Drugs that cannot be sold legally without a prescription.
Directions written for the obtaining and use of DRUGS.
Insurance providing for payment of services rendered by the pharmacist. Services include the preparation and distribution of medical products.
Improper use of drugs or medications outside the intended purpose, scope, or guidelines for use. This is in contrast to MEDICATION ADHERENCE, and distinguished from DRUG ABUSE, which is a deliberate or willful action.
The charge levied on the consumer for drugs or therapy prescribed under written order of a physician or other health professional.
Directions written for the obtaining and use of PHARMACEUTICAL PREPARATIONS; MEDICAL DEVICES; corrective LENSES; and a variety of other medical remedies.
A stand-alone drug plan offered by insurers and other private companies to beneficiaries that receive their Medicare Part A and/or B benefits through the Original Medicare Plan. It includes Medicare Private Fee-for-Service Plans that do not offer prescription drug coverage and Medicare Cost Plans offering Medicare prescription drug coverage. The plan was enacted as the Medicare Prescription Drug, Improvement and Modernization Act of 2003 with coverage beginning January 1, 2006.
The amount that a health care institution or organization pays for its drugs. It is one component of the final price that is charged to the consumer (FEES, PHARMACEUTICAL or PRESCRIPTION FEES).
Provisions of an insurance policy that require the insured to pay some portion of covered expenses. Several forms of sharing are in use, e.g., deductibles, coinsurance, and copayments. Cost sharing does not refer to or include amounts paid in premiums for the coverage. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)
Laws concerned with manufacturing, dispensing, and marketing of drugs.
Payments or services provided under stated circumstances under the terms of an insurance policy. In prepayment programs, benefits are the services the programs will provide at defined locations and to the extent needed.
Works about lists of drugs or collections of recipes, formulas, and prescriptions for the compounding of medicinal preparations. Formularies differ from PHARMACOPOEIAS in that they are less complete, lacking full descriptions of the drugs, their formulations, analytic composition, chemical properties, etc. In hospitals, formularies list all drugs commonly stocked in the hospital pharmacy.
The utilization of drugs as reported in individual hospital studies, FDA studies, marketing, or consumption, etc. This includes drug stockpiling, and patient drug profiles.
The term "United States" in a medical context often refers to the country where a patient or study participant resides, and is not a medical term per se, but relevant for epidemiological studies, healthcare policies, and understanding differences in disease prevalence, treatment patterns, and health outcomes across various geographic locations.
Drugs whose drug name is not protected by a trademark. They may be manufactured by several companies.
Amounts charged to the patient or third-party payer for medication. It includes the pharmacist's professional fee and cost of ingredients, containers, etc.
Federal program, created by Public Law 89-97, Title XVIII-Health Insurance for the Aged, a 1965 amendment to the Social Security Act, that provides health insurance benefits to persons over the age of 65 and others eligible for Social Security benefits. It consists of two separate but coordinated programs: hospital insurance (MEDICARE PART A) and supplementary medical insurance (MEDICARE PART B). (Hospital Administration Terminology, AHA, 2d ed and A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, US House of Representatives, 1976)
The Balanced Budget Act (BBA) of 1997 establishes a Medicare+Choice program under part C of Title XVIII, Section 4001, of the Social Security Act. Under this program, an eligible individual may elect to receive Medicare benefits through enrollment in a Medicare+Choice plan. Beneficiaries may choose to use private pay options, establish medical savings accounts, use managed care plans, or join provider-sponsored plans.
A component of the Department of Health and Human Services to oversee and direct the Medicare and Medicaid programs and related Federal medical care quality control staffs. Name was changed effective June 14, 2001.
Formal programs for assessing drug prescription against some standard. Drug utilization review may consider clinical appropriateness, cost effectiveness, and, in some cases, outcomes. Review is usually retrospective, but some analysis may be done before drugs are dispensed (as in computer systems which advise physicians when prescriptions are entered). Drug utilization review is mandated for Medicaid programs beginning in 1993.
That segment of commercial enterprise devoted to the design, development, and manufacture of chemical products for use in the diagnosis and treatment of disease, disability, or other dysfunction, or to improve function.
Exploitation through misrepresentation of the facts or concealment of the purposes of the exploiter.
The amounts spent by individuals, groups, nations, or private or public organizations for total health care and/or its various components. These amounts may or may not be equivalent to the actual costs (HEALTH CARE COSTS) and may or may not be shared among the patient, insurers, and/or employers.
Use of written, printed, or graphic materials upon or accompanying a drug container or wrapper. It includes contents, indications, effects, dosages, routes, methods, frequency and duration of administration, warnings, hazards, contraindications, side effects, precautions, and other relevant information.
The containment, regulation, or restraint of costs. Costs are said to be contained when the value of resources committed to an activity is not considered excessive. This determination is frequently subjective and dependent upon the specific geographic area of the activity being measured. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)
Control of drug and narcotic use by international agreement, or by institutional systems for handling prescribed drugs. This includes regulations concerned with the manufacturing, dispensing, approval (DRUG APPROVAL), and marketing of drugs.
Generally refers to the amount of protection available and the kind of loss which would be paid for under an insurance contract with an insurer. (Slee & Slee, Health Care Terms, 2d ed)
Payment by individuals or their family for health care services which are not covered by a third-party payer, either insurance or medical assistance.
Facilities for the preparation and dispensing of drugs.
The transfer of prescription drugs from legal to illegal distribution and marketing networks.
Cost-sharing mechanisms that provide for payment by the insured of some portion of covered expenses. Deductibles are the amounts paid by the insured under a health insurance contract before benefits become payable; coinsurance is the provision under which the insured pays part of the medical bill, usually according to a fixed percentage, when benefits become payable.
Disorders related to substance abuse.
Review of claims by insurance companies to determine liability and amount of payment for various services. The review may also include determination of eligibility of the claimant or beneficiary or of the provider of the benefit; determination that the benefit is covered or not payable under another policy; or determination that the service was necessary and of reasonable cost and quality.
Patterns of practice related to diagnosis and treatment as especially influenced by cost of the service requested and provided.
Disorders related or resulting from abuse or mis-use of opioids.
Compounds with activity like OPIATE ALKALOIDS, acting at OPIOID RECEPTORS. Properties include induction of ANALGESIA or NARCOSIS.
Medicines that can be sold legally without a DRUG PRESCRIPTION.
Reductions in all or any portion of the costs of providing goods or services. Savings may be incurred by the provider or the consumer.
Services providing pharmaceutic and therapeutic drug information and consultation.
Application of marketing principles and techniques to maximize the use of health care resources.
A traditional grouping of drugs said to have a soothing or calming effect on mood, thought, or behavior. Included here are the ANTI-ANXIETY AGENTS (minor tranquilizers), ANTIMANIC AGENTS, and the ANTIPSYCHOTIC AGENTS (major tranquilizers). These drugs act by different mechanisms and are used for different therapeutic purposes.
A supplemental health insurance policy sold by private insurance companies and designed to pay for health care costs and services that are not paid for either by Medicare alone or by a combination of Medicare and existing private health insurance benefits. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988)
Federal program, created by Public Law 89-97, Title XIX, a 1965 amendment to the Social Security Act, administered by the states, that provides health care benefits to indigent and medically indigent persons.
Those persons legally qualified by education and training to engage in the practice of pharmacy.
Drugs intended for human or veterinary use, presented in their finished dosage form. Included here are materials used in the preparation and/or formulation of the finished dosage form.
The use of DRUGS to treat a DISEASE or its symptoms. One example is the use of ANTINEOPLASTIC AGENTS to treat CANCER.
Drugs or chemical agents whose manufacture, possession, or use are regulated by government. This may include narcotics and prescription medications.
The use of COMPUTER COMMUNICATION NETWORKS to store and transmit medical PRESCRIPTIONS.
The self administration of medication not prescribed by a physician or in a manner not directed by a physician.
Criteria to determine eligibility of patients for medical care programs and services.
Health insurance plans for employees, and generally including their dependents, usually on a cost-sharing basis with the employer paying a percentage of the premium.
Health insurance plans intended to reduce unnecessary health care costs through a variety of mechanisms, including: economic incentives for physicians and patients to select less costly forms of care; programs for reviewing the medical necessity of specific services; increased beneficiary cost sharing; controls on inpatient admissions and lengths of stay; the establishment of cost-sharing incentives for outpatient surgery; selective contracting with health care providers; and the intensive management of high-cost health care cases. The programs may be provided in a variety of settings, such as HEALTH MAINTENANCE ORGANIZATIONS and PREFERRED PROVIDER ORGANIZATIONS.
The act or practice of calling public attention to a product, service, need, etc., especially by paid announcements in newspapers, magazines, on radio, or on television. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)
Process of shifting publicly controlled services and/or facilities to the private sector.
Drugs obtained and often manufactured illegally for the subjective effects they are said to produce. They are often distributed in urban areas, but are also available in suburban and rural areas, and tend to be grossly impure and may cause unexpected toxicity.
An agency of the PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE concerned with the overall planning, promoting, and administering of programs pertaining to maintaining standards of quality of foods, drugs, therapeutic devices, etc.
The voluntary portion of Medicare, known as the Supplementary Medical Insurance (SMI) Program, that includes physician's services, home health care, medical services, outpatient hospital services, and laboratory, pathology, and radiology services. All persons entitled to Medicare Part A may enroll in Medicare Part B on a monthly premium basis.
Programs and activities sponsored or administered by local, state, or national governments.
Errors in prescribing, dispensing, or administering medication with the result that the patient fails to receive the correct drug or the indicated proper drug dosage.
Economic aspects of the fields of pharmacy and pharmacology as they apply to the development and study of medical economics in rational drug therapy and the impact of pharmaceuticals on the cost of medical care. Pharmaceutical economics also includes the economic considerations of the pharmaceutical care delivery system and in drug prescribing, particularly of cost-benefit values. (From J Res Pharm Econ 1989;1(1); PharmacoEcon 1992;1(1))
State plans prepared by the State Health Planning and Development Agencies which are made up from plans submitted by the Health Systems Agencies and subject to review and revision by the Statewide Health Coordinating Council.
The practice of compounding and dispensing medicinal preparations.
Processes or methods of reimbursement for services rendered or equipment.
Drugs used to induce drowsiness or sleep or to reduce psychological excitement or anxiety.
Assistance in managing and monitoring drug therapy for patients receiving treatment for cancer or chronic conditions such as asthma and diabetes, consulting with patients and their families on the proper use of medication; conducting wellness and disease prevention programs to improve public health; overseeing medication use in a variety of settings.
Tax-exempt trusts or custodial accounts established by individuals with financial institutions for saving money for future medical expenses.
Organized systems for providing comprehensive prepaid health care that have five basic attributes: (1) provide care in a defined geographic area; (2) provide or ensure delivery of an agreed-upon set of basic and supplemental health maintenance and treatment services; (3) provide care to a voluntarily enrolled group of persons; (4) require their enrollees to use the services of designated providers; and (5) receive reimbursement through a predetermined, fixed, periodic prepayment made by the enrollee without regard to the degree of services provided. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988)
The design, completion, and filing of forms with the insurer.
Statistical measures of utilization and other aspects of the provision of health care services including hospitalization and ambulatory care.
Financing of medical care provided to public assistance recipients.
Total pharmaceutical services provided by qualified PHARMACISTS. In addition to the preparation and distribution of medical products, they may include consultative services provided to agencies and institutions which do not have a qualified pharmacist.
Arrangements negotiated between a third-party payer (often a self-insured company or union trust fund) and a group of health-care providers (hospitals and physicians) who furnish services at lower than usual fees, and, in return, receive prompt payment and an expectation of an increased volume of patients.
The effort of two or more parties to secure the business of a third party by offering, usually under fair or equitable rules of business practice, the most favorable terms.
The use of multiple drugs administered to the same patient, most commonly seen in elderly patients. It includes also the administration of excessive medication. Since in the United States most drugs are dispensed as single-agent formulations, polypharmacy, though using many drugs administered to the same patient, must be differentiated from DRUG COMBINATIONS, single preparations containing two or more drugs as a fixed dose, and from DRUG THERAPY, COMBINATION, two or more drugs administered separately for a combined effect. (From Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)
Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.
Voluntary cooperation of the patient in taking drugs or medicine as prescribed. This includes timing, dosage, and frequency.
A loosely defined group of drugs that tend to increase behavioral alertness, agitation, or excitation. They work by a variety of mechanisms, but usually not by direct excitation of neurons. The many drugs that have such actions as side effects to their main therapeutic use are not included here.
An increase in the volume of money and credit relative to available goods resulting in a substantial and continuing rise in the general price level.
Voluntary cooperation of the patient in following a prescribed regimen.
Total pharmaceutical services provided to the public through community pharmacies.
Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.
A telecommunication system combining the transmission of a document scanned at a transmitter, its reconstruction at a receiving station, and its duplication there by a copier.
A method of examining and setting levels of payments.
Extensive collections, reputedly complete, of facts and data garnered from material of a specialized subject area and made available for analysis and application. The collection can be automated by various contemporary methods for retrieval. The concept should be differentiated from DATABASES, BIBLIOGRAPHIC which is restricted to collections of bibliographic references.
The effect of herbs, other PLANTS, or PLANT EXTRACTS on the activity, metabolism, or toxicity of drugs.
Process that is gone through in order for a drug to receive approval by a government regulatory agency. This includes any required pre-clinical or clinical testing, review, submission, and evaluation of the applications and test results, and post-marketing surveillance of the drug.
Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.
Narcotic analgesic related to CODEINE, but more potent and more addicting by weight. It is used also as cough suppressant.
Payment by a third-party payer in a sum equal to the amount expended by a health care provider or facility for health services rendered to an insured or program beneficiary. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988)
The practice of administering medications in a manner that poses more risk than benefit, particularly where safer alternatives exist.
A province of Canada, lying between the provinces of Alberta and Manitoba. Its capital is Regina. It is entirely a plains region with prairie in the south and wooded country with many lakes and swamps in the north. The name was taken from the Saskatchewan River from the Cree name Kisiskatchewani Sipi, meaning rapid-flowing river. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p1083 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p486)
A loosely defined grouping of drugs that have effects on psychological function. Here the psychotropic agents include the antidepressive agents, hallucinogens, and tranquilizing agents (including the antipsychotics and anti-anxiety agents).
Accidental or deliberate use of a medication or street drug in excess of normal dosage.
Facilities which provide information concerning poisons and treatment of poisoning in emergencies.
A branch of law that defines criminal offenses, regulates the apprehension, charging and trial of suspected persons, and fixes the penalties and modes of treatment applicable to convicted offenders.
A province of Canada on the Pacific coast. Its capital is Victoria. The name given in 1858 derives from the Columbia River which was named by the American captain Robert Gray for his ship Columbia which in turn was named for Columbus. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p178 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p81-2)
An Act prohibiting a health plan from establishing lifetime limits or annual limits on the dollar value of benefits for any participant or beneficiary after January 1, 2014. It permits a restricted annual limit for plan years beginning prior to January 1, 2014. It provides that a health plan shall not be prevented from placing annual or lifetime per-beneficiary limits on covered benefits. The Act sets up a competitive health insurance market.
Disorders that result from the intended use of PHARMACEUTICAL PREPARATIONS. Included in this heading are a broad variety of chemically-induced adverse conditions due to toxicity, DRUG INTERACTIONS, and metabolic effects of pharmaceuticals.
Adverse or favorable selection bias exhibited by insurers or enrollees resulting in disproportionate enrollment of certain groups of people.
Pharmacy services accessed via electronic means.
Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.
Exercise of governmental authority to control conduct.
Community or individual involvement in the decision-making process.
The physician's inability to practice medicine with reasonable skill and safety to the patient due to the physician's disability. Common causes include alcohol and drug abuse, mental illness, physical disability, and senility.
The condition in which individuals are financially unable to access adequate medical care without depriving themselves and their dependents of food, clothing, shelter, and other essentials of living.
Economic sector concerned with the provision, distribution, and consumption of health care services and related products.
Economic aspects of the field of medicine, the medical profession, and health care. It includes the economic and financial impact of disease in general on the patient, the physician, society, or government.
Activity involved in transfer of goods from producer to consumer or in the exchange of services.
A group of two-ring heterocyclic compounds consisting of a benzene ring fused to a diazepine ring.
Individuals enrolled in a school or formal educational program.
Any system which allows payors to share some of the financial risk associated with a particular patient population with providers. Providers agree to adhere to fixed fee schedules in exchange for an increase in their payor base and a chance to benefit from cost containment measures. Common risk-sharing methods are prospective payment schedules (PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEM), capitation (CAPITATION FEES), diagnosis-related fees (DIAGNOSIS-RELATED GROUPS), and pre-negotiated fees.
The practice of replacing one prescribed drug with another that is expected to have the same clinical or psychological effect.
Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.
The degree to which individuals are inhibited or facilitated in their ability to gain entry to and to receive care and services from the health care system. Factors influencing this ability include geographic, architectural, transportational, and financial considerations, among others.
The actual costs of providing services related to the delivery of health care, including the costs of procedures, therapies, and medications. It is differentiated from HEALTH EXPENDITURES, which refers to the amount of money paid for the services, and from fees, which refers to the amount charged, regardless of cost.
The level of governmental organization and function at the national or country-wide level.
The functions and activities carried out by the U.S. Postal Service, foreign postal services, and private postal services such as Federal Express.
The application of mathematical formulas and statistical techniques to the testing and quantifying of economic theories and the solution of economic problems.
Customer satisfaction or dissatisfaction with a benefit or service received.
Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.
The business and managerial aspects of pharmacy in its broadest sense.
A cabinet department in the Executive Branch of the United States Government concerned with overall planning, promoting, and administering programs pertaining to VETERANS. It was established March 15, 1989 as a Cabinet-level position.
Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.
Platforms that provide the ability and tools to create and publish information accessed via the INTERNET. Generally these platforms have three characteristics with content user generated, high degree of interaction between creator and viewer, and easily integrated with other sites.
The level of governmental organization and function below that of the national or country-wide government.
Decisions, usually developed by government policymakers, for determining present and future objectives pertaining to the health care system.
Health care services provided to patients on an ambulatory basis, rather than by admission to a hospital or other health care facility. The services may be a part of a hospital, augmenting its inpatient services, or may be provided at a free-standing facility.
The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.
The interchange of goods or commodities, especially on a large scale, between different countries or between populations within the same country. It includes trade (the buying, selling, or exchanging of commodities, whether wholesale or retail) and business (the purchase and sale of goods to make a profit). (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed, p411, p2005 & p283)
Agents that alleviate ANXIETY, tension, and ANXIETY DISORDERS, promote sedation, and have a calming effect without affecting clarity of consciousness or neurologic conditions. ADRENERGIC BETA-ANTAGONISTS are commonly used in the symptomatic treatment of anxiety but are not included here.
Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.
Detailed financial plans for carrying out specific activities for a certain period of time. They include proposed income and expenditures.
The branch of medicine concerned with the physiological and pathological aspects of the aged, including the clinical problems of senescence and senility.
Absolute, comparative, or differential costs pertaining to services, institutions, resources, etc., or the analysis and study of these costs.
That distinct portion of the institutional, industrial, or economic structure of a country that is controlled or owned by non-governmental, private interests.
Insurance providing coverage of medical, surgical, or hospital care in general or for which there is no specific heading.
Innovation and improvement of the health care system by reappraisal, amendment of services, and removal of faults and abuses in providing and distributing health services to patients. It includes a re-alignment of health services and health insurance to maximum demographic elements (the unemployed, indigent, uninsured, elderly, inner cities, rural areas) with reference to coverage, hospitalization, pricing and cost containment, insurers' and employers' costs, pre-existing medical conditions, prescribed drugs, equipment, and services.
The teaching or training of patients concerning their own health needs.
Individuals licensed to practice medicine.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Florida" is a geographical location and not a medical term or condition with a specific definition. It is the 27th largest state by area in the United States, located in the southeastern region of the country and known for its diverse wildlife, beautiful beaches, and theme parks. If you have any medical questions or terms that need clarification, please feel free to ask!
Activities concerned with governmental policies, functions, etc.
Patient or client refusal of or resistance to medical, psychological, or psychiatric treatment. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed.)
Unlawful act of taking property.
Method of charging whereby a physician or other practitioner bills for each encounter or service rendered. In addition to physicians, other health care professionals are reimbursed via this mechanism. Fee-for-service plans contrast with salary, per capita, and prepayment systems, where the payment does not change with the number of services actually used or if none are used. (From Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, 1976)
Revenues or receipts accruing from business enterprise, labor, or invested capital.
Care which provides integrated, accessible health care services by clinicians who are accountable for addressing a large majority of personal health care needs, developing a sustained partnership with patients, and practicing in the context of family and community. (JAMA 1995;273(3):192)
Hospital department responsible for the receiving, storing, and distribution of pharmaceutical supplies.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Kentucky" is a proper noun and not a term that has a medical definition. It is a state located in the eastern region of the United States. If you have any questions related to medical conditions or terminology, I would be happy to help answer those!
Educational institutions providing facilities for teaching and research and authorized to grant academic degrees.
Complex pharmaceutical substances, preparations, or matter derived from organisms usually obtained by biological methods or assay.
The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.
A system for the collection and/or processing of data from various sources, and using the information for policy making and management of health services. It could be paper-based or electronic. (From http://web.worldbank.org/WBSITE/EXTERNAL/TOPICS/EXTHEALTHNUTRITIONANDPOPULATION/EXTHSD/0,,contentMDK:22239824~menuPK:376799~pagePK:148956~piPK:216618~theSitePK:376793,00.html. http://www.who.int/healthinfo/systems/en/)
A system wherein reimbursement rates are set, for a given period of time, prior to the circumstances giving rise to actual reimbursement claims.
Persistent pain that is refractory to some or all forms of treatment.
Mood-stimulating drugs used primarily in the treatment of affective disorders and related conditions. Several MONOAMINE OXIDASE INHIBITORS are useful as antidepressants apparently as a long-term consequence of their modulation of catecholamine levels. The tricyclic compounds useful as antidepressive agents (ANTIDEPRESSIVE AGENTS, TRICYCLIC) also appear to act through brain catecholamine systems. A third group (ANTIDEPRESSIVE AGENTS, SECOND-GENERATION) is a diverse group of drugs including some that act specifically on serotonergic systems.
The geographic area of the northwestern region of the United States. The states usually included in this region are Idaho, Montana, Oregon, Washington, and Wyoming.
Exclusive legal rights or privileges applied to inventions, plants, etc.
Visits made by patients to health service providers' offices for diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up.
The decision process by which individuals, groups or institutions establish policies pertaining to plans, programs or procedures.
Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)
The integration of epidemiologic, sociological, economic, and other analytic sciences in the study of health services. Health services research is usually concerned with relationships between need, demand, supply, use, and outcome of health services. The aim of the research is evaluation, particularly in terms of structure, process, output, and outcome. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)
The process of observing, recording, or detecting the effects of a chemical substance administered to an individual therapeutically or diagnostically.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but "California" is a place, specifically a state on the western coast of the United States, and not a medical term or concept. Therefore, it doesn't have a medical definition.
Compounds capable of relieving pain without the loss of CONSCIOUSNESS.
A medical specialty concerned with the provision of continuing, comprehensive primary health care for the entire family.
Substances that reduce the growth or reproduction of BACTERIA.
The expected function of a member of a particular profession.
Services for the diagnosis and treatment of disease and the maintenance of health.
Detection of drugs that have been abused, overused, or misused, including legal and illegal drugs. Urine screening is the usual method of detection.
The relative equivalency in the efficacy of different modes of treatment of a disease, most often used to compare the efficacy of different pharmaceuticals to treat a given disease.
An unpleasant sensation induced by noxious stimuli which are detected by NERVE ENDINGS of NOCICEPTIVE NEURONS.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but the term "Michigan" is not a medical concept or condition that has a defined meaning within the medical field. It refers to a state in the United States, and does not have a direct medical connotation.
The act or fact of grasping the meaning, nature, or importance of; understanding. (American Heritage Dictionary, 4th ed) Includes understanding by a patient or research subject of information disclosed orally or in writing.
An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.
A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.
Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).
Individuals enrolled in a school of pharmacy or a formal educational program leading to a degree in pharmacy.
Agents that affect the rate or intensity of cardiac contraction, blood vessel diameter, or blood volume.
Amounts charged to the patient as payer for health care services.
Instruments or technological means of communication that reach large numbers of people with a common message: press, radio, television, etc.
The process of bargaining in order to arrive at an agreement or compromise on a matter of importance to the parties involved. It also applies to the hearing and determination of a case by a third party chosen by the parties in controversy, as well as the interposing of a third party to reconcile the parties in controversy.
Adjunctive computer programs in providing drug treatment to patients.
The practice of prescribing or using a drug outside the scope of the drug's official approved label as designated by a regulatory agency concerning the treatment of a particular disease or condition.
Agents that induce NARCOSIS. Narcotics include agents that cause somnolence or induced sleep (STUPOR); natural or synthetic derivatives of OPIUM or MORPHINE or any substance that has such effects. They are potent inducers of ANALGESIA and OPIOID-RELATED DISORDERS.
Information intended for potential users of medical and healthcare services. There is an emphasis on self-care and preventive approaches as well as information for community-wide dissemination and use.
Information systems, usually computer-assisted, designed to store, manipulate, and retrieve information for planning, organizing, directing, and controlling administrative activities associated with the provision and utilization of clinical pharmacy services.
"Handwriting is a form of personal script or symbolic representation, primarily used in communication, created by the controlled motion of a writing instrument over a surface, typically performed with the hand and fingers."
Analogs or derivatives of AMPHETAMINE. Many are sympathomimetics and central nervous system stimulators causing excitation, vasopressin, bronchodilation, and to varying degrees, anorexia, analepsis, nasal decongestion, and some smooth muscle relaxation.
People who take drugs for a non-therapeutic or non-medical effect. The drugs may be legal or illegal, but their use often results in adverse medical, legal, or social consequences for the users.
The science concerned with the benefit and risk of drugs used in populations and the analysis of the outcomes of drug therapies. Pharmacoepidemiologic data come from both clinical trials and epidemiological studies with emphasis on methods for the detection and evaluation of drug-related adverse effects, assessment of risk vs benefit ratios in drug therapy, patterns of drug utilization, the cost-effectiveness of specific drugs, methodology of postmarketing surveillance, and the relation between pharmacoepidemiology and the formulation and interpretation of regulatory guidelines. (Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf 1992;1(1); J Pharmacoepidemiol 1990;1(1))
Federal, state, or local government organized methods of financial assistance.
The interactions between physician and patient.
A situation in which the level of living of an individual, family, or group is below the standard of the community. It is often related to a specific income level.
The action of a drug that may affect the activity, metabolism, or toxicity of another drug.
A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.
Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.
The state of being retired from one's position or occupation.
A semisynthetic derivative of CODEINE.
Conformity in fulfilling or following official, recognized, or institutional requirements, guidelines, recommendations, protocols, pathways, or other standards.
The presence of co-existing or additional diseases with reference to an initial diagnosis or with reference to the index condition that is the subject of study. Comorbidity may affect the ability of affected individuals to function and also their survival; it may be used as a prognostic indicator for length of hospital stay, cost factors, and outcome or survival.
Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.
Severe gender dysphoria, coupled with a persistent desire for the physical characteristics and social roles that connote the opposite biological sex. (APA, DSM-IV, 1994)

Misuse of "study drugs:" prevalence, consequences, and implications for policy. (1/633)

BACKGROUND: Non-medical/illegal use of prescription stimulants popularly have been referred to as "study drugs". This paper discusses the current prevalence and consequences of misuse of these drugs and implications of this information for drug policy. RESULTS: Study drugs are being misused annually by approximately 4% of older teens and emerging adults. Yet, there are numerous consequences of misuse of prescription stimulants including addiction, negative reactions to high dosages, and medical complications. Policy implications include continuing to limit access to study drugs, finding more safe prescription drug alternatives, interdiction, and public education. CONCLUSION: Much more work is needed on prescription stimulant misuse assessment, identifying the extent of the social and economic costs of misuse, monitoring and reducing access, and developing prevention and cessation education efforts.  (+info)

HIV/AIDS drugs for Sub-Saharan Africa: how do brand and generic supply compare? (2/633)

BACKGROUND: Significant quantities of antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) to treat HIV/AIDS have been procured for Sub-Saharan Africa for the first time in their 20-year history. This presents a novel opportunity to empirically study the roles of brand and generic suppliers in providing access to ARVs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: An observational study of brand and generic supply based on a dataset of 2,162 orders of AIDS drugs for Sub-Saharan Africa reported to the Global Price Reporting Mechanism at the World Health Organization from January 2004-March 2006 was performed. Generic companies supplied 63% of the drugs studied, at prices that were on average about a third of the prices charged by brand companies. 96% of the procurement was of first line drugs, which were provided mostly by generic firms, while the remaining 4%, of second line drugs, was sourced primarily from brand companies. 85% of the generic drugs in the sample were manufactured in India, where the majority of the drugs procured were ineligible for patent protection. The remaining 15% was manufactured in South Africa, mostly under voluntary licenses provided by brand companies to a single generic company. In Sub-Saharan African countries, four first line drugs in the dataset were widely patented, however no general deterrent to generic purchasing based on a patent was detected. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Generic and brand companies have played distinct roles in increasing the availability of ARVs in Sub-Saharan Africa. Generic companies provided most of the drugs studied, at prices below those charged by brand companies, and until now, almost exclusively supplied several fixed-dose combination drugs. Brand companies have supplied almost all second line drugs, signed voluntary licenses with generic companies, and are not strictly enforcing patents in certain countries. Further investigation into how price reductions in second line drugs can be achieved and the cheapest drugs can actually be procured is warranted.  (+info)

Using nurses and office staff to report prescribing errors in primary care. (3/633)

 (+info)

Potential savings from an evidence-based consumer-oriented public education campaign on prescription drugs. (4/633)

 (+info)

Introduction of a self-report version of the Prescription Drug Use Questionnaire and relationship to medication agreement noncompliance. (5/633)

 (+info)

A profile of concurrent alcohol and alcohol-interactive prescription drug use in the US population. (6/633)

 (+info)

The relative abuse liability of oral oxycodone, hydrocodone and hydromorphone assessed in prescription opioid abusers. (7/633)

 (+info)

The impact of consumer-directed health plans on prescription drug use. (8/633)

 (+info)

Prescription drugs are medications that are only available to patients with a valid prescription from a licensed healthcare professional, such as a doctor or nurse practitioner. These drugs cannot be legally obtained over-the-counter and require a prescription due to their potential for misuse, abuse, or serious side effects. They are typically used to treat complex medical conditions, manage symptoms of chronic illnesses, or provide necessary pain relief in certain situations.

