
  • Marketplace health plans must cover a set of preventive services - like shots and screening tests - at no cost to you when delivered by a doctor or other provider within your plan's network. (healthcare.gov)
  • Most health plans must cover a set of preventive services like shots and screening tests at no cost to you. (thebestplanforyou.com)
  • Preventive services, such as screening tests, counseling services, and preventive medicines, are tests or treatments that your doctor or others provide to prevent illnesses before they cause you symptoms or problems. (uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org)
  • Preventative (screening) tests when the patient has no symptoms to suggest that they are unhealth y. (knoxvillehospital.org)
  • Most health insurance plans must cover a set of preventive services - like shots and screening tests. (knoxvillehospital.org)
  • Any testing is considered diagnostic testing and not screening (preventative). (knoxvillehospital.org)
  • Alternatives to preventive mastectomy include high-risk screening which usually means a woman undergoes a clinical breast exam by her doctor every six months along with screening mammography and breast MRI on a prescribed schedule. (umms.org)
  • With this new upwards trend, national health guidelines recently lowered the initial screening age from 50 to 45. (health.mil)
  • In addition, physicians and other health professionals are urged to consider promoting nonclinical automobile injury prevention measures. (kaiserpermanente.org)
  • Healthy people 2000 : national health promotion and disease prevention objectives, full report, with commentary. (who.int)
  • Corporate Authors(s) : National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (U.S.)Division of Population Health. (cdc.gov)
  • Direct the Secretary of Health and Human Services (HHS) to undertake a coordinated, focused public health education campaign to enhance access to preventive services, in collaboration with the Director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the U.S. Surgeon General, and the Administrator of the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS). (wsaw.com)
  • Testing, prevention, and other services related to HIV/AIDS. (elpasotexas.gov)
  • Detection, prevention, and protection from infectious foodborne and waterborne diseases, and public health emergencies. (elpasotexas.gov)
  • Provides clinical services for the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of Sexually Transmitted Infections. (elpasotexas.gov)
  • As a provider of health care to people with Medicare you can help your patients make the most of their benefits by talking with them about their risk factors for disease and the importance of prevention and early detection and encouraging them to take advantage of the preventive services that are most appropriate for them. (healthcarebiller.com)
  • When you request a Medicare patient's eligibility status, we either give the dates they may get certain preventive services or give you data to help determine the next eligible date. (cms.gov)
  • 2013. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS). (cdc.gov)
  • This educational tool helps you properly provide and bill Medicare preventive services. (cms.gov)
  • When can CMS add new Medicare preventive services? (cms.gov)
  • We recommend that every Primary Care Provider include a checklist of Medicare covered preventive services (the Medicare Quick Reference Preventive Services Information Sheet is a perfect tool) in the front of each Medicare patient's chart. (healthcarebiller.com)
  • Signify Health providers perform the kidney health evaluation as part of an In-home Health Evaluation (IHE), which is available at no additional cost to Medicare Advantage plan members. (signifyhealth.com)
  • Michiganders can also turn to local groups such as the Washtenaw Health Plan , which serves people in the area around Ann Arbor, or use the statewide Michigan Medicare/Medicaid Assistance Program . (newswise.com)
  • Anyone in the United States can turn to local helpers listed in the Local Help section of healthcare.gov or, for Medicare assistance, to the State Health Insurance Assistance Program run by their local Area Agency on Aging. (newswise.com)
  • People who choose Medicare Advantage plans offered by health insurance companies will also see slightly lower average costs. (newswise.com)
  • My patients don't follow up on routine preventive care. (cms.gov)
  • The routine cleanings, fluoride treatments, and dental sealants that your dentist provides are all considered preventive. (bobcavin.com)
  • Diagnostic services done on a routine basis include items such as high blood pressure check, diabetes check, thyroid check and labs associated with the medical condition. (knoxvillehospital.org)
  • Its evidence-based recommendations empower patients and their clinicians to make informed choices based on what works-and what doesn't-in preventive care. (uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org)
