Rupture: Forcible or traumatic tear or break of an organ or other soft part of the body.Dissection: The separation and isolation of tissues for surgical purposes, or for the analysis or study of their structures.Aortic Rupture: The tearing or bursting of the wall along any portion of the AORTA, such as thoracic or abdominal. It may result from the rupture of an aneurysm or it may be due to TRAUMA.Aneurysm, Dissecting: Aneurysm caused by a tear in the TUNICA INTIMA of a blood vessel leading to interstitial HEMORRHAGE, and splitting (dissecting) of the vessel wall, often involving the AORTA. Dissection between the intima and media causes luminal occlusion. Dissection at the media, or between the media and the outer adventitia causes aneurismal dilation.Splenic RuptureHeart Rupture: Disease-related laceration or tearing of tissues of the heart, including the free-wall MYOCARDIUM; HEART SEPTUM; PAPILLARY MUSCLES; CHORDAE TENDINEAE; and any of the HEART VALVES. Pathological rupture usually results from myocardial infarction (HEART RUPTURE, POST-INFARCTION).Uterine Rupture: A complete separation or tear in the wall of the UTERUS with or without expulsion of the FETUS. It may be due to injuries, multiple pregnancies, large fetus, previous scarring, or obstruction.Neck Dissection: Dissection in the neck to remove all disease tissues including cervical LYMPH NODES and to leave an adequate margin of normal tissue. This type of surgery is usually used in tumors or cervical metastases in the head and neck. The prototype of neck dissection is the radical neck dissection described by Crile in 1906.Aortic Aneurysm: An abnormal balloon- or sac-like dilatation in the wall of AORTA.Heart Rupture, Post-Infarction: Laceration or tearing of cardiac tissues appearing after MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION.Carotid Artery, Internal, Dissection: The splitting of the vessel wall in one or both (left and right) internal carotid arteries (CAROTID ARTERY, INTERNAL). Interstitial hemorrhage into the media of the vessel wall can lead to occlusion of the internal carotid artery and aneurysm formation.Fetal Membranes, Premature Rupture: Spontaneous tearing of the membranes surrounding the FETUS any time before the onset of OBSTETRIC LABOR. Preterm PROM is membrane rupture before 37 weeks of GESTATION.Vertebral Artery Dissection: Splitting of the vessel wall in the VERTEBRAL ARTERY. Interstitial hemorrhage into the media of the vessel wall can lead to occlusion of the vertebral artery, aneurysm formation, or THROMBOEMBOLISM. Vertebral artery dissection is often associated with TRAUMA and injuries to the head-neck region but can occur spontaneously.Aortic Aneurysm, Thoracic: An abnormal balloon- or sac-like dilatation in the wall of the THORACIC AORTA. This proximal descending portion of aorta gives rise to the visceral and the parietal branches above the aortic hiatus at the diaphragm.Aneurysm, Ruptured: The tearing or bursting of the weakened wall of the aneurysmal sac, usually heralded by sudden worsening pain. The great danger of a ruptured aneurysm is the large amount of blood spilling into the surrounding tissues and cavities, causing HEMORRHAGIC SHOCK.Aortography: Radiographic visualization of the aorta and its branches by injection of contrast media, using percutaneous puncture or catheterization procedures.Lymph Node Excision: Surgical excision of one or more lymph nodes. Its most common use is in cancer surgery. (From Dorland, 28th ed, p966)Blood Vessel Prosthesis Implantation: Surgical insertion of BLOOD VESSEL PROSTHESES to repair injured or diseased blood vessels.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Stomach Rupture: Bursting of the STOMACH.Tendon Injuries: Injuries to the fibrous cords of connective tissue which attach muscles to bones or other structures.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal: An abnormal balloon- or sac-like dilatation in the wall of the ABDOMINAL AORTA which gives rise to the visceral, the parietal, and the terminal (iliac) branches below the aortic hiatus at the diaphragm.Blood Vessel Prosthesis: Device constructed of either synthetic or biological material that is used for the repair of injured or diseased blood vessels.Intracranial Aneurysm: Abnormal outpouching in the wall of intracranial blood vessels. Most common are the saccular (berry) aneurysms located at branch points in CIRCLE OF WILLIS at the base of the brain. Vessel rupture results in SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE or INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES. Giant aneurysms (>2.5 cm in diameter) may compress adjacent structures, including the OCULOMOTOR NERVE. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p841)Stents: Devices that provide support for tubular structures that are being anastomosed or for body cavities during skin grafting.Wounds, Nonpenetrating: Injuries caused by impact with a blunt object where there is no penetration of the skin.Coronary Aneurysm: Abnormal balloon- or sac-like dilatation in the wall of CORONARY VESSELS. Most coronary aneurysms are due to CORONARY ATHEROSCLEROSIS, and the rest are due to inflammatory diseases, such as KAWASAKI DISEASE.Endovascular Procedures: Minimally invasive procedures, diagnostic or therapeutic, performed within the BLOOD VESSELS. They may be perfomed via ANGIOSCOPY; INTERVENTIONAL MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING; INTERVENTIONAL RADIOGRAPHY; or INTERVENTIONAL ULTRASONOGRAPHY.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Aorta, Thoracic: The portion of the descending aorta proceeding from the arch of the aorta and extending to the DIAPHRAGM, eventually connecting to the ABDOMINAL AORTA.Hematoma: A collection of blood outside the BLOOD VESSELS. Hematoma can be localized in an organ, space, or tissue.Marfan Syndrome: An autosomal dominant disorder of CONNECTIVE TISSUE with abnormal features in the heart, the eye, and the skeleton. Cardiovascular manifestations include MITRAL VALVE PROLAPSE, dilation of the AORTA, and aortic dissection. Other features include lens displacement (ectopia lentis), disproportioned long limbs and enlarged DURA MATER (dural ectasia). Marfan syndrome is associated with mutations in the gene encoding fibrillin, a major element of extracellular microfibrils of connective tissue.Hemoperitoneum: Accumulations of blood in the PERITONEAL CAVITY due to internal HEMORRHAGE.Axilla: Area of the human body underneath the SHOULDER JOINT, also known as the armpit or underarm.Achilles Tendon: A fibrous cord that connects the muscles in the back of the calf to the HEEL BONE.Vertebral Artery: The first branch of the SUBCLAVIAN ARTERY with distribution to muscles of the NECK; VERTEBRAE; SPINAL CORD; CEREBELLUM; and interior of the CEREBRUM.Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Aneurysm, False: Not an aneurysm but a well-defined collection of blood and CONNECTIVE TISSUE outside the wall of a blood vessel or the heart. It is the containment of a ruptured blood vessel or heart, such as sealing a rupture of the left ventricle. False aneurysm is formed by organized THROMBUS and HEMATOMA in surrounding tissue.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Fatal Outcome: Death resulting from the presence of a disease in an individual, as shown by a single case report or a limited number of patients. This should be differentiated from DEATH, the physiological cessation of life and from MORTALITY, an epidemiological or statistical concept.