Prescription drugs are classified based on their active ingredients and therapeutic uses. In the United States, the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) categorizes them into five schedules (I-V) depending on their potential for abuse and dependence. Schedule I substances have the highest potential for abuse and no accepted medical use, while schedule V substances have a lower potential for abuse and are often used for legitimate medical purposes.

Examples of prescription drugs include opioid painkillers like oxycodone and hydrocodone, stimulants such as Adderall and Ritalin, benzodiazepines like Xanax and Ativan, and various other medications used to treat conditions such as epilepsy, depression, anxiety, and high blood pressure.

It is essential to use prescription drugs only as directed by a healthcare professional, as misuse or abuse can lead to severe health consequences, including addiction, overdose, and even death.

A drug prescription is a written or electronic order provided by a licensed healthcare professional, such as a physician, dentist, or advanced practice nurse, to a pharmacist that authorizes the preparation and dispensing of a specific medication for a patient. The prescription typically includes important information such as the patient's name and date of birth, the name and strength of the medication, the dosage regimen, the duration of treatment, and any special instructions or precautions.

Prescriptions serve several purposes, including ensuring that patients receive the appropriate medication for their medical condition, preventing medication errors, and promoting safe and effective use of medications. They also provide a legal record of the medical provider's authorization for the pharmacist to dispense the medication to the patient.

There are two main types of prescriptions: written prescriptions and electronic prescriptions. Written prescriptions are handwritten or printed on paper, while electronic prescriptions are transmitted electronically from the medical provider to the pharmacy. Electronic prescriptions are becoming increasingly common due to their convenience, accuracy, and security.

It is important for patients to follow the instructions provided on their prescription carefully and to ask their healthcare provider or pharmacist any questions they may have about their medication. Failure to follow a drug prescription can result in improper use of the medication, which can lead to adverse effects, treatment failure, or even life-threatening situations.

Pharmaceutical services insurance refers to a type of coverage that helps individuals and families pay for their prescription medications. This type of insurance is often offered as part of a larger health insurance plan, but can also be purchased as a standalone policy.

The specifics of pharmaceutical services insurance coverage can vary widely depending on the policy. Some plans may cover only generic medications, while others may cover both brand-name and generic drugs. Additionally, some policies may require individuals to pay a portion of the cost of their prescriptions in the form of copays or coinsurance, while others may cover the full cost of medications.

Pharmaceutical services insurance can be especially important for individuals who have chronic medical conditions that require ongoing treatment with expensive prescription medications. By helping to offset the cost of these medications, pharmaceutical services insurance can make it easier for people to afford the care they need to manage their health and improve their quality of life.

Prescription drug misuse is defined as the use of a medication without a prescription, in a way other than prescribed (such as taking more than the prescribed dose), or for the experience or feeling it causes. It's important to note that this behavior can lead to negative health consequences, including addiction and overdose.

The term "prescription drug" refers to a medication that is legally available only with a prescription from a healthcare provider. These drugs are typically classified into different categories based on their potential for misuse or dependence. Examples of commonly misused prescription drugs include opioids (such as oxycodone and hydrocodone), benzodiazepines (such as diazepam and alprazolam), and stimulants (such as amphetamine and methylphenidate).

Prescription drug misuse is a significant public health concern in many parts of the world. It's important to only use prescription medications as directed by a healthcare provider, and to store them securely to prevent others from accessing them without a prescription. If you or someone you know is struggling with prescription drug misuse, it's important to seek help from a healthcare professional.

A prescription fee is not a medical definition per se, but rather a term used in the context of pharmacy and healthcare services. It refers to the charge for dispensing a medication that has been prescribed by a healthcare professional. The prescription fee may cover the cost of the medication itself, as well as any additional services provided by the pharmacist, such as counseling on how to take the medication, potential side effects, and monitoring requirements.

Prescription fees may vary depending on the location, the type of medication, and the healthcare system in place. In some cases, prescription fees may be covered or subsidized by health insurance plans, while in other cases, patients may be responsible for paying the fee out of pocket. It is important for patients to understand their prescription coverage and any associated costs before filling a prescription.

A prescription is a written or electronic order for a medication or device issued by a healthcare provider (such as a doctor, nurse practitioner, or dentist) to a patient. It provides detailed instructions about the medication, including its dosage, frequency, route of administration, and duration of treatment. Prescriptions may also include additional information such as warnings about potential side effects or interactions with other medications.

Prescriptions are typically required for medications that have the potential to cause harm if used improperly, such as controlled substances or those that require careful monitoring. They serve as a legal document that authorizes a pharmacist to dispense the prescribed medication to the patient and may also be used for insurance billing purposes.

Prescriptions are an important tool in the management of medical conditions and can help ensure that patients receive appropriate and safe treatment with medications.

Medicare Part D is a voluntary program within the U.S. Medicare system that provides prescription drug coverage to beneficiaries. It is offered through private insurance companies approved by and contracting with the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS).

Medicare Part D has two primary components: the Prescription Drug Plans (PDPs) and the Medicare Advantage Prescription Drug plans (MA-PDs). PDPs are standalone drug plans that can be added to Original Medicare or certain Medicare Cost Plans, Private Fee-for-Service Plans, and Medical Savings Account Plans. MA-PDs combine medical and prescription drug coverage in a single plan offered by private insurance companies approved by CMS.

Beneficiaries enrolled in Medicare Part D plans pay premiums, deductibles, coinsurance, or copayments for their covered medications, depending on the specific plan they choose. Additionally, there is an annual out-of-pocket spending limit called the "catastrophic coverage threshold" that provides some financial protection for beneficiaries with high drug costs.

"Drug costs" refer to the amount of money that must be paid to acquire and use a particular medication. These costs can include the following:

1. The actual purchase price of the drug, which may vary depending on factors such as the dosage form, strength, and quantity of the medication, as well as whether it is obtained through a retail pharmacy, mail-order service, or other distribution channel.
2. Any additional fees or charges associated with obtaining the drug, such as shipping and handling costs, insurance copayments or coinsurance amounts, and deductibles.
3. The cost of any necessary medical services or supplies that are required to administer the drug, such as syringes, needles, or alcohol swabs for injectable medications, or nebulizers for inhaled drugs.
4. The cost of monitoring and managing any potential side effects or complications associated with the use of the drug, which may include additional medical appointments, laboratory tests, or other diagnostic procedures.

It is important to note that drug costs can vary widely depending on a variety of factors, including the patient's insurance coverage, the pharmacy where the drug is obtained, and any discounts or rebates that may be available. Patients are encouraged to shop around for the best prices and to explore all available options for reducing their out-of-pocket costs, such as using generic medications or participating in manufacturer savings programs.

Cost sharing in a medical or healthcare context refers to the portion of health care costs that are paid by the patient or health plan member, rather than by their insurance company. Cost sharing can take various forms, including deductibles, coinsurance, and copayments.

A deductible is the amount that a patient must pay out of pocket for medical services before their insurance coverage kicks in. For example, if a health plan has a $1,000 deductible, the patient must pay the first $1,000 of their medical expenses before their insurance starts covering costs.

Coinsurance is the percentage of medical costs that a patient is responsible for paying after they have met their deductible. For example, if a health plan has 20% coinsurance, the patient would pay 20% of the cost of medical services, and their insurance would cover the remaining 80%.

Copayments are fixed amounts that patients must pay for specific medical services, such as doctor visits or prescription medications. Copayments are typically paid at the time of service and do not count towards a patient's deductible.

Cost sharing is intended to encourage patients to be more cost-conscious in their use of healthcare services, as they have a financial incentive to seek out lower-cost options. However, high levels of cost sharing can also create barriers to accessing necessary medical care, particularly for low-income individuals and families.

'Drug legislation' refers to the laws and regulations that govern the production, distribution, sale, possession, and use of medications and pharmaceutical products within a given jurisdiction. These laws are designed to protect public health and safety by establishing standards for drug quality, ensuring appropriate prescribing and dispensing practices, preventing drug abuse and diversion, and promoting access to necessary medications. Drug legislation may also include provisions related to clinical trials, advertising, packaging, labeling, and reimbursement. Compliance with these regulations is typically enforced through a combination of government agencies, professional organizations, and legal penalties for non-compliance.

Insurance benefits refer to the coverage, payments or services that a health insurance company provides to its policyholders based on the terms of their insurance plan. These benefits can include things like:

* Payment for all or a portion of medical services, such as doctor visits, hospital stays, and prescription medications
* Coverage for specific treatments or procedures, such as cancer treatment or surgery
* Reimbursement for out-of-pocket expenses, such as deductibles, coinsurance, and copayments
* Case management and care coordination services to help policyholders navigate the healthcare system and receive appropriate care.

The specific benefits provided will vary depending on the type of insurance plan and the level of coverage purchased by the policyholder. It is important for individuals to understand their insurance benefits and how they can access them in order to make informed decisions about their healthcare.

A formulary is a list of prescription drugs, both generic and brand-name, that are approved for use in a specific health plan or healthcare system. The formulary includes information on the preferred drugs within each therapeutic class, along with any restrictions or limitations on their use. Formularies are developed and maintained by a committee of healthcare professionals, including pharmacists and physicians, who evaluate the safety, efficacy, and cost-effectiveness of different medications.

The purpose of a formulary is to promote the appropriate use of medications, improve patient outcomes, and manage healthcare costs. By establishing a preferred list of drugs, health plans and healthcare systems can negotiate better prices with pharmaceutical manufacturers and ensure that patients receive high-quality, evidence-based care.

Formularies may include various types of medications, such as oral solid dosage forms, injectables, inhalants, topicals, and others. They are typically organized by therapeutic class, and each drug is assigned a tier based on its cost and clinical value. Tier 1 drugs are usually preferred generics or lower-cost brand-name medications, while Tier 2 drugs may be higher-cost brand-name medications that have no generic equivalent. Tier 3 drugs are typically specialty medications that are used to treat complex or rare conditions and are often associated with high costs.

Healthcare providers are encouraged to prescribe drugs that are listed on the formulary, as these medications have been thoroughly reviewed and deemed safe and effective for use in their patient population. However, there may be situations where a non-formulary medication is necessary to treat a particular patient's condition. In such cases, healthcare providers can request an exception or prior authorization to prescribe the non-formulary drug.

Formularies are regularly updated to reflect new drugs that come on the market, changes in clinical guidelines, and shifts in the therapeutic landscape. Health plans and healthcare systems may also modify their formularies in response to feedback from patients and providers or to address concerns about safety, efficacy, or cost.

In summary, a formulary is a comprehensive list of prescription drugs that are approved for use in a specific health plan or healthcare system. Formularies promote the appropriate use of medications, improve patient outcomes, and manage costs by encouraging the prescribing of safe and effective drugs that have been thoroughly reviewed and deemed appropriate for their patient population.

Drug utilization refers to the use of medications by patients or healthcare professionals in a real-world setting. It involves analyzing and evaluating patterns of medication use, including prescribing practices, adherence to treatment guidelines, potential duplications or interactions, and outcomes associated with drug therapy. The goal of drug utilization is to optimize medication use, improve patient safety, and minimize costs while achieving the best possible health outcomes. It can be studied through various methods such as prescription claims data analysis, surveys, and clinical audits.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "United States" is a geopolitical entity, specifically the name of the country consisting of 50 states, and it is not a medical term or concept. Therefore, I can't provide a medical definition for it. If you have any questions related to health, medicine, or biology, I would be happy to try to help answer those!

A generic drug is a medication that contains the same active ingredients as an originally marketed brand-name drug, known as its "innovator" or "reference listed" drug. The active ingredient is the component of the drug that is responsible for its therapeutic effect. Generic drugs are required to have the same quality, strength, purity, and stability as their brand-name counterparts. They must also meet the same rigorous Food and Drug Administration (FDA) standards regarding safety, effectiveness, and manufacturing.

Generic drugs are typically less expensive than their brand-name equivalents because generic manufacturers do not have to repeat the costly clinical trials that were required for the innovator drug. Instead, they demonstrate through bioequivalence studies that their product is therapeutically equivalent to the reference listed drug. This means that the generic drug delivers the same amount of active ingredient into a patient's bloodstream in the same timeframe as the brand-name drug.

In summary, generic drugs are copies of brand-name drugs with the same active ingredients, dosage forms, strengths, routes of administration, and intended uses. They must meet FDA regulations for safety, efficacy, and manufacturing standards, ensuring that they provide patients with the same therapeutic benefits as their brand-name counterparts at a more affordable price.

Pharmaceutical fees are charges that healthcare professionals or institutions may impose on patients for various services related to the prescribing and dispensing of medications. These fees can include costs associated with medication therapy management, drug monitoring, medication reconciliation, and other clinical services provided by pharmacists or other healthcare providers.

It's important to note that these fees are separate from the cost of the medication itself and may not be covered by insurance. Patients should always ask about any potential fees before receiving pharmaceutical services and clarify whether they will be responsible for paying them out-of-pocket.

Medicare is a social insurance program in the United States, administered by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), that provides health insurance coverage to people who are aged 65 and over; or who have certain disabilities; or who have End-Stage Renal Disease (permanent kidney failure requiring dialysis or a transplant).

The program consists of four parts:

1. Hospital Insurance (Part A), which helps pay for inpatient care in hospitals, skilled nursing facilities, hospices, and home health care.
2. Medical Insurance (Part B), which helps pay for doctors' services, outpatient care, medical supplies, and preventive services.
3. Medicare Advantage Plans (Part C), which are private insurance plans that provide all of your Part A and Part B benefits, and may include additional benefits like dental, vision, and hearing coverage.
4. Prescription Drug Coverage (Part D), which helps pay for medications doctors prescribe for treatment.

Medicare is funded by payroll taxes, premiums paid by beneficiaries, and general revenue. Beneficiaries typically pay a monthly premium for Part B and Part D coverage, while Part A is generally free for those who have worked and paid Medicare taxes for at least 40 quarters.

Medicare Part C, also known as Medicare Advantage, refers to a type of Medicare health plan offered by private insurance companies that are approved by Medicare. These plans combine the benefits of Original Medicare (Part A and Part B) and often include additional benefits such as vision, hearing, dental, and prescription drug coverage. They may also offer extra benefits like fitness programs or transportation to healthcare appointments.

Medicare Advantage plans must cover all of the services that Original Medicare covers, except for hospice care, which is still covered under Part A. These plans can have different out-of-pocket costs and rules for how you receive services than Original Medicare. For example, you may need to go to doctors, hospitals, or other healthcare providers that belong to the plan's network, except in emergency or urgent situations.

It is important to compare the costs, benefits, and restrictions of different Medicare Advantage plans before enrolling to ensure that you choose the one that best meets your healthcare needs and budget.

A Drug Utilization Review (DUR) is a systematic retrospective examination of a patient's current and past use of medications to identify medication-related problems, such as adverse drug reactions, interactions, inappropriate dosages, duplicate therapy, and noncompliance with the treatment plan. The goal of DUR is to optimize medication therapy, improve patient outcomes, reduce healthcare costs, and promote safe and effective use of medications.

DUR is typically conducted by pharmacists, physicians, or other healthcare professionals who review medication records, laboratory results, and clinical data to identify potential issues and make recommendations for changes in medication therapy. DUR may be performed manually or using automated software tools that can analyze large datasets of medication claims and electronic health records.

DUR is an important component of medication management programs in various settings, including hospitals, long-term care facilities, managed care organizations, and ambulatory care clinics. It helps ensure that patients receive the right medications at the right doses for the right indications, and reduces the risk of medication errors and adverse drug events.

The "drug industry" is also commonly referred to as the "pharmaceutical industry." It is a segment of the healthcare sector that involves the research, development, production, and marketing of medications or drugs. This includes both prescription and over-the-counter medicines used to treat, cure, or prevent diseases and medical conditions in humans and animals.

The drug industry comprises various types of organizations, such as:

1. Research-based pharmaceutical companies: These are large corporations that focus on the research and development (R&D) of new drugs, clinical trials, obtaining regulatory approvals, manufacturing, and marketing their products globally. Examples include Pfizer, Johnson & Johnson, Roche, and Merck.

2. Generic drug manufacturers: After the patent for a brand-name drug expires, generic drug manufacturers can produce and sell a similar version of the drug at a lower cost. These companies must demonstrate that their product is bioequivalent to the brand-name drug in terms of safety, quality, and efficacy.

3. Biotechnology companies: These firms specialize in developing drugs using biotechnological methods, such as recombinant DNA technology, gene therapy, or monoclonal antibodies. Many biotech companies focus on specific therapeutic areas, like oncology, immunology, or neurology.

4. Contract research organizations (CROs): CROs provide various services to the drug industry, including clinical trial management, data analysis, regulatory affairs support, and pharmacovigilance. They work with both large pharmaceutical companies and smaller biotech firms to help streamline the drug development process.

5. Drug delivery system companies: These organizations focus on developing innovative technologies for delivering drugs more effectively and safely to patients. Examples include transdermal patches, inhalers, or long-acting injectables.

6. Wholesalers and distributors: Companies that purchase drugs from manufacturers and distribute them to pharmacies, hospitals, and other healthcare providers.

The drug industry plays a crucial role in improving public health by discovering, developing, and delivering new treatments for various diseases and medical conditions. However, it is also subject to criticism and regulation due to concerns about high drug prices, marketing practices, and the potential for conflicts of interest between industry and healthcare professionals.

In the context of medical law and ethics, fraud refers to a deliberate and intentional deception or misrepresentation of facts, motivated by personal gain, which is made by a person or entity in a position of trust, such as a healthcare professional or organization. This deception can occur through various means, including the provision of false information, the concealment of important facts, or the manipulation of data.

Medical fraud can take many forms, including:

1. Billing fraud: This occurs when healthcare providers submit false claims to insurance companies or government programs like Medicare and Medicaid for services that were not provided, were unnecessary, or were more expensive than the services actually rendered.
2. Prescription fraud: Healthcare professionals may engage in prescription fraud by writing unnecessary prescriptions for controlled substances, such as opioids, for their own use or to sell on the black market. They may also alter prescriptions or use stolen identities to obtain these drugs.
3. Research fraud: Scientists and researchers can commit fraud by manipulating or falsifying data in clinical trials, experiments, or studies to support predetermined outcomes or to secure funding and recognition.
4. Credentialing fraud: Healthcare professionals may misrepresent their qualifications, licenses, or certifications to gain employment or admitting privileges at healthcare facilities.
5. Identity theft: Stealing someone's personal information to obtain medical services, prescription medications, or insurance benefits is another form of medical fraud.

Medical fraud not only has severe legal consequences for those found guilty but also undermines the trust between patients and healthcare providers, jeopardizes patient safety, and contributes to rising healthcare costs.

Health expenditures refer to the total amount of money spent on health services, goods, and resources in a given period. This can include expenses for preventive care, medical treatments, medications, long-term care, and administrative costs. Health expenditures can be made by individuals, corporations, insurance companies, or governments, and they can be measured at the national, regional, or household level.

Health expenditures are often used as an indicator of a country's investment in its healthcare system and can reflect the overall health status of a population. High levels of health expenditures may indicate a strong commitment to healthcare, but they can also place a significant burden on individuals, businesses, and governments. Understanding patterns and trends in health expenditures is important for policymakers, healthcare providers, and researchers who are working to improve the efficiency, effectiveness, and accessibility of healthcare services.

Drug labeling refers to the information that is provided on the packaging or container of a medication, as well as any accompanying promotional materials. This information is intended to provide healthcare professionals and patients with accurate and up-to-date data about the drug's composition, intended use, dosage, side effects, contraindications, and other important details that are necessary for safe and effective use.

The labeling of prescription drugs in the United States is regulated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), which requires manufacturers to submit proposed labeling as part of their new drug application. The FDA reviews the labeling to ensure that it is truthful, balanced, and not misleading, and provides accurate information about the drug's risks and benefits.

The labeling of over-the-counter (OTC) drugs is also regulated by the FDA, but in this case, the agency has established a set of monographs that specify the conditions under which certain active ingredients can be used and the labeling requirements for each ingredient. Manufacturers of OTC drugs must ensure that their labeling complies with these monographs.

In addition to the information required by regulatory agencies, drug labeling may also include additional information provided by the manufacturer, such as detailed instructions for use, storage requirements, and any warnings or precautions that are necessary to ensure safe and effective use of the medication. It is important for healthcare professionals and patients to carefully review and understand all of the information provided on a drug's labeling before using the medication.

Cost control in a medical context refers to the strategies and practices employed by healthcare organizations to manage and reduce the costs associated with providing patient care while maintaining quality and safety. The goal is to optimize resource allocation, increase efficiency, and contain expenses without compromising the standard of care. This may involve measures such as:

1. Utilization management: Reviewing and monitoring the use of medical services, tests, and treatments to ensure they are necessary, appropriate, and evidence-based.
2. Case management: Coordinating patient care across various healthcare providers and settings to improve outcomes, reduce unnecessary duplication of services, and control costs.
3. Negotiating contracts with suppliers and vendors to secure favorable pricing for medical equipment, supplies, and pharmaceuticals.
4. Implementing evidence-based clinical guidelines and pathways to standardize care processes and reduce unwarranted variations in practice that can drive up costs.
5. Using technology such as electronic health records (EHRs) and telemedicine to streamline operations, improve communication, and reduce errors.
6. Investing in preventive care and wellness programs to keep patients healthy and reduce the need for costly interventions and hospitalizations.
7. Continuously monitoring and analyzing cost data to identify trends, opportunities for improvement, and areas of potential waste or inefficiency.

"Drug and narcotic control" refers to the regulation and oversight of drugs and narcotics, including their production, distribution, and use. This is typically carried out by governmental agencies in order to ensure public safety, prevent abuse and diversion, and protect the health of individuals. The goal of drug and narcotic control is to strike a balance between making sure that medications are available for legitimate medical purposes while also preventing their misuse and illegal sale.

Drug control policies may include measures such as licensing and registration of manufacturers, distributors, and pharmacies; tracking and monitoring of controlled substances; setting standards for prescription practices; and enforcement of laws and regulations related to drug use and trafficking. Narcotic control specifically refers to the regulation of drugs that have a high potential for abuse and are subject to international treaties, such as opioids.

It's important to note that while these regulations aim to protect public health and safety, they can also be controversial and have unintended consequences, such as contributing to drug shortages or creating barriers to access for people who need controlled substances for legitimate medical reasons.

Insurance coverage, in the context of healthcare and medicine, refers to the financial protection provided by an insurance policy that covers all or a portion of the cost of medical services, treatments, and prescription drugs. The coverage is typically offered by health insurance companies, employers, or government programs such as Medicare and Medicaid.

The specific services and treatments covered by insurance, as well as the out-of-pocket costs borne by the insured individual, are determined by the terms of the insurance policy. These terms may include deductibles, copayments, coinsurance, and coverage limits or exclusions. The goal of insurance coverage is to help individuals manage the financial risks associated with healthcare expenses and ensure access to necessary medical services.

Personal Financing is not a term that has a specific medical definition. However, in general terms, it refers to the management of an individual's financial resources, such as income, assets, liabilities, and debts, to meet their personal needs and goals. This can include budgeting, saving, investing, planning for retirement, and managing debt.

In the context of healthcare, personal financing may refer to the ability of individuals to pay for their own medical care expenses, including health insurance premiums, deductibles, co-pays, and out-of-pocket costs. This can be a significant concern for many people, particularly those with chronic medical conditions or disabilities who may face ongoing healthcare expenses.

Personal financing for healthcare may involve various strategies, such as setting aside savings, using health savings accounts (HSAs) or flexible spending accounts (FSAs), purchasing health insurance policies with lower premiums but higher out-of-pocket costs, or negotiating payment plans with healthcare providers. Ultimately, personal financing for healthcare involves making informed decisions about how to allocate financial resources to meet both immediate and long-term medical needs while also balancing other financial goals and responsibilities.

A pharmacy is a retail store or a healthcare facility where medications, both prescription and over-the-counter, are sold or dispensed. Pharmacies are staffed by professional pharmacists who provide medication therapy management services, including reviewing the patient's medication history, checking for potential drug interactions, dosage adjustments, and providing education to patients on the safe and effective use of their medications.

Pharmacies may also offer other health-related products such as medical supplies, vitamins, and personal care items. Some pharmacies are part of a larger healthcare system, such as hospitals or clinics, while others are standalone retail stores. In addition to traditional brick-and-mortar locations, there are also online pharmacies that operate over the internet.

It's important for patients to only obtain medications from licensed and reputable pharmacies to ensure their safety and the effectiveness of their treatment.

Prescription drug diversion is the act of redirecting legally prescribed controlled substances from their intended medical purpose to be used for non-medical purposes, typically for the feeling or sensation they produce. This can include activities such as taking a medication that was prescribed for someone else, selling prescription drugs, or altering prescriptions to obtain more medication than actually needed. Prescription drug diversion is considered a form of substance abuse and can lead to serious legal and health consequences.

A deductible is a specific amount of money that a patient must pay out of pocket before their health insurance starts covering the costs of medical services. For example, if a patient has a $1000 deductible, they must pay the first $1000 of their medical bills themselves before the insurance begins to cover the remaining costs. Deductibles are annual, meaning they reset every year.

Coinsurance is the percentage of costs for a covered medical service that a patient is responsible for paying after they have met their deductible. For example, if a patient has a 20% coinsurance rate, they will be responsible for paying 20% of the cost of each medical service, while their insurance covers the remaining 80%. Coinsurance rates vary depending on the health insurance plan and the specific medical service being provided.

Substance-related disorders, as defined in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), refer to a group of conditions caused by the use of substances such as alcohol, drugs, or medicines. These disorders are characterized by a problematic pattern of using a substance that leads to clinically significant impairment or distress. They can be divided into two main categories: substance use disorders and substance-induced disorders. Substance use disorders involve a pattern of compulsive use despite negative consequences, while substance-induced disorders include conditions such as intoxication, withdrawal, and substance/medication-induced mental disorders. The specific diagnosis depends on the type of substance involved, the patterns of use, and the presence or absence of physiological dependence.

An insurance claim review is the process conducted by an insurance company to evaluate a claim made by a policyholder for coverage of a loss or expense. This evaluation typically involves examining the details of the claim, assessing the damages or injuries incurred, verifying the coverage provided by the policy, and determining the appropriate amount of benefits to be paid. The insurance claim review may also include investigating the circumstances surrounding the claim to ensure its validity and confirming that it complies with the terms and conditions of the insurance policy.

Physician's practice patterns refer to the individual habits and preferences of healthcare providers when it comes to making clinical decisions and managing patient care. These patterns can encompass various aspects, such as:

1. Diagnostic testing: The types and frequency of diagnostic tests ordered for patients with similar conditions.
2. Treatment modalities: The choice of treatment options, including medications, procedures, or referrals to specialists.
3. Patient communication: The way physicians communicate with their patients, including the amount and type of information shared, as well as the level of patient involvement in decision-making.
4. Follow-up care: The frequency and duration of follow-up appointments, as well as the monitoring of treatment effectiveness and potential side effects.
5. Resource utilization: The use of healthcare resources, such as hospitalizations, imaging studies, or specialist consultations, and the associated costs.

Physician practice patterns can be influenced by various factors, including medical training, clinical experience, personal beliefs, guidelines, and local availability of resources. Understanding these patterns is essential for evaluating the quality of care, identifying potential variations in care, and implementing strategies to improve patient outcomes and reduce healthcare costs.

Opioid-related disorders is a term that encompasses a range of conditions related to the use of opioids, which are a class of drugs that include prescription painkillers such as oxycodone and hydrocodone, as well as illegal drugs like heroin. The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) identifies the following opioid-related disorders:

1. Opioid Use Disorder: This disorder is characterized by a problematic pattern of opioid use that leads to clinically significant impairment or distress. The symptoms may include a strong desire to use opioids, increased tolerance, withdrawal symptoms when not using opioids, and unsuccessful efforts to cut down or control opioid use.
2. Opioid Intoxication: This disorder occurs when an individual uses opioids and experiences significant problematic behavioral or psychological changes, such as marked sedation, small pupils, or respiratory depression.
3. Opioid Withdrawal: This disorder is characterized by the development of a substance-specific withdrawal syndrome following cessation or reduction of opioid use. The symptoms may include anxiety, irritability, dysphoria, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and muscle aches.
4. Other Opioid-Induced Disorders: This category includes disorders that are caused by the direct physiological effects of opioids, such as opioid-induced sexual dysfunction or opioid-induced sleep disorder.

It is important to note that opioid use disorder is a chronic and often relapsing condition that can cause significant harm to an individual's health, relationships, and overall quality of life. If you or someone you know is struggling with opioid use, it is essential to seek professional help from a healthcare provider or addiction specialist.

Analgesics, opioid are a class of drugs used for the treatment of pain. They work by binding to specific receptors in the brain and spinal cord, blocking the transmission of pain signals to the brain. Opioids can be synthetic or natural, and include drugs such as morphine, codeine, oxycodone, hydrocodone, hydromorphone, fentanyl, and methadone. They are often used for moderate to severe pain, such as that resulting from injury, surgery, or chronic conditions like cancer. However, opioids can also produce euphoria, physical dependence, and addiction, so they are tightly regulated and carry a risk of misuse.

Nonprescription drugs, also known as over-the-counter (OTC) drugs, are medications that can be legally purchased without a prescription from a healthcare professional. They are considered safe and effective for treating minor illnesses or symptoms when used according to the directions on the label. Examples include pain relievers like acetaminophen and ibuprofen, antihistamines for allergies, and topical treatments for skin conditions. It is still important to follow the recommended dosage and consult with a healthcare provider if there are any concerns or questions about using nonprescription drugs.

Cost savings in a medical context generally refers to the reduction in expenses or resources expended in the delivery of healthcare services, treatments, or procedures. This can be achieved through various means such as implementing more efficient processes, utilizing less expensive treatment options when appropriate, preventing complications or readmissions, and negotiating better prices for drugs or supplies.

Cost savings can also result from comparative effectiveness research, which compares the relative benefits and harms of different medical interventions to help doctors and patients make informed decisions about which treatment is most appropriate and cost-effective for a given condition.

Ultimately, cost savings in healthcare aim to improve the overall value of care delivered by reducing unnecessary expenses while maintaining or improving quality outcomes for patients.

Drug Information Services (DIS) are specialized resources within healthcare systems, typically staffed by clinical pharmacists and pharmacy residents, that provide evidence-based information and analysis about medications to healthcare professionals and patients. The primary goal of DIS is to optimize medication use and improve patient outcomes through the provision of accurate, unbiased, and timely information on drug therapy.