  • The new advice is based on improved scientific evidence about the benefits and harms associated with mammography and is consistent with recommendations by the World Health Organization and other major medical bodies. (wikipedia.org)
  • The goal of these recommendations is not only to offer guidance to doctors, nurses and other primary care professionals, but to provide patients and their families with the most accurate and up-to-date information on ways to prevent illness and improve health and well-being. (uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org)
  • I want to utilize all available tools to ensure their health, wellness, and readiness records are easily accessible," said Army Col. (Dr.) Neil Page, deputy and military chief, Clinical Support Division, Medical Affairs at the Defense Health Agency. (health.mil)
  • In the Military Health System, the estimated impact of the lower age recommendation is that over 200,000 additional beneficiaries will need to be screened for CRC, according to Dr. Chin Hee Kim, deputy chief of specialty care support of the Defense Health Agency Directorate of Medical Affairs. (health.mil)
  • We need to manage risk in a sensible way," said Defense Health Agency Director Lt. Gen (Dr.) Ronald Place. (health.mil)
  • Health Services Utilization Among Children With and Without Autism Spectrum Disorders. (blogspot.com)
  • Efforts to increase farm ers' utilization of healthcare services must address these considerations. (cdc.gov)
  • The Soldier Medical Readiness Center, located in the Shoemaker Center, Bldg. 36000, provides periodic health assessments, military schools physicals, out-processing services and other services in support of the medical aspects of military readiness. (tricare.mil)
  • All flight physicals must be done at Russell Collier Health Clinic by appointment only at 553-3001. (tricare.mil)
  • The Service member must pick up all physicals other than Periodic physicals. (tricare.mil)
  • A new bill introduced by U.S. Senator Tammy Baldwin aims to promote the use of preventative services like physicals and mammograms. (wsaw.com)
  • The consistency of observed differences by age and health insurance coverage status were also investigated. (cdc.gov)
  • 45 CFR § 147.130 - Coverage of preventive health services. (cornell.edu)
  • Beat the December 15 deadline to enroll in health coverage that starts January 1. (healthcare.gov)
  • Many health plans are still using exclusions such as "services related to sex change" or "sex reassignment surgery" to deny coverage to transgender people for certain health care services. (healthcare.gov)
  • An easy-to-read summary that lets you make apples-to-apples comparisons of costs and coverage between health plans. (healthcare.gov)
  • You'll get the 'Summary of Benefits and Coverage' (SBC) when you shop for coverage on your own or through your job, renew or change coverage, or request an SBC from the health insurance company. (healthcare.gov)
  • These policies are ideal for individuals who are self-employed or do not have health insurance coverage through their employers. (sreditingzone.in)
  • Group health insurance policies are designed for employers who want to provide health insurance coverage to their employees. (sreditingzone.in)
  • When choosing a health insurance policy, it is important to consider factors such as the premium amount, coverage amount, and the terms and conditions of the policy. (sreditingzone.in)
  • Individuals should carefully consider their healthcare needs and choose a health insurance policy that offers comprehensive coverage and fits within their budget. (sreditingzone.in)
  • Depending on your health coverage, you may have the choice to see providers who are in-network or out-of-network. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Lawyers for both sides agreed to a compromise while the case on prevenantive health care coverage makes its way through the appeals process. (advocate.com)
  • Focus only on preventive services offered in primary care settings or services that are referable by a primary care clinician and apply to patients without signs or symptoms of the condition. (uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org)
  • Mobile clinics provide a convenient solution that allows patients better access to preventive health services across more diverse geographies. (businessgrouphealth.org)
  • Virtual primary care can assist in lessening the preventive visit gaps for patients who have barriers like transportation, accessibility concerns or other SDOH. (businessgrouphealth.org)
  • For many patients, restorative care is frequently the focus since it is used to restore the health of the teeth or gums after a problem arises. (bobcavin.com)
  • Mycetoma has numerous adverse medical, health and socioeconomic consequences for patients, communities and health services in affected areas. (who.int)
  • Given its slow progression, painless nature, ignorance about the disease and its causes, and scarcity of medical and health facilities in the areas where it occurs, many patients present late with advanced disease, when amputation may be the only available treatment. (who.int)