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Acute Disease: Disease having a short and relatively severe course.Lymphatic Metastasis: Transfer of a neoplasm from its primary site to lymph nodes or to distant parts of the body by way of the lymphatic system.Anatomy: A branch of biology dealing with the structure of organisms.Suture Techniques: Techniques for securing together the edges of a wound, with loops of thread or similar materials (SUTURES).Aortic Diseases: Pathological processes involving any part of the AORTA.Aorta, Abdominal: The aorta from the DIAPHRAGM to the bifurcation into the right and left common iliac arteries.Cadaver: A dead body, usually a human body.Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy: A diagnostic procedure used to determine whether LYMPHATIC METASTASIS has occurred. The sentinel lymph node is the first lymph node to receive drainage from a neoplasm.Reoperation: A repeat operation for the same condition in the same patient due to disease progression or recurrence, or as followup to failed previous surgery.Retroperitoneal Space: An area occupying the most posterior aspect of the ABDOMINAL CAVITY. It is bounded laterally by the borders of the quadratus lumborum muscles and extends from the DIAPHRAGM to the brim of the true PELVIS, where it continues as the pelvic extraperitoneal space.Angiography: Radiography of blood vessels after injection of a contrast medium.Aneurysm: Pathological outpouching or sac-like dilatation in the wall of any blood vessel (ARTERIES or VEINS) or the heart (HEART ANEURYSM). It indicates a thin and weakened area in the wall which may later rupture. Aneurysms are classified by location, etiology, or other characteristics.Mesenteric Artery, Superior: A large vessel supplying the whole length of the small intestine except the superior part of the duodenum. It also supplies the cecum and the ascending part of the colon and about half the transverse part of the colon. It arises from the anterior surface of the aorta below the celiac artery at the level of the first lumbar vertebra.Heart Injuries: General or unspecified injuries to the heart.Ultrasonography, Interventional: The use of ultrasound to guide minimally invasive surgical procedures such as needle ASPIRATION BIOPSY; DRAINAGE; etc. Its widest application is intravascular ultrasound imaging but it is useful also in urology and intra-abdominal conditions.Iatrogenic Disease: Any adverse condition in a patient occurring as the result of treatment by a physician, surgeon, or other health professional, especially infections acquired by a patient during the course of treatment.Magnetic Resonance Angiography: Non-invasive method of vascular imaging and determination of internal anatomy without injection of contrast media or radiation exposure. The technique is used especially in CEREBRAL ANGIOGRAPHY as well as for studies of other vascular structures.Echocardiography, Transesophageal: Ultrasonic recording of the size, motion, and composition of the heart and surrounding tissues using a transducer placed in the esophagus.Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Bleeding into the intracranial or spinal SUBARACHNOID SPACE, most resulting from INTRACRANIAL ANEURYSM rupture. It can occur after traumatic injuries (SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE, TRAUMATIC). Clinical features include HEADACHE; NAUSEA; VOMITING, nuchal rigidity, variable neurological deficits and reduced mental status.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Cardiac Tamponade: Compression of the heart by accumulated fluid (PERICARDIAL EFFUSION) or blood (HEMOPERICARDIUM) in the PERICARDIUM surrounding the heart. The affected cardiac functions and CARDIAC OUTPUT can range from minimal to total hemodynamic collapse.Hemothorax: Hemorrhage within the pleural cavity.Embolization, Therapeutic: A method of hemostasis utilizing various agents such as Gelfoam, silastic, metal, glass, or plastic pellets, autologous clot, fat, and muscle as emboli. It has been used in the treatment of spinal cord and INTRACRANIAL ARTERIOVENOUS MALFORMATIONS, renal arteriovenous fistulas, gastrointestinal bleeding, epistaxis, hypersplenism, certain highly vascular tumors, traumatic rupture of blood vessels, and control of operative hemorrhage.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Intraoperative Complications: Complications that affect patients during surgery. They may or may not be associated with the disease for which the surgery is done, or within the same surgical procedure.Prosthesis Design: The plan and delineation of prostheses in general or a specific prosthesis.Vaginal Birth after Cesarean: Delivery of an infant through the vagina in a female who has had a prior cesarean section.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Lymph Nodes: They are oval or bean shaped bodies (1 - 30 mm in diameter) located along the lymphatic system.Tissue Adhesives: Substances used to cause adherence of tissue to tissue or tissue to non-tissue surfaces, as for prostheses.Carotid Artery, Internal: Branch of the common carotid artery which supplies the anterior part of the brain, the eye and its appendages, the forehead and nose.Neck: The part of a human or animal body connecting the HEAD to the rest of the body.Chordae Tendineae: The tendinous cords that connect each cusp of the two atrioventricular HEART VALVES to appropriate PAPILLARY MUSCLES in the HEART VENTRICLES, preventing the valves from reversing themselves when the ventricles contract.Emergency Treatment: First aid or other immediate intervention for accidents or medical conditions requiring immediate care and treatment before definitive medical and surgical management can be procured.Esophageal Diseases: Pathological processes in the ESOPHAGUS.Anterior Cruciate Ligament: A strong ligament of the knee that originates from the posteromedial portion of the lateral condyle of the femur, passes anteriorly and inferiorly between the condyles, and attaches to the depression in front of the intercondylar eminence of the tibia.Subclavian Artery: Artery arising from the brachiocephalic trunk on the right side and from the arch of the aorta on the left side. It distributes to the neck, thoracic wall, spinal cord, brain, meninges, and upper limb.Aorta: The main trunk of the systemic arteries.Extraembryonic Membranes: The thin layers of tissue that surround the developing embryo. There are four extra-embryonic membranes commonly found in VERTEBRATES, such as REPTILES; BIRDS; and MAMMALS. They are the YOLK SAC, the ALLANTOIS, the AMNION, and the CHORION. These membranes provide protection and means to transport nutrients and wastes.Fibromuscular Dysplasia: An idiopathic, segmental, nonatheromatous disease of the musculature of arterial walls, leading to STENOSIS of small and medium-sized arteries. There is true proliferation of SMOOTH MUSCLE CELLS and fibrous tissue. Fibromuscular dysplasia lesions are smooth stenosis and occur most often in the renal and carotid arteries. They may also occur in other peripheral arteries of the extremity.Iliac Artery: Either of two large arteries originating from the abdominal aorta; they supply blood to the pelvis, abdominal wall and legs.Paraplegia: Severe or complete loss of motor function in the lower extremities and lower portions of the trunk. This condition is most often associated with SPINAL CORD DISEASES, although BRAIN DISEASES; PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES; NEUROMUSCULAR DISEASES; and MUSCULAR DISEASES may also cause bilateral leg weakness.Circulatory Arrest, Deep Hypothermia Induced: A technique to arrest the flow of blood by lowering BODY TEMPERATURE to about 20 degrees Centigrade, usually achieved by infusing chilled perfusate. The technique provides a bloodless surgical field for complex surgeries.Coronary Vessels: The veins and arteries of the HEART.Carotid Artery Diseases: Pathological conditions involving the CAROTID ARTERIES, including the common, internal, and external carotid arteries. ATHEROSCLEROSIS and TRAUMA are relatively frequent causes of carotid artery pathology.Vascular Surgical Procedures: Operative procedures for the treatment of vascular disorders.Hernia, Diaphragmatic, Traumatic: The type of DIAPHRAGMATIC HERNIA caused by TRAUMA or injury, usually to the ABDOMEN.Seroma: Tumor-like sterile accumulation of serum in a tissue, organ, or cavity. It results from a tissue insult and is the product of tissue inflammation. It most commonly occurs following MASTECTOMY.Myocardial Infarction: NECROSIS of the MYOCARDIUM caused by an obstruction of the blood supply to the heart (CORONARY CIRCULATION).Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Brachiocephalic Trunk: The first and largest artery branching from the aortic arch. It distributes blood to the right side of the head and neck and to the right arm.Stress, Mechanical: A purely physical condition which exists within any material because of strain or deformation by external forces or by non-uniform thermal expansion; expressed quantitatively in units of force per unit area.Plaque, Atherosclerotic: Lesions formed within the walls of ARTERIES.Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.Sternotomy: Making an incision in the STERNUM.Splenectomy: Surgical procedure involving either partial or entire removal of the spleen.Surgical Instruments: Hand-held tools or implements used by health professionals for the performance of surgical tasks.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Polyethylene Terephthalates: Polyester polymers formed from terephthalic acid or its esters and ethylene glycol. They can be formed into tapes, films or pulled into fibers that are pressed into meshes or woven into fabrics.Coronary Angiography: Radiography of the vascular system of the heart muscle after injection of a contrast medium.Trial of Labor: Allowing a woman to be in LABOR, OBSTETRIC long enough to determine if vaginal birth may be anticipated.Heart Aneurysm: A localized bulging or dilatation in the muscle wall of a heart (MYOCARDIUM), usually in the LEFT VENTRICLE. Blood-filled aneurysms are dangerous because they may burst. Fibrous aneurysms interfere with the heart function through the loss of contractility. True aneurysm is bound by the vessel wall or cardiac wall. False aneurysms are HEMATOMA caused by myocardial rupture.Thoracotomy: Surgical incision into the chest wall.Pericardial Effusion: Fluid accumulation within the PERICARDIUM. Serous effusions are associated with pericardial diseases. Hemopericardium is associated with trauma. Lipid-containing effusion (chylopericardium) results from leakage of THORACIC DUCT. Severe cases can lead to CARDIAC TAMPONADE.Angioplasty: Reconstruction or repair of a blood vessel, which includes the widening of a pathological narrowing of an artery or vein by the removal of atheromatous plaque material and/or the endothelial lining as well, or by dilatation (BALLOON ANGIOPLASTY) to compress an ATHEROMA. Except for ENDARTERECTOMY, usually these procedures are performed via catheterization as minimally invasive ENDOVASCULAR PROCEDURES.Angiography, Digital Subtraction: A method of delineating blood vessels by subtracting a tissue background image from an image of tissue plus intravascular contrast material that attenuates the X-ray photons. The background image is determined from a digitized image taken a few moments before injection of the contrast material. The resulting angiogram is a high-contrast image of the vessel. This subtraction technique allows extraction of a high-intensity signal from the superimposed background information. The image is thus the result of the differential absorption of X-rays by different tissues.Aortic Valve: The valve between the left ventricle and the ascending aorta which prevents backflow into the left ventricle.Pregnancy Complications, Cardiovascular: The co-occurrence of pregnancy and a cardiovascular disease. The disease may precede or follow FERTILIZATION and it may or may not have a deleterious effect on the pregnant woman or FETUS.Abdominal Injuries: General or unspecified injuries involving organs in the abdominal cavity.Thrombosis: Formation and development of a thrombus or blood clot in the blood vessel.Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome: A heterogeneous group of autosomally inherited COLLAGEN DISEASES caused by defects in the synthesis or structure of FIBRILLAR COLLAGEN. There are numerous subtypes: classical, hypermobility, vascular, and others. Common clinical features include hyperextensible skin and joints, skin fragility and reduced wound healing capability.Laparoscopy: A procedure in which a laparoscope (LAPAROSCOPES) is inserted through a small incision near the navel to examine the abdominal and pelvic organs in the PERITONEAL CAVITY. If appropriate, biopsy or surgery can be performed during laparoscopy.Abdomen, Acute: A clinical syndrome with acute abdominal pain that is severe, localized, and rapid in onset. Acute abdomen may be caused by a variety of disorders, injuries, or diseases.Cerebral Angiography: Radiography of the vascular system of the brain after injection of a contrast medium.Dilatation, Pathologic: The condition of an anatomical structure's being dilated beyond normal dimensions.Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Neoplasm Staging: Methods which attempt to express in replicable terms the extent of the neoplasm in the patient.Abdominal Pain: Sensation of discomfort, distress, or agony in the abdominal region.Rupture, Spontaneous: Tear or break of an organ, vessel or other soft part of the body, occurring in the absence of external force.Puerperal Disorders: Disorders or diseases associated with PUERPERIUM, the six-to-eight-week period immediately after PARTURITION in humans.Survival Rate: The proportion of survivors in a group, e.g., of patients, studied and followed over a period, or the proportion of persons in a specified group alive at the beginning of a time interval who survive to the end of the interval. It is often studied using life table methods.Knee Injuries: Injuries to the knee or the knee joint.Ulcer: A lesion on the surface of the skin or a mucous surface, produced by the sloughing of inflammatory necrotic tissue.Tensile Strength: The maximum stress a material subjected to a stretching load can withstand without tearing. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 5th ed, p2001)Electrocoagulation: Procedures using an electrically heated wire or scalpel to treat hemorrhage (e.g., bleeding ulcers) and to ablate tumors, mucosal lesions, and refractory arrhythmias. It is different from ELECTROSURGERY which is used more for cutting tissue than destroying and in which the patient is part of the electric circuit.Endoscopy: Procedures of applying ENDOSCOPES for disease diagnosis and treatment. Endoscopy involves passing an optical instrument through a small incision in the skin i.e., percutaneous; or through a natural orifice and along natural body pathways such as the digestive tract; and/or through an incision in the wall of a tubular structure or organ, i.e. transluminal, to examine or perform surgery on the interior parts of the body.Anastomosis, Surgical: Surgical union or shunt between ducts, tubes or vessels. It may be end-to-end, end-to-side, side-to-end, or side-to-side.Tendons: Fibrous bands or cords of CONNECTIVE TISSUE at the ends of SKELETAL MUSCLE FIBERS that serve to attach the MUSCLES to bones and other structures.Surgical Procedures, Minimally Invasive: Procedures that avoid use of open, invasive surgery in favor of closed or local surgery. These generally involve use of laparoscopic devices and remote-control manipulation of instruments with indirect observation of the surgical field through an endoscope or similar device.Chorioamnionitis: INFLAMMATION of the placental membranes (CHORION; AMNION) and connected tissues such as fetal BLOOD VESSELS and UMBILICAL CORD. It is often associated with intrauterine ascending infections during PREGNANCY.Cesarean Section: Extraction of the FETUS by means of abdominal HYSTEROTOMY.Aneurysm, Infected: Aneurysm due to growth of microorganisms in the arterial wall, or infection arising within preexisting arteriosclerotic aneurysms.Models, Cardiovascular: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of the cardiovascular system, processes, or phenomena; includes the use of mathematical equations, computers and other electronic equipment.Axillary Artery: The continuation of the subclavian artery; it distributes over the upper limb, axilla, chest and shoulder.Hemostasis, Surgical: Control of bleeding during or after surgery.Splenic Artery: The largest branch of the celiac trunk with distribution to the spleen, pancreas, stomach and greater omentum.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Prolapse: The protrusion of an organ or part of an organ into a natural or artificial orifice.Biomechanical Phenomena: The properties, processes, and behavior of biological systems under the action of mechanical forces.Splenic DiseasesRecurrence: The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.Prosthesis Failure: Malfunction of implantation shunts, valves, etc., and prosthesis loosening, migration, and breaking.Gastrectomy: Excision of the whole (total gastrectomy) or part (subtotal gastrectomy, partial gastrectomy, gastric resection) of the stomach. (Dorland, 28th ed)Paraparesis: Mild to moderate loss of bilateral lower extremity motor function, which may be a manifestation of SPINAL CORD DISEASES; PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES; MUSCULAR DISEASES; INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION; parasagittal brain lesions; and other conditions.Feasibility Studies: Studies to determine the advantages or disadvantages, practicability, or capability of accomplishing a projected plan, study, or project.Sinus of Valsalva: The dilatation of the aortic wall behind each of the cusps of the aortic valve.Eye Injuries: Damage or trauma inflicted to the eye by external means. The concept includes both surface injuries and intraocular injuries.Pectoralis Muscles: The pectoralis major and pectoralis minor muscles that make up the upper and fore part of the chest in front of the AXILLA.Lymphedema: Edema due to obstruction of lymph vessels or disorders of the lymph nodes.Iliac Aneurysm: Abnormal balloon- or sac-like dilatation in the wall of any one of the iliac arteries including the common, the internal, or the external ILIAC ARTERY.Groin: The external junctural region between the lower part of the abdomen and the thigh.Mediastinum: A membrane in the midline of the THORAX of mammals. It separates the lungs between the STERNUM in front and the VERTEBRAL COLUMN behind. It also surrounds the HEART, TRACHEA, ESOPHAGUS, THYMUS, and LYMPH NODES.Cardiopulmonary Bypass: Diversion of the flow of blood from the entrance of the right atrium directly to the aorta (or femoral artery) via an oxygenator thus bypassing both the heart and lungs.Angioplasty, Balloon: Use of a balloon catheter for dilation of an occluded artery. It is used in treatment of arterial occlusive diseases, including renal artery stenosis and arterial occlusions in the leg. For the specific technique of BALLOON DILATION in coronary arteries, ANGIOPLASTY, BALLOON, CORONARY is available.Endoleak: Postoperative hemorrhage from an endovascular AORTIC ANEURYSM repaired with endoluminal placement of stent grafts (BLOOD VESSEL PROSTHESIS IMPLANTATION). It is associated with pressurization, expansion, and eventual rupture of the aneurysm.Angioplasty, Laser: A technique utilizing a laser coupled to a catheter which is used in the dilatation of occluded blood vessels. This includes laser thermal angioplasty where the laser energy heats up a metal tip, and direct laser angioplasty where the laser energy directly ablates the occlusion. One form of the latter approach uses an EXCIMER LASER which creates microscopically precise cuts without thermal injury. When laser angioplasty is performed in combination with balloon angioplasty it is called laser-assisted balloon angioplasty (ANGIOPLASTY, BALLOON, LASER-ASSISTED).Lateral Medullary Syndrome: INFARCTION of the dorsolateral aspect of MEDULLA OBLONGATA in the BRAIN STEM. It is caused by occlusion of the VERTEBRAL ARTERY and/or the posterior inferior cerebellar artery. Clinical manifestations vary with the size of infarction, but may include loss of pain and temperature sensation in the ipsilateral face and contralateral body below the chin; ipsilateral HORNER SYNDROME; ipsilateral ATAXIA; DYSARTHRIA; VERTIGO; nausea, hiccup; dysphagia; and VOCAL CORD PARALYSIS. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p801)Reconstructive Surgical Procedures: Procedures used to reconstruct, restore, or improve defective, damaged, or missing structures.Tendon Transfer: Surgical procedure by which a tendon is incised at its insertion and placed at an anatomical site distant from the original insertion. The tendon remains attached at the point of origin and takes over the function of a muscle inactivated by trauma or disease.Radiography, Interventional: Diagnostic and therapeutic procedures that are invasive or surgical in nature, and require the expertise of a specially trained radiologist. In general, they are more invasive than diagnostic imaging but less invasive than major surgery. They often involve catheterization, fluoroscopy, or computed tomography. Some examples include percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography, percutaneous transthoracic biopsy, balloon angioplasty, and arterial embolization.Hemorrhage: Bleeding or escape of blood from a vessel.Celiac Artery: The arterial trunk that arises from the abdominal aorta and after a short course divides into the left gastric, common hepatic and splenic arteries.Catheterization: Use or insertion of a tubular device into a duct, blood vessel, hollow organ, or body cavity for injecting or withdrawing fluids for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes. It differs from INTUBATION in that the tube here is used to restore or maintain patency in obstructions.Esophageal Perforation: An opening or hole in the ESOPHAGUS that is caused by TRAUMA, injury, or pathological process.Glossectomy: Partial or total surgical excision of the tongue. (Dorland, 28th ed)Autopsy: Postmortem examination of the body.Neoplasm Micrometastasis: Newly arising secondary tumors so small they are difficult to detect by physical examination or routine imaging techniques.Vascular Grafting: Surgical insertion of BLOOD VESSEL PROSTHESES, or transplanted BLOOD VESSELS, or other biological material to repair injured or diseased blood vessels.Surgical Procedures, Elective: Surgery which could be postponed or not done at all without danger to the patient. Elective surgery includes procedures to correct non-life-threatening medical problems as well as to alleviate conditions causing psychological stress or other potential risk to patients, e.g., cosmetic or contraceptive surgery.Pelvis: The space or compartment surrounded by the pelvic girdle (bony pelvis). It is subdivided into the greater pelvis and LESSER PELVIS. The pelvic girdle is formed by the PELVIC BONES and SACRUM.Laparotomy: Incision into the side of the abdomen between the ribs and pelvis.