DIS commonly provide a range of services, including:

1. Answering medication-related questions from healthcare providers, such as physicians, nurses, and other pharmacists, regarding drug interactions, dosing, adverse effects, and therapeutic alternatives.
2. Developing and maintaining formulary management systems to ensure the safe and cost-effective use of medications within a healthcare institution or system.
3. Providing patient education materials and resources on medication therapy, including proper administration techniques, potential side effects, and storage requirements.
4. Conducting ongoing literature evaluations and synthesizing evidence-based recommendations for medication use in various clinical scenarios.
5. Collaborating with healthcare teams to develop and implement guidelines, policies, and procedures related to medication management and safety.
6. Offering educational programs and resources for healthcare professionals and students to enhance their knowledge of pharmacotherapy and medication safety practices.
7. Participating in multidisciplinary committees focused on improving medication use processes, reducing medication errors, and promoting patient safety.

DIS are essential components of modern healthcare systems, as they help ensure the safe, effective, and efficient use of medications for improved patient outcomes.

"Marketing of Health Services" refers to the application of marketing principles and strategies to promote, sell, and deliver health care services to individuals, families, or communities. This can include activities such as advertising, public relations, promotions, and sales to increase awareness and demand for health services, as well as researching and analyzing consumer needs and preferences to tailor health services to better meet those needs. The ultimate goal of marketing in health services is to improve access to and utilization of high-quality health care while maintaining ethical standards and ensuring patient satisfaction.

Tranquilizing agents, also known as major tranquilizers or antipsychotic drugs, are a class of medications used primarily to manage psychosis, including schizophrenia, and other mental health disorders. These agents work by blocking dopamine receptors in the brain, which helps reduce the symptoms of psychosis such as hallucinations, delusions, and disordered thinking.

Tranquilizing agents can be further divided into two categories: first-generation antipsychotics (FGAs) and second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs). FGAs, also known as typical antipsychotics, were developed earlier and have a higher risk of side effects such as extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS), which include involuntary movements, stiffness, and tremors. SGAs, also known as atypical antipsychotics, were developed more recently and have a lower risk of EPS but may have other side effects such as weight gain and metabolic issues.

It's important to note that tranquilizing agents should only be prescribed and monitored by a qualified healthcare professional, as they can have significant risks and benefits.

Medigap, also known as Medicare Supplement Insurance, is a type of insurance policy sold by private companies that helps cover costs not paid for by Original Medicare (Part A and Part B), such as deductibles, copayments, and coinsurance. Medigap policies are standardized and come in different plans labeled with letters (A, B, C, D, F, G, K, L, M, N). Each plan offers a different level of coverage, but all plans cover at least 50% of the Part A deductible. It's important to note that Medigap policies do not include coverage for prescription drugs, and separate Medicare Prescription Drug Plans (Part D) must be purchased if desired. Additionally, individuals cannot have both a Medigap policy and a Medicare Advantage plan at the same time.

Medicaid is a joint federal-state program that provides health coverage for low-income individuals, including children, pregnant women, elderly adults, and people with disabilities. Eligibility, benefits, and administration vary by state, but the program is designed to ensure that low-income individuals have access to necessary medical services. Medicaid is funded jointly by the federal government and the states, and is administered by the states under broad federal guidelines.

Medicaid programs must cover certain mandatory benefits, such as inpatient and outpatient hospital services, laboratory and X-ray services, and physician services. States also have the option to provide additional benefits, such as dental care, vision services, and prescription drugs. In addition, many states have expanded their Medicaid programs to cover more low-income adults under the Affordable Care Act (ACA).

Medicaid is an important source of health coverage for millions of Americans, providing access to necessary medical care and helping to reduce financial burden for low-income individuals.

A Pharmacist is a healthcare professional who practices in the field of pharmacy, focusing on the safe and effective use of medications. They are responsible for dispensing medications prescribed by physicians and other healthcare providers, as well as providing information and counseling to patients about their medications. This includes explaining how to take the medication, potential side effects, and any drug interactions. Pharmacists may also be involved in medication therapy management, monitoring patient health and adjusting medication plans as needed. They must have a deep understanding of the properties and actions of drugs, including how they are absorbed, distributed, metabolized, and excreted by the body, as well as their potential interactions with other substances and treatments. In addition to a Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm.D.) degree, pharmacists must also be licensed in the state where they practice.

Pharmaceutical preparations refer to the various forms of medicines that are produced by pharmaceutical companies, which are intended for therapeutic or prophylactic use. These preparations consist of an active ingredient (the drug) combined with excipients (inactive ingredients) in a specific formulation and dosage form.

The active ingredient is the substance that has a therapeutic effect on the body, while the excipients are added to improve the stability, palatability, bioavailability, or administration of the drug. Examples of pharmaceutical preparations include tablets, capsules, solutions, suspensions, emulsions, ointments, creams, and injections.

The production of pharmaceutical preparations involves a series of steps that ensure the quality, safety, and efficacy of the final product. These steps include the selection and testing of raw materials, formulation development, manufacturing, packaging, labeling, and storage. Each step is governed by strict regulations and guidelines to ensure that the final product meets the required standards for use in medical practice.

Drug therapy, also known as pharmacotherapy, refers to the use of medications to treat, cure, or prevent a disease or disorder. It is a crucial component of medical treatment and involves the prescription, administration, and monitoring of drugs to achieve specific therapeutic goals. The choice of drug therapy depends on various factors, including the patient's age, sex, weight, overall health status, severity of the condition, potential interactions with other medications, and personal preferences.

The goal of drug therapy is to alleviate symptoms, reduce the risk of complications, slow down disease progression, or cure a disease. It can be used as a standalone treatment or in combination with other therapies such as surgery, radiation therapy, or lifestyle modifications. The effectiveness of drug therapy varies depending on the condition being treated and the individual patient's response to the medication.

Drug therapy requires careful monitoring to ensure its safety and efficacy. Patients should be informed about the potential benefits and risks associated with the medication, including side effects, contraindications, and interactions with other drugs or foods. Regular follow-up appointments with healthcare providers are necessary to assess the patient's response to the therapy and make any necessary adjustments.

In summary, drug therapy is a medical intervention that involves the use of medications to treat, cure, or prevent diseases or disorders. It requires careful consideration of various factors, including the patient's individual needs and preferences, and ongoing monitoring to ensure its safety and effectiveness.

Controlled substances are drugs or chemicals that are regulated by governments to control their manufacture, distribution, and use. These substances have the potential for abuse and dependence, and therefore, they are classified into different schedules based on their medical use, abuse potential, and safety profile. The classification and regulation of controlled substances vary by country and jurisdiction, but in the United States, the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) is responsible for enforcing the Controlled Substances Act (CSA).

The CSA divides controlled substances into five schedules:

1. Schedule I drugs have no currently accepted medical use in the United States, a high potential for abuse, and are not considered safe for use even under medical supervision. Examples include heroin, LSD, marijuana (cannabis), ecstasy (MDMA), and psilocybin.
2. Schedule II drugs have a high potential for abuse, a currently accepted medical use in the United States, or a currently accepted medical use with severe restrictions, and abuse may lead to severe psychological or physical dependence. Examples include oxycodone, hydrocodone, fentanyl, morphine, cocaine, methamphetamine, and amphetamine.
3. Schedule III drugs have a lower potential for abuse than Schedule II drugs, a currently accepted medical use in the United States, and abuse may lead to moderate or low physical dependence or high psychological dependence. Examples include buprenorphine, codeine, testosterone, anabolic steroids, and ketamine.
4. Schedule IV drugs have a lower potential for abuse than Schedule III drugs, a currently accepted medical use in the United States, and abuse may lead to limited physical or psychological dependence. Examples include alprazolam, clonazepam, diazepam, lorazepam, tramadol, and zolpidem.
5. Schedule V drugs have a lower potential for abuse than Schedule IV drugs, a currently accepted medical use in the United States, and contain limited quantities of certain narcotics. Examples include cough suppressants containing small amounts of codeine or hydrocodone.

The classification and regulation of controlled substances aim to balance their medical benefits with their potential risks and harms. Healthcare providers who prescribe controlled substances must comply with strict regulations, including maintaining accurate records, using secure storage, and following specific prescribing guidelines. Patients who receive controlled substances must also follow specific rules, such as not sharing or selling their medications and properly disposing of any unused or expired drugs.

Electronic prescribing, also known as e-prescribing, is the practice of using electronic systems and technologies to create, transmit, and fill prescriptions. This process involves the use of computerized software or mobile applications that allow healthcare providers to write and send prescriptions directly to a patient's preferred pharmacy. The system can also check for potential drug interactions, allergies, and other factors that may affect the safety and efficacy of the prescribed medication.

E-prescribing offers several benefits over traditional paper prescription methods, including improved efficiency, reduced errors, and better coordination of care between healthcare providers and pharmacists. It can also help to reduce healthcare costs by minimizing unnecessary tests and procedures, as well as reducing the risk of adverse drug events.

Overall, electronic prescribing is an important tool for improving medication safety, reducing healthcare costs, and enhancing the quality of care delivered to patients.

Self-medication is the use of medications or other healthcare products by individuals to treat self-diagnosed disorders or symptoms, without consulting a healthcare professional. This may include using leftover prescription medications, over-the-counter drugs, or alternative therapies. While it might seem convenient and cost-effective, self-medication can lead to incorrect diagnosis, inappropriate treatment, masking of serious conditions, potential drug interactions, dependency, and complications, which may result in further health issues. It is always recommended to seek professional medical advice before starting any medication or therapy.

Eligibility determination is the process of evaluating whether an individual meets the required criteria or conditions to be qualified for a particular program, benefit, service, or position. This process typically involves assessing various factors such as medical condition, functional abilities, financial status, age, and other relevant aspects based on the specific eligibility requirements.

In the context of healthcare and medical services, eligibility determination is often used to establish whether a patient qualifies for certain treatments, insurance coverage, government assistance programs (like Medicaid or Medicare), or disability benefits. This process may include reviewing medical records, conducting assessments, and comparing the individual's situation with established guidelines or criteria.

The primary goal of eligibility determination is to ensure that resources are allocated fairly and appropriately to those who genuinely need them and meet the necessary requirements.

A Health Benefit Plan for Employees refers to a type of insurance policy that an employer provides to their employees as part of their benefits package. These plans are designed to help cover the costs of medical care and services for the employees and sometimes also for their dependents. The specific coverage and details of the plan can vary depending on the terms of the policy, but they typically include a range of benefits such as doctor visits, hospital stays, prescription medications, and preventative care. Employers may pay all or part of the premiums for these plans, and employees may also have the option to contribute to the cost of coverage. The goal of health benefit plans for employees is to help protect the financial well-being of workers by helping them manage the costs of medical care.

Managed care programs are a type of health insurance plan that aims to control healthcare costs and improve the quality of care by managing the utilization of healthcare services. They do this by using a network of healthcare providers who have agreed to provide services at reduced rates, and by implementing various strategies such as utilization review, case management, and preventive care.

In managed care programs, there is usually a primary care physician (PCP) who acts as the patient's main doctor and coordinates their care within the network of providers. Patients may need a referral from their PCP to see specialists or access certain services. Managed care programs can take various forms, including Health Maintenance Organizations (HMOs), Preferred Provider Organizations (PPOs), Point-of-Service (POS) plans, and Exclusive Provider Organizations (EPOs).

The goal of managed care programs is to provide cost-effective healthcare services while maintaining or improving the quality of care. They can help patients save money on healthcare costs by providing coverage for a range of services at lower rates than traditional fee-for-service plans, but they may also limit patient choice and require prior authorization for certain procedures or treatments.

Advertising is a form of communication used to promote or sell products, services, or ideas. In the medical field, advertising is often used by healthcare providers, hospitals, and pharmaceutical companies to reach potential patients or customers. Advertisements may appear in various media formats, such as television, radio, print, online platforms, and outdoor displays.

In the context of medical advertising, it is essential to ensure that all information presented is accurate, balanced, and not misleading. The advertising of prescription medications directly to consumers is regulated by government agencies, such as the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in the United States, to ensure that the benefits and risks of the medication are clearly communicated.

Healthcare providers may also engage in advertising to promote their services or expertise. This can include listing their qualifications, areas of specialization, and patient testimonials. However, healthcare providers must adhere to ethical guidelines and avoid making exaggerated claims about their abilities or the outcomes that patients can expect.

Overall, medical advertising plays an essential role in informing the public about available healthcare options and promoting healthy behaviors. Still, it is crucial to ensure that all advertisements are truthful, transparent, and adhere to ethical standards.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "privatization" is not a term that has a specific medical definition. Privatization generally refers to the process of transferring ownership, control, or management of a previously publicly owned or controlled entity, industry, or service to private hands. This concept can apply to various sectors, including healthcare services and institutions, but it does not have a unique medical meaning.

"Street drugs" is a colloquial term rather than medical jargon, but it generally refers to illegal substances or medications that are used without a prescription. These can include a wide variety of drugs such as marijuana, cocaine, heroin, methamphetamines, ecstasy, LSD, and many others. They are called "street drugs" because they are often bought and sold on the street or in clandestine settings, rather than through legitimate pharmacies or medical professionals. It's important to note that these substances can be highly dangerous and addictive, with serious short-term and long-term health consequences.

The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is a federal government agency responsible for protecting public health by ensuring the safety, efficacy, and security of human and veterinary drugs, biological products, medical devices, our country's food supply, cosmetics, and products that emit radiation. The FDA also provides guidance on the proper use of these products, and enforces laws and regulations related to them. It is part of the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS).

Medicare Part B is the component of Medicare, a federal health insurance program in the United States, that covers medically necessary outpatient services and preventive services. These services include doctor visits, laboratory tests, diagnostic imaging, durable medical equipment, mental health services, ambulance services, and some home health care services.

Medicare Part B also covers certain preventive services such as cancer screenings, vaccinations, and wellness visits to help maintain an individual's health and prevent illnesses or diseases from getting worse. It is financed through a combination of monthly premiums paid by enrollees and funds from the federal government's general revenue. Enrollment in Medicare Part B is voluntary, but there are penalties for not enrolling when first eligible, unless an individual has creditable coverage from another source.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Government Programs" is a very broad term and can encompass many different fields, including healthcare, social services, education, and more. If you're looking for a medical definition related to government programs, you might be referring to initiatives like Medicare, Medicaid, or the Affordable Care Act in the United States, which are government-run health insurance programs or policies.

1. Medicare: A federal health insurance program in the United States, primarily for people 65 and older, but also for some younger people with disabilities and those with end-stage renal disease. Medicare provides coverage for hospitalization, doctor visits, and other healthcare services.

2. Medicaid: A joint federal-state health insurance program in the United States that provides coverage to low-income individuals, including children, pregnant women, elderly adults, and people with disabilities. Medicaid covers a range of medical services, including hospital stays, doctor visits, and long-term care.

3. The Affordable Care Act (ACA): Also known as "Obamacare," the ACA is a United States healthcare reform law that aims to increase the quality and affordability of health insurance, lower the uninsured rate, and regulate the health insurance industry. The ACA includes provisions such as mandated insurance coverage, subsidies for low-income individuals, and protections for those with pre-existing conditions.

Please provide more context if you were looking for information on a different government program related to the medical field.

Medication errors refer to preventable events that may cause or lead to inappropriate medication use or patient harm, while the medication is in the control of the healthcare professional, patient, or consumer. Such events may be related to professional practice, health care products, procedures, and systems, including prescribing; order communication; product labeling, packaging, and nomenclature; compounding; dispensing; distribution; administration; education; monitoring; and use.

Medication errors can occur at any stage of the medication process, including ordering, transcribing, dispensing, administering, and monitoring. They can result from various factors such as poor communication, lack of knowledge, distractions, confusing drug names or labels, and inadequate systems for preventing errors. Medication errors can lead to adverse drug events, which can cause patient harm, including temporary or permanent disability, and even death.

Pharmaceutical economics is a branch of economics that focuses on the production and distribution of pharmaceutical products and services. It involves the analysis of various factors that influence the development, pricing, and accessibility of medications, including issues related to healthcare policy, regulation, reimbursement, and market competition.

Pharmaceutical economists study topics such as:

1. The research and development (R&D) process for new drugs, including the costs, risks, and uncertainties associated with bringing a new drug to market.
2. The pricing of pharmaceuticals, taking into account factors such as production costs, R&D expenses, market competition, and the value that medications provide to patients and society.
3. The impact of government regulations and policies on the pharmaceutical industry, including issues related to intellectual property protection, drug safety, and efficacy testing.
4. The role of health insurance and other third-party payers in shaping the demand for and access to pharmaceuticals.
5. The evaluation of pharmaceutical interventions' cost-effectiveness and their impact on healthcare outcomes and patient well-being.
6. The analysis of market structures, competitive dynamics, and strategic decision-making within the pharmaceutical industry.
7. The assessment of globalization, international trade, and cross-border collaboration in the pharmaceutical sector.

Pharmaceutical economics plays a crucial role in informing healthcare policy decisions, improving patient access to essential medications, and promoting sustainable and innovative practices within the pharmaceutical industry.

"State Health Plans" is a general term that refers to the healthcare coverage programs offered or managed by individual states in the United States. These plans can be divided into two main categories: Medicaid and state-based marketplaces.

1. **Medicaid**: This is a joint federal-state program that provides healthcare coverage to low-income individuals, families, and qualifying groups, such as pregnant women, children, elderly people, and people with disabilities. Each state administers its own Medicaid program within broad federal guidelines, and therefore, the benefits, eligibility criteria, and enrollment processes can vary from state to state.

2. **State-based Marketplaces (SBMs)**: These are online platforms where individuals and small businesses can compare and purchase health insurance plans that meet the standards set by the Affordable Care Act (ACA). SBMs operate in accordance with federal regulations, but individual states have the flexibility to design their own marketplace structure, manage their own enrollment process, and determine which insurers can participate.

It is important to note that state health plans are subject to change based on federal and state laws, regulations, and funding allocations. Therefore, it is always recommended to check the most recent and specific information from the relevant state agency or department.

Pharmacy, as defined by the Merriam-Webster Medical Dictionary, is: "a place or store where drugs, medicines, and other similar items are prepared, compounded, dispensed, or sold." It can also refer to the art, science, or practice of preparing, compounding, and dispensing medicinal preparations.

Pharmacists are healthcare professionals who practice in pharmacy, and they are responsible for ensuring that the medications prescribed to patients are appropriate, safe, and effective. They also provide advice on the proper use of medications, monitor patient health and drug therapies, and offer specialized services to help patients manage their medications.

Pharmacies can be found in a variety of settings, including hospitals, clinics, retail stores, and online platforms. Regardless of where they are located, pharmacies must adhere to strict regulations and standards to ensure the safety and efficacy of the medications they dispense.

Reimbursement mechanisms in a medical context refer to the various systems and methods used by health insurance companies, government agencies, or other payers to refund or recompense healthcare providers, institutions, or patients for the costs associated with medical services, treatments, or products. These mechanisms ensure that covered individuals receive necessary medical care while protecting payers from unnecessary expenses.

There are several types of reimbursement mechanisms, including:

1. Fee-for-service (FFS): In this model, healthcare providers are paid for each service or procedure they perform, with the payment typically based on a predetermined fee schedule. This can lead to overutilization and increased costs if providers perform unnecessary services to increase their reimbursement.
2. Capitation: Under capitation, healthcare providers receive a set amount of money per patient enrolled in their care for a specified period, regardless of the number or type of services provided. This encourages providers to manage resources efficiently and focus on preventive care to maintain patients' health and reduce overall costs.
3. Bundled payments: Also known as episode-based payment, this model involves paying a single price for all the services related to a specific medical event, treatment, or condition over a defined period. This encourages coordination among healthcare providers and can help eliminate unnecessary procedures and costs.
4. Resource-Based Relative Value Scale (RBRVS): RBRVS is a payment system that assigns relative value units (RVUs) to various medical services based on factors such as time, skill, and intensity required for the procedure. The RVUs are then converted into a monetary amount using a conversion factor. This system aims to create more equitable and consistent payments across different medical specialties and procedures.
5. Prospective payment systems (PPS): In PPS, healthcare providers receive predetermined fixed payments for specific services or conditions based on established diagnosis-related groups (DRGs) or other criteria. This system encourages efficiency in care delivery and can help control costs by setting limits on reimbursement amounts.
6. Pay-for-performance (P4P): P4P models tie a portion of healthcare providers' reimbursements to their performance on specific quality measures, such as patient satisfaction scores or adherence to evidence-based guidelines. This system aims to incentivize high-quality care and improve overall healthcare outcomes.
7. Shared savings/risk arrangements: In these models, healthcare providers form accountable care organizations (ACOs) or other collaborative entities that assume responsibility for managing the total cost of care for a defined population. If they can deliver care at lower costs while maintaining quality standards, they share in the savings with payers. However, if costs exceed targets, they may be required to absorb some of the financial risk.

These various reimbursement models aim to balance the need for high-quality care with cost control and efficiency in healthcare delivery. By aligning incentives and promoting coordination among providers, these systems can help improve patient outcomes while reducing unnecessary costs and waste in the healthcare system.

Hypnotics and sedatives are classes of medications that have depressant effects on the central nervous system, leading to sedation (calming or inducing sleep), reduction in anxiety, and in some cases, decreased awareness or memory. These agents work by affecting the neurotransmitter GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid) in the brain, which results in inhibitory effects on neuronal activity.

Hypnotics are primarily used for the treatment of insomnia and other sleep disorders, while sedatives are often prescribed to manage anxiety or to produce a calming effect before medical procedures. Some medications can function as both hypnotics and sedatives, depending on the dosage and specific formulation. Common examples of these medications include benzodiazepines (such as diazepam and lorazepam), non-benzodiazepine hypnotics (such as zolpidem and eszopiclone), barbiturates, and certain antihistamines.

It is essential to use these medications under the guidance of a healthcare professional, as they can have potential side effects, such as drowsiness, dizziness, confusion, and impaired coordination. Additionally, long-term use or high doses may lead to tolerance, dependence, and withdrawal symptoms upon discontinuation.

Medication Therapy Management (MTM) is a structured, patient-centered process of care that involves the medication use process for individual patients to optimize therapeutic outcomes and reduce the risk of adverse effects. MTM includes various services such as medication review, identification of potential drug therapy problems, formulation of a personalized care plan, education and counseling, and ongoing monitoring and adjustment of medication therapy. The goal of MTM is to improve medication adherence, enhance patient engagement in their healthcare, and promote the safe and effective use of medications. MTM services may be provided by pharmacists, physicians, nurses, and other healthcare professionals as part of a collaborative care team.

A Medical Savings Account (MSA) is a type of savings account that allows individuals to set aside a portion of their earnings on a pre-tax basis to pay for current or future medical expenses. The funds in the MSA can be used to pay for qualified medical expenses, such as deductibles, copayments, and medications, which are not covered by health insurance.

There are two main types of MSAs: Archer MSAs and Health Savings Accounts (HSAs). Archer MSAs were established in 1996 and are available to self-employed individuals and employees of small businesses who have high-deductible health plans. HSAs, on the other hand, were created in 2003 and are available to anyone who has a high-deductible health plan, regardless of their employment status.

One of the benefits of MSAs is that they offer tax advantages. Contributions to an MSA are deductible from an individual's gross income, which reduces their taxable income. The funds in the account grow tax-deferred, and withdrawals used for qualified medical expenses are tax-free.

It's important to note that MSAs have certain rules and restrictions, such as annual contribution limits and requirements for using the funds for qualified medical expenses. If funds are withdrawn for non-qualified expenses, they may be subject to income taxes and penalties.

A Health Maintenance Organization (HMO) is a type of managed care organization (MCO) that provides comprehensive health care services to its members, typically for a fixed monthly premium. HMOs are characterized by a prepaid payment model and a focus on preventive care and early intervention to manage the health of their enrolled population.

In an HMO, members must choose a primary care physician (PCP) who acts as their first point of contact for medical care and coordinates all aspects of their healthcare needs within the HMO network. Specialist care is generally only covered if it is referred by the PCP, and members are typically required to obtain medical services from providers that are part of the HMO's network. This helps to keep costs down and ensures that care is coordinated and managed effectively.

HMOs may also offer additional benefits such as dental, vision, and mental health services, depending on the specific plan. However, members may face higher out-of-pocket costs if they choose to receive care outside of the HMO network. Overall, HMOs are designed to provide comprehensive healthcare coverage at a more affordable cost than traditional fee-for-service insurance plans.

Insurance claim reporting is the process of informing an insurance company about a potential claim that an insured individual or business intends to make under their insurance policy. This report typically includes details about the incident or loss, such as the date, time, location, and type of damage or injury, as well as any relevant documentation, such as police reports or medical records.

The purpose of insurance claim reporting is to initiate the claims process and provide the insurance company with the necessary information to evaluate the claim and determine coverage. The insured individual or business may be required to submit additional information or evidence to support their claim, and the insurance company will conduct an investigation to assess the validity and value of the claim.

Prompt and accurate reporting of insurance claims is important to ensure that the claim is processed in a timely manner and to avoid any potential delays or denials of coverage based on late reporting. It is also important to provide complete and truthful information during the claims process, as misrepresentations or false statements can lead to claim denials or even fraud investigations.

Health care surveys are research tools used to systematically collect information from a population or sample regarding their experiences, perceptions, and knowledge of health services, health outcomes, and various other health-related topics. These surveys typically consist of standardized questionnaires that cover specific aspects of healthcare, such as access to care, quality of care, patient satisfaction, health disparities, and healthcare costs. The data gathered from health care surveys are used to inform policy decisions, improve healthcare delivery, identify best practices, allocate resources, and monitor the health status of populations. Health care surveys can be conducted through various modes, including in-person interviews, telephone interviews, mail-in questionnaires, or online platforms.

"Medical Assistance" is a term used in the United States that primarily refers to government-funded health care programs for individuals who are unable to afford medical care on their own. The most well-known program is Medicaid, which is a joint federal-state program that provides health coverage for low-income individuals, including children, pregnant women, elderly adults, and people with disabilities.

Medical Assistance can also refer to other government-funded programs that provide financial assistance for medical care, such as the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP), which provides low-cost health insurance for children in families who earn too much to qualify for Medicaid but still cannot afford private insurance.

In general, Medical Assistance programs are designed to help ensure that all individuals have access to necessary medical care, regardless of their ability to pay. These programs are funded through a combination of federal and state funds, and eligibility criteria and benefits may vary from state to state.

Pharmaceutical services refer to the direct patient care activities conducted by licensed pharmacists, which include but are not limited to:

1. Medication therapy management: This involves reviewing a patient's medications to ensure they are appropriate, effective, and safe. Pharmacists may make recommendations to the prescriber about changes to medication therapy as needed.
2. Patient education: Pharmacists provide education to patients about their medications, including how to take them, potential side effects, and storage instructions. They also provide information on disease prevention and management.
3. Immunizations: Many pharmacists are trained to administer vaccines, which can help increase access to this important preventive health service.
4. Monitoring and evaluation: Pharmacists monitor patients' responses to medication therapy and make adjustments as needed. They also evaluate the effectiveness of medication therapy and make recommendations for changes if necessary.
5. Clinical services: Pharmacists may provide a range of clinical services, such as managing anticoagulation therapy, providing diabetes education, or conducting medication reconciliation after hospital discharge.
6. Collaborative practice: Pharmacists work collaboratively with other healthcare providers to optimize medication therapy and improve patient outcomes. This may involve participating in multidisciplinary teams, consulting with prescribers, or sharing information with other healthcare professionals.

Overall, pharmaceutical services aim to improve patient outcomes by ensuring that medications are used safely and effectively.

A Preferred Provider Organization (PPO) is a type of managed care plan in which the enrollee can choose to receive healthcare services from any provider within the network, without needing a referral from a primary care physician. The network includes hospitals, physicians, and other healthcare professionals who have agreed to provide services to the PPO's members at reduced rates.

In a PPO plan, members typically pay lower out-of-pocket costs when they use providers within the network, compared to using non-network providers. However, members still have some coverage for care received from non-network providers, although it is usually subject to higher cost-sharing requirements.

PPOs aim to provide more flexibility and choice to enrollees than other managed care plans, such as Health Maintenance Organizations (HMOs), while also offering lower costs through negotiated rates with network providers.

Economic competition in the context of healthcare and medicine generally refers to the rivalry among healthcare providers, organizations, or pharmaceutical companies competing for patients, resources, market share, or funding. This competition can drive innovation, improve quality of care, and increase efficiency. However, it can also lead to cost-containment measures that may negatively impact patient care and safety.

In the pharmaceutical industry, economic competition exists between different companies developing and marketing similar drugs. This competition can result in lower prices for consumers and incentives for innovation, but it can also lead to unethical practices such as price gouging or misleading advertising.

Regulation and oversight are crucial to ensure that economic competition in healthcare and medicine promotes the well-being of patients and the public while discouraging harmful practices.

Polypharmacy is the use of multiple medications by a patient, especially when too many forms of medication are used by a patient, inappropriately or, when there is a lack of indication for some of the drugs used. It is often seen in elderly patients who may be prescribed numerous medications by different healthcare providers that can increase the risk of adverse drug reactions, interactions, and impaired cognitive function. The term does not necessarily have a negative connotation, as polypharmacy can also refer to the complex process of managing multiple chronic conditions with appropriate medication therapy. However, it is often used to describe a situation where the number of medications being taken by a patient poses a significant risk to their health.

A cross-sectional study is a type of observational research design that examines the relationship between variables at one point in time. It provides a snapshot or a "cross-section" of the population at a particular moment, allowing researchers to estimate the prevalence of a disease or condition and identify potential risk factors or associations.

In a cross-sectional study, data is collected from a sample of participants at a single time point, and the variables of interest are measured simultaneously. This design can be used to investigate the association between exposure and outcome, but it cannot establish causality because it does not follow changes over time.

Cross-sectional studies can be conducted using various data collection methods, such as surveys, interviews, or medical examinations. They are often used in epidemiology to estimate the prevalence of a disease or condition in a population and to identify potential risk factors that may contribute to its development. However, because cross-sectional studies only provide a snapshot of the population at one point in time, they cannot account for changes over time or determine whether exposure preceded the outcome.

Therefore, while cross-sectional studies can be useful for generating hypotheses and identifying potential associations between variables, further research using other study designs, such as cohort or case-control studies, is necessary to establish causality and confirm any findings.

Medication adherence, also known as medication compliance, refers to the degree or extent of conformity to a treatment regimen as prescribed by a healthcare provider. This includes taking medications at the right time, in the correct dosage, and for the designated duration. Poor medication adherence can lead to worsening health conditions, increased hospitalizations, and higher healthcare costs.

Central nervous system (CNS) stimulants are a class of drugs that increase alertness, attention, energy, and/or mood by directly acting on the brain. They can be prescribed to treat medical conditions such as narcolepsy, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and depression that has not responded to other treatments.

Examples of CNS stimulants include amphetamine (Adderall), methylphenidate (Ritalin, Concerta), and modafinil (Provigil). These medications work by increasing the levels of certain neurotransmitters, such as dopamine and norepinephrine, in the brain.