  • Before any patients come in for a preventative health consultation their owner should complete a Preventative Health Questionnaire, which can help to build a picture of the realistic risk of infectious disease and parasites for your patient. (veterinaryit.services)
  • These preventive services have a high or moderate net benefit for patients. (uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org)
  • Medicaid expansion plans - Medicaid expansion plans offered by states that extend Medicaid eligibility to non-elderly individuals with annual incomes at or below 133 percent of the federal poverty level ($16,611 for an individual or $34,247 for a family of 4 in 2019) are required to cover the full range of preventive services required in the essential health benefits (EHB) final rule. (cdc.gov)
  • Working in nine districts of Ghana's Brong Ahafo Region, the project used a social marketing approach to engage households and communities through radio spots, radio discussions with community health workers and community leaders, and use of social and behavior change communication materials. (who.int)
  • Although the system initially had no effect on patient perceptions about the frequency of preventive services delivery, there was reasonable concordance between patient desires and physician behavior for the discussion of preventive services (Kappa = .5 to .6). (nih.gov)
  • We define a primary care setting as a place where clinicians deliver integrated, accessible health care services and are responsible for addressing most patient health care needs, developing a sustained patient partnership, and practicing in the context of family and community. (cms.gov)
  • Employers should consider these opportunities when wanting to provide preventive care services. (businessgrouphealth.org)
  • The amount you pay for covered health care services before your insurance plan starts to pay. (healthcare.gov)
  • This indicator is dependent on a response for the indicator: Migrant children receive all health care services free of charge (survey question 3.31a- In relation to migrant and refugee children, please choose the type of health care free of charge that they are entitled to receive (Migrant children receive all health care services free of charge)? (who.int)
  • Many insurance companies now offer preventative care services at no cost to their members. (knoxvillehospital.org)
  • Although only limited data exist on their health and use of health care services as they transition to adolescence, emerging data suggest that a minority of these persons receive recommended guidance* from their primary care providers (PCPs) starting at age 12 years to ensure a planned transition from pediatric to adult health care ( 4 , 5 ). (cdc.gov)
  • As virtual health programs have risen to prominence during the pandemic, employers can consider how virtual preventive care can best serve their employees. (businessgrouphealth.org)
  • The COVID-19 pandemic showed us that sometimes these tools are best provided through digital health services. (health.mil)
  • The international responses to the COVID-19 pandemic led to a host of changes and lessons learned across the Military Health System that will be valuable in preparing for the next crisis - whether that's another pandemic, a new conflict or natural disaster. (health.mil)
  • The far-reaching effects of the pandemic was a topic for top military health leaders from the U.S. and several other countries at an international COVID-19 panel discussion on Feb. 23. (health.mil)
  • Preventative medicine casts a wide net in terms of what is covered. (blogspot.com)
  • The associated findings that rates of " vaccine-preventable diseases " may be increased in some of the analysed cohorts with autism and/or that immunisation as part of a strategy of preventative medicine might be diminished are worrying trends. (blogspot.com)
  • Not taking your medicine or not taking enough medicine may lead to further health problems. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Place said he gives "great credit to our public health and preventive medicine teams. (health.mil)
  • An example of this to use in a preventative health care plans would be basic videos on how to administer worming treatment, search for and remove ticks and cleaning dogs' teeth. (veterinaryit.services)
  • I know this area still attracts some discussion alongside more general debates about vaccines for example [3] but as part of the arsenal of initiatives to improve public and 'personal' health, one might see such findings as part of a wider issue with health inequality when it comes to autism. (blogspot.com)
  • In honor of National Men's Health Week and Father's Day, NCHS has released a new report that looks at preventive health care service use among groups of men aged 18-64: married men, cohabitating men and other not-married men. (cdc.gov)
  • CMS recently published an article on raising awareness of men's health issues and preventive services - in light of June being Men's Health Month. (healthcarebiller.com)
  • SAMHSA] Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. (cdc.gov)