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Equipment Design: Methods of creating machines and devices.Ligaments, Articular: Fibrous cords of CONNECTIVE TISSUE that attach bones to each other and hold together the many types of joints in the body. Articular ligaments are strong, elastic, and allow movement in only specific directions, depending on the individual joint.Aortic Valve Insufficiency: Pathological condition characterized by the backflow of blood from the ASCENDING AORTA back into the LEFT VENTRICLE, leading to regurgitation. It is caused by diseases of the AORTIC VALVE or its surrounding tissue (aortic root).Obstetric Labor, Premature: Onset of OBSTETRIC LABOR before term (TERM BIRTH) but usually after the FETUS has become viable. In humans, it occurs sometime during the 29th through 38th week of PREGNANCY. TOCOLYSIS inhibits premature labor and can prevent the BIRTH of premature infants (INFANT, PREMATURE).Coronary Thrombosis: Coagulation of blood in any of the CORONARY VESSELS. The presence of a blood clot (THROMBUS) often leads to MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION.Posterior Capsular Rupture, Ocular: A breach in the continuity of the posterior chamber of the eyeball.Microsurgery: The performance of surgical procedures with the aid of a microscope.Thyroidectomy: Surgical removal of the thyroid gland. (Dorland, 28th ed)Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Amniotic Fluid: A clear, yellowish liquid that envelopes the FETUS inside the sac of AMNION. In the first trimester, it is likely a transudate of maternal or fetal plasma. In the second trimester, amniotic fluid derives primarily from fetal lung and kidney. Cells or substances in this fluid can be removed for prenatal diagnostic tests (AMNIOCENTESIS).Phenotype: The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.Hospital Mortality: A vital statistic measuring or recording the rate of death from any cause in hospitalized populations.Angioplasty, Balloon, Coronary: Dilation of an occluded coronary artery (or arteries) by means of a balloon catheter to restore myocardial blood supply.Labor, Induced: Artificially induced UTERINE CONTRACTION. Generally, LABOR, OBSTETRIC is induced with the intent to cause delivery of the fetus and termination of pregnancy.Vertebrobasilar Insufficiency: Localized or diffuse reduction in blood flow through the vertebrobasilar arterial system, which supplies the BRAIN STEM; CEREBELLUM; OCCIPITAL LOBE; medial TEMPORAL LOBE; and THALAMUS. Characteristic clinical features include SYNCOPE; lightheadedness; visual disturbances; and VERTIGO. BRAIN STEM INFARCTIONS or other BRAIN INFARCTION may be associated.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Breast Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the human BREAST.Femoral Artery: The main artery of the thigh, a continuation of the external iliac artery.Balloon Occlusion: Use of a balloon CATHETER to block the flow of blood through an artery or vein.Urinary Bladder Diseases: Pathological processes of the URINARY BLADDER.Atherosclerosis: A thickening and loss of elasticity of the walls of ARTERIES that occurs with formation of ATHEROSCLEROTIC PLAQUES within the ARTERIAL INTIMA.Athletic Injuries: Injuries incurred during participation in competitive or non-competitive sports.Uterine Myomectomy: Surgical removal of a LEIOMYOMA of the UTERUS.Arteriosclerosis: Thickening and loss of elasticity of the walls of ARTERIES of all sizes. There are many forms classified by the types of lesions and arteries involved, such as ATHEROSCLEROSIS with fatty lesions in the ARTERIAL INTIMA of medium and large muscular arteries.Horner Syndrome: A syndrome associated with defective sympathetic innervation to one side of the face, including the eye. Clinical features include MIOSIS; mild BLEPHAROPTOSIS; and hemifacial ANHIDROSIS (decreased sweating)(see HYPOHIDROSIS). Lesions of the BRAIN STEM; cervical SPINAL CORD; first thoracic nerve root; apex of the LUNG; CAROTID ARTERY; CAVERNOUS SINUS; and apex of the ORBIT may cause this condition. (From Miller et al., Clinical Neuro-Ophthalmology, 4th ed, pp500-11)Patient Selection: Criteria and standards used for the determination of the appropriateness of the inclusion of patients with specific conditions in proposed treatment plans and the criteria used for the inclusion of subjects in various clinical trials and other research protocols.Combined Modality Therapy: The treatment of a disease or condition by several different means simultaneously or sequentially. Chemoimmunotherapy, RADIOIMMUNOTHERAPY, chemoradiotherapy, cryochemotherapy, and SALVAGE THERAPY are seen most frequently, but their combinations with each other and surgery are also used.
... and dissections increase the risk of vessel rupture. Idiopathic diseases are those that occur spontaneously without a known ... The embolism prevents blood flow to the brain, which leads to a stroke. An aneurysm is an abnormal bulging of small sections of ... Arterial dissections are tears of the internal lining of arteries, often associated with trauma. Dissections within the carotid ... A germinal matrix hemorrhage is bleeding into the brain of premature infants caused by the rupture of fragile blood vessels ...
... rupture can be caused by a myocardial infarct, and dysfunction can be caused by ischemia. Both complications ... This prevents regurgitation-backward flow of ventricular blood into the atrial cavities-by bracing the atrioventricular valves ... Deep dissection. Trabeculae carneae Moore KL, Dalley AF, Agur AM (2007). Clinically Oriented Anatomy (3rd ed.). Baltimore: ... The posteromedial muscle ruptures more frequently because it only has one source of blood supply. The papillary muscles of both ...
Rarer severe differential diagnoses includes aortic dissection, esophageal rupture, tension pneumothorax, and pericardial ... However, 1 in 200 people were prevented from a repeat heart attack, and another 1 in 200 from having an abnormal heart rhythm. ... Rupture of the ventricular dividing wall or left ventricular wall may occur within the initial weeks. Dressler's syndrome, a ... Play media The most common cause of a myocardial infarction is the rupture of an atherosclerotic plaque on an artery supplying ...
Acute coronary syndrome Air embolism (arterial) Aortic aneurysm (ruptured) Abdominal aortic aneurysm Aortic dissection Bleeding ... Not all medical emergencies are life-threatening; some conditions require medical attention in order to prevent significant and ... Fetal distress Obstetrical hemorrhage Placental abruption Prolapsed cord Puerperal sepsis Shoulder dystocia Uterine rupture ... Pancreatitis Peritonitis Poisoning Food poisoning Venomous animal bite Pharmacological overdose Botanical Polytrauma Ruptured ...