In addition to their therapeutic uses, CNS stimulants are also sometimes misused for non-medical reasons, such as to enhance cognitive performance or to get high. However, it's important to note that misusing these drugs can lead to serious health consequences, including addiction, cardiovascular problems, and mental health issues.

I apologize for the confusion, but "inflation" is an economic term and not a medical one. Here's a simple explanation of what it means:

Economic inflation is a rise in the general price level of goods and services in an economy over a period of time. When the overall prices of these items increase, each unit of currency buys fewer goods and services; consequently, inflation reflects a reduction in the purchasing power of money – a loss of real value in the medium of exchange and unit of account within an economic system. This is typically measured by the Consumer Price Index (CPI) or the Producer Price Index (PPI), and central banks attempt to limit inflation, and avoid deflation, in order to keep the economy running smoothly.

Patient compliance, also known as medication adherence or patient adherence, refers to the degree to which a patient's behavior matches the agreed-upon recommendations from their healthcare provider. This includes taking medications as prescribed (including the correct dosage, frequency, and duration), following dietary restrictions, making lifestyle changes, and attending follow-up appointments. Poor patient compliance can negatively impact treatment outcomes and lead to worsening of symptoms, increased healthcare costs, and development of drug-resistant strains in the case of antibiotics. It is a significant challenge in healthcare and efforts are being made to improve patient education, communication, and support to enhance compliance.

Community pharmacy services refer to the healthcare services provided by retail pharmacies within a community setting. These services typically include:

1. Dispensing medications: Pharmacists ensure that prescriptions are filled correctly and provide patients with necessary instructions for use, potential side effects, and warnings about drug interactions.

2. Medication therapy management (MTM): Pharmacists review a patient's medication regimen to identify any potential issues, such as duplications, dosage errors, or interactions. They may also make recommendations to optimize the effectiveness and safety of the medications being used.

3. Immunizations: Many community pharmacies now offer immunization services for various vaccine-preventable diseases, such as influenza, pneumococcal disease, and hepatitis B.

4. Point-of-care testing: Some community pharmacies provide diagnostic tests, like blood glucose or cholesterol screening, to help monitor chronic conditions or identify health issues early on.

5. Health screenings and wellness programs: Community pharmacies often host health fairs, smoking cessation programs, or weight management initiatives to promote overall well-being and prevent disease.

6. Medication disposal: Pharmacies sometimes offer safe disposal options for unused or expired medications to help prevent environmental contamination and misuse.

7. Patient education: Community pharmacists provide counseling on various topics, such as proper use of inhalers, managing side effects, and adhering to medication schedules. They may also offer information about disease prevention and healthy lifestyle choices.

8. Consultation services: Pharmacists can provide one-on-one consultations for patients seeking advice on over-the-counter products, self-care, or management of chronic conditions.

9. Collaborative care: Community pharmacists work closely with other healthcare providers, such as physicians and nurses, to coordinate patient care and ensure optimal treatment outcomes.

10. Public health initiatives: Community pharmacies often participate in public health campaigns, like promoting tobacco-free lifestyles or supporting immunization efforts during outbreaks or epidemics.

Data collection in the medical context refers to the systematic gathering of information relevant to a specific research question or clinical situation. This process involves identifying and recording data elements, such as demographic characteristics, medical history, physical examination findings, laboratory results, and imaging studies, from various sources including patient interviews, medical records, and diagnostic tests. The data collected is used to support clinical decision-making, inform research hypotheses, and evaluate the effectiveness of treatments or interventions. It is essential that data collection is performed in a standardized and unbiased manner to ensure the validity and reliability of the results.

Telefacsimile, often abbreviated as "fax," is not typically considered a medical term. However, it is widely used in the medical field as a means of transmitting documents electronically. Here's a general definition:

A telefacsimile (fax) is an electronic communication system that can transmit and receive fixed or document images via telephone lines or other communication networks. It allows for the conversion of physical documents into digital form, their transmission to a remote location, and subsequent conversion back into physical form through a printer. In healthcare settings, fax machines are often used to send patient records, referrals, prescriptions, and other sensitive documents between healthcare providers, hospitals, laboratories, and insurance companies.

"Rate setting and review" is not a commonly used medical term with a specific definition in the field. However, I can provide you with information about what these terms might refer to in a broader healthcare context:

Rate setting generally refers to the process of determining the payment rates for healthcare services, programs, or products. This could involve setting reimbursement rates for medical procedures, medications, or durable medical equipment under government-funded health insurance programs like Medicare and Medicaid, or in the private insurance sector. Rate setting can be influenced by various factors, including the cost of providing care, resource utilization, quality metrics, and market competition.

Review, in this context, typically refers to the process of evaluating and assessing healthcare services, programs, or products to ensure their quality, effectiveness, and efficiency. This could involve reviewing medical records, clinical outcomes, and financial data to determine if the care provided is consistent with evidence-based guidelines, industry best practices, and regulatory requirements. Regular reviews are essential for maintaining high standards of care, identifying areas for improvement, and ensuring that resources are allocated efficiently.

Together, "rate setting and review" may refer to a comprehensive approach to managing healthcare costs and quality by establishing appropriate payment rates while continuously monitoring and improving the effectiveness and efficiency of healthcare services.

A factual database in the medical context is a collection of organized and structured data that contains verified and accurate information related to medicine, healthcare, or health sciences. These databases serve as reliable resources for various stakeholders, including healthcare professionals, researchers, students, and patients, to access evidence-based information for making informed decisions and enhancing knowledge.

Examples of factual medical databases include:

1. PubMed: A comprehensive database of biomedical literature maintained by the US National Library of Medicine (NLM). It contains citations and abstracts from life sciences journals, books, and conference proceedings.
2. MEDLINE: A subset of PubMed, MEDLINE focuses on high-quality, peer-reviewed articles related to biomedicine and health. It is the primary component of the NLM's database and serves as a critical resource for healthcare professionals and researchers worldwide.
3. Cochrane Library: A collection of systematic reviews and meta-analyses focused on evidence-based medicine. The library aims to provide unbiased, high-quality information to support clinical decision-making and improve patient outcomes.
4. OVID: A platform that offers access to various medical and healthcare databases, including MEDLINE, Embase, and PsycINFO. It facilitates the search and retrieval of relevant literature for researchers, clinicians, and students.
5. ClinicalTrials.gov: A registry and results database of publicly and privately supported clinical studies conducted around the world. The platform aims to increase transparency and accessibility of clinical trial data for healthcare professionals, researchers, and patients.
6. UpToDate: An evidence-based, physician-authored clinical decision support resource that provides information on diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of medical conditions. It serves as a point-of-care tool for healthcare professionals to make informed decisions and improve patient care.
7. TRIP Database: A search engine designed to facilitate evidence-based medicine by providing quick access to high-quality resources, including systematic reviews, clinical guidelines, and practice recommendations.
8. National Guideline Clearinghouse (NGC): A database of evidence-based clinical practice guidelines and related documents developed through a rigorous review process. The NGC aims to provide clinicians, healthcare providers, and policymakers with reliable guidance for patient care.
9. DrugBank: A comprehensive, freely accessible online database containing detailed information about drugs, their mechanisms, interactions, and targets. It serves as a valuable resource for researchers, healthcare professionals, and students in the field of pharmacology and drug discovery.
10. Genetic Testing Registry (GTR): A database that provides centralized information about genetic tests, test developers, laboratories offering tests, and clinical validity and utility of genetic tests. It serves as a resource for healthcare professionals, researchers, and patients to make informed decisions regarding genetic testing.

Herb-drug interactions (HDIs) refer to the pharmacological or clinical consequences that occur when a patient takes a herbal product concurrently with a prescribed medication. These interactions can result in various outcomes, such as decreased, increased, or altered drug effects due to changes in the absorption, distribution, metabolism, or excretion of the drug.

Herbs may contain various bioactive compounds that can interact with drugs and affect their pharmacokinetics or pharmacodynamics. For example, some herbs may induce or inhibit drug-metabolizing enzymes, such as cytochrome P450 (CYP) isoenzymes, leading to altered drug metabolism and potentially increased or decreased drug concentrations in the body.

Similarly, herbs can also affect drug transporters, such as P-glycoprotein, which can further alter drug absorption, distribution, and excretion. Moreover, some herbs may have pharmacodynamic interactions with drugs, leading to additive or synergistic effects, or antagonism of the drug's therapeutic action.

Therefore, healthcare providers should be aware of potential HDIs when prescribing medications to patients who use herbal products and consider monitoring their patients' medication responses closely. Patients should also be advised to inform their healthcare providers about any herbal products they are taking, including dosage and frequency of use.

"Drug approval" is the process by which a regulatory agency, such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), grants formal authorization for a pharmaceutical company to market and sell a drug for a specific medical condition. The approval process is based on rigorous evaluation of clinical trial data to ensure that the drug is safe and effective for its intended use.

The FDA's approval process typically involves several stages, including preclinical testing in the lab and animal studies, followed by three phases of clinical trials in human subjects. The first phase tests the safety of the drug in a small group of healthy volunteers, while the second and third phases test the drug's efficacy and side effects in larger groups of patients with the medical condition for which the drug is intended.

If the results of these studies demonstrate that the drug is safe and effective, the pharmaceutical company can submit a New Drug Application (NDA) or Biologics License Application (BLA) to the FDA for review. The application includes data from the clinical trials, as well as information about the manufacturing process, labeling, and proposed use of the drug.

The FDA reviews the application and may seek input from independent experts before making a decision on whether to approve the drug. If approved, the drug can be marketed and sold to patients with the medical condition for which it was approved. The FDA continues to monitor the safety and efficacy of approved drugs after they reach the market to ensure that they remain safe and effective for their intended use.

Retrospective studies, also known as retrospective research or looking back studies, are a type of observational study that examines data from the past to draw conclusions about possible causal relationships between risk factors and outcomes. In these studies, researchers analyze existing records, medical charts, or previously collected data to test a hypothesis or answer a specific research question.

Retrospective studies can be useful for generating hypotheses and identifying trends, but they have limitations compared to prospective studies, which follow participants forward in time from exposure to outcome. Retrospective studies are subject to biases such as recall bias, selection bias, and information bias, which can affect the validity of the results. Therefore, retrospective studies should be interpreted with caution and used primarily to generate hypotheses for further testing in prospective studies.

Hydrocodone is an opioid medication used to treat severe pain. It works by changing how the brain and nervous system respond to pain. Medically, it's defined as a semisynthetic opioid analgesic, synthesized from codeine, one of the natural opiates found in the resin of the poppy seed pod.

Hydrocodone is available only in combination with other drugs, such as acetaminophen or ibuprofen, which are added to enhance its pain-relieving effects and/or to prevent abuse and overdose. Common brand names include Vicodin, Lortab, and Norco.

Like all opioids, hydrocodone carries a risk of addiction and dependence, and it should be used only under the supervision of a healthcare provider. It's also important to note that misuse or abuse of hydrocodone can lead to overdose and death.

Health Insurance Reimbursement refers to the process of receiving payment from a health insurance company for medical expenses that you have already paid out of pocket. Here is a brief medical definition of each term:

1. Insurance: A contract, represented by a policy, in which an individual or entity receives financial protection or reimbursement against losses from an insurance company. The company pools clients' risks to make payments more affordable for the insured.
2. Health: Refers to the state of complete physical, mental, and social well-being, and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity.
3. Reimbursement: The act of refunding or compensating a person for expenses incurred, especially those that have been previously paid by the individual and are now being paid back by an insurance company.

In the context of health insurance, reimbursement typically occurs when you receive medical care, pay the provider, and then submit a claim to your insurance company for reimbursement. The insurance company will review the claim, determine whether the services are covered under your policy, and calculate the amount they will reimburse you based on your plan's benefits and any applicable co-pays, deductibles, or coinsurance amounts. Once this process is complete, the insurance company will issue a payment to you to cover a portion or all of the costs you incurred for the medical services.

Inappropriate prescribing is a term used to describe the prescription of medications that are not indicated, are not at the correct dose, or have potential adverse effects outweighing their benefits for a particular patient. This can include prescribing medications for indications not approved by regulatory authorities (off-label use), using incorrect dosages, and failing to consider potential drug interactions or contraindications. Inappropriate prescribing can lead to medication errors, adverse drug reactions, increased healthcare costs, and reduced therapeutic effectiveness, posing a significant patient safety concern.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Saskatchewan" is not a medical term. It is a province in Canada, located in the central part of the country. If you have any questions about medical terms or health-related topics, I would be happy to try and help answer those for you.

Psychotropic drugs, also known as psychoactive drugs, are a class of medications that affect the function of the central nervous system, leading to changes in consciousness, perception, mood, cognition, or behavior. These drugs work by altering the chemical neurotransmitters in the brain, such as dopamine, serotonin, and norepinephrine, which are involved in regulating mood, thought, and behavior.

Psychotropic drugs can be classified into several categories based on their primary therapeutic effects, including:

1. Antipsychotic drugs: These medications are used to treat psychosis, schizophrenia, and other related disorders. They work by blocking dopamine receptors in the brain, which helps reduce hallucinations, delusions, and disordered thinking.
2. Antidepressant drugs: These medications are used to treat depression, anxiety disorders, and some chronic pain conditions. They work by increasing the availability of neurotransmitters such as serotonin, norepinephrine, or dopamine in the brain, which helps improve mood and reduce anxiety.
3. Mood stabilizers: These medications are used to treat bipolar disorder and other mood disorders. They help regulate the ups and downs of mood swings and can also be used as adjunctive treatment for depression and anxiety.
4. Anxiolytic drugs: Also known as anti-anxiety medications, these drugs are used to treat anxiety disorders, panic attacks, and insomnia. They work by reducing the activity of neurotransmitters such as GABA, which can help reduce anxiety and promote relaxation.
5. Stimulant drugs: These medications are used to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and narcolepsy. They work by increasing the availability of dopamine and norepinephrine in the brain, which helps improve focus, concentration, and alertness.

It is important to note that psychotropic drugs can have significant side effects and should only be used under the close supervision of a qualified healthcare provider.

A drug overdose occurs when a person ingests, inhales, or absorbs through the skin a toxic amount of a drug or combination of drugs. This can result in a variety of symptoms, depending on the type of drug involved. In some cases, an overdose can be fatal.

An overdose can occur accidentally, for example if a person mistakenly takes too much of a medication or if a child accidentally ingests a medication that was left within their reach. An overdose can also occur intentionally, such as when a person takes too much of a drug to attempt suicide or to achieve a desired high.

The symptoms of a drug overdose can vary widely depending on the type of drug involved. Some common symptoms of a drug overdose may include:

* Nausea and vomiting
* Abdominal pain
* Dizziness or confusion
* Difficulty breathing
* Seizures
* Unconsciousness
* Rapid heart rate or low blood pressure

If you suspect that someone has overdosed on a drug, it is important to seek medical help immediately. Call your local poison control center or emergency number (such as 911 in the United States) for assistance. If possible, try to provide the medical personnel with as much information as you can about the person and the drug(s) involved. This can help them to provide appropriate treatment more quickly.

Poison Control Centers are specialized organizations that provide immediate, free, and expert advice and treatment recommendations for exposure to potentially harmful substances, also known as poisons. They are staffed by trained healthcare professionals, including medical toxicologists, nurses, pharmacists, and poison information providers. These centers manage a wide range of poisoning cases, from accidental ingestions in children to intentional overdoses and chemical exposures in adults. They offer 24/7 emergency hotline services to the public, healthcare providers, and first responders for poison-related emergencies and provide valuable resources for poison prevention and education. The primary goal of Poison Control Centers is to reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with poison exposures and promote overall public health and safety.

Criminal law is a system of laws that governs criminal behavior and prescribes punishment for offenses. It defines conduct that is considered illegal and punishable by the state or federal government, and outlines the process for investigating, charging, and trying individuals accused of committing crimes. Criminal laws are designed to protect society from harm and maintain social order.

Crimes can be classified as either misdemeanors or felonies, depending on their severity. Misdemeanors are less serious offenses that are typically punishable by fines, community service, or short jail sentences. Felonies, on the other hand, are more serious crimes that can result in significant prison time and even the death penalty in some jurisdictions.

Examples of criminal offenses include murder, manslaughter, robbery, burglary, theft, assault, battery, sexual assault, fraud, and drug trafficking. Criminal laws vary from state to state and country to country, so it is important to consult with a qualified attorney if you are facing criminal charges.

British Columbia is a province located on the west coast of Canada. It is not a medical term or concept. The province has a diverse geography, with mountains, forests, and coastal areas. Its largest city is Vancouver, and its capital is Victoria. The province is known for its natural beauty and outdoor recreational opportunities, as well as its vibrant cities and cultural attractions. It is home to a number of medical facilities and healthcare providers, and the provincial government plays a role in regulating and funding healthcare services within the province.

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) is a comprehensive healthcare reform law passed in 2010 in the United States. Its primary goal is to increase the quality and affordability of health insurance, lower the uninsured rate by expanding public and private insurance coverage, and reduce the costs of healthcare for individuals, businesses, and government.

The ACA achieves these goals through several key provisions:

1. Individual mandate: Requires most individuals to have health insurance or pay a penalty, with some exceptions.
2. Employer mandate: Requires certain employers to offer health insurance to their employees or face penalties.
3. Insurance market reforms: Prohibits insurers from denying coverage based on pre-existing conditions, limits out-of-pocket costs, and requires coverage of essential health benefits.
4. Medicaid expansion: Expands Medicaid eligibility to cover more low-income individuals and families.
5. Health insurance exchanges: Establishes state-based marketplaces where individuals and small businesses can purchase qualified health plans.
6. Subsidies: Provides premium tax credits and cost-sharing reductions to help eligible individuals and families afford health insurance.
7. Prevention and public health fund: Invests in prevention, wellness, and public health programs.
8. Medicare reforms: Improves benefits for Medicare beneficiaries, reduces costs for some beneficiaries, and extends the solvency of the Medicare Trust Fund.

The ACA has been subject to numerous legal challenges and political debates since its passage. Despite these controversies, the law has significantly reduced the number of uninsured Americans and reshaped the U.S. healthcare system.

Drug-related side effects and adverse reactions refer to any unintended or harmful outcome that occurs during the use of a medication. These reactions can be mild or severe and may include predictable, known responses (side effects) as well as unexpected, idiosyncratic reactions (adverse effects). Side effects are typically related to the pharmacologic properties of the drug and occur at therapeutic doses, while adverse reactions may result from allergic or hypersensitivity reactions, overdoses, or interactions with other medications or substances.

Side effects are often dose-dependent and can be managed by adjusting the dose, frequency, or route of administration. Adverse reactions, on the other hand, may require discontinuation of the medication or treatment with antidotes or supportive care. It is important for healthcare providers to monitor patients closely for any signs of drug-related side effects and adverse reactions and to take appropriate action when necessary.

"Insurance Selection Bias" is not a widely recognized medical term. However, in the context of health services research and health economics, "selection bias" generally refers to the distortion of study results due to the non-random selection of individuals into different groups, such as treatment and control groups. In the context of health insurance, selection bias may occur when individuals who choose to enroll in a particular insurance plan have different characteristics (such as age, health status, or income) than those who do not enroll, leading to biased estimates of the plan's effectiveness or cost.

For example, if healthier individuals are more likely to choose a particular insurance plan because it has lower premiums, while sicker individuals are more likely to choose a different plan with more comprehensive coverage, then any comparison of health outcomes or costs between the two plans may be biased due to the differences in the health status of the enrollees.

Therefore, researchers must take steps to control for selection bias in their analyses, such as adjusting for confounding variables or using statistical methods like propensity score matching to create more comparable groups.

Online pharmaceutical services, also known as internet or digital pharmacy services, refer to the provision of medication-related services through the internet. These services may include the following:

1. Prescription medication dispensing and delivery: This involves the online ordering and delivery of prescription medications to patients' homes or other preferred locations. Patients can submit their prescriptions electronically or by mail, and the pharmacy will fill the order and ship it to the patient.
2. Medication therapy management (MTM): MTM services involve a comprehensive review of a patient's medication regimen by a licensed healthcare professional, such as a pharmacist. This includes evaluating the appropriateness, effectiveness, and safety of medications, identifying potential drug interactions or adverse effects, and making recommendations for changes as needed.
3. Telemedicine consultations: Some online pharmacies offer telemedicine services, allowing patients to consult with healthcare professionals remotely via video conferencing or phone calls. This can be particularly useful for patients who have difficulty traveling to a physical clinic or those living in remote areas.
4. Refill reminders and automatic refills: Online pharmacies often provide refill reminders to help patients stay on track with their medication schedules. Some also offer automatic refill services, where medications are automatically shipped to the patient when they are due for a refill.
5. Health information resources: Many online pharmacies provide health-related resources and information, such as articles, videos, and interactive tools, to help patients better understand their medications and overall health.

It is essential to ensure that any online pharmaceutical service is legitimate and adheres to all relevant laws and regulations. Patients should look for websites that are verified by organizations such as the National Association of Boards of Pharmacy (NABP) or the Verified Internet Pharmacy Practice Sites (VIPPS) program, which helps ensure that the pharmacy is operating legally and safely.

"Age factors" refer to the effects, changes, or differences that age can have on various aspects of health, disease, and medical care. These factors can encompass a wide range of issues, including:

1. Physiological changes: As people age, their bodies undergo numerous physical changes that can affect how they respond to medications, illnesses, and medical procedures. For example, older adults may be more sensitive to certain drugs or have weaker immune systems, making them more susceptible to infections.
2. Chronic conditions: Age is a significant risk factor for many chronic diseases, such as heart disease, diabetes, cancer, and arthritis. As a result, age-related medical issues are common and can impact treatment decisions and outcomes.
3. Cognitive decline: Aging can also lead to cognitive changes, including memory loss and decreased decision-making abilities. These changes can affect a person's ability to understand and comply with medical instructions, leading to potential complications in their care.
4. Functional limitations: Older adults may experience physical limitations that impact their mobility, strength, and balance, increasing the risk of falls and other injuries. These limitations can also make it more challenging for them to perform daily activities, such as bathing, dressing, or cooking.
5. Social determinants: Age-related factors, such as social isolation, poverty, and lack of access to transportation, can impact a person's ability to obtain necessary medical care and affect their overall health outcomes.

Understanding age factors is critical for healthcare providers to deliver high-quality, patient-centered care that addresses the unique needs and challenges of older adults. By taking these factors into account, healthcare providers can develop personalized treatment plans that consider a person's age, physical condition, cognitive abilities, and social circumstances.

Government regulation in the context of medicine refers to the rules, guidelines, and laws established by government agencies to control, monitor, and standardize various aspects of healthcare. These regulations are designed to protect patients, promote public health, ensure quality of care, and regulate the healthcare industry. Examples of government regulation in medicine include:

1. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulations for drug approval, medical device clearance, and food safety.
2. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) regulations for healthcare reimbursement, quality measures, and program eligibility.
3. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) regulations for workplace safety in healthcare settings.
4. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations to minimize environmental impacts from healthcare facilities and pharmaceutical manufacturing.
5. State medical boards' regulations for licensing, disciplining, and monitoring physicians and other healthcare professionals.
6. Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) regulations for patient privacy and data security.
7. Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA) regulations for laboratory testing quality and standards.
8. Federal Trade Commission (FTC) regulations to prevent deceptive or unfair trade practices in healthcare marketing and advertising.
9. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) guidelines for evidence-based practice and patient safety.
10. Public Health Service Act (PHSA) regulations related to infectious diseases, bioterrorism preparedness, and substance abuse treatment.

Consumer participation in the context of healthcare refers to the active involvement and engagement of patients, families, caregivers, and communities in their own healthcare decision-making processes and in the development, implementation, and evaluation of health policies, programs, and services. It emphasizes the importance of patient-centered care, where the unique needs, preferences, values, and experiences of individuals are respected and integrated into their healthcare.

Consumer participation can take many forms, including:

1. Patient-provider communication: Consumers engage in open and honest communication with their healthcare providers to make informed decisions about their health.
2. Shared decision-making: Consumers work together with their healthcare providers to weigh the benefits and risks of different treatment options and make evidence-based decisions that align with their values, preferences, and goals.
3. Patient education: Consumers receive accurate, timely, and understandable information about their health conditions, treatments, and self-management strategies.
4. Patient advocacy: Consumers advocate for their own health needs and rights, as well as those of other patients and communities.
5. Community engagement: Consumers participate in the development, implementation, and evaluation of health policies, programs, and services that affect their communities.
6. Research partnerships: Consumers collaborate with researchers to design, conduct, and disseminate research that is relevant and meaningful to their lives.

Consumer participation aims to improve healthcare quality, safety, and outcomes by empowering individuals to take an active role in their own health and well-being, and by ensuring that healthcare systems are responsive to the needs and preferences of diverse populations.

Physician impairment is a state in which a physician's ability to practice medicine safely and effectively is compromised due to a physical or mental condition, substance use disorder, or behavioral issue. This can include conditions such as chronic illness, addiction, cognitive decline, or psychological disorders that may affect the physician's judgment, decision-making, motor skills, or emotional stability.

It is important for regulatory bodies and healthcare organizations to identify and address physician impairment in order to ensure patient safety and maintain the integrity of the medical profession. This can involve providing support and resources for physicians who are struggling with these issues, as well as implementing policies and procedures for monitoring and addressing impaired physicians.

Medical indigence is a term used to describe a person's inability to pay for necessary medical care due to financial constraints. This can occur when an individual lacks sufficient health insurance coverage, has limited financial resources, or both. In many cases, medical indigence can lead to delayed or avoided medical treatment, which can result in more severe health conditions and higher healthcare costs in the long run.

In some jurisdictions, laws have been enacted to provide relief for medically indigent individuals by requiring hospitals or healthcare providers to provide care regardless of a patient's ability to pay. These programs are often funded through a combination of government funding, hospital funds, and charitable donations. The goal of these programs is to ensure that all individuals have access to necessary medical care, regardless of their financial situation.

The Health Care Sector is a segment of the economy that includes companies and organizations that provide goods and services to treat patients with medical conditions, as well as those that work to maintain people's health through preventative care and health education. This sector includes hospitals, clinics, physician practices, dental practices, pharmacies, home health care agencies, nursing homes, laboratories, and medical device manufacturers, among others.

The Health Care Sector is often broken down into several subsectors, including:

1. Providers of healthcare services, such as hospitals, clinics, and physician practices.
2. Payers of healthcare costs, such as insurance companies and government agencies like Medicare and Medicaid.
3. Manufacturers of healthcare products, such as medical devices, pharmaceuticals, and biotechnology products.
4. Distributors of healthcare products, such as wholesalers and pharmacy benefit managers.
5. Providers of healthcare information technology, such as electronic health record systems and telemedicine platforms.

The Health Care Sector is a significant contributor to the economy in many countries, providing employment opportunities and contributing to economic growth. However, it also faces significant challenges, including rising costs, an aging population, and increasing demands for access to high-quality care.

Medical economics is a branch of economics that deals with the application of economic principles and concepts to issues related to health and healthcare. It involves the study of how medical care is produced, distributed, consumed, and financed, as well as the factors that influence these processes. The field encompasses various topics, including the behavior of healthcare providers and consumers, the efficiency and effectiveness of healthcare systems, the impact of health policies on outcomes, and the allocation of resources within the healthcare sector. Medical economists may work in academia, government agencies, healthcare organizations, or consulting firms, contributing to research, policy analysis, and program evaluation.

I am not aware of a specific medical definition for the term "marketing." In general, marketing refers to the activities involved in promoting, selling, and distributing a product or service. This can include market research, product development, advertising, public relations, sales, and customer service. Marketing is used in many industries, including healthcare, to connect with and engage customers, build brand awareness, and increase sales.

Benzodiazepines are a class of psychoactive drugs that have been widely used for their sedative, hypnotic, anxiolytic, anticonvulsant, and muscle relaxant properties. They act by enhancing the inhibitory effects of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system.

Benzodiazepines are commonly prescribed for the treatment of anxiety disorders, insomnia, seizures, and muscle spasms. They can also be used as premedication before medical procedures to produce sedation, amnesia, and anxiolysis. Some examples of benzodiazepines include diazepam (Valium), alprazolam (Xanax), clonazepam (Klonopin), lorazepam (Ativan), and temazepam (Restoril).

While benzodiazepines are effective in treating various medical conditions, they can also cause physical dependence and withdrawal symptoms. Long-term use of benzodiazepines can lead to tolerance, meaning that higher doses are needed to achieve the same effect. Abrupt discontinuation of benzodiazepines can result in severe withdrawal symptoms, including seizures, hallucinations, and anxiety. Therefore, it is important to taper off benzodiazepines gradually under medical supervision.

Benzodiazepines are classified as Schedule IV controlled substances in the United States due to their potential for abuse and dependence. It is essential to use them only as directed by a healthcare provider and to be aware of their potential risks and benefits.

I apologize for any confusion, but "students" is not a medical term. It refers to individuals who are engaged in studying or learning at an educational institution, such as a school, college, or university. If you have any questions related to medical terminology or concepts, I would be happy to help clarify those for you.

"Financial Risk Sharing" in a medical context generally refers to the allocation of financial risk between parties involved in the provision, financing, or coverage of healthcare services. This can include arrangements such as capitation payments, where healthcare providers receive a set amount of money per patient enrolled in their care, regardless of the number of services provided; or reinsurance, where insurance companies share the risk of large claims with other insurers. The goal of financial risk sharing is to create incentives for efficient and cost-effective care while also protecting against unexpectedly high costs.

Drug substitution, also known as medication substitution, refers to the practice of replacing a prescribed medication with a different one that is therapeutically equivalent or similar. This may be done for various reasons such as:

* Cost: The substitute drug may be less expensive than the original medication.
* Availability: The substitute drug may be more readily available than the original medication.
* Adverse effects: The substitute drug may have fewer or less severe side effects than the original medication.
* Drug interactions: The substitute drug may have fewer or no interactions with other medications that the patient is taking.
* Efficacy: The substitute drug may be equally or more effective than the original medication.

It's important to note that any changes to a patient's medication regimen should be made in consultation with their healthcare provider, as substituting medications can have potential risks and benefits. Additionally, some states have laws and regulations that govern when and how drug substitution can be done.

A questionnaire in the medical context is a standardized, systematic, and structured tool used to gather information from individuals regarding their symptoms, medical history, lifestyle, or other health-related factors. It typically consists of a series of written questions that can be either self-administered or administered by an interviewer. Questionnaires are widely used in various areas of healthcare, including clinical research, epidemiological studies, patient care, and health services evaluation to collect data that can inform diagnosis, treatment planning, and population health management. They provide a consistent and organized method for obtaining information from large groups or individual patients, helping to ensure accurate and comprehensive data collection while minimizing bias and variability in the information gathered.