  • Questionnaires were sent to ministries of health of the 53 countries in the WHO EURO region on areas related to the strategy, to document how well policies are aligned with the Strategy. (who.int)
  • It goes without saying that when designing your preventative health questionnaires that they must be as simple as possible , whether done on the website, an app on a smart device or in person. (veterinaryit.services)
  • A Department of the Army memorandum dated October 12, 2006 and signed by the Secretary of the Army, announced the replacement of the retention physical with the Periodic Health Assessment (PHA). (tricare.mil)
  • Community health assessment and health improvement planning. (cdc.gov)
  • Nutrition and preventive health care / Mary Alice Caliendo. (who.int)
  • While providing them with a loving home, proper nutrition, and regular exercise are all crucial, one aspect that often gets overlooked is their dental health. (uintavet.com)
  • Compared with a general population control group, adolescents with autism were 90% more likely to have additional mental health or other conditions and three times more likely to have unmet health care service needs. (cdc.gov)
  • Improved provider training on the heath care needs of adolescents with autism and coordination of comprehensive programs to meet their needs can improve delivery of services and adherence to guidance for transitioning from pediatric to adult health care. (cdc.gov)
  • These findings are consistent with previous research ( 4 , 5 ) indicating that few adolescents receive the recommended transition guidance and suggest that adolescents identified with autism in early childhood are more likely than adolescents in the general population to have unmet health care service needs. (cdc.gov)
  • Improved provider training on the heath care needs of adolescents with autism and coordination of comprehensive programs ¶ to meet their needs can improve delivery of services and adherence to recommended guidance for transitioning from pediatric to adult health care. (cdc.gov)
  • Awareness of reproductive health issues in developing of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights states that nations is growing. (cdc.gov)
  • We searched MEDLINE , Cochrane Library , CINAHL, and Scopus for English- language studies (July 2016 to May 2022) for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and observational studies of telehealth strategies for women 's reproductive health and IPV versus usual care. (bvsalud.org)
  • Results of the kidney health evaluation, including urinalysis (uACR) and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), provide clinicians and members with information to help them determine the treatment and management plan that is best for them. (signifyhealth.com)
  • We strive to improve and increase health and safety awareness. (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • personnel participates in programs for the community, including the post-partum home visitation program, health education/awareness activities, special clinics offered to the tribal communities through the CHC, satellite clinics, and other MBCI tribal programs & events. (choctawhealthcenter.org)
  • it reviews and assesses the best available evidence to make a conclusion about the benefits and harms of preventive services. (uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org)
  • Evidence on access, health equity , or harms was lacking. (bvsalud.org)
  • The system had sophisticated preventive services tracking and reminder, physician, and patient education features. (nih.gov)
  • These text messages are specifically tailored for navigating the unique circumstances of service members and spouses as they aim to improve their physical and emotional health. (health.mil)
  • Instead of improving the health of the teeth, cosmetic services are offered to improve their appearance. (bobcavin.com)
  • Using this examination as a quasi-exogenous shock to employees' personal health knowledge, we examine which employees are more likely to improve health, controlling for differences in initial health, demographics, job type, and income. (researchgate.net)
  • U.S. Department of Health & Human Services. (cdc.gov)
  • Chronic kidney disease is often underdiagnosed and, if not addressed, can lead to a need for dialysis or kidney transplant, especially for those who also have diabetes," said Heidi Schwarzwald, MD, MPH, Chief Medical Officer, Signify Health Home and Community Services. (signifyhealth.com)
  • The goal of the Public Health Services department is to enable MS Band of Choctaw Indian Tribal members to achieve optimal health by improving each individual's health knowledge, attitudes, and practices about health by promoting, supporting and assisting the Choctaw Health Center with health care delivery at the community level. (choctawhealthcenter.org)
  • More accurate surveillance and burden of disease data are therefore essential in order to evaluate its significance as a public health problem. (who.int)