EVAR is also used for rupture of the abdominal and descending thoracic aorta, and in rare cases used to treat pathology of the ... In uncomplicated aortic dissections, no benefit has been demonstrated over medical management alone. In uncomplicated type B ... EndoAnchors are small, helically shaped implants that directly lock the graft to the aortic wall with the goal to prevent ... Endograft migration, aneurysm rupture, graft limb stenosis/kinking, type I/III/IV endoleaks or stent graft thrombosis. An ...
... can quickly lead to death from not enough blood flow to the heart or rupture of the aorta. Aortic dissection ... Also, the area of dissection is removed and replaced with a Dacron graft to prevent further dissection from occurring. However ... Complications include compromise of a vital organ, rupture or impending rupture of the aorta, retrograde dissection into the ... Type A aortic dissection Play media Type A aortic dissection Play media Dissection of both the thoracic and abdominal aorta ...
A myotendinous rupture of the temporalis can occur during a seizure due to extreme clenching of the jaw. During a seizure the ... When lower dentures are fitted, they should not extend into the retromolar fossa to prevent trauma of the mucosa due to the ... Temporal muscle (red). Muscles of head and neck Temporal muscle.Deep dissection.Mummification process. Illustrated Anatomy of ... Naffa, Lena; Yasmeen, Tandon; Rubin, Michael (2014). "Myotendinous rupture of temporalis muscle: A rare injury following ...
It may not be possible to remove all lesions, nor will the operation prevent new lesions from growing. Development of new ... It is well known that myomectomy surgery is associated with a higher risk of uterine rupture in later pregnancy. Thus, women ... There is less evidence supporting the usefulness chemical dissection (such as with mesna), vaginal insertion of dinoprostone, a ... should get Cesarean delivery to avoid the risk of uterine rupture that is commonly fatal to the fetus. To reduce bleeding ...
... if successful fill the aneurysm dome and prevent its rupture.[citation needed] Flow diverter can be used but not without ... "Expandable device type III for easy and reliable approximation of dissection layers in sutureless aortic anastomosis. Ex vivo ... There may be no symptoms present at all until the aneurysm ruptures. For an aneurysm that has not ruptured the following ... If the CT scan is negative but a ruptured aneurysm is still suspected based on clinical findings, a lumbar puncture can be ...
A ruptured cyst is treated with rest, leg elevation, and injection of a corticosteroid into the knee. Baker's cysts in children ... In this image, the Baker's cyst is the yellowish bulbous tissue which was identified during routine dissection. Baker's cyst on ... Avoiding activities such as squatting, kneeling, heavy lifting, climbing, and even running can help prevent pain. Despite this ... A Baker's cyst can rupture and produce acute pain behind the knee and in the calf and swelling of the calf muscles. Diagnosis ...
Spontaneous renal artery dissection: three cases and clinical algorithms. J Hum Hypertens. 2006 Sep;20(9):710-718. Mace, P., " ... PTRA can also aide in preventing a lifelong dependency on a medication for such a young patient. According to Meyers, " ... Adverse events may include, "recurrent stenosis, arterial occlusion with renal loss, and arterial rupture with extravasations ... Spontaneous dissection of the carotid and vertebral arteries. N Engl J Med. 2001;344;898-906.. ...
Chest trauma Aortic dissection Pulmonary contusion Schrader L, Carey MJ (2000). "Traumatic Aortic Rupture". The Doctor Will See ... In some of these patients, the adventitia and nearby structures within the chest may serve to prevent severe bleeding. After ... Aortic rupture can also be caused by non-traumatic mechanisms, particularly abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture. The injury is ... Thus traumatic aortic rupture is a common killer in automotive accidents and other traumas, with up to 18% of deaths that occur ...
... and vertebral artery dissection. Violent coughing can cause the pleura to rupture, leading to a pneumothorax. Vomiting after a ... Antibiotics may be used to prevent the disease in those who have been exposed and are at risk of severe disease. In those with ... Pertussis vaccines are effective at preventing illness and are recommended for routine use by the World Health Organization and ...
... if successful fill the aneurysm dome and prevent its rupture.[citation needed] Flow diverter can be used but not without ... John Ritter, died September 11, 2003 of a misdiagnosed thoracic aortic dissection (aortic aneurysm).[42][43] ... As an aneurysm increases in size, the risk of rupture increases.[2] A ruptured aneurysm can lead to bleeding. Aneurysms are a ... There may be no symptoms present at all until the aneurysm ruptures.[11] For an aneurysm that has not ruptured the following ...
... and aortic dissection.[citation needed] Risk factors for rupture after an acute myocardial infarction include female gender, ... these would prevent egress of blood) and pericardial tamponade. An accumulation of as little as 75 ml of blood, acquired ... Myocardial ruptures can be classified as one of three types. Type I myocardial rupture is an abrupt slit-like tear that ... Rupture of a papillary muscle will cause acute mitral regurgitation. The rupture will most often occur near the edge of the ...
Acute arterial occlusion may develop as a result of arterial dissection in the carotid artery or aorta or as a result of ... Anticoagulant therapy is initiated to prevent further enlargement of the thrombus. Continuous IV unfractionated heparin has ... and peripheral artery occlusive disease rupture of significant blood vessels supplying a tissue or organ. Anemia vasoconstricts ... can result in ischemia of the extremities due to unusual body positions that prevent normal circulation Ischemia results in ...
The risk of rupture of an AAA is related to its diameter; once the aneurysm reaches about 5 cm, the yearly risk of rupture may ... Aortic valve repair Aortic dissection Cardarelli's sign Johnston KW, Rutherford RB, Tilson MD, Shah DM, Hollier L, Stanley JC ( ... A 2012 Cochrane systematic review noted that further research regarding the effectiveness of CFSD for preventing a spinal cord ... Unfortunately, however, rupture may be the first hint of AAA. Once an aneurysm has ruptured, it presents with classic symptoms ...
... created from the deep scleral dissection is proposed to accommodate certain biocompatible spacer or devices in order to prevent ... rupture of long posterior ciliary artery from progressive stretching with progressive serous choroidal detachment; usually ... This iridectomy will prevent future blockage of the sclerostomy. The scleral flap is then sutured loosely back in place with ... Additional deep scleral dissection can also be performed in the scleral bed with trabeculectomy, first introduced by T. Dada et ...
... is distinct from aortic dissection, which is a tear through the inner wall of the aorta that can block the flow ... An aortic occlusion balloon can be placed to stabilize the patient and prevent further blood loss prior to the induction of ... Aortic rupture is the rupture or breakage of the aorta, the largest artery in the body. Aortic rupture is a rare, extremely ... An aortic rupture can be classified according to its cause into one of the following main types: Traumatic aortic rupture ...