Health services accessibility refers to the degree to which individuals and populations are able to obtain needed health services in a timely manner. It includes factors such as physical access (e.g., distance, transportation), affordability (e.g., cost of services, insurance coverage), availability (e.g., supply of providers, hours of operation), and acceptability (e.g., cultural competence, language concordance).

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), accessibility is one of the key components of health system performance, along with responsiveness and fair financing. Improving accessibility to health services is essential for achieving universal health coverage and ensuring that everyone has access to quality healthcare without facing financial hardship. Factors that affect health services accessibility can vary widely between and within countries, and addressing these disparities requires a multifaceted approach that includes policy interventions, infrastructure development, and community engagement.

Health care costs refer to the expenses incurred for medical services, treatments, procedures, and products that are used to maintain or restore an individual's health. These costs can be categorized into several types:

1. Direct costs: These include payments made for doctor visits, hospital stays, medications, diagnostic tests, surgeries, and other medical treatments and services. Direct costs can be further divided into two subcategories:
* Out-of-pocket costs: Expenses paid directly by patients, such as co-payments, deductibles, coinsurance, and any uncovered medical services or products.
* Third-party payer costs: Expenses covered by insurance companies, government programs (like Medicare, Medicaid), or other entities that pay for health care services on behalf of patients.
2. Indirect costs: These are the expenses incurred as a result of illness or injury that indirectly impact an individual's ability to work and earn a living. Examples include lost productivity, absenteeism, reduced earning capacity, and disability benefits.
3. Non-medical costs: These are expenses related to caregiving, transportation, home modifications, assistive devices, and other non-medical services required for managing health conditions or disabilities.

Health care costs can vary significantly depending on factors such as the type of medical service, geographic location, insurance coverage, and individual health status. Understanding these costs is essential for patients, healthcare providers, policymakers, and researchers to make informed decisions about treatment options, resource allocation, and health system design.

The Federal Government, in the context of medical definitions, typically refers to the national government of a country that has a federal system of government. In such a system, power is divided between the national government and regional or state governments. The Federal Government is responsible for matters that affect the entire nation, such as foreign policy, national defense, and regulating interstate commerce, including certain aspects of healthcare policy and regulation.

In the United States, for example, the Federal Government plays a significant role in healthcare through programs like Medicare, Medicaid, and the Affordable Care Act (ACA), which are designed to ensure access to affordable healthcare services for specific populations or address broader health reform initiatives. The Federal Government also regulates food and drugs through agencies such as the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). These federal entities work to ensure the safety, efficacy, and security of medical products, foods, and public health.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Postal Service" is not a term used in medical definitions. It generally refers to the system for delivering mail and packages, such as the United States Postal Service (USPS). If you have any questions about medical terminology or concepts, I'd be happy to help answer those!

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Models, Econometric" is not a medical term. Econometric models are statistical tools used in the field of economics to estimate economic relationships and forecast future outcomes. They are based on economic theory and use historical data to estimate the parameters of mathematical equations that describe these relationships.

If you have any questions about medical terms or concepts, I'd be happy to try to help! Just let me know what you're looking for.

Consumer satisfaction in a medical context refers to the degree to which a patient or their family is content with the healthcare services, products, or experiences they have received. It is a measure of how well the healthcare delivery aligns with the patient's expectations, needs, and preferences. Factors that contribute to consumer satisfaction may include the quality of care, communication and interpersonal skills of healthcare providers, accessibility and convenience, affordability, and outcomes. High consumer satisfaction is associated with better adherence to treatment plans, improved health outcomes, and higher patient loyalty.

"Sex factors" is a term used in medicine and epidemiology to refer to the differences in disease incidence, prevalence, or response to treatment that are observed between males and females. These differences can be attributed to biological differences such as genetics, hormones, and anatomy, as well as social and cultural factors related to gender.

For example, some conditions such as autoimmune diseases, depression, and osteoporosis are more common in women, while others such as cardiovascular disease and certain types of cancer are more prevalent in men. Additionally, sex differences have been observed in the effectiveness and side effects of various medications and treatments.

It is important to consider sex factors in medical research and clinical practice to ensure that patients receive appropriate and effective care.

Pharmacy administration refers to the management and leadership of pharmacy operations, services, and resources within healthcare systems or organizations. It involves planning, organizing, directing, and coordinating various activities related to the safe and effective use of medications, including medication therapy management, formulary management, drug utilization review, quality improvement, regulatory compliance, and financial management.

Pharmacy administrators may oversee pharmacy staff, operations, and budgets, as well as develop and implement policies and procedures that promote high-quality patient care, ensure medication safety, and optimize medication use. They may also collaborate with other healthcare professionals to develop and implement strategies for improving medication management and promoting interprofessional communication and collaboration.

Pharmacy administration is a critical component of healthcare delivery, as it helps to ensure that patients receive the right medications at the right time, in the right dose, and for the right duration. Effective pharmacy administration can help to improve patient outcomes, reduce medication errors, and lower healthcare costs.

The United States Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) is not a medical term per se, but it is a government agency that provides medical care and benefits to veterans of the US armed forces. Here's the official definition from the VA's website:

"The US Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) is an independent federal establishment charged with providing federal benefits, services, and healthcare to eligible United States veterans, their dependents, and certain other specified individuals."

The VA operates a vast network of medical centers, clinics, and benefits offices throughout the country, providing a range of services including medical treatment, long-term care, disability compensation, vocational rehabilitation, education assistance, home loan guarantees, and life insurance.

Logistic models, specifically logistic regression models, are a type of statistical analysis used in medical and epidemiological research to identify the relationship between the risk of a certain health outcome or disease (dependent variable) and one or more independent variables, such as demographic factors, exposure variables, or other clinical measurements.

In contrast to linear regression models, logistic regression models are used when the dependent variable is binary or dichotomous in nature, meaning it can only take on two values, such as "disease present" or "disease absent." The model uses a logistic function to estimate the probability of the outcome based on the independent variables.

Logistic regression models are useful for identifying risk factors and estimating the strength of associations between exposures and health outcomes, adjusting for potential confounders, and predicting the probability of an outcome given certain values of the independent variables. They can also be used to develop clinical prediction rules or scores that can aid in decision-making and patient care.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Social Media" is a term related to communication technologies, particularly websites and applications that enable users to create and share content or to participate in social networking. It is not a medical concept or term, and therefore, it does not have a medical definition. If you have any questions about medical terms or concepts, I'd be happy to help with those!

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "State Government" is not a medical term. It refers to the level of government in the United States that is responsible for governing each of the individual states. This includes executives (such as governors), legislative bodies (like state senates and houses of representatives), and courts.

If you have any questions related to medicine or healthcare, I'd be happy to try and help answer those for you!

Health policy refers to a set of decisions, plans, and actions that are undertaken to achieve specific healthcare goals within a population. It is formulated by governmental and non-governmental organizations with the objective of providing guidance and direction for the management and delivery of healthcare services. Health policies address various aspects of healthcare, including access, financing, quality, and equity. They can be designed to promote health, prevent disease, and provide treatment and rehabilitation services to individuals who are sick or injured. Effective health policies require careful consideration of scientific evidence, ethical principles, and societal values to ensure that they meet the needs of the population while being fiscally responsible.

Ambulatory care is a type of health care service in which patients are treated on an outpatient basis, meaning they do not stay overnight at the medical facility. This can include a wide range of services such as diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up care for various medical conditions. The goal of ambulatory care is to provide high-quality medical care that is convenient, accessible, and cost-effective for patients.

Examples of ambulatory care settings include physician offices, community health centers, urgent care centers, outpatient surgery centers, and diagnostic imaging facilities. Patients who receive ambulatory care may have a variety of medical needs, such as routine checkups, chronic disease management, minor procedures, or same-day surgeries.

Overall, ambulatory care is an essential component of modern healthcare systems, providing patients with timely and convenient access to medical services without the need for hospitalization.

I apologize, but "Canada" is not a medical term or concept. It is a country located in North America, known for its vast wilderness, multicultural cities, and significant natural resources. If you have any questions related to healthcare or medical terms, I would be happy to help answer those!

I believe you may have mixed up the terms "medicine" and "commerce." Commerce is a broad term that refers to the buying and selling of goods and services. It is not typically used in a medical context, so it does not have a specific medical definition. However, I can provide you with some related terms that might be helpful:

1. Medical commerce: This term generally refers to the business aspects of healthcare, such as the buying and selling of medical supplies, equipment, and services. It may also refer to the economic relationships between various stakeholders in the healthcare system, including providers, insurers, pharmaceutical companies, and patients.
2. Telemedicine commerce: This term specifically refers to the use of technology to facilitate remote consultations and transactions between healthcare providers and patients. Examples include online appointment scheduling, virtual consultations, and electronic prescribing.
3. Medical tourism: This is a form of commerce where people travel to other countries to receive medical treatment or procedures that may be less expensive or more accessible than in their home country. It can also refer to the business of providing medical services to international patients.
4. Healthcare marketing: This term refers to the activities and strategies used by healthcare organizations to promote their products, services, and brands to potential customers. It includes advertising, public relations, social media, content marketing, and other tactics designed to build awareness, generate leads, and drive sales.

I hope this information is helpful! Let me know if you have any further questions or concerns.

Anti-anxiety agents, also known as anxiolytics, are a class of medications used to manage symptoms of anxiety disorders. These drugs work by reducing the abnormal excitement in the brain and promoting relaxation and calmness. They include several types of medications such as benzodiazepines, azapirone, antihistamines, and beta-blockers.

Benzodiazepines are the most commonly prescribed anti-anxiety agents. They work by enhancing the inhibitory effects of a neurotransmitter called gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the brain, which results in sedative, hypnotic, anxiolytic, anticonvulsant, and muscle relaxant properties. Examples of benzodiazepines include diazepam (Valium), alprazolam (Xanax), lorazepam (Ativan), and clonazepam (Klonopin).

Azapirones are a newer class of anti-anxiety agents that act on serotonin receptors in the brain. Buspirone (Buspar) is an example of this type of medication, which has fewer side effects and less potential for abuse compared to benzodiazepines.

Antihistamines are medications that are primarily used to treat allergies but can also have anti-anxiety effects due to their sedative properties. Examples include hydroxyzine (Vistaril, Atarax) and diphenhydramine (Benadryl).

Beta-blockers are mainly used to treat high blood pressure and heart conditions but can also help manage symptoms of anxiety such as rapid heartbeat, tremors, and sweating. Propranolol (Inderal) is an example of a beta-blocker used for this purpose.

It's important to note that anti-anxiety agents should be used under the guidance of a healthcare professional, as they can have side effects and potential for dependence or addiction. Additionally, these medications are often used in combination with psychotherapy and lifestyle modifications to manage anxiety disorders effectively.

A cohort study is a type of observational study in which a group of individuals who share a common characteristic or exposure are followed up over time to determine the incidence of a specific outcome or outcomes. The cohort, or group, is defined based on the exposure status (e.g., exposed vs. unexposed) and then monitored prospectively to assess for the development of new health events or conditions.

Cohort studies can be either prospective or retrospective in design. In a prospective cohort study, participants are enrolled and followed forward in time from the beginning of the study. In contrast, in a retrospective cohort study, researchers identify a cohort that has already been assembled through medical records, insurance claims, or other sources and then look back in time to assess exposure status and health outcomes.

Cohort studies are useful for establishing causality between an exposure and an outcome because they allow researchers to observe the temporal relationship between the two. They can also provide information on the incidence of a disease or condition in different populations, which can be used to inform public health policy and interventions. However, cohort studies can be expensive and time-consuming to conduct, and they may be subject to bias if participants are not representative of the population or if there is loss to follow-up.

In medical terminology, a budget is not explicitly defined. However, in a general sense, it refers to a financial plan that outlines the anticipated costs and expenses for a specific period. In healthcare, budgets can be used by hospitals, clinics, or other medical facilities to plan for and manage their finances.

A healthcare organization's budget may include expenses related to:

* Salaries and benefits for staff
* Equipment and supply costs
* Facility maintenance and improvements
* Research and development expenses
* Insurance and liability coverage
* Marketing and advertising costs

Budgets can help healthcare organizations manage their finances effectively, allocate resources efficiently, and make informed decisions about spending. They may also be used to plan for future growth and expansion.

Geriatrics is a branch of medicine focused on the health care and well-being of older adults, typically defined as those aged 65 years and older. It deals with the physiological, psychological, social, and environmental aspects of aging and addresses the medical, functional, and cognitive issues that are common in this population. The goal of geriatric medicine is to promote health, independence, and quality of life for older adults by preventing and managing diseases and disabilities, coordinating care, and supporting optimal functioning in their daily lives.

Geriatricians, who specialize in geriatrics, receive additional training beyond medical school and residency to develop expertise in the unique needs and challenges of older adults. They often work as part of interdisciplinary teams that include nurses, social workers, physical therapists, occupational therapists, and other healthcare professionals to provide comprehensive care for their patients.

Costs refer to the total amount of resources, such as money, time, and labor, that are expended in the provision of a medical service or treatment. Costs can be categorized into direct costs, which include expenses directly related to patient care, such as medication, supplies, and personnel; and indirect costs, which include overhead expenses, such as rent, utilities, and administrative salaries.

Cost analysis is the process of estimating and evaluating the total cost of a medical service or treatment. This involves identifying and quantifying all direct and indirect costs associated with the provision of care, and analyzing how these costs may vary based on factors such as patient volume, resource utilization, and reimbursement rates.

Cost analysis is an important tool for healthcare organizations to understand the financial implications of their operations and make informed decisions about resource allocation, pricing strategies, and quality improvement initiatives. It can also help policymakers and payers evaluate the cost-effectiveness of different treatment options and develop evidence-based guidelines for clinical practice.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but the term "Private Sector" is not a medical definition. It is an economic and sociopolitical term that refers to businesses and organizations which are not owned or controlled by the government. They can be privately owned and operated for profit, such as corporations, partnerships, and sole proprietorships, or they can be non-profit organizations, such as charities and advocacy groups. The private sector is distinct from the "Public Sector," which includes entities that are owned and controlled by the government, like public schools, hospitals, and other services provided by the state.

Health Insurance is a type of insurance that covers the whole or a part of the risk of a person incurring medical expenses, spreading the risk over a large number of persons. By purchasing health insurance, insured individuals pay a premium to an insurance company, which then pools those funds with other policyholders' premiums to pay for the medical care costs of individuals who become ill or injured. The coverage can include hospitalization, medical procedures, prescription drugs, and preventive care, among other services. The goal of health insurance is to provide financial protection against unexpected medical expenses and to make healthcare services more affordable.

Health care reform refers to the legislative efforts, initiatives, and debates aimed at improving the quality, affordability, and accessibility of health care services. These reforms may include changes to health insurance coverage, delivery systems, payment methods, and healthcare regulations. The goals of health care reform are often to increase the number of people with health insurance, reduce healthcare costs, and improve the overall health outcomes of a population. Examples of notable health care reform measures in the United States include the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and Medicare for All proposals.

Patient education, as defined by the US National Library of Medicine's Medical Subject Headings (MeSH), is "the teaching or training of patients concerning their own health needs. It includes the patient's understanding of his or her condition and the necessary procedures for self, assisted, or professional care." This encompasses a wide range of activities and interventions aimed at helping patients and their families understand their medical conditions, treatment options, self-care skills, and overall health management. Effective patient education can lead to improved health outcomes, increased patient satisfaction, and better use of healthcare resources.

A physician is a healthcare professional who practices medicine, providing medical care and treatment to patients. Physicians may specialize in various fields of medicine, such as internal medicine, surgery, pediatrics, psychiatry, or radiology, among others. They are responsible for diagnosing and treating illnesses, injuries, and disorders; prescribing medications; ordering and interpreting diagnostic tests; providing counseling and education to patients; and collaborating with other healthcare professionals to provide comprehensive care. Physicians may work in a variety of settings, including hospitals, clinics, private practices, and academic medical centers. To become a physician, one must complete a Doctor of Medicine (M.D.) or Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine (D.O.) degree program and pass licensing exams to practice medicine in their state.

I'm not aware of any medical definition for the term "Florida." It is primarily used to refer to a state in the United States located in the southeastern region. If you have any specific medical context in which this term was used, please let me know and I will do my best to provide a relevant answer.

I must clarify that I'm a helpful assistant and not a doctor, but I can tell you that 'politics' is not a term used in medicine. Politics refers to the activities associated with the governance of a country or area, especially the debate or conflict among individuals or groups having or hoping to achieve power. If you have any medical questions, feel free to ask!

Treatment refusal, in a medical context, refers to the situation where a patient declines or denies recommended medical treatment or intervention for their health condition. This decision is made with full understanding and awareness of the potential consequences of not receiving the proposed medical care.

It's important to note that patients have the right to accept or refuse medical treatments based on their personal values, beliefs, and preferences. Healthcare providers must respect this right, while also ensuring that patients are well-informed about their health status, treatment options, and associated benefits, risks, and outcomes. In some cases, it might be necessary to explore the reasons behind the refusal and address any concerns or misconceptions the patient may have, in order to support informed decision-making.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "theft" is not a term that has a medical definition. Theft is a legal term that refers to the unlawful taking of another's property without their consent and with the intent to deprive the owner of that property permanently. If you have any questions related to healthcare or medicine, I would be happy to try to help answer those for you!

Fee-for-service (FFS) plans are a type of medical reimbursement model in which healthcare providers are paid for each specific service or procedure they perform. In this system, the patient or their insurance company is charged separately for each appointment, test, or treatment, and the provider receives payment based on the number and type of services delivered.

FFS plans can be either traditional fee-for-service or modified fee-for-service. Traditional FFS plans offer providers more autonomy in setting their fees but may lead to higher healthcare costs due to potential overutilization of services. Modified FFS plans, on the other hand, involve pre-negotiated rates between insurance companies and healthcare providers, aiming to control costs while still allowing providers to be compensated for each service they deliver.

It is important to note that FFS plans can sometimes create financial incentives for healthcare providers to perform more tests or procedures than necessary, potentially leading to increased healthcare costs and potential overtreatment. As a result, alternative payment models like capitation, bundled payments, and value-based care have emerged as alternatives to address these concerns.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "income" is not a medical term. Income is an economic term that refers to the inflow of monetary resources or earnings that an individual or household receives from various sources, such as employment, investments, or government benefits. It is typically used in financial and economic contexts rather than medical ones. If you have any questions related to medical terminology or concepts, I would be happy to help with those!

Primary health care is defined by the World Health Organization (WHO) as:

"Essential health care that is based on practical, scientifically sound and socially acceptable methods and technology made universally accessible to individuals and families in the community through their full participation and at a cost that the community and country can afford. It forms an integral part both of the country's health system, of which it is the central function and main focus, and of the overall social and economic development of the community. It is the first level of contact of individuals, the family and community with the national health system bringing health care as close as possible to where people live and work, and constitutes the first element of a continuing health care process."

Primary health care includes a range of services such as preventive care, health promotion, curative care, rehabilitation, and palliative care. It is typically provided by a team of health professionals including doctors, nurses, midwives, pharmacists, and other community health workers. The goal of primary health care is to provide comprehensive, continuous, and coordinated care to individuals and families in a way that is accessible, affordable, and culturally sensitive.

A "Pharmacy Service, Hospital" is a health care service that provides for the careful compounding, dispensing, and distribution of medications and pharmaceutical devices within a hospital or healthcare facility. It is typically staffed by licensed pharmacists and pharmacy technicians who work collaboratively with other healthcare professionals to ensure the safe and effective use of medications for patients.

The hospital pharmacy service is responsible for managing the medication use process, including the acquisition, storage, preparation, dispensing, administration, and monitoring of medications. This includes ensuring that medications are properly labeled, stored, and distributed to patients in a timely manner, as well as providing education and counseling to patients on the safe and effective use of their medications.

The hospital pharmacy service may also provide specialized services such as sterile product preparation, investigational drug services, medication therapy management, and pharmacokinetic dosing services. These services are designed to optimize medication therapy, improve patient outcomes, reduce medication errors, and minimize the risk of adverse drug events.

Overall, the hospital pharmacy service plays a critical role in ensuring the safe and effective use of medications in the hospital setting, and contributes to the overall quality and safety of patient care.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Kentucky" is not a medical term or condition. It is a geographical location, being the name of a state in the United States. If you have any questions related to medical conditions or terminology, I would be happy to try and help answer those for you!

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "universities" is a term that refers to institutions of higher education and research, and it is not a medical term. A university typically offers undergraduate and postgraduate programs leading to the award of degrees such as bachelor's, master's, and doctoral degrees.

If you have any questions related to medicine or healthcare, I would be happy to try to help answer them for you.

According to the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA), biological products are "products that are made from or contain a living organism or its derivatives, such as vaccines, blood and blood components, cells, genes, tissues, and proteins." These products can be composed of sugars, proteins, nucleic acids, or complex combinations of these substances, and they can come from many sources, including humans, animals, microorganisms, or plants.

Biological products are often used to diagnose, prevent, or treat a wide range of medical conditions, and they can be administered in various ways, such as through injection, inhalation, or topical application. Because biological products are derived from living organisms, their manufacturing processes can be complex and must be tightly controlled to ensure the safety, purity, and potency of the final product.

It's important to note that biological products are not the same as drugs, which are chemically synthesized compounds. While drugs are designed to interact with specific targets in the body, such as enzymes or receptors, biological products can have more complex and varied mechanisms of action, making them potentially more difficult to characterize and regulate.

Prevalence, in medical terms, refers to the total number of people in a given population who have a particular disease or condition at a specific point in time, or over a specified period. It is typically expressed as a percentage or a ratio of the number of cases to the size of the population. Prevalence differs from incidence, which measures the number of new cases that develop during a certain period.

Health Information Systems (HIS) refer to the integrated set of components for collecting, processing, storing and disseminating health information. It includes hardware, software, telecommunications, people and procedures needed to run them. HIS can be used by various healthcare stakeholders such as hospitals, clinics, laboratories, pharmacies, insurance companies, and public health agencies to support clinical, administrative, and financial operations.

The primary goal of HIS is to improve the quality, safety, and efficiency of healthcare delivery by providing timely and accurate information to the right people in the right format. It supports decision-making at all levels of the healthcare organization, from individual patient care to population health management.

HIS can include various applications such as electronic health records (EHR), computerized physician order entry (CPOE), clinical decision support systems (CDSS), picture archiving and communication systems (PACS), laboratory information systems (LIS), radiology information systems (RIS), pharmacy information systems (PIS), and many others.

Overall, Health Information Systems play a critical role in modern healthcare by facilitating the management of health data and supporting evidence-based practice, patient engagement, and population health management.

A Prospective Payment System (PPS) is a method of reimbursement in which the payment for a specific service is determined before the service is provided. It is commonly used in healthcare systems, including hospitals and post-acute care facilities, to control costs and promote efficiency. Under this system, providers are paid a predetermined amount based on the patient's diagnosis or the type of procedure being performed, rather than being reimbursed for each individual service provided. This encourages providers to deliver care in the most cost-effective manner possible while still meeting quality standards. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) uses PPS for many of its payment models, including the Inpatient Prospective Payment System (IPPS) and the Outpatient Prospective Payment System (OPPS).

In medicine, "intractable pain" is a term used to describe pain that is difficult to manage, control or relieve with standard treatments. It's a type of chronic pain that continues for an extended period, often months or even years, and does not respond to conventional therapies such as medications, physical therapy, or surgery. Intractable pain can significantly affect a person's quality of life, causing emotional distress, sleep disturbances, and reduced mobility. It is essential to distinguish intractable pain from acute pain, which is typically sharp and short-lived, resulting from tissue damage or inflammation.

Intractable pain may be classified as:

1. Refractory pain: Pain that persists despite optimal treatment with various modalities, including medications, interventions, and multidisciplinary care.
2. Incurable pain: Pain caused by a progressive or incurable disease, such as cancer, for which no curative treatment is available.
3. Functional pain: Pain without an identifiable organic cause that does not respond to standard treatments.

Managing intractable pain often requires a multidisciplinary approach involving healthcare professionals from various fields, including pain specialists, neurologists, psychiatrists, psychologists, and physical therapists. Treatment options may include:

1. Adjuvant medications: Medications that are not primarily analgesics but have been found to help with pain relief, such as antidepressants, anticonvulsants, and muscle relaxants.
2. Interventional procedures: Minimally invasive techniques like nerve blocks, spinal cord stimulation, or intrathecal drug delivery systems that target specific nerves or areas of the body to reduce pain signals.
3. Psychological interventions: Techniques such as cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), mindfulness meditation, and relaxation training can help patients cope with chronic pain and improve their overall well-being.
4. Physical therapy and rehabilitation: Exercise programs, massage, acupuncture, and other physical therapies may provide relief for some types of intractable pain.
5. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM): Techniques like yoga, tai chi, hypnosis, or biofeedback can be helpful in managing chronic pain.
6. Lifestyle modifications: Dietary changes, stress management, and quitting smoking may also contribute to improved pain management.

Antidepressive agents are a class of medications used to treat various forms of depression and anxiety disorders. They act on neurotransmitters, the chemical messengers in the brain, to restore the balance that has been disrupted by mental illness. The most commonly prescribed types of antidepressants include selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs), tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs), and monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs). These medications can help alleviate symptoms such as low mood, loss of interest in activities, changes in appetite and sleep patterns, fatigue, difficulty concentrating, and thoughts of death or suicide. It is important to note that antidepressants may take several weeks to reach their full effectiveness and may cause side effects, so it is essential to work closely with a healthcare provider to find the right medication and dosage.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Northwestern United States" is not a term that has a medical definition. It generally refers to a geographical region in the US, consisting of states like Washington, Oregon, Idaho, and sometimes Montana and Wyoming. If you have any questions related to medical topics, I'd be happy to try to help answer those!

A patent, in the context of medicine and healthcare, generally refers to a government-granted exclusive right for an inventor to manufacture, use, or sell their invention for a certain period of time, typically 20 years from the filing date. In the medical field, patents may cover a wide range of inventions, including new drugs, medical devices, diagnostic methods, and even genetic sequences.

The purpose of patents is to provide incentives for innovation by allowing inventors to profit from their inventions. However, patents can also have significant implications for access to medical technologies and healthcare costs. For example, a patent on a life-saving drug may give the patent holder the exclusive right to manufacture and sell the drug, potentially limiting access and driving up prices.

It's worth noting that the patent system is complex and varies from country to country. In some cases, there may be ways to challenge or circumvent patents in order to increase access to medical technologies, such as through compulsory licensing or generic substitution.

In the context of medical terminology, "office visits" refer to patients' appointments or consultations with healthcare professionals in their respective offices or clinics. These visits may include various services such as physical examinations, diagnosis, treatment planning, prescribing medications, providing referrals, and offering counseling or education on health-related topics. Office visits can be for routine checkups, follow-up appointments, or addressing acute or chronic medical concerns. It is important to note that office visits do not include services provided in a hospital setting, emergency department, or other healthcare facilities.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "policy making" is not a medical term per se. It refers to the process of formulating or establishing official guidelines or rules, such as public policies or organizational policies, that govern decisions and actions. In the context of healthcare, policy making can refer to the development of guidelines, laws, regulations, and procedures that govern the delivery, financing, and accessibility of medical care and health promotion activities.

Examples of policy making in healthcare include:

* Developing clinical practice guidelines for the management of specific medical conditions
* Establishing reimbursement policies for medical procedures or treatments
* Implementing regulations to ensure patient safety and quality of care
* Creating public health policies to address population health issues, such as tobacco control or obesity prevention.

A chronic disease is a long-term medical condition that often progresses slowly over a period of years and requires ongoing management and care. These diseases are typically not fully curable, but symptoms can be managed to improve quality of life. Common chronic diseases include heart disease, stroke, cancer, diabetes, arthritis, and COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease). They are often associated with advanced age, although they can also affect children and younger adults. Chronic diseases can have significant impacts on individuals' physical, emotional, and social well-being, as well as on healthcare systems and society at large.

Health services research (HSR) is a multidisciplinary field of scientific investigation that studies how social factors, financing systems, organizational structures and processes, health technologies, and personal behaviors affect access to healthcare, the quality and cost of care, and ultimately, our health and well-being. The goal of HSR is to inform policy and practice, improve system performance, and enhance the health and well-being of individuals and communities. It involves the use of various research methods, including epidemiology, biostatistics, economics, sociology, management science, political science, and psychology, to answer questions about the healthcare system and how it can be improved.

Examples of HSR topics include:

* Evaluating the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of different healthcare interventions and technologies
* Studying patient-centered care and patient experiences with the healthcare system
* Examining healthcare workforce issues, such as shortages of primary care providers or the impact of nurse-to-patient ratios on patient outcomes
* Investigating the impact of health insurance design and financing systems on access to care and health disparities
* Analyzing the organization and delivery of healthcare services in different settings, such as hospitals, clinics, and long-term care facilities
* Identifying best practices for improving healthcare quality and safety, reducing medical errors, and eliminating wasteful or unnecessary care.

Drug monitoring, also known as therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM), is a medical practice that involves testing blood or other bodily fluids to determine the concentration of a particular medication. This information is used to ensure that the patient is receiving an appropriate dosage and to help guide adjustments in medication therapy. It can be especially important for medications with a narrow therapeutic index, meaning that there is a small range between the effective dose and a toxic dose.

The goal of drug monitoring is to optimize medication effectiveness while minimizing potential side effects. This may involve measuring the concentration of a drug at various times after dosing to determine how quickly it is being metabolized or eliminated from the body, as well as to assess compliance with the prescribed treatment regimen.

Drug monitoring can be performed using a variety of methods, including immunoassays, chromatography, and mass spectrometry. The specific method used will depend on the drug being monitored and the level of sensitivity required. Results from drug monitoring tests are typically interpreted in conjunction with other clinical information, such as the patient's age, weight, renal function, liver function, and overall health status.

"California" is a geographical location and does not have a medical definition. It is a state located on the west coast of the United States, known for its diverse landscape including mountains, beaches, and forests. However, in some contexts, "California" may refer to certain medical conditions or situations that are associated with the state, such as:

* California encephalitis: a viral infection transmitted by mosquitoes that is common in California and other western states.
* California king snake: a non-venomous snake species found in California and other parts of the southwestern United States, which can bite and cause allergic reactions in some people.
* California roll: a type of sushi roll that originated in California and is made with avocado, cucumber, and crab meat, which may pose an allergy risk for some individuals.

It's important to note that these uses of "California" are not medical definitions per se, but rather descriptive terms that refer to specific conditions or situations associated with the state.

Analgesics are a class of drugs that are used to relieve pain. They work by blocking the transmission of pain signals in the nervous system, allowing individuals to manage their pain levels more effectively. There are many different types of analgesics available, including both prescription and over-the-counter options. Some common examples include acetaminophen (Tylenol), ibuprofen (Advil or Motrin), and opioids such as morphine or oxycodone.