  • The Department of Public Health delivers high quality, data driven public health services to our citizens, achieving objectives set forth by Healthy People 2030 through a set of public health programs staffed by highly qualified public health professionals practicing in a goal oriented, fiscally responsible department. (elpasotexas.gov)
  • The Department of Public Health (DPH) is proudly an academic health department and has multiple affiliations with local, state and national educational institutions to provide student internships, public health education and training, research, and services. (elpasotexas.gov)
  • Prioritize allocation of TSTs, in consultation with state and local public health authorities. (cdc.gov)
  • Varicella and associated complications in previously healthy children is becoming an important clinical and public health problem in the UAE. (who.int)
  • Preventative health, like mammograms, can be especially helpful for women with certain risk factors for breast cancer, such as having a strong family history or certain gene changes. (wsaw.com)
  • We provide direct access to professional expertise for employees in their pursuit of health and well being in the workplace. (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • Health insurance also provides individuals with access to quality healthcare services. (sreditingzone.in)
  • It offers a range of benefits, including access to quality healthcare services, peace of mind, and tax benefits. (sreditingzone.in)
  • In a press release, Senator Baldwin said, "We can always do more to promote preventive health care and make sure everyone has access to it. (wsaw.com)
  • Lauer called easier access to preventative health care relating to breast health, life-saving. (wsaw.com)
  • Assists the undeserved community with access to preventive health services. (elpasotexas.gov)
  • Your health insurance company can't limit sex-specific recommended preventive services based on your sex assigned at birth, gender identity, or recorded gender - for example, a transgender man who has residual breast tissue or an intact cervix getting a mammogram or pap smear. (healthcare.gov)
  • We therefore focus on the social and eases, cervical cancer, malaria, death during childbirth, and health consequences of child marriage for girls. (cdc.gov)
  • We offer a Preventive Services Checklist so they can track their preventive services. (cms.gov)
  • But staying at a healthy weight, getting regular exercise, and not smoking lowers your risk for health problems. (medlineplus.gov)
  • WSAW) - There's no sure way to prevent breast cancer but there are things you can do that might lower your risk including preventative care. (wsaw.com)
  • Preventive mastectomy is extremely effective in preventing breast cancer in high risk women and can decrease their risk of developing it by 90-95 percent. (umms.org)
  • Preventative care minimizes the risk of such issues, ensuring a better quality of life. (uintavet.com)
  • One of those categorical grant programs was the Health Education-Risk Reduction (HERR) Grants Program. (cdc.gov)
  • In conclusion, health insurance is an essential tool that provides financial protection to individuals and their families in times of medical emergencies. (sreditingzone.in)
  • In addition to these services, private and public plans may cover other preventive services without cost-sharing. (cdc.gov)
  • At this time , all nongrandfathered plans m u st continue to cover all preventive s ervices that are recommended by these bodies. (kff.org)
  • Cover more than 80 preventive service topics for people across the lifespan. (uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org)
  • Individual health insurance policies are designed to cover the medical expenses of an individual. (sreditingzone.in)
  • All Marketplace plans and many other plans must cover the following list of preventive services without charging you a co-payment or coinsurance. (thebestplanforyou.com)
  • Those that save for the future by contributing to a 401(k) improved abnormal health test results and poor health behaviors approximately 27% more than non-contributors. (researchgate.net)
  • That means "an increase in interagency cooperation," said Col. (Dr.) Sandrine Duron Martinaud, head of the epidemiology and health policies evaluation unit in the Office of the French Surgeon General for the French Armed Forces Health Service. (health.mil)
  • Are poor physical and financial health driven by the same underlying psychological factors? (researchgate.net)
  • We document that the decision to contribute to a 401(k) retirement plan predicts whether or not an individual will act to correct poor physical health indicators revealed during an employer-sponsored health examination. (researchgate.net)
  • Ask your health care provider if you can switch to generic medicines. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Through our platform, we coordinate what we believe is a holistic suite of clinical, social, and behavioral services to address an individual's healthcare needs and prevent adverse events that drive excess cost, all while shifting services towards the home. (signifyhealth.com)