As IUA frequently reform after surgery, techniques have been developed to prevent recurrence of adhesions. Methods to prevent ... Deaton JL, Maier D, Andreoli J (1989). "Spontaneous uterine rupture during pregnancy after treatment of Asherman's syndrome". ... Operative hysteroscopy is used for visual inspection of the uterine cavity during adhesion dissection (adhesiolysis). However, ... Early monitoring during pregnancy to identify miscarriage can prevent the development of, or as the case may be, the recurrence ...
A common structure used to identify part of the brachial plexus in cadaver dissections is the M or W shape made by the ... Although very hard to prevent during live birth, doctors must be able to deliver a newborn with precise and gentle movements to ... These stretches can cause ruptures to the superior portions of the brachial plexus or avulse the roots from the spinal cord. ... Dissection of brachial plexus Brachial plexus Brachial plexus Brachial plexus Spinal cord. Brachial plexus. Cerebrum.Inferior ...
The goal may also be to avert complications of the aorta (rupture or dissection) in the treatment of aneurysm. Repair is a more ... Blood thinning may only be necessary if atrial fibrillation occurs or persists in order to prevent blood clot formation in the ... The aneurysm of the ascending aorta may also become so large that it can develop rupture or dissection as life-threatening ... valve repair may also be performed in the treatment of aortic aneurysm or aortic dissection if either aneurysm or dissection ...
Aneurysms and dissections also can occur in arteries other than the aorta. Because aneurysms in children tend to rupture early ... If an increased heart rate is present, atenolol is sometimes prescribed to reduce the heart rate to prevent any extra pressure ... The disorder is marked by aneurysms in the aorta, often in children, and the aorta may also undergo sudden dissection in the ... Due to the high risk of death from aortic aneurysm rupture, patients should be followed closely to monitor aneurysm formation, ...
OAS is used to treat patients with aortic aneurysms greater than 5.5 cm in diameter, to treat aortic rupture of an aneurysm any ... OAS is used to treat aneurysms of the abdominal and thoracic aorta, aortic dissection, acute aortic syndrome, and aortic ... A 2012 Cochrane systematic review noted that further research regarding the effectiveness of CFSD for preventing a spinal cord ... Cinà, C.; Abouzahr, L.; Arena, G.; Laganà, A.; Devereaux, P.; Farrokhyar, F. (2004). "Cerebrospinal fluid drainage to prevent ...
The maneuvers are the retraction of the colon, the division of the attachments to the colon and the dissection of the mesentery ... There is no evidence to suggest that the avoidance of nuts and seeds prevents the progression of diverticulosis to an acute ... With CT scan evidence of abscess, fistula, or intestinal rupture with peritonitis, antibiotics are recommended and routinely ... Emergency surgery is indicated for intestinal rupture with peritonitis. The first surgical approach consists of the resection ...
This treatment also has an immunosuppressive effect that prevents rejection of the HSC by the recipient's immune system. The ... The documented adverse effects of filgrastim include splenic rupture (indicated by left upper abdominal or shoulder pain, risk ... Neck dissection. *Retroperitoneal lymph node dissection. *Lymph node biopsy. Tonsils. *see Template:Procedures on the mouth and ... It is usually not life-threatening but is very painful, and prevents eating and drinking. Mucositis is treated with pain ...
Tendon lengthening is a key problem in the restoration of function following Achilles tendon rupture. A study was performed to ... Operative repair of Achilles tendon ruptures leads to reduced tendon elongation. ... Rupture of the Achilles tendon often leads to long-term morbidity, particularly calf weakness associated with tendon elongation ... The use of a "clean" tenotomy, with a flat tendon end, may prevent shortening of the tendon at the time of repair due to the ...
The reduced pressure prevents the occurrence of vessel dissection or rupture. In one embodiment of the present invention the ... This reduced pressure may prevent the occurrence of vessel dissection or rupture. In one embodiment of the present invention ... and prevent vessel rupture. The balloon 10 remains intact and at least a portion of the balloon 10 continues to be held to the ... A sudden rupture and release of inflation media due to over-pressurization may also result in damage to the vessel wall ...
... aortic root reconstruction now is widely used in treatment of chronic aortic aneurysmal disease and acute aortic dissections ... Surgery is indicated to prevent rupture [31]. Rupture is often into an adjacent heart chamber with high-out heat failure [32]. ... 6. Aortic dissection. Acute aortic dissection is a high-risk aortic catastrophe which occurs in 5-30/1,000,000 patient annually ... Patients may have an intra-mural hematoma prior to developing dissection.. Aortic dissection is classified according to the ...
Captain Suffers an Acute Aortic Dissection After Responding to Two Alarms and Subsequently Dies Due to Hemopericardium - ... Rupture of the intra-pericardial portion of the ascending thoracic aorta *Thoracoabdominal aortic dissection extending from the ... NFPA 1500 requires a wellness program that provides health promotion activities for preventing health problems and enhancing ... The autopsy revealed the cause of death to be "hemopericardium" due to an "aortic rupture" and "aortic dissection." ...
Aortic dissection. *Esophageal rupture (Boerhaaves syndrome). 9. What are the signs/symptoms and issues with digoxin toxicity? ... They are for symptom relief and to prevent heart failure hospitalization only. For you gunners, the Congestive Heart Failure - ... What are the five life-threatening complications of aortic dissection?. * Coronary dissection (usually the right coronary ... BONUS: Mitral stenosis is in the differential diagnosis of hemoptysis which can occur due to rupture of a bronchial vein (they ...
Ascending aortic dissection and rupture remain a life-threatening complication in patients with Marfan syndrome (MFS). The ... extracellular matrix provides strength and elastic recoil to the aortic wall, thereby preventing radial expansion. We have ...
Rupture and dissection of aortic root aneurysms remain the leading causes of death in patients with the Marfan syndrome, a ... Although TGF-? blockade prevents aneurysms in MFS mouse models, the mechanisms through which excessive TGF-? causes aneurysms ... Ascending aortic dissection and rupture remain a life-threatening complication in patients with Marfan syndrome (MFS). The ... Aortic root aneurysm formation and subsequent dissection and/or rupture remain the leading cause of death in patients with ...
This helps prevent additional bleeding and reduces the risk of a rupture. ... What causes aortic dissection, and how can it be prevented?. The key point in prevention of aortic dissection is managing high ... Aortic Dissection. Skip to the navigation Topic Overview. What is an aortic dissection?. Aortic dissection occurs when a small ... How is aortic dissection treated?. The treatment of aortic dissection depends in part on where the dissection is located:. * ...