The choice of analgesic will depend on several factors, including the type and severity of pain being experienced, any underlying medical conditions, potential drug interactions, and individual patient preferences. It is important to use these medications as directed by a healthcare provider, as misuse or overuse can lead to serious side effects and potential addiction.

In addition to their pain-relieving properties, some analgesics may also have additional benefits such as reducing inflammation (like in the case of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or NSAIDs) or causing sedation (as with certain opioids). However, it is essential to weigh these potential benefits against the risks and side effects associated with each medication.

When used appropriately, analgesics can significantly improve a person's quality of life by helping them manage their pain effectively and allowing them to engage in daily activities more comfortably.

Family practice, also known as family medicine, is a medical specialty that provides comprehensive and continuous care to patients of all ages, genders, and stages of life. Family physicians are trained to provide a wide range of services, including preventive care, diagnosis and treatment of acute and chronic illnesses, management of complex medical conditions, and providing health education and counseling.

Family practice emphasizes the importance of building long-term relationships with patients and their families, and takes into account the physical, emotional, social, and psychological factors that influence a person's health. Family physicians often serve as the primary point of contact for patients within the healthcare system, coordinating care with other specialists and healthcare providers as needed.

Family practice is a broad and diverse field, encompassing various areas such as pediatrics, internal medicine, obstetrics and gynecology, geriatrics, and behavioral health. The goal of family practice is to provide high-quality, patient-centered care that meets the unique needs and preferences of each individual patient and their family.

Anti-bacterial agents, also known as antibiotics, are a type of medication used to treat infections caused by bacteria. These agents work by either killing the bacteria or inhibiting their growth and reproduction. There are several different classes of anti-bacterial agents, including penicillins, cephalosporins, fluoroquinolones, macrolides, and tetracyclines, among others. Each class of antibiotic has a specific mechanism of action and is used to treat certain types of bacterial infections. It's important to note that anti-bacterial agents are not effective against viral infections, such as the common cold or flu. Misuse and overuse of antibiotics can lead to antibiotic resistance, which is a significant global health concern.

A "Professional Role" in the context of medicine typically refers to the specific duties, responsibilities, and expectations associated with a particular healthcare position. It encompasses the legal, ethical, and clinical aspects of the job, and is shaped by education, training, and professional standards. Examples include roles such as a physician, nurse, pharmacist, or therapist, each with their own distinct set of professional responsibilities and obligations to patients, colleagues, and society.

Health services refer to the delivery of healthcare services, including preventive, curative, and rehabilitative services. These services are typically provided by health professionals such as doctors, nurses, and allied health personnel in various settings, including hospitals, clinics, community health centers, and long-term care facilities. Health services may also include public health activities such as health education, surveillance, and health promotion programs aimed at improving the health of populations. The goal of health services is to promote and restore health, prevent disease and injury, and improve the quality of life for individuals and communities.

Substance abuse detection refers to the process of identifying the use or misuse of psychoactive substances, such as alcohol, illicit drugs, or prescription medications, in an individual. This can be done through various methods, including:

1. Physical examination: A healthcare professional may look for signs of substance abuse, such as track marks, enlarged pupils, or unusual behavior.
2. Laboratory tests: Urine, blood, hair, or saliva samples can be analyzed to detect the presence of drugs or their metabolites. These tests can provide information about recent use (hours to days) or longer-term use (up to several months).
3. Self-report measures: Individuals may be asked to complete questionnaires or interviews about their substance use patterns and behaviors.
4. Observational assessments: In some cases, such as in a treatment setting, healthcare professionals may observe an individual's behavior over time to identify patterns of substance abuse.

Substance abuse detection is often used in clinical, workplace, or legal settings to assess individuals for potential substance use disorders, monitor treatment progress, or ensure compliance with laws or regulations.

Therapeutic equivalence refers to the concept in pharmaceutical medicine where two or more medications are considered to be equivalent in clinical efficacy and safety profiles. This means that they can be used interchangeably to produce the same therapeutic effect.

Two products are deemed therapeutically equivalent if they contain the same active ingredient(s), are available in the same dosage form and strength, and have been shown to have comparable bioavailability, which is a measure of how much and how quickly a drug becomes available for use in the body.

It's important to note that therapeutic equivalence does not necessarily mean that the medications are identical or have identical excipients (inactive ingredients). Therefore, patients who may have sensitivities or allergies to certain excipients should still consult their healthcare provider before switching between therapeutically equivalent medications.

In many countries, including the United States, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) maintains a list of therapeutic equivalence evaluations for generic drugs, known as the "Orange Book." This resource helps healthcare providers and patients make informed decisions about using different versions of the same medication.

Pain is an unpleasant sensory and emotional experience associated with actual or potential tissue damage, or described in terms of such damage. It is a complex phenomenon that can result from various stimuli, such as thermal, mechanical, or chemical irritation, and it can be acute or chronic. The perception of pain involves the activation of specialized nerve cells called nociceptors, which transmit signals to the brain via the spinal cord. These signals are then processed in different regions of the brain, leading to the conscious experience of pain. It's important to note that pain is a highly individual and subjective experience, and its perception can vary widely among individuals.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Michigan" is not a medical term or concept. It is a geographical location, referring to the state of Michigan in the United States. If you have any questions related to medical topics, I would be happy to try and help answer those for you!

Comprehension, in a medical context, usually refers to the ability to understand and interpret spoken or written language, as well as gestures and expressions. It is a key component of communication and cognitive functioning. Difficulties with comprehension can be a symptom of various neurological conditions, such as aphasia (a disorder caused by damage to the language areas of the brain), learning disabilities, or dementia. Assessment of comprehension is often part of neuropsychological evaluations and speech-language pathology assessments.

Medical Definition:

"Risk factors" are any attribute, characteristic or exposure of an individual that increases the likelihood of developing a disease or injury. They can be divided into modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors. Modifiable risk factors are those that can be changed through lifestyle choices or medical treatment, while non-modifiable risk factors are inherent traits such as age, gender, or genetic predisposition. Examples of modifiable risk factors include smoking, alcohol consumption, physical inactivity, and unhealthy diet, while non-modifiable risk factors include age, sex, and family history. It is important to note that having a risk factor does not guarantee that a person will develop the disease, but rather indicates an increased susceptibility.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Internet" is a term that pertains to the global network of interconnected computers and servers that enable the transmission and reception of data via the internet protocol (IP). It is not a medical term and does not have a specific medical definition. If you have any questions related to medicine or health, I'd be happy to try to help answer them for you!

"Health Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices" (HKAP) is a term used in public health to refer to the knowledge, beliefs, assumptions, and behaviors that individuals possess or engage in that are related to health. Here's a brief definition of each component:

1. Health Knowledge: Refers to the factual information and understanding that individuals have about various health-related topics, such as anatomy, physiology, disease processes, and healthy behaviors.
2. Attitudes: Represent the positive or negative evaluations, feelings, or dispositions that people hold towards certain health issues, practices, or services. These attitudes can influence their willingness to adopt and maintain healthy behaviors.
3. Practices: Encompass the specific actions or habits that individuals engage in related to their health, such as dietary choices, exercise routines, hygiene practices, and use of healthcare services.

HKAP is a multidimensional concept that helps public health professionals understand and address various factors influencing individual and community health outcomes. By assessing and addressing knowledge gaps, negative attitudes, or unhealthy practices, interventions can be designed to promote positive behavior change and improve overall health status.

I'm happy to help! However, I believe there may be a slight misunderstanding in your question. "Students, Pharmacy" is not a medical term or concept. Instead, it likely refers to individuals who are studying to become pharmacists or are taking courses related to pharmacy as part of their education.

Pharmacy students are typically enrolled in a professional degree program, such as a Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm.D.) program, which prepares them to become licensed pharmacists. These programs typically include coursework in topics such as pharmaceutical chemistry, pharmacology, and clinical practice, as well as supervised clinical experiences in various healthcare settings.

Therefore, the term "Students, Pharmacy" generally refers to individuals who are pursuing a degree or certification in the field of pharmacy.

Cardiovascular agents are a class of medications that are used to treat various conditions related to the cardiovascular system, which includes the heart and blood vessels. These agents can be further divided into several subcategories based on their specific mechanisms of action and therapeutic effects. Here are some examples:

1. Antiarrhythmics: These drugs are used to treat abnormal heart rhythms or arrhythmias. They work by stabilizing the electrical activity of the heart and preventing irregular impulses from spreading through the heart muscle.
2. Antihypertensives: These medications are used to lower high blood pressure, also known as hypertension. There are several classes of antihypertensive drugs, including diuretics, beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers, and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors.
3. Anticoagulants: These drugs are used to prevent blood clots from forming or growing larger. They work by interfering with the coagulation cascade, which is a series of chemical reactions that lead to the formation of a blood clot.
4. Antiplatelet agents: These medications are used to prevent platelets in the blood from sticking together and forming clots. They work by inhibiting the aggregation of platelets, which are small cells in the blood that help form clots.
5. Lipid-lowering agents: These drugs are used to lower cholesterol and other fats in the blood. They work by reducing the production or absorption of cholesterol in the body or increasing the removal of cholesterol from the bloodstream. Examples include statins, bile acid sequestrants, and PCSK9 inhibitors.
6. Vasodilators: These medications are used to widen blood vessels and improve blood flow. They work by relaxing the smooth muscle in the walls of blood vessels, causing them to dilate or widen. Examples include nitrates, calcium channel blockers, and ACE inhibitors.
7. Inotropes: These drugs are used to increase the force of heart contractions. They work by increasing the sensitivity of heart muscle cells to calcium ions, which are necessary for muscle contraction.

These are just a few examples of cardiovascular medications that are used to treat various conditions related to the heart and blood vessels. It is important to note that these medications can have side effects and should be taken under the guidance of a healthcare provider.

Fees and charges in a medical context refer to the costs that patients are required to pay for healthcare services, treatments, or procedures. These may include:

1. Professional fees: The amount charged by healthcare professionals such as doctors, nurses, or therapists for their time, expertise, and services provided during consultations, examinations, or treatments.

2. Hospital charges: The costs associated with a patient's hospital stay, including room and board, nursing care, medications, and diagnostic tests.

3. Facility fees: Additional charges levied by hospitals, clinics, or ambulatory surgery centers to cover the overhead expenses of maintaining the facility and its equipment.

4. Procedure or treatment-specific fees: Costs directly related to specific medical procedures, surgeries, or treatments, such as anesthesia, radiology services, laboratory tests, or surgical supplies.

5. Ancillary fees: Additional costs for items like crutches, slings, or durable medical equipment that patients may need during their recovery process.

6. Insurance copayments, coinsurance, and deductibles: The portion of healthcare expenses that patients are responsible for paying based on their insurance policy terms.

It is essential for patients to understand the fees and charges associated with their medical care to make informed decisions about their treatment options and manage their healthcare costs effectively.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Mass Media" is not a term that has a medical definition. Mass media refers to the means of communication that reach large numbers of people simultaneously, such as television, radio, newspapers, and the Internet. It may be used in a public health context to discuss how information about health-related topics is disseminated to the general population. However, it is not a term that is typically used within the field of medicine to describe a specific medical concept or condition.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "negotiating" is not a term that has a specific medical definition. Negotiation is a process in which different parties come together to reach a mutually satisfactory agreement on a particular matter. It is often used in various contexts such as business, politics, and law, but it is not typically used in the context of medical terminology.

If you have any questions related to medical terminology or healthcare, I would be happy to try and help answer them for you!

Computer-assisted drug therapy refers to the use of computer systems and technology to support and enhance medication management and administration. This can include a variety of applications such as:

1. Medication ordering and prescribing systems that help reduce errors by providing alerts for potential drug interactions, dosage issues, and allergies.
2. Computerized physician order entry (CPOE) systems that allow healthcare providers to enter, review, and modify medication orders electronically.
3. Electronic medication administration records (eMARs) that track the administration of medications to patients in real-time, reducing errors and improving patient safety.
4. Clinical decision support systems (CDSS) that provide evidence-based recommendations for medication therapy based on patient-specific data.
5. Medication reconciliation systems that help ensure accurate and up-to-date medication lists for patients during transitions of care.

Overall, computer-assisted drug therapy aims to improve the safety, efficacy, and efficiency of medication management by reducing errors, enhancing communication, and providing timely access to relevant patient information.

Off-label use refers to the practice of prescribing or using pharmaceutical drugs for purposes, dosages, patient populations, or routes of administration that are not included in the approved labeling of the drug by the regulatory authority, such as the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). It is not illegal or unethical for physicians to prescribe medications off-label when they judge that it is medically appropriate for their patients. However, manufacturers are prohibited from promoting their drugs for off-label uses.

Narcotics, in a medical context, are substances that induce sleep, relieve pain, and suppress cough. They are often used for anesthesia during surgical procedures. Narcotics are derived from opium or its synthetic substitutes and include drugs such as morphine, codeine, fentanyl, oxycodone, and hydrocodone. These drugs bind to specific receptors in the brain and spinal cord, reducing the perception of pain and producing a sense of well-being. However, narcotics can also produce physical dependence and addiction, and their long-term use can lead to tolerance, meaning that higher doses are required to achieve the same effect. Narcotics are classified as controlled substances due to their potential for abuse and are subject to strict regulations.

Consumer health information (CHI) refers to the resources and materials that provide health information and education to the general public, who are not necessarily healthcare professionals. CHI is designed to be understandable and accessible to laypeople, and it covers a wide range of topics related to health and wellness, including:

* Diseases and conditions
* Preventive care and healthy lifestyles
* Medications and treatments
* Medical tests and procedures
* Healthcare services and facilities
* Patient rights and responsibilities

CHI can be found in various formats, such as pamphlets, brochures, websites, videos, podcasts, and social media. It is essential to ensure that CHI is accurate, unbiased, and up-to-date to help consumers make informed decisions about their health and healthcare. The goal of CHI is to empower individuals to take an active role in managing their health and making healthcare choices that are right for them.

Clinical Pharmacy Information Systems (CPIS) are specialized software applications designed to support the work of clinical pharmacists and other healthcare professionals in managing medication therapy for patients. These systems typically integrate with electronic health records (EHRs) and other hospital information systems to provide real-time, patient-specific data on medication orders, drug allergies, lab results, and other relevant patient information.

CPIS can help clinical pharmacists identify potential drug interactions, dosing errors, and other medication-related problems, and provide evidence-based recommendations for resolving them. They may also include features such as automated medication dispensing systems, barcode scanning for medication administration, and clinical decision support tools to guide medication therapy decisions.

The primary goal of CPIS is to improve the safety and efficacy of medication use in healthcare settings, ultimately leading to better patient outcomes and reduced healthcare costs.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "handwriting" is not a term that has a specific medical definition. Handwriting refers to the personal style or manner in which a person writes by hand. It can vary from person to person and can be influenced by factors such as an individual's fine motor skills, cultural background, and personal preferences.

However, in a broader context, there are certain medical conditions that can affect handwriting, such as neurological disorders (like stroke, Parkinson's disease, or cerebral palsy) or orthopedic issues (like arthritis or fractures). In these cases, healthcare professionals might assess a person's handwriting as part of the diagnostic process or to monitor the progression or treatment response of a condition. But again, handwriting itself is not a medical term with a specific definition.

Amphetamines are a type of central nervous system stimulant drug that increases alertness, wakefulness, and energy levels. They work by increasing the activity of certain neurotransmitters (chemical messengers) in the brain, such as dopamine and norepinephrine. Amphetamines can be prescribed for medical conditions such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and narcolepsy, but they are also commonly abused for their ability to produce euphoria, increase confidence, and improve performance in tasks that require sustained attention.

Some common examples of amphetamines include:

* Adderall: a combination of amphetamine and dextroamphetamine, used to treat ADHD and narcolepsy
* Dexedrine: a brand name for dextroamphetamine, used to treat ADHD and narcolepsy
* Vyvanse: a long-acting formulation of lisdexamfetamine, a prodrug that is converted to dextroamphetamine in the body, used to treat ADHD

Amphetamines can be taken orally, snorted, smoked, or injected. Long-term use or abuse of amphetamines can lead to a number of negative health consequences, including addiction, cardiovascular problems, malnutrition, mental health disorders, and memory loss.

A "drug user" is a person who uses or consumes illegal drugs, such as heroin, cocaine, or methamphetamine, or misuses prescription medications for recreational purposes or to self-medicate. It's important to note that the term "drug user" can have stigmatizing connotations and may not accurately reflect the complexity of an individual's relationship with drugs. Many prefer terms like "person who uses drugs" or "substance user," which emphasize the personhood and agency of the individual rather than reducing them to their drug use.

It's also worth noting that there is a wide range of drug use behaviors, from occasional recreational use to heavy, dependent use. The medical community recognizes that problematic drug use can lead to negative health consequences, but it's important to approach individuals who use drugs with compassion and understanding rather than judgment. Providing access to evidence-based treatments and harm reduction services can help reduce the risks associated with drug use and support individuals in making positive changes in their lives.

Pharmacoepidemiology is the study of the use and effects of drugs in large populations. It combines epidemiological methods with pharmacologic knowledge to address questions about drug safety, efficacy, and optimal use in real-world settings. This field of study investigates the following aspects:

1. Drug utilization: How drugs are prescribed, used, and monitored in various populations.
2. Adverse drug events (ADEs): The identification, quantification, and prevention of ADEs, including drug reactions, interactions, and medication errors.
3. Effectiveness: Assessing the real-world effectiveness of drugs under routine clinical practice conditions, as opposed to highly controlled clinical trials.
4. Drug outcomes research: Investigating the impact of drugs on patient health outcomes, quality of life, and healthcare resource utilization.
5. Risk assessment and benefit-risk analysis: Evaluating the balance between the benefits and risks associated with drug therapy in specific populations or clinical scenarios.
6. Post-marketing surveillance: Monitoring the safety and effectiveness of drugs after they have been approved for use in the market.
7. Pharmacogenomics: Examining the role of genetic factors in drug response variability among individuals, which can inform personalized medicine approaches.

Pharmacoepidemiology is essential for informing evidence-based decision-making in clinical practice, public health policy, and regulatory affairs related to drug therapy.

'Government Financing' in the context of healthcare refers to the role of government in funding healthcare services, programs, and infrastructure. This can be achieved through various mechanisms such as:

1. Direct provision of healthcare services: The government operates and funds its own hospitals, clinics, and other healthcare facilities, where it employs healthcare professionals to deliver care.
2. Public insurance programs: The government establishes and manages health insurance programs, like Medicare and Medicaid in the United States, which provide coverage for specific populations and reimburse healthcare providers for services delivered to enrollees.
3. Tax subsidies and incentives: Governments may offer tax breaks or other financial incentives to encourage private investments in healthcare infrastructure, research, and development.
4. Grants and loans: Government agencies can provide funding to healthcare organizations, researchers, and educational institutions in the form of grants and loans for specific projects, programs, or initiatives.
5. Public-private partnerships (PPPs): Governments collaborate with private entities to jointly fund and manage healthcare services, facilities, or infrastructure projects.

Government financing plays a significant role in shaping healthcare systems and ensuring access to care for vulnerable populations. The extent of government involvement in financing varies across countries, depending on their political, economic, and social contexts.

Physician-patient relations, also known as doctor-patient relationships, refer to the interaction and communication between healthcare professionals and their patients. This relationship is founded on trust, respect, and understanding, with the physician providing medical care and treatment based on the patient's needs and best interests. Effective physician-patient relations involve clear communication, informed consent, shared decision-making, and confidentiality. A positive and collaborative relationship can lead to better health outcomes, improved patient satisfaction, and increased adherence to treatment plans.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "poverty" is not a medical condition or term. It is a social condition defined by the World Bank as "pronounced deprivation in well-being," and measured through indicators such as income, consumption, and access to basic services. Poverty can have significant impacts on health outcomes and healthcare access, but it is not considered a medical diagnosis. If you have any questions related to health or medicine, I'd be happy to try my best to help answer them!

A drug interaction is the effect of combining two or more drugs, or a drug and another substance (such as food or alcohol), which can alter the effectiveness or side effects of one or both of the substances. These interactions can be categorized as follows:

1. Pharmacodynamic interactions: These occur when two or more drugs act on the same target organ or receptor, leading to an additive, synergistic, or antagonistic effect. For example, taking a sedative and an antihistamine together can result in increased drowsiness due to their combined depressant effects on the central nervous system.
2. Pharmacokinetic interactions: These occur when one drug affects the absorption, distribution, metabolism, or excretion of another drug. For example, taking certain antibiotics with grapefruit juice can increase the concentration of the antibiotic in the bloodstream, leading to potential toxicity.
3. Food-drug interactions: Some drugs may interact with specific foods, affecting their absorption, metabolism, or excretion. An example is the interaction between warfarin (a blood thinner) and green leafy vegetables, which can increase the risk of bleeding due to enhanced vitamin K absorption from the vegetables.
4. Drug-herb interactions: Some herbal supplements may interact with medications, leading to altered drug levels or increased side effects. For instance, St. John's Wort can decrease the effectiveness of certain antidepressants and oral contraceptives by inducing their metabolism.
5. Drug-alcohol interactions: Alcohol can interact with various medications, causing additive sedative effects, impaired judgment, or increased risk of liver damage. For example, combining alcohol with benzodiazepines or opioids can lead to dangerous levels of sedation and respiratory depression.

It is essential for healthcare providers and patients to be aware of potential drug interactions to minimize adverse effects and optimize treatment outcomes.

Health surveys are research studies that collect data from a sample population to describe the current health status, health behaviors, and healthcare utilization of a particular group or community. These surveys may include questions about various aspects of health such as physical health, mental health, chronic conditions, lifestyle habits, access to healthcare services, and demographic information. The data collected from health surveys can be used to monitor trends in health over time, identify disparities in health outcomes, develop and evaluate public health programs and policies, and inform resource allocation decisions. Examples of national health surveys include the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) and the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS).

Socioeconomic factors are a range of interconnected conditions and influences that affect the opportunities and resources a person or group has to maintain and improve their health and well-being. These factors include:

1. Economic stability: This includes employment status, job security, income level, and poverty status. Lower income and lack of employment are associated with poorer health outcomes.
2. Education: Higher levels of education are generally associated with better health outcomes. Education can affect a person's ability to access and understand health information, as well as their ability to navigate the healthcare system.
3. Social and community context: This includes factors such as social support networks, discrimination, and community safety. Strong social supports and positive community connections are associated with better health outcomes, while discrimination and lack of safety can negatively impact health.
4. Healthcare access and quality: Access to affordable, high-quality healthcare is an important socioeconomic factor that can significantly impact a person's health. Factors such as insurance status, availability of providers, and cultural competency of healthcare systems can all affect healthcare access and quality.
5. Neighborhood and built environment: The physical conditions in which people live, work, and play can also impact their health. Factors such as housing quality, transportation options, availability of healthy foods, and exposure to environmental hazards can all influence health outcomes.

Socioeconomic factors are often interrelated and can have a cumulative effect on health outcomes. For example, someone who lives in a low-income neighborhood with limited access to healthy foods and safe parks may also face challenges related to employment, education, and healthcare access that further impact their health. Addressing socioeconomic factors is an important part of promoting health equity and reducing health disparities.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "retirement" is not a term that has a medical definition. Retirement generally refers to the point in a person's life when they stop working or withdraw from one's position or occupation. It is often associated with reaching a certain age or becoming eligible for pension benefits. However, it's important to note that retirement can have various physical and mental health implications, as it can impact social connections, cognitive stimulation, financial security, and daily structure, among other factors. These impacts can be either positive or negative, depending on the individual's circumstances and experiences during retirement.

Oxycodone is a semi-synthetic opioid analgesic, which means it's a painkiller that's synthesized from thebaine, an alkaloid found in the poppy plant. It's a strong pain reliever used to treat moderate to severe pain and is often prescribed for around-the-clock treatment of chronic pain. Oxycodone can be found in various forms, such as immediate-release tablets, extended-release tablets, capsules, and solutions.

Common brand names for oxycodone include OxyContin (extended-release), Percocet (oxycodone + acetaminophen), and Roxicodone (immediate-release). As an opioid, oxycodone works by binding to specific receptors in the brain, spinal cord, and gut, reducing the perception of pain and decreasing the emotional response to pain.

However, it's important to note that oxycodone has a high potential for abuse and addiction due to its euphoric effects. Misuse or prolonged use can lead to physical dependence, tolerance, and withdrawal symptoms upon discontinuation. Therefore, it should be taken exactly as prescribed by a healthcare professional and used with caution.

Guideline adherence, in the context of medicine, refers to the extent to which healthcare professionals follow established clinical practice guidelines or recommendations in their daily practice. These guidelines are systematically developed statements designed to assist practitioners and patient decisions about appropriate health care for specific clinical circumstances. Adherence to evidence-based guidelines can help improve the quality of care, reduce unnecessary variations in practice, and promote optimal patient outcomes. Factors that may influence guideline adherence include clinician awareness, familiarity, agreement, self-efficacy, outcome expectancy, and the complexity of the recommendation.

Comorbidity is the presence of one or more additional health conditions or diseases alongside a primary illness or condition. These co-occurring health issues can have an impact on the treatment plan, prognosis, and overall healthcare management of an individual. Comorbidities often interact with each other and the primary condition, leading to more complex clinical situations and increased healthcare needs. It is essential for healthcare professionals to consider and address comorbidities to provide comprehensive care and improve patient outcomes.

Longitudinal studies are a type of research design where data is collected from the same subjects repeatedly over a period of time, often years or even decades. These studies are used to establish patterns of changes and events over time, and can help researchers identify causal relationships between variables. They are particularly useful in fields such as epidemiology, psychology, and sociology, where the focus is on understanding developmental trends and the long-term effects of various factors on health and behavior.

In medical research, longitudinal studies can be used to track the progression of diseases over time, identify risk factors for certain conditions, and evaluate the effectiveness of treatments or interventions. For example, a longitudinal study might follow a group of individuals over several decades to assess their exposure to certain environmental factors and their subsequent development of chronic diseases such as cancer or heart disease. By comparing data collected at multiple time points, researchers can identify trends and correlations that may not be apparent in shorter-term studies.

Longitudinal studies have several advantages over other research designs, including their ability to establish temporal relationships between variables, track changes over time, and reduce the impact of confounding factors. However, they also have some limitations, such as the potential for attrition (loss of participants over time), which can introduce bias and affect the validity of the results. Additionally, longitudinal studies can be expensive and time-consuming to conduct, requiring significant resources and a long-term commitment from both researchers and study participants.

Transsexualism is not considered a medical condition in itself, but rather a symptom or a part of a larger gender dysphoria diagnosis. According to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), published by the American Psychiatric Association, gender dysphoria refers to the distress that may accompany the incongruence between one's experienced or expressed gender and one's assigned gender.

Transsexualism is an outdated term that was previously used to describe individuals who strongly identify with a gender different from the one they were assigned at birth and wish to permanently transition to their identified gender through medical and social means, including hormone therapy and gender confirmation surgery. The current preferred terminology is to use the term "transgender" as an umbrella term that includes all people whose gender identity differs from the sex they were assigned at birth.

It's important to note that being transgender is not a mental illness, but rather a part of human diversity. The distress that some transgender individuals experience is primarily due to societal stigma and discrimination, rather than their gender identity itself.

In the field of medicine, "time factors" refer to the duration of symptoms or time elapsed since the onset of a medical condition, which can have significant implications for diagnosis and treatment. Understanding time factors is crucial in determining the progression of a disease, evaluating the effectiveness of treatments, and making critical decisions regarding patient care.

For example, in stroke management, "time is brain," meaning that rapid intervention within a specific time frame (usually within 4.5 hours) is essential to administering tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a clot-busting drug that can minimize brain damage and improve patient outcomes. Similarly, in trauma care, the "golden hour" concept emphasizes the importance of providing definitive care within the first 60 minutes after injury to increase survival rates and reduce morbidity.

Time factors also play a role in monitoring the progression of chronic conditions like diabetes or heart disease, where regular follow-ups and assessments help determine appropriate treatment adjustments and prevent complications. In infectious diseases, time factors are crucial for initiating antibiotic therapy and identifying potential outbreaks to control their spread.

Overall, "time factors" encompass the significance of recognizing and acting promptly in various medical scenarios to optimize patient outcomes and provide effective care.

A "Veteran" is not a medical term per se, but rather a term used to describe individuals who have served in the military. Specifically, in the United States, a veteran is defined as a person who has served in the armed forces of the country and was discharged or released under conditions other than dishonorable. This definition can include those who served in war time or peace time. The term "veteran" does not imply any specific medical condition or diagnosis. However, veterans may have unique health needs and challenges related to their military service, such as exposure to hazardous materials, traumatic brain injury, post-traumatic stress disorder, and other physical and mental health conditions.

National health programs are systematic, large-scale initiatives that are put in place by national governments to address specific health issues or improve the overall health of a population. These programs often involve coordinated efforts across various sectors, including healthcare, education, and social services. They may aim to increase access to care, improve the quality of care, prevent the spread of diseases, promote healthy behaviors, or reduce health disparities. Examples of national health programs include immunization campaigns, tobacco control initiatives, and efforts to address chronic diseases such as diabetes or heart disease. These programs are typically developed based on scientific research, evidence-based practices, and public health data, and they may be funded through a variety of sources, including government budgets, grants, and private donations.

Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors, also known as statins, are a class of cholesterol-lowering medications. They work by inhibiting the enzyme HMG-CoA reductase, which plays a central role in the production of cholesterol in the liver. By blocking this enzyme, the liver is stimulated to take up more low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol from the bloodstream, leading to a decrease in LDL cholesterol levels and a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease.

Examples of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors include atorvastatin, simvastatin, pravastatin, rosuvastatin, and fluvastatin. These medications are commonly prescribed to individuals with high cholesterol levels, particularly those who are at risk for or have established cardiovascular disease.

It's important to note that while HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors can be effective in reducing LDL cholesterol levels and the risk of cardiovascular events, they should be used as part of a comprehensive approach to managing high cholesterol, which may also include lifestyle modifications such as dietary changes, exercise, and weight management.

Multivariate analysis is a statistical method used to examine the relationship between multiple independent variables and a dependent variable. It allows for the simultaneous examination of the effects of two or more independent variables on an outcome, while controlling for the effects of other variables in the model. This technique can be used to identify patterns, associations, and interactions among multiple variables, and is commonly used in medical research to understand complex health outcomes and disease processes. Examples of multivariate analysis methods include multiple regression, factor analysis, cluster analysis, and discriminant analysis.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Ontario" is not a medical term. It is the name of a province in Canada, similar to how "California" is the name of a state in the United States. If you have any questions related to medical terminology or health conditions, I would be happy to try and help answer those for you!

An ethnic group is a category of people who identify with each other based on shared ancestry, language, culture, history, and/or physical characteristics. The concept of an ethnic group is often used in the social sciences to describe a population that shares a common identity and a sense of belonging to a larger community.

Ethnic groups can be distinguished from racial groups, which are categories of people who are defined by their physical characteristics, such as skin color, hair texture, and facial features. While race is a social construct based on physical differences, ethnicity is a cultural construct based on shared traditions, beliefs, and practices.

It's important to note that the concept of ethnic groups can be complex and fluid, as individuals may identify with multiple ethnic groups or switch their identification over time. Additionally, the boundaries between different ethnic groups can be blurred and contested, and the ways in which people define and categorize themselves and others can vary across cultures and historical periods.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Los Angeles" is not a medical term or concept. It is a city in the state of California, USA. If you have any questions related to medical topics, I would be happy to try and help answer them!

"Cost of Illness" is a medical-economic concept that refers to the total societal cost associated with a specific disease or health condition. It includes both direct and indirect costs. Direct costs are those that can be directly attributed to the illness, such as medical expenses for diagnosis, treatment, rehabilitation, and medications. Indirect costs include productivity losses due to morbidity (reduced efficiency while working) and mortality (lost earnings due to death). Other indirect costs may encompass expenses related to caregiving or special education needs. The Cost of Illness is often used in health policy decision-making, resource allocation, and evaluating the economic impact of diseases on society.

Cost-benefit analysis (CBA) is a systematic process used to compare the costs and benefits of different options to determine which one provides the greatest net benefit. In a medical context, CBA can be used to evaluate the value of medical interventions, treatments, or policies by estimating and monetizing all the relevant costs and benefits associated with each option.

The costs included in a CBA may include direct costs such as the cost of the intervention or treatment itself, as well as indirect costs such as lost productivity or time away from work. Benefits may include improved health outcomes, reduced morbidity or mortality, and increased quality of life.

Once all the relevant costs and benefits have been identified and quantified, they are typically expressed in monetary terms to allow for a direct comparison. The option with the highest net benefit (i.e., the difference between total benefits and total costs) is considered the most cost-effective.

It's important to note that CBA has some limitations and can be subject to various biases and assumptions, so it should be used in conjunction with other evaluation methods to ensure a comprehensive understanding of the value of medical interventions or policies.

Antihypertensive agents are a class of medications used to treat high blood pressure (hypertension). They work by reducing the force and rate of heart contractions, dilating blood vessels, or altering neurohormonal activation to lower blood pressure. Examples include diuretics, beta blockers, ACE inhibitors, ARBs, calcium channel blockers, and direct vasodilators. These medications may be used alone or in combination to achieve optimal blood pressure control.

Ambulatory care facilities are healthcare providers where patients receive medical services, treatments, or procedures that do not require an overnight hospital stay. These facilities are often used for diagnosis, observation, and outpatient care such as same-day surgery, preventive health screenings, and minor procedures. They can include a wide range of settings like physician offices, community clinics, urgent care centers, dialysis centers, and surgical centers. The goal of ambulatory care facilities is to provide high-quality medical services in a convenient and cost-effective manner for patients who do not require hospitalization.

Treatment outcome is a term used to describe the result or effect of medical treatment on a patient's health status. It can be measured in various ways, such as through symptoms improvement, disease remission, reduced disability, improved quality of life, or survival rates. The treatment outcome helps healthcare providers evaluate the effectiveness of a particular treatment plan and make informed decisions about future care. It is also used in clinical research to compare the efficacy of different treatments and improve patient care.

Chinese herbal drugs, also known as traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), refer to a system of medicine that has been practiced in China for thousands of years. It is based on the belief that the body's vital energy, called Qi, must be balanced and flowing freely for good health. TCM uses various techniques such as herbal therapy, acupuncture, dietary therapy, and exercise to restore balance and promote healing.

Chinese herbal drugs are usually prescribed in the form of teas, powders, pills, or tinctures and may contain one or a combination of herbs. The herbs used in Chinese medicine are typically derived from plants, minerals, or animal products. Some commonly used Chinese herbs include ginseng, astragalus, licorice root, and cinnamon bark.

It is important to note that the use of Chinese herbal drugs should be under the guidance of a qualified practitioner, as some herbs can interact with prescription medications or have side effects. Additionally, the quality and safety of Chinese herbal products can vary widely depending on the source and manufacturing process.

A Medical Order Entry System (MOES) is a computer-based tool that allows healthcare professionals to enter, modify, review, and communicate orders for patients' medications, tests, or other treatments in a structured and standardized electronic format. MOES are designed to improve the safety, efficiency, and legibility of medical orders, reducing the risk of medication errors and improving overall patient care. These systems can be integrated with other healthcare information systems, such as electronic health records (EHRs), to provide a seamless and coordinated approach to patient care.

Health status is a term used to describe the overall condition of an individual's health, including physical, mental, and social well-being. It is often assessed through various measures such as medical history, physical examination, laboratory tests, and self-reported health assessments. Health status can be used to identify health disparities, track changes in population health over time, and evaluate the effectiveness of healthcare interventions.

Hospitalization is the process of admitting a patient to a hospital for the purpose of receiving medical treatment, surgery, or other health care services. It involves staying in the hospital as an inpatient, typically under the care of doctors, nurses, and other healthcare professionals. The length of stay can vary depending on the individual's medical condition and the type of treatment required. Hospitalization may be necessary for a variety of reasons, such as to receive intensive care, to undergo diagnostic tests or procedures, to recover from surgery, or to manage chronic illnesses or injuries.

In the context of medical terminology, "attitude" generally refers to the position or posture of a patient's body or a part of it. It can also refer to the mental set or disposition that a person has towards their health, illness, or healthcare providers. However, it is not a term that has a specific medical definition like other medical terminologies do.

For example, in orthopedics, "attitude" may be used to describe the position of a limb or joint during an examination or surgical procedure. In psychology, "attitude" may refer to a person's feelings, beliefs, and behaviors towards a particular object, issue, or idea related to their health.

Therefore, the meaning of "attitude" in medical terminology can vary depending on the context in which it is used.

I'm happy to help! However, I must clarify that "information dissemination" is not a medical term per se, but rather a general term used in various fields, including healthcare and medicine. It refers to the process of spreading or distributing information to a specific audience or the public.

In the context of medicine and healthcare, information dissemination often relates to sharing clinical guidelines, research findings, public health messages, or patient education materials with healthcare professionals, patients, or the general public. This can occur through various channels, such as scientific conferences, peer-reviewed journals, newsletters, websites, social media platforms, and other communication methods.

The goal of information dissemination in medicine is to ensure that accurate, evidence-based, and up-to-date information reaches the intended audience, ultimately improving healthcare quality, patient outcomes, and decision-making processes.

The "attitude of health personnel" refers to the overall disposition, behavior, and approach that healthcare professionals exhibit towards their patients or clients. This encompasses various aspects such as:

1. Interpersonal skills: The ability to communicate effectively, listen actively, and build rapport with patients.
2. Professionalism: Adherence to ethical principles, confidentiality, and maintaining a non-judgmental attitude.
3. Compassion and empathy: Showing genuine concern for the patient's well-being and understanding their feelings and experiences.
4. Cultural sensitivity: Respecting and acknowledging the cultural backgrounds, beliefs, and values of patients.
5. Competence: Demonstrating knowledge, skills, and expertise in providing healthcare services.
6. Collaboration: Working together with other healthcare professionals to ensure comprehensive care for the patient.
7. Patient-centeredness: Focusing on the individual needs, preferences, and goals of the patient in the decision-making process.
8. Commitment to continuous learning and improvement: Staying updated with the latest developments in the field and seeking opportunities to enhance one's skills and knowledge.

A positive attitude of health personnel contributes significantly to patient satisfaction, adherence to treatment plans, and overall healthcare outcomes.

"Age distribution" is a term used to describe the number of individuals within a population or sample that fall into different age categories. It is often presented in the form of a graph, table, or chart, and can provide important information about the demographic structure of a population.

The age distribution of a population can be influenced by a variety of factors, including birth rates, mortality rates, migration patterns, and aging. Public health officials and researchers use age distribution data to inform policies and programs related to healthcare, social services, and other areas that affect the well-being of populations.

For example, an age distribution graph might show a larger number of individuals in the younger age categories, indicating a population with a high birth rate. Alternatively, it might show a larger number of individuals in the older age categories, indicating a population with a high life expectancy or an aging population. Understanding the age distribution of a population can help policymakers plan for future needs and allocate resources more effectively.

Risk adjustment is a statistical method used in healthcare financing and delivery to account for differences in the health status and expected healthcare costs among groups of enrollees. It is a process that modifies payment rates or capitation amounts based on the relative risk of each enrollee, as measured by demographic factors such as age, sex, and chronic medical conditions. The goal of risk adjustment is to create a more level playing field for healthcare providers and insurers by reducing the financial impact of serving patients who are sicker or have greater healthcare needs. This allows for a more fair comparison of performance and payment across different populations and helps to ensure that resources are distributed equitably.

Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM) is a medical approach that combines the best available scientific evidence with clinical expertise and patient values to make informed decisions about diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of diseases. It emphasizes the use of systematic research, including randomized controlled trials and meta-analyses, to guide clinical decision making. EBM aims to provide the most effective and efficient care while minimizing variations in practice, reducing errors, and improving patient outcomes.

I'm happy to help! However, I believe there might be a slight misunderstanding in your question. "Legislation" and "Pharmacy" are two distinct concepts from different fields - legislation is a term related to law-making, while pharmacy is a field of healthcare concerned with the preparation and dispensing of medications.

There isn't a specific medical definition for "legislation, pharmacy." However, I can provide you with some information about each concept separately:

1. Legislation: In general terms, legislation refers to the process of creating, enacting, and amending laws in a political system or jurisdiction. In the context of healthcare, legislation may refer to laws and regulations that govern various aspects of medical practice, patient care, public health, and pharmaceutical industry, among others.
2. Pharmacy: Pharmacy is a healthcare profession concerned with the safe and effective use of medications. Pharmacists are experts in medicines who work to ensure that patients receive the best possible outcomes from their medication therapy. They may practice in various settings, including community pharmacies, hospitals, clinics, and long-term care facilities.

If you have any further questions or need more information about either concept, please let me know!

Practice guidelines, also known as clinical practice guidelines, are systematically developed statements that aim to assist healthcare professionals and patients in making informed decisions about appropriate health care for specific clinical circumstances. They are based on a thorough evaluation of the available scientific evidence, consensus of expert opinion, and consideration of patient preferences. Practice guidelines can cover a wide range of topics, including diagnosis, management, prevention, and treatment options for various medical conditions. They are intended to improve the quality and consistency of care, reduce unnecessary variations in practice, and promote evidence-based medicine. However, they should not replace clinical judgment or individualized patient care.

An emergency service in a hospital is a department that provides immediate medical or surgical care for individuals who are experiencing an acute illness, injury, or severe symptoms that require immediate attention. The goal of an emergency service is to quickly assess, stabilize, and treat patients who require urgent medical intervention, with the aim of preventing further harm or death.

Emergency services in hospitals typically operate 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, and are staffed by teams of healthcare professionals including physicians, nurses, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, and other allied health professionals. These teams are trained to provide rapid evaluation and treatment for a wide range of medical conditions, from minor injuries to life-threatening emergencies such as heart attacks, strokes, and severe infections.

In addition to providing emergency care, hospital emergency services also serve as a key point of entry for patients who require further hospitalization or specialized care. They work closely with other departments within the hospital, such as radiology, laboratory, and critical care units, to ensure that patients receive timely and appropriate treatment. Overall, the emergency service in a hospital plays a crucial role in ensuring that patients receive prompt and effective medical care during times of crisis.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Linear Models" is actually a term from the field of statistics and machine learning, rather than medicine. A linear model is a type of statistical model that is used to analyze the relationship between two or more variables. In a linear model, the relationship between the dependent variable (the outcome or result) and the independent variable(s) (the factors being studied) is assumed to be linear, meaning that it can be described by a straight line on a graph.

The equation for a simple linear model with one independent variable (x) and one dependent variable (y) looks like this:

y = β0 + β1*x + ε

In this equation, β0 is the y-intercept or the value of y when x equals zero, β1 is the slope or the change in y for each unit increase in x, and ε is the error term or the difference between the actual values of y and the predicted values of y based on the linear model.

Linear models are widely used in medical research to study the relationship between various factors (such as exposure to a risk factor or treatment) and health outcomes (such as disease incidence or mortality). They can also be used to adjust for confounding variables, which are factors that may influence both the independent variable and the dependent variable, and thus affect the observed relationship between them.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Urban Population" is not a medical term. It is a demographic term used to describe the portion of a country's population that lives in areas classified as urban. The United Nations defines an urban area as a city, town, or other agglomeration with a population of 20,000 or more. However, the specific definition can vary by country and organization.

In contrast, medical terms typically refer to conditions, diseases, symptoms, treatments, or healthcare-related concepts. If you have any questions related to health or medicine, I'd be happy to help if I can!

Substance abuse treatment centers are healthcare facilities that provide a range of services for individuals struggling with substance use disorders (SUDs), including addiction to alcohol, illicit drugs, prescription medications, and other substances. These centers offer comprehensive, evidence-based assessments, interventions, and treatments aimed at helping patients achieve and maintain sobriety, improve their overall health and well-being, and reintegrate into society as productive members.

The medical definition of 'Substance Abuse Treatment Centers' encompasses various levels and types of care, such as:

1. **Medical Detoxification:** This is the first step in treating substance abuse, where patients are closely monitored and managed for withdrawal symptoms as their bodies clear the harmful substances. Medical detox often involves the use of medications to alleviate discomfort and ensure safety during the process.
2. **Inpatient/Residential Treatment:** This level of care provides 24-hour structured, intensive treatment in a controlled environment. Patients live at the facility and receive various therapeutic interventions, such as individual therapy, group counseling, family therapy, and psychoeducation, to address the underlying causes of their addiction and develop coping strategies for long-term recovery.
3. **Partial Hospitalization Programs (PHP):** Also known as day treatment, PHPs offer structured, intensive care for several hours a day while allowing patients to return home or to a sober living environment during non-treatment hours. This level of care typically includes individual and group therapy, skill-building activities, and case management services.
4. **Intensive Outpatient Programs (IOP):** IOPs provide flexible, less intensive treatment than PHPs, with patients attending sessions for a few hours per day, several days a week. These programs focus on relapse prevention, recovery skills, and addressing any co-occurring mental health conditions.
5. **Outpatient Treatment:** This is the least restrictive level of care, where patients attend individual or group therapy sessions on a regular basis while living at home or in a sober living environment. Outpatient treatment often serves as step-down care after completing higher levels of treatment or as an initial intervention for those with milder SUDs.
6. **Aftercare/Continuing Care:** Aftercare or continuing care services help patients maintain their recovery and prevent relapse by providing ongoing support, such as 12-step meetings, alumni groups, individual therapy, and case management.

Each treatment modality has its unique benefits and is tailored to meet the specific needs of individuals at various stages of addiction and recovery. It's essential to consult with a healthcare professional or an addiction specialist to determine the most appropriate level of care for each person's situation.

Regression analysis is a statistical technique used in medicine, as well as in other fields, to examine the relationship between one or more independent variables (predictors) and a dependent variable (outcome). It allows for the estimation of the average change in the outcome variable associated with a one-unit change in an independent variable, while controlling for the effects of other independent variables. This technique is often used to identify risk factors for diseases or to evaluate the effectiveness of medical interventions. In medical research, regression analysis can be used to adjust for potential confounding variables and to quantify the relationship between exposures and health outcomes. It can also be used in predictive modeling to estimate the probability of a particular outcome based on multiple predictors.

Respiratory tract infections (RTIs) are infections that affect the respiratory system, which includes the nose, throat (pharynx), voice box (larynx), windpipe (trachea), bronchi, and lungs. These infections can be caused by viruses, bacteria, or, less commonly, fungi.

RTIs are classified into two categories based on their location: upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs) and lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs). URTIs include infections of the nose, sinuses, throat, and larynx, such as the common cold, flu, laryngitis, and sinusitis. LRTIs involve the lower airways, including the bronchi and lungs, and can be more severe. Examples of LRTIs are pneumonia, bronchitis, and bronchiolitis.

Symptoms of RTIs depend on the location and cause of the infection but may include cough, congestion, runny nose, sore throat, difficulty breathing, wheezing, fever, fatigue, and chest pain. Treatment for RTIs varies depending on the severity and underlying cause of the infection. For viral infections, treatment typically involves supportive care to manage symptoms, while antibiotics may be prescribed for bacterial infections.

Quality of health care is a term that refers to the degree to which health services for individuals and populations increase the likelihood of desired health outcomes and are consistent with current professional knowledge. It encompasses various aspects such as:

1. Clinical effectiveness: The use of best available evidence to make decisions about prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and care. This includes considering the benefits and harms of different options and making sure that the most effective interventions are used.
2. Safety: Preventing harm to patients and minimizing risks associated with healthcare. This involves identifying potential hazards, implementing measures to reduce errors, and learning from adverse events to improve systems and processes.
3. Patient-centeredness: Providing care that is respectful of and responsive to individual patient preferences, needs, and values. This includes ensuring that patients are fully informed about their condition and treatment options, involving them in decision-making, and providing emotional support throughout the care process.
4. Timeliness: Ensuring that healthcare services are delivered promptly and efficiently, without unnecessary delays. This includes coordinating care across different providers and settings to ensure continuity and avoid gaps in service.
5. Efficiency: Using resources wisely and avoiding waste, while still providing high-quality care. This involves considering the costs and benefits of different interventions, as well as ensuring that healthcare services are equitably distributed.
6. Equitability: Ensuring that all individuals have access to quality healthcare services, regardless of their socioeconomic status, race, ethnicity, gender, age, or other factors. This includes addressing disparities in health outcomes and promoting fairness and justice in healthcare.

Overall, the quality of health care is a multidimensional concept that requires ongoing evaluation and improvement to ensure that patients receive the best possible care.

"Medically uninsured" is not a term that has an official medical definition. However, it generally refers to individuals who do not have health insurance coverage. This can include those who cannot afford it, those who are not offered coverage through their employer, and those who are ineligible for government-sponsored programs like Medicaid or Medicare. Being medically uninsured can lead to financial strain if an individual experiences a medical emergency or needs ongoing care, as they will be responsible for paying for these services out of pocket.

Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents (NSAIDs) are a class of medications that reduce pain, inflammation, and fever. They work by inhibiting the activity of cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes, which are involved in the production of prostaglandins, chemicals that contribute to inflammation and cause blood vessels to dilate and become more permeable, leading to symptoms such as pain, redness, warmth, and swelling.

NSAIDs are commonly used to treat a variety of conditions, including arthritis, muscle strains and sprains, menstrual cramps, headaches, and fever. Some examples of NSAIDs include aspirin, ibuprofen, naproxen, and celecoxib.

While NSAIDs are generally safe and effective when used as directed, they can have side effects, particularly when taken in large doses or for long periods of time. Common side effects include stomach ulcers, gastrointestinal bleeding, and increased risk of heart attack and stroke. It is important to follow the recommended dosage and consult with a healthcare provider if you have any concerns about using NSAIDs.

Hypoglycemic agents are a class of medications that are used to lower blood glucose levels in the treatment of diabetes mellitus. These medications work by increasing insulin sensitivity, stimulating insulin release from the pancreas, or inhibiting glucose production in the liver. Examples of hypoglycemic agents include sulfonylureas, meglitinides, biguanides, thiazolidinediones, DPP-4 inhibitors, SGLT2 inhibitors, and GLP-1 receptor agonists. It's important to note that the term "hypoglycemic" refers to a condition of abnormally low blood glucose levels, but in this context, the term is used to describe agents that are used to treat high blood glucose levels (hyperglycemia) associated with diabetes.

Choice behavior refers to the selection or decision-making process in which an individual consciously or unconsciously chooses one option over others based on their preferences, values, experiences, and motivations. In a medical context, choice behavior may relate to patients' decisions about their healthcare, such as selecting a treatment option, choosing a healthcare provider, or adhering to a prescribed medication regimen. Understanding choice behavior is essential in shaping health policies, developing patient-centered care models, and improving overall health outcomes.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "New York City" is not a medical term or concept. It's a city located in the state of New York, United States. If you have any questions about medical terminology or concepts, I'd be happy to help with those!

Cooperative behavior, in a medical or healthcare context, refers to the actions and attitudes displayed by individuals or groups working together to achieve a common goal related to health and well-being. This may involve patients following their healthcare providers' advice, healthcare professionals collaborating to diagnose and treat medical conditions, or communities coming together to promote healthy behaviors and environments. Cooperative behavior is essential for positive health outcomes, as it fosters trust, communication, and shared decision-making between patients and healthcare providers, and helps to ensure that everyone involved in the care process is working towards the same goal.

Demography is the statistical study of populations, particularly in terms of size, distribution, and characteristics such as age, race, gender, and occupation. In medical contexts, demography is often used to analyze health-related data and trends within specific populations. This can include studying the prevalence of certain diseases or conditions, identifying disparities in healthcare access and outcomes, and evaluating the effectiveness of public health interventions. Demographic data can also be used to inform policy decisions and allocate resources to address population health needs.

A newborn infant is a baby who is within the first 28 days of life. This period is also referred to as the neonatal period. Newborns require specialized care and attention due to their immature bodily systems and increased vulnerability to various health issues. They are closely monitored for signs of well-being, growth, and development during this critical time.

Medication systems in a hospital setting refer to the organized processes and structures designed to ensure the safe and effective use of medications in patient care. These systems typically include several key components:

1. Medication ordering and prescribing: This involves the process by which healthcare providers order and document medication therapy for patients, often using electronic health records (EHRs) or computerized physician order entry (CPOE) systems.
2. Medication dispensing: This refers to the process of preparing and distributing medications to patients, typically through automated dispensing machines, pharmacy robots, or manual systems.
3. Medication administration: This involves the delivery of medications to patients by nurses or other authorized healthcare providers, often using barcode scanning technology to verify patient identification and medication orders.
4. Medication monitoring and reconciliation: This includes ongoing assessment and evaluation of medication therapy to ensure safety and effectiveness, as well as regular review of medication orders to prevent errors and duplications.
5. Education and training: Providing education and training for healthcare providers, patients, and families on the safe use of medications is an essential component of hospital medication systems.
6. Quality improvement and error reporting: Hospital medication systems should include processes for monitoring and improving medication safety, as well as mechanisms for reporting and analyzing medication errors to prevent future occurrences.

Overall, hospital medication systems aim to provide a structured and standardized approach to medication management, with the goal of reducing medication errors, improving patient outcomes, and promoting safe and effective use of medications in the healthcare setting.

I'm not aware of a specific medical definition for "Continental Population Groups." However, in the context of genetics and population health, continental population groups often refer to the major population divisions based on genetic ancestry and geographical origin. These groups typically include:

1. African: Individuals with recent ancestry primarily from Africa, particularly sub-Saharan Africa.
2. European: Individuals with recent ancestry primarily from Europe.
3. Asian: Individuals with recent ancestry primarily from Asia, including East Asia, South Asia, and Central Asia.
4. Native American: Individuals with recent ancestry primarily from the indigenous populations of North, Central, and South America.
5. Oceanian: Individuals with recent ancestry primarily from Australia, New Guinea, and neighboring islands in the Pacific region.

It is important to note that these categories are not exhaustive or mutually exclusive, as human migration and admixture have led to a complex web of genetic ancestries. Furthermore, using continental population labels can oversimplify the rich diversity within each group and may perpetuate harmful stereotypes or misunderstandings about racial and ethnic identities.

Follow-up studies are a type of longitudinal research that involve repeated observations or measurements of the same variables over a period of time, in order to understand their long-term effects or outcomes. In medical context, follow-up studies are often used to evaluate the safety and efficacy of medical treatments, interventions, or procedures.

In a typical follow-up study, a group of individuals (called a cohort) who have received a particular treatment or intervention are identified and then followed over time through periodic assessments or data collection. The data collected may include information on clinical outcomes, adverse events, changes in symptoms or functional status, and other relevant measures.

The results of follow-up studies can provide important insights into the long-term benefits and risks of medical interventions, as well as help to identify factors that may influence treatment effectiveness or patient outcomes. However, it is important to note that follow-up studies can be subject to various biases and limitations, such as loss to follow-up, recall bias, and changes in clinical practice over time, which must be carefully considered when interpreting the results.

The odds ratio (OR) is a statistical measure used in epidemiology and research to estimate the association between an exposure and an outcome. It represents the odds that an event will occur in one group versus the odds that it will occur in another group, assuming that all other factors are held constant.

In medical research, the odds ratio is often used to quantify the strength of the relationship between a risk factor (exposure) and a disease outcome. An OR of 1 indicates no association between the exposure and the outcome, while an OR greater than 1 suggests that there is a positive association between the two. Conversely, an OR less than 1 implies a negative association.

It's important to note that the odds ratio is not the same as the relative risk (RR), which compares the incidence rates of an outcome in two groups. While the OR can approximate the RR when the outcome is rare, they are not interchangeable and can lead to different conclusions about the association between an exposure and an outcome.

Health services needs refer to the population's requirement for healthcare services based on their health status, disease prevalence, and clinical guidelines. These needs can be categorized into normative needs (based on expert opinions or clinical guidelines) and expressed needs (based on individuals' perceptions of their own healthcare needs).

On the other hand, health services demand refers to the quantity of healthcare services that consumers are willing and able to pay for, given their preferences, values, and financial resources. Demand is influenced by various factors such as price, income, education level, and cultural beliefs.

It's important to note that while needs represent a population's requirement for healthcare services, demand reflects the actual utilization of these services. Understanding both health services needs and demand is crucial in planning and delivering effective healthcare services that meet the population's requirements while ensuring efficient resource allocation.

In medical terms, "outpatients" refers to individuals who receive medical care or treatment at a hospital or clinic without being admitted as inpatients. This means that they do not stay overnight or for an extended period; instead, they visit the healthcare facility for specific services such as consultations, diagnostic tests, treatments, or follow-up appointments and then return home afterward. Outpatient care can include various services like primary care, specialty clinics, dental care, physical therapy, and more. It is often more convenient and cost-effective than inpatient care, as it allows patients to maintain their daily routines while receiving necessary medical attention.

I'm not sure I understand your question. "Denmark" is a country located in Northern Europe, and it is not a medical term or concept. It is the southernmost of the Nordic countries, and it consists of the Jutland peninsula and several islands in the Baltic Sea. The capital city of Denmark is Copenhagen.

If you are looking for information about a medical condition that may be associated with Denmark, could you please provide more context or clarify your question? I would be happy to help you with more specific information if I can.

Alcoholism is a chronic and often relapsing brain disorder characterized by the excessive and compulsive consumption of alcohol despite negative consequences to one's health, relationships, and daily life. It is also commonly referred to as alcohol use disorder (AUD) or alcohol dependence.

The diagnostic criteria for AUD include a pattern of alcohol use that includes problems controlling intake, continued use despite problems resulting from drinking, development of a tolerance, drinking that leads to risky behaviors or situations, and withdrawal symptoms when not drinking.

Alcoholism can cause a wide range of physical and psychological health problems, including liver disease, heart disease, neurological damage, mental health disorders, and increased risk of accidents and injuries. Treatment for alcoholism typically involves a combination of behavioral therapies, medications, and support groups to help individuals achieve and maintain sobriety.

Diabetes Mellitus is a chronic metabolic disorder characterized by elevated levels of glucose in the blood (hyperglycemia) due to absolute or relative deficiency in insulin secretion and/or insulin action. There are two main types: Type 1 diabetes, which results from the autoimmune destruction of pancreatic beta cells leading to insulin deficiency, and Type 2 diabetes, which is associated with insulin resistance and relative insulin deficiency.

Type 1 diabetes typically presents in childhood or young adulthood, while Type 2 diabetes tends to occur later in life, often in association with obesity and physical inactivity. Both types of diabetes can lead to long-term complications such as damage to the eyes, kidneys, nerves, and cardiovascular system if left untreated or not well controlled.

The diagnosis of diabetes is usually made based on fasting plasma glucose levels, oral glucose tolerance tests, or hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels. Treatment typically involves lifestyle modifications such as diet and exercise, along with medications to lower blood glucose levels and manage associated conditions.

The "delivery of health care" refers to the process of providing medical services, treatments, and interventions to individuals in order to maintain, restore, or improve their health. This encompasses a wide range of activities, including:

1. Preventive care: Routine check-ups, screenings, immunizations, and counseling aimed at preventing illnesses or identifying them at an early stage.
2. Diagnostic services: Tests and procedures used to identify and understand medical conditions, such as laboratory tests, imaging studies, and biopsies.
3. Treatment interventions: Medical, surgical, or therapeutic treatments provided to manage acute or chronic health issues, including medications, surgeries, physical therapy, and psychotherapy.
4. Acute care services: Short-term medical interventions focused on addressing immediate health concerns, such as hospitalizations for infections, injuries, or complications from medical conditions.
5. Chronic care management: Long-term care and support provided to individuals with ongoing medical needs, such as those living with chronic diseases like diabetes, heart disease, or cancer.
6. Rehabilitation services: Programs designed to help patients recover from illnesses, injuries, or surgeries, focusing on restoring physical, cognitive, and emotional function.
7. End-of-life care: Palliative and hospice care provided to individuals facing terminal illnesses, with an emphasis on comfort, dignity, and quality of life.
8. Public health initiatives: Population-level interventions aimed at improving community health, such as disease prevention programs, health education campaigns, and environmental modifications.

The delivery of health care involves a complex network of healthcare professionals, institutions, and systems working together to ensure that patients receive the best possible care. This includes primary care physicians, specialists, nurses, allied health professionals, hospitals, clinics, long-term care facilities, and public health organizations. Effective communication, coordination, and collaboration among these stakeholders are essential for high-quality, patient-centered care.

Medication systems refer to the organizational and operational structures, processes, and technologies that are put in place to ensure the safe and effective use of medications in healthcare settings. These systems encompass all aspects of medication management, including prescribing, transcribing, dispensing, administering, and monitoring. They are designed to minimize errors, improve patient outcomes, and reduce costs associated with medication-related harm.

Medication systems may include various components such as:

1. Medication ordering and documentation systems that standardize the way medications are prescribed and documented in the medical record.
2. Computerized physician order entry (CPOE) systems that allow providers to enter medication orders electronically, reducing errors associated with handwritten orders.
3. Pharmacy information systems that manage medication inventory, track medication use, and ensure the accuracy of dispensed medications.
4. Medication administration records (MARs) that document the medications administered to each patient, including the dose, route, and time of administration.
5. Automated dispensing systems that allow medications to be dispensed directly to patients or medication carts, reducing errors associated with manual handling of medications.
6. Smart infusion pumps that incorporate safety features such as dose error reduction software and drug libraries to prevent medication errors during infusion therapy.
7. Medication reconciliation processes that ensure accurate and up-to-date medication lists are maintained for each patient, reducing the risk of medication errors during transitions of care.
8. Clinical decision support systems that provide alerts and reminders to providers regarding potential drug-drug interactions, dosing errors, and other medication-related risks.
9. Patient education materials that provide clear and concise information about medications, including dosage instructions, side effects, and storage requirements.
10. Performance improvement processes that monitor medication use and outcomes, identify areas for improvement, and implement changes to the medication system as needed.