Prompt surgical intervention is an important preventive measure against possible aortic dissection, a serious tear or rupture ... There is no cure, but therapy can improve quality of life for a person with the condition and prevent potentially dangerous ... Regular monitoring can help to prevent bone, joint, and tissue problems by recognizing any changes in the spine or sternum at ... However, treatment can relieve symptoms and minimize or prevent possible complications.. The doctor will develop a personalized ...
In a randomized trial, celiprolol, an inexpensive, well-tolerated drug, decreased incidence of arterial rupture or dissection. ... These findings suggest that celiprolol can prevent life-threatening complications of vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Although ... arterial rupture or dissection, was significantly lower in celiprolol recipients than in controls (20% vs. 50%; hazard ratio, ... Fatal complications, which occur at a median age of 40-50, can include mitral valve prolapse and spontaneous rupture of large- ...
... most of which are the result of rupture or dissection. However, early diagnosis and treatment can help prevent these events ... As with abdominal aortic aneurysm ruptures, a thoracic aortic aneurysm rupture or dissection can quickly lead to shock. ... Ruptures and dissections are the leading causes of deaths from aortic aneurysms, while occlusions can lead to amputation of the ... If your doctor finds that your aneurysm is growing quickly or at risk of rupture or dissection, he or she may recommend surgery ...
Medicine is used to lower blood pressure to help prevent an aneurysm from rupturing and causing a dissection of the aorta.2 ... Some complications of Marfan syndrome can be treated or prevented, including heart disease, bone deformities such as a curved ...
Surgery for Marfan syndrome is aimed at preventing aortic dissection or rupture and treating valve problems. When the aorta ... If the aorta is normal size, the risk for dissection is lower, but not absent. Those with even slight enlargement are at higher ... Medications are not used to treat Marfan syndrome, however they may be used to prevent or control complications. Medications ... Clinical trials are currently being conducted to evaluate how these medications may prevent aortic enlargement. Early studies ...
... or it can tear or rupture. People with certain genetic conditions, and those who have a relative who has… ... Thats a shame, because finding them early can prevent most deadly dissections or ruptures. ... Aneurysm dissection Dissection of an aneurysm occurs when a rip appears in the inner layer of the aortic wall and it peels away ... Others can lead to the catastrophic problems known as dissection or rupture. For now, size is the best and only guide to the ...
... prevent aortic dissection and rupture. In this open-heart surgery, the aortic valve and part of the aorta are replaced. ... Slow or prevent aortic enlargement *Stabilize aortic dissections that begin away from the heart so that immediate surgery is ... An aortic dissection is a life-threatening emergency. Signs and symptoms of an aortic dissection include abrupt onset of chest ... Other family members with Marfan syndrome have had aortic dissection or aortic aneurysm rupture. ...
Speed is of aortic dissection and rupture. At that age it is common to use clinical trials should be observed when considering ... To prevent hypoxia a lack of spoken language; difculty in weight between the group means are different from other types of food ...
Type A dissections start in the ascending aorta and require emergent surgical repair to prevent death from aortic rupture. Type ... Repair of Aortic Dissection. Aortic dissection is a tearing within the wall of the aorta (the largest artery in the body), and ... Aortic dissections are classified into two types: Type A and Type B dissections. ... Dissections are often associated with uncontrolled high blood pressure or smoking and may occur in a patient with an aneurysm ( ...
Chronic treatment with a broad-spectrum metalloproteinase inhibitor, doxycycline, prevents the development of spontaneous ... ruptures, dissections, or aneurysms), with a majority of dissections affecting notably AA and TA. These ruptures might be ... 7 These arterial ruptures may be preceded by dissections or aneurysms but spontaneous arterial ruptures are the most common ... mice caused by thoracic aortic dissections and ruptures. Aortic ruptures were correlated with significantly less collagen ...
... size criteria for preemptive surgical replacement of the aneurysmal aorta to prevent the complications of rupture or dissection ... Descending Aortic Dissections. Acute Descending Aortic Dissections. Acute aortic dissection is the most common catastrophe of ... for type A dissections, and 4.1% (4 of 98 patients) for type B dissections (P=0.0001). The ruptures occurred with initial ... rupture, and mortality rates for each size of the thoracic aorta. Figure 5 demonstrates that the risk of rupture, dissection, ...
Ascending aorta replacement is performed when there is aneurismal enlargement or dissection of the aortic root. The ascending ... Chest or back pain in the presence of an enlarged thoracic aorta is a predictor of aortic rupture or dissection. ... These patients require emergent surgery to prevent death.. Multiple surgical procedures may accompany ascending aorta ... because they are at a higher risk for rupture or dissection compared to the general population. ...
The autopsy revealed the cause of death to be "hemopericardium" due to an "aortic rupture" and "aortic dissection." It is ... unlikely the following recommendations could have prevented the Captains death. Nonetheless, the NIOSH investigators offer ... Captain suffers an acute aortic dissection after responding to two alarms and subsequently dies due to hemopericardium - ... his aortic dissection went undiagnosed. He was treated for bilateral pneumonia but his condition continued to deteriorate. ...
... with an intracranial aneurysm had a procedure to prevent aneurysm rupture. Of 237 patients with dissection, 41 (17.3%) ... Eight patients (32%) with coronary dissection underwent procedures for management of this dissection. For dissections, ... More than one-third of patients with intracranial aneurysms underwent a procedure to treat the aneurysm and prevent rupture. ... As for dissection, an overall association with tobacco use was not observed. For the patients with aortic dissection, the ...
... comprising a self-expandable stent that is at least partially covered with a biocompatible material configured to prevent ... ruptures, dissections, punctures, etc. While FIGS. 5 depict vessel V with a relatively constant internal diameter, this is only ... Material 54 prevents dynamic self-expansion of stent 52. Radial opening 56 extends through stent 52 and material 54, thereby ... In addition to preventing release of emboli, stent grafts are indicated for bridging defective points within a vessel, such as ...
... an elaborate strategy to prevent an intraoperative cerebral embolism is especially important.. Jpn. J. Cardiovasc. Surg. 38:64- ... A Case of Partial Arch and Descending Aortic Replacement for a Ruptured Type B Acute Aortic Dissection ... Ruptured type B acute aortic dissection iAAD jis a life-threatening condition, in which surgical treatment most often yields ... We report a case of a ruptured type B AAD in a 67-year-old man detected on computed tomography that required a partial aortic ...
... doxycycline prevents the early accumulation of aortic neutrophils and significantly reduces the incidence of AD and rupture. ... Aortic dissection (AD) is a life-threatening vascular disease with limited treatment strategies. Here, we show that loss of the ... Adoptive transfer of Lnk-/- leukocytes into Rag1-/- mice induces AD and rupture in response to Ang II, demonstrating that LNK ... markedly increases susceptibility to acute AD and rupture in response to angiotensin (Ang) II infusion. As early as day 3 ...