A mental disorder is a syndrome characterized by clinically significant disturbance in an individual's cognition, emotion regulation, or behavior. It's associated with distress and/or impaired functioning in social, occupational, or other important areas of life, often leading to a decrease in quality of life. These disorders are typically persistent and can be severe and disabling. They may be related to factors such as genetics, early childhood experiences, or trauma. Examples include depression, anxiety disorders, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and personality disorders. It's important to note that a diagnosis should be made by a qualified mental health professional.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Netherlands" is not a medical term. It is a country located in Western Europe, known for its artistic heritage, elaborate canal system, and legalized marijuana and prostitution. If you have any questions about medical terms or concepts, I would be happy to help with those!

Decision-making is the cognitive process of selecting a course of action from among multiple alternatives. In a medical context, decision-making refers to the process by which healthcare professionals and patients make choices about medical tests, treatments, or management options based on a thorough evaluation of available information, including the patient's preferences, values, and circumstances.

The decision-making process in medicine typically involves several steps:

1. Identifying the problem or issue that requires a decision.
2. Gathering relevant information about the patient's medical history, current condition, diagnostic test results, treatment options, and potential outcomes.
3. Considering the benefits, risks, and uncertainties associated with each option.
4. Evaluating the patient's preferences, values, and goals.
5. Selecting the most appropriate course of action based on a careful weighing of the available evidence and the patient's individual needs and circumstances.
6. Communicating the decision to the patient and ensuring that they understand the rationale behind it, as well as any potential risks or benefits.
7. Monitoring the outcomes of the decision and adjusting the course of action as needed based on ongoing evaluation and feedback.

Effective decision-making in medicine requires a thorough understanding of medical evidence, clinical expertise, and patient preferences. It also involves careful consideration of ethical principles, such as respect for autonomy, non-maleficence, beneficence, and justice. Ultimately, the goal of decision-making in healthcare is to promote the best possible outcomes for patients while minimizing harm and respecting their individual needs and values.

Medical malpractice is a legal term that refers to the breach of the duty of care by a healthcare provider, such as a doctor, nurse, or hospital, resulting in harm to the patient. This breach could be due to negligence, misconduct, or a failure to provide appropriate treatment. The standard of care expected from healthcare providers is based on established medical practices and standards within the relevant medical community.

To prove medical malpractice, four key elements must typically be demonstrated:

1. Duty of Care: A healthcare provider-patient relationship must exist, establishing a duty of care.
2. Breach of Duty: The healthcare provider must have failed to meet the standard of care expected in their field or specialty.
3. Causation: The breach of duty must be directly linked to the patient's injury or harm.
4. Damages: The patient must have suffered harm, such as physical injury, emotional distress, financial loss, or other negative consequences due to the healthcare provider's actions or inactions.

Medical malpractice cases can result in significant financial compensation for the victim and may also lead to changes in medical practices and policies to prevent similar incidents from happening in the future.

Risk assessment in the medical context refers to the process of identifying, evaluating, and prioritizing risks to patients, healthcare workers, or the community related to healthcare delivery. It involves determining the likelihood and potential impact of adverse events or hazards, such as infectious diseases, medication errors, or medical devices failures, and implementing measures to mitigate or manage those risks. The goal of risk assessment is to promote safe and high-quality care by identifying areas for improvement and taking action to minimize harm.

A prescription drug (also prescription medication, prescription medicine or prescription-only medication) is a pharmaceutical ... Prices of prescription drugs vary widely around the world. Prescription costs for biosimilar and generic drugs are usually less ... Drug companies, however, are prohibited from marketing their drugs for off-label uses. Some prescription drugs are commonly ... The safety and the effectiveness of prescription drugs in the US are regulated by the 1987 Prescription Drug Marketing Act ( ...
A prescription drug is a pharmaceutical drug that may not be dispensed without a legal medical prescription. Drugs in this ... including prescription drugs) in South Africa is relatively low. Prescription drug and over-the-counter (OTC) drug abuse ... club drugs and others. Medicine portal Prescription drug Drug addiction Drug overdose Controlled Substances Act Harm reduction ... Prescription drug addiction is the chronic, repeated use of a prescription drug in ways other than prescribed for, including ...
Minnesota Multistate Contracting Alliance for Pharmacy (MMCAP) Prescription drug Prescription drug prices in the United States ... Prescription Drug Purchasing Pools are groups of individuals, businesses, and governments that pool their purchasing power to ... Northwest Prescription Drug Consortium (NPDC) combines non-Medicaid Rx programs in Oregon and Washington, effective 2007. ... Cauchi, Richard (February 2010). "Bulk Purchasing of Prescription Drug - NCSL 2010". National Conference of State Legislatures ...
... for prescription drugs. The PDMA was modified by the Prescription Drug Amendments of 1992 (P.L. 102-353, 106 Stat. 941) on ... The Prescription Drug Marketing Act (PDMA) of 1987 (P.L. 100-293, 102 Stat. 95) is a law of the United States federal ... It establishes legal safeguards for prescription drug distribution to ensure safe and effective pharmaceuticals and is designed ... and expired prescription drugs. It was passed in response to the development of a wholesale sub-market (known as the "diversion ...
The Prescription Drug User Fee Act (PDUFA) was first enacted in 1992. PDUFA gives the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) a ... Food and Drug Administration, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (10 February 2021). "Prescription Drug User Fee ... AIDS groups fought for the reauthorization of the Orphan Drug Act and the passage of the Prescription Drug User Fee Act in 1992 ... Cantor, David J. (1997). "Prescription Drug User Fee Act of 1992: Effects On Bringing New Drugs To Market" (PDF). CRS Report ...
Smith, M. C. (2001). Prescription drugs under Medicare: the legacy of the Task Force on Prescription Drugs. CRC Press. Oliver, ... The Task Force documented the state of the American prescription drug market in the 1960s, and influenced Medicare policy in ... The Task Force on Prescription Drugs, established in May 1967, was a commission chaired by the Assistant Secretary for Health ... Thomas R; Lee, Philip R; Lipton, Helene L (June 2004). "A Political History of Medicare and Prescription Drug Coverage". The ...
... refers to an individual person, typically a patient, getting prescription drugs from a ... Governments typically oversee the import of prescription drugs so bringing a prescription drug from a foreign country could be ... Consumers may feel that prescription drugs which are available to multiple countries to be of equivalent quality, and feel ... Steps To Fix America's Broken Prescription Drug System (Articles with short description, Short description is different from ...
It was founded in 1977 as the extension of a Drug Ad Hoc Committee that made recommendations for the U.S. National Drug Code ( ... The National Council for Prescription Drug Programs (NCPDP) is an American nonprofit standards development organization ... and the Medicare Prescription Drug, Improvement, and Modernization Act. NCPDP members have created standards such as the ... and wholesale drug distributors. Official website (Articles with topics of unclear notability from May 2020, All articles with ...
... which created the prescription drug program. Prescription Drug Price Comparison by www.ePharmacies.com House OKs bill on cost ... the Medicare Prescription Drug Price Negotiation Act, a bill to require federal officials to negotiate with drug companies for ... a provision that was part of the GOP-sponsored 2003 measure called the Medicare Prescription Drug, Improvement, and ... lower prices for the 23 million senior citizens who have signed up for Medicare's prescription drug coverage. The bill was ...
The Medicare Prescription Drug Act expressly prohibited Medicare from negotiating bulk prescription drug prices. The "donut ... to restrict prescription drug choices prescription coverage would be deferred to the patient or a Medicare Part D prescription ... the role of prescription drugs in patient care has significantly increased. As new and expensive drugs have come into use, ... only insurance companies administering Medicare prescription drug program, not Medicare, had the legal right to negotiate drug ...
The first being that drug companies must give prior notice of price increases for prescription drugs. Drug Manufacturers must ... Medicare Prescription Drug, Improvement, and Modernization Act Essential medicines policies Prescription costs Prescription ... who had prescription drug expenses between $2,084-$4,723 and $1-2,083, respectively. Prescription drugs known as "specialty" ... of Americans with Medicare coverage had no prescription drug expenses, while 61.6% had prescription drug expenses up to $2,083 ...
Prescription drugs Private prescription Referral Special prescription form List of abbreviations used in medical prescriptions ... Depending upon a jurisdiction's medical system, non-prescription drugs may be prescribed because drug benefit plans may ... Each prescription is dated, and some jurisdictions may place a time limit on the prescription. In the past, prescriptions ... This is regardless of whether the prescription includes prescription drugs, controlled substances, or over-the-counter ...
Excise taxes totaling $3 billion were levied on importers and manufacturers of prescription drugs. An excise tax of 2.3% on ... Annual excise taxes totaling $3 billion were levied on importers and manufacturers of prescription drugs. The Individual ... "Closing the Coverage Gap - Medicare Prescription Drugs Are Becoming More Affordable" (PDF). CMS. January 2015. Archived from ... prescription drugs; rehabilitative and habilitative services and devices; laboratory services; preventive and wellness services ...
Prescription drugs. Rehabilitative and habilitative services and devices. Laboratory services Preventive and wellness services ...
Gillespie, Nick (February 1997). "Prescription: Drugs". Reason Magazine. Retrieved 12 July 2011. Bjerre-Poulsen, Niels (2002). ...
"Prescription Drug List". Government of Canada. 23 October 2014. "Albuterol". Drugs.com. The American Society of Health-System ... "Albuterol Sulfate: FDA-Approved Drugs". U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Retrieved 26 February 2020. "FDA Approves ... Infobox drug with local INN variant, Drugs with non-standard legal status, Articles with changed DrugBank identifier, Articles ... The drug is marketed under many names worldwide. As of 2011[update] there was no evidence that an increase in physical ...
... "outpatient prescription drugs"; "inpatient and outpatient hospital services"; and "outpatient speech-language pathology ...
According to the OECD, U.S. prescription drug spending in 2015 was $1,162 per person on average, versus $807 for Canada, $766 ... prescription drugs 10%; and all other, including many categories individually making up less than 5% of spending. These first ... Drugs are more expensive, doctors are paid more, and suppliers charge more for medical equipment than other countries. ...
Prescription drugs are often handled differently from medical services, including by the government programs. Major federal ... In one survey, 22% of consumers reported going to the doctor less often, and 11% reported buying fewer prescription drugs. The ... Allowing the government to negotiate more forcefully to reduce the costs of prescription drugs, which are roughly twice the ... prescription drugs 10%; and all other, including many categories individually making up less than 7% of spending. These first ...
The list of drugs that an insurance program agrees to cover is called a formulary. Additionally, some prescriptions drugs may ... In the U.S., the patient usually pays a copayment and the prescription drug insurance part or all of the balance for drugs ... Out-of-pocket maximum can be limited to a specific benefit category (such as prescription drugs) or can apply to all coverage ... Prescription drug insurance. Archived 25 May 2020 at the Wayback Machine Accessed 3 June 2011. "OECD.StatExtracts, Health, ...
ISBN 978-157951156-2. Estren, Mark James (2013). Prescription Drug Abuse. ISBN 978-1579511685. Gaskin, Stephen (1999). Amazing ... The company has been subpoenaed by the Drug Enforcement Administration to provide names and addresses for people having ...
The prescription monitoring program monitors the prescription of everyone, to stop those with a prescription drug addiction ... "Prescription Drug Misuse , dmh.mo.gov". dmh.mo.gov. Retrieved 2023-04-18. Lee, Jerry (September 2012). "NATURE AND EXTENT OF ... "Prescription Drug Misuse". dmh.mo.gov. Retrieved 2021-12-28. "SAMHSA's National Helpline". www.samhsa.gov. 14 May 2014. ... In addition, The Department Of Mental Health launched a public education campaign to educate children about prescription drug ...
... and prescription drug insurance. In 1969, SSQ moved its head office to Boulevard Laurier in Quebec City. The introduction of ... prescription drug insurance; health insurance; travel insurance and trip cancellation insurance; dental care insurance; ...
"Prescription Drug Costs". Andrew Yang for President. Archived from the original on August 26, 2019. Retrieved August 28, 2019 ... Tulsi Gabbard Backs Bills to Lower Skyrocketing Cost of Prescription Drugs". Congresswoman Tulsi Gabbard. January 10, 2019. ... SenSanders (February 16, 2016). "For decades, we have been engaged in a failed 'War on Drugs' with racially-biased mandatory ... "Tulsi Gabbard Endorses Legalizing Drugs". Forbes. Retrieved January 22, 2020. Bacon Jr., Perry (June 20, 2019). "Democratic ...
Prescription drugs. Any drug that is intended for human use that is in a dosage form intended for oral administration and that ... This law required the use of child-resistant packaging for prescription drugs, over-the-counter (OTC) drugs, household ... with the exception of prescription drugs, manufacturers of certain household products that are regulated under the PPPA have ... Controlled drugs. Any product intended for human use that consists in whole or in part of any substance subject to control ...
Outpatient prescription drugs are not required to be covered, but some provinces have drug cost programs that cover most drug ... Drug prices are also regulated, so brand-name prescription drugs are often significantly cheaper than in the U.S. Optometry is ... "Prescription Drug Prices in Canada: What Are the Lessons for the U.S.? Archived October 11, 2006, at the Wayback Machine" AARP ... In Canada all drugs given in hospitals fall under Medicare, but other prescriptions do not. The provinces all have some ...
... and Prescription Drug Affordability. Pappas proposed the creation of an income tax credit in an amount equal to the amount paid ...
Creates prescription drug tax credit and facilitates import and Internet sale of such drugs. Cancer and Terminal Illness ... So, yes, government just gets in the way on so many of those things." He favors allowing FDA-approved prescription drugs to be ... Prescription Drug Affordability Act. H.R. 163, 2009-01-06, originally H.R. 3636, 2000-02-10 (Pharmaceutical Freedom Act). ... "H.R. 1: Medicare Prescription Drug, Improvement, and Modernization Act of 2003". 108th Congress, 2003-11-22. Retrieved February ...
Reducing Prescription Drug Shortages". whitehouse.gov. 2011-10-31. Retrieved 2019-02-08. "Reducing Prescription Drug Shortages ...
"Clonazepam, Prescription Marketed Drugs". Archived from the original on 25 April 2012. R. Baselt, Disposition of Toxic Drugs ... "Drug Abuse Warning Network, 2006: National Estimates of Drug-Related Emergency Department Visits". Substance Abuse and Mental ... "FDA expands Boxed Warning to improve safe use of benzodiazepine drug". U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). 23 September ... Drugs.com. Archived from the original on 25 August 2017. "Clonazepam Use During Pregnancy". Drugs.com. 4 May 2020. Retrieved 17 ...
... the problem is called prescription drug use disorder. People who have this disorder take the drugs because ... People who have this disorder take the drugs because ... the problem is called prescription drug use disorder. ... prescription drugs; Substance abuse - prescription drugs; Drug abuse - prescription drugs; Drug use - prescription drugs; ... Misuse of prescription drugs research report. www.drugabuse.gov/publications/research-reports/misuse-prescription-drugs/ ...
A prescription drug monitoring program (PDMP) is an electronic database that tracks controlled substance prescriptions. PDMPs ... Information from prescription drug monitoring programs (PDMPs) can alert you to opportunities to provide potentially lifesaving ... about risks of prescription opioids and overdose prevention) and interventions (e.g., safer prescriptions, nonopioid pain ... If you think your patient might be sharing or selling prescription opioids and not taking them (known as diverting), consider ...
... - Featured Topics from the National Center for Health Statistics ... Tags medication, National Health Interview Survey, Prescription Drugs, uninsured adults Health, United States, 2013 explores ... Approximately one-fifth (18%) of the $263 billion spent on retail prescription drugs in the United States in 2012 was paid out ... Some adults offset the cost of prescription drugs by reducing the dosage and frequency of the recommended pharmacotherapy. ...
... but few know about the new law enacted in 2022 to bring down drug prices for consumers. ... Older adults are concerned about high prescription drug prices, ... Keenan, Teresa A. Views on Prescription Drug Costs and Voting ... Big Concerns Over Prescription Drug Prices, Less Awareness of New Law. Views on Prescription Drug Costs and Voting Among Adults ... Prescription drug affordability is a concern for many Virginia voters. They call for a Prescription Drug Affordability Board to ...
Vitamin, Supplements, and Prescription Drugs Public-Use Data Files Usage Notes ... Prescription Medication file. Pupremed (Response to prescription medicine questions). This file contains the responses to the ... prescription medicine questions for prescription medicine users ONLY; listed as one record per prescription medicine taken. In ... This file contains an overview discussion about the prescription medicine section of the questionnaire as well as specific ...
NorthWestPharmacy.com offers prescription drugs and over the counter medications but does not offer controlled prescription ... drugs. We are certified by the Canadian International Pharmacy Association.. Copyright © 2024 - All Rights Reserved. ... How To Buy Prescription Drugs Online * How To Mail Order Prescription Drugs from Canada ...
NorthWestPharmacy.com offers prescription drugs and over the counter medications but does not offer controlled prescription ... drugs. We are certified by the Canadian International Pharmacy Association.. Copyright © 2024 - All Rights Reserved. ... How To Buy Prescription Drugs Online * How To Mail Order Prescription Drugs from Canada ...
Blog: Addressing Out-Of-Pocket Prescription Drug Costs for Older Adults April 22, 2020 ... Chairmans Blog: Limiting Out-Of-Pocket Prescription Drug Costs July 25, 2019 ... Alliance for Aging Research and USC Schaeffer Center Host Drug Pricing Webinar with Rep. Scott Peters (D-CA) October 19, 2021 ... International Reference Pricing: There Are Better Options to Address Patients Drug Costs September 2, 2021 ...
If you do not enroll in Medicare Part D or in your private insurance companys prescription drug plan, you will need to pay out ... Prescription drugs are extremely expensive, sometimes costing thousands of dollars a month. If you are not enrolled in Medicare ... The Partnership for Prescription Assistance also has a list of patient assistance programs for prescription medicines. At this ... Medicare and some private insurance policies do not automatically include prescription drug coverage. ...
A prescription drug (also prescription medication, prescription medicine or prescription-only medication) is a pharmaceutical ... Prices of prescription drugs vary widely around the world. Prescription costs for biosimilar and generic drugs are usually less ... Drug companies, however, are prohibited from marketing their drugs for off-label uses. Some prescription drugs are commonly ... The safety and the effectiveness of prescription drugs in the US are regulated by the 1987 Prescription Drug Marketing Act ( ...
As Congress continues to debate whether and how to add prescription drug coverage to Medicare, beneficiaries with incomes ... Caught in Between: Prescription Drug Coverage of Medicare Beneficiaries Near Poverty, Dennis G. Shea, Bruce C. Stuart, and ... As Congress continues to debate whether and how to add prescription drug coverage to Medicare, beneficiaries with incomes near ... How Young Voices Can Shape Prescription Drug Policy blog / Feb 27, 2024 ...
To enhance the capacity of regulatory and law enforcement agencies to collect and analyze controlled substance prescription ... Harold Rogers Prescription Drug Monitoring Program. Goals: To enhance the capacity of regulatory and law enforcement agencies ... The Harold Rogers Prescription Drug Monitoring Program (PDMP) allows for states’ discretion as they plan, implement, or ... Objectives: Implement and enhance prescription drug monitoring programs. Develop and enhance public safety, behavioral health, ...
Nonmedical use of these drugs was associated with a higher risk of smoking, illegal drug use and binge drinking, but proper ... Nearly 1 in 4 high school seniors has ever taken a prescription opioid pain reliever either medically or recreationally, ... Recreational Use of Prescription Painkillers Linked to Other Drug Problems in Teens. By Maia Szalavitz May 08, 2012 ... MORE: Government Considers Overdose Antidote, Naloxone, to Fight Prescription Drug Misuse). The research was led by Sean McCabe ...
The MHRA has launched a consultation on reclassifying opioid-containing cough medicines as prescription-only. ... Cotswolds county lines drug dealer jailed for 28 months. Michael Smith, 22, was part of a large scale dealing operation of ... Every response received will help us to develop a broader view on whether codeine linctus should be restricted to prescription- ... If reclassified, however, it would be unavailable to buy without presentation of a prescription. ...
Remember… if you are not enrolled in a Part D prescription drug plan at the right time, you will not have prescription drug ... I am in excellent health and take NO prescriptions. What happens if I do not apply for a Medicare prescription drug plan? Do I ... advise everyone to enroll in a Part D prescription drug plan whether you are taking no prescriptions or a lot of prescriptions ... B Medical premium and Part D Medicare Prescription Drug premium when you have enrolled in a Medicare Part D prescription drug ...
Learn how BCBSKS meets your prescription drug needs. ... BCBSKS prescription drug benefits may include access to retail ... Pharmacy and prescription drugs. We know prescription drugs can sometimes make up a large part of your overall health care ... Prescription drug coverage. Find out whether your prescription is covered and what your cost will be. ... Prescription drug coverage can help you manage those costs. We have some helpful tools to get the most out of your insurance. ...
... On September 25, 2020, in ... "Driving down the cost of prescription drugs for Floridians has remained a top priority of mine," said Governor DeSantis. "This ... affordable prescription drugs," said the Agency for Health Care Administration (AHCA) Secretary Mary Mayhew. "These actions by ... Under the leadership of President Trump, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the U.S. Food and Drug ...
Prescription drugs cost more in the U.S. than elsewhere, even though taxpayers dollars support federal research. Each year, U. ... The Biden-Harris administration recently announced new actions to lower health care and prescription drug costs by promoting ... Taxpayer money is crucial for the development of prescription drugs. Rena M. Conti, technology and policy research initiative ... White House proposes use of march-in rights to help lower prescription drug prices. ...
The users guide to prescription medications and side effects. Comparing RX and complementary medicine; providing best health ... to prescription drugs. and supplements. Finding the right. medication is important. Let RateADrug help. ... Short Version: RateADrug.com User Scores & Evaluations on over 8000 prescription drugs and alternative therapies ... RateADrug.com is a commmunity-driven information source for prescription drugs, side effects and alternative therapies. Our ...
Analysis of drug prescriptions in primary health care centres in Bahrain ... Using the WHO indicators, the mean number of drugs per prescription was 3.3. The percentage of prescriptions with a single drug ... The mean number of drugs prescribed at each encounter was 3.3 (SD 0.7). A single drug was prescribed on 6.3% of prescriptions ... The percentage of total prescriptions for a single drug was 6.3% and for drugs prescribed by generic name was 10.2% (range 0.0 ...
Anti-Bacterial Agents Cephalosporins Cities Drug Prescriptions Drug Resistance, Multiple, Bacterial Fluoroquinolones Gonorrhea ... "Antimicrobial Drug Prescription and Neisseria gonorrhoeae Susceptibility, United States, 2005-2013" vol. 23, no. 10, 2017. ... 2017). Antimicrobial Drug Prescription and Neisseria gonorrhoeae Susceptibility, United States, 2005-2013. 23(10). Kirkcaldy, ... "Antimicrobial Drug Prescription and Neisseria gonorrhoeae Susceptibility, United States, 2005-2013" 23, no. 10 (2017). ...
HUMAN PRESCRIPTION DRUG Indicates the type of product, such as Human Prescription Drug or Human OTC Drug. This data element ... Drug Overview The NDC Code 0173-0737-01 is assigned to "Imitrex " (also known as: "Sumatriptan"), a human prescription drug ... Drug for Further Processing, Bulk for Human Drug Compounding, and Bulk for Animal Drug Compounding. FDA does not review and ... General information about the drug product, including the proprietary and established name of the drug, the type of dosage form ...
Prescription Drugs. Prescriptions and pregnancy. Drugs are intentionally ingested chemicals that achieve measurable levels in ... Drugs of Abuse. Prevalence and reporting. Substance abuse is the deliberate use of licit or illicit drugs and substances for ... Check free drug levels if active seizure activity is present or if a greater than 50% decline in total drug levels occurs. ... Please refer to the previous section, Prescription Drugs, specifically Retinoids, for further information regarding Accutane ...
Cialis works faster than other ED drugs drugs for sale without prescription. Dr drugs for sale without prescription. OK ... Silagra is a generic version of the brand name drug called Viagra drugs for sale without prescription. Silagra is a generic ... Online drugs online pharmacy low cost drugs Canada get online drugs buy online pharmacy new low cost drugs Canada from . ... Worldwide Shipping, No Prescription. Express Delivery, Viagra Suppositories Buy drugs for sale without prescription. ...
h1,FLOXIN (OFLOXACIN),/h1, ,h2,About Floxin and Why It’s Prescribed,/h2, ,p,Floxin is a broad-spectrum antibiotic drug ... Discount Drugs from Canada. Cart0Item(s) You have no items in your shopping cart. ... Discount Drugs From Canada. Our ordering process is quick, easy and reliable. We offer several ways for you to order, including ... Floxin is a broad-spectrum antibiotic drug called a fluoroquinolone. Your doctor may prescribe Floxin or generic Ofloxacin to ...
Canadian Prescriptions Drugs. How can i decrease propranolol. ... Generic and Brand drugs online without Prescription. Buy canada ... Specific laboratory abused drugs propranolol tests propranolol hydrochloride dosage are required to diagnose Listeria s, which ...
HealthWarehouse is licensed to supply generic drugs and medical supplies of various brands. Create an account with us today, ... Go to Active Prescriptions. For the Rx you want refilled, click "Actions" then "Add to Cart". Proceed to checkout to complete ... Your prescription will be verified and shipped directly to your door when ready. You will receive an email notification of the ... "Ive been getting my prescriptions filled here for several years and I can truly say that their prices are by far the best Ive ...
... and Child Neurology Society details ethical concerns about high drug prices -- and what neurologists can do. ... Cite this: AAN Blasts Runaway Neurology, Other Prescription Drug Costs - Medscape - Oct 12, 2021. ... "Runaway drug costs continue to be a pressing problem with recent dramatic price increases not only for specialty drugs, but ... including giving Medicare officials the power to negotiate drug prices, allowing the safe importation of drugs from other ...
... the prescription is filled at a MetroPlusHealth network pharmacy, and other plan rules are followed. ... MetroPlusHealth will generally cover the drugs listed in our formulary as long as the drug is medically necessary, ... Only drugs that are Part D drugs may receive a transition fill. Any drug that may be considered either Part B drugs or may be ... To access more information about your prescription drug benefits click here: CVS-Caremark - MetroPlusHealth Prescription Drug ...
  • Clinicians should check PDMP data for prescription opioids and other controlled medications patients have received from other clinicians to determine whether a patient is receiving opioid dosages or combinations (e.g., opioids combined with benzodiazepines) that put the patient at high risk for overdose. (cdc.gov)
  • Talk with your patient about the findings and any safety concerns, including increased risk for respiratory depression and overdose if they are receiving overlapping prescription opioids from multiple clinicians who are not coordinating the patient's care or receiving medications that increase risk when combined with opioids (e.g., benzodiazepines) ( Recommendation 11 ). (cdc.gov)
  • AARP surveyed a nationally representative sample of more than 1,000 adults 50 and older in September about the price of medications, knowledge of recent Medicare-related legislation, and the likelihood of voting for congressional candidates who support measures to address prescription drug costs. (aarp.org)
  • NorthWestPharmacy.com offers prescription drugs and over the counter medications but does not offer controlled prescription drugs. (northwestpharmacy.com)
  • Of the teens who did have prior medical exposure and chose to misuse the drugs, 80% used leftover medications from a legitimate prescription. (time.com)
  • The authors cite research showing that pharmacies in neighborhoods with high minority populations - regardless of income - are more than 50 times less likely to carry sufficient supplies of opioid medications, compared with white-dominated areas (many refuse to stock the drugs at all). (time.com)
  • We provide self-evaluation tools for patients to track the effects of their medications, and unbiased user scores, reviews and testimonials on over 8000 prescription drugs and holistic medicine. (rateadrug.com)
  • the User's Guide to Prescription Medications and Side Effects. (rateadrug.com)
  • RateADrug.com is a community-based information source of prescription medications, side effects and alternative options. (rateadrug.com)
  • A new position statement from the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) and other organizations warns soaring prices for neurologic and other prescription medications is leading to rationing of care and diverting clinicians' time from the clinic to insurance bureaucracy. (medscape.com)
  • Out-of-pocket costs for neurologic medications have risen dramatically over the past decade, with the fastest rise reported among drugs for multiple sclerosis. (medscape.com)
  • Aim: To analyze, among dental students from two public universities in Paraiba, these students' points of view regarding prescription drugs, as well as to verify if the knowledge acquired during their undergraduate studies is sufficient to correctly and safely prescribe medications. (bvsalud.org)
  • Moreover, the authors note that MMT confers significant health benefits, and continued use of non-prescribed prescription medications may interrupt treatment. (atforum.com)
  • The authors did not list the specific prescription sedatives and pain medications bought on the street, but the former group includes benzodiazepines and barbiturates, and the latter group, opioids and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) combinations. (atforum.com)
  • About Lethal Counterfeit Pills Flooding the Black Market to look identical to prescription opioid medications like Xanax, Vicodin. (myalphabaymarket.com)
  • Portland Police and Multnomah County are warning people to only buy prescription medications from licensed professionals. (myalphabaymarket.com)
  • In response to a spike in prescription medication related incidents, the Police Department has implemented a prescription drug disposal program to assist with reducing the amount of unused medications out in the public. (moorheadmn.gov)
  • Prescription medications have become increasingly attractive targets for narcotics abusers. (moorheadmn.gov)
  • Retaining prescription medications beyond their intended use increases the chances that these prescriptions are accidentally or intentionally consumed by the wrong people. (moorheadmn.gov)
  • In today's increasingly expensive healthcare landscape, many Americans are burdened with the high cost of prescription medications like trying to buy Cefixime 200mg online (Cefixime) . (universalmedications.com)
  • First and foremost, the cost of prescription medications in Canada is substantially lower compared to the United States. (universalmedications.com)
  • Generic drugs are bioequivalent versions of brand-name medications, providing the same therapeutic benefits and safety standards but at a fraction of the cost. (universalmedications.com)
  • A prescription drug (also prescription medication, prescription medicine or prescription-only medication) is a pharmaceutical drug that is permitted to be dispensed only to those with a medical prescription. (wikipedia.org)
  • She has a number of patients who have rationed their medication or stopped taking it altogether when their co-pays increased or they lost access to a co-pay assistance program because their insurance company chose to cover a still-expensive generic drug with no assistance program over a slightly costlier brand-name medication that comes with patient discounts. (medscape.com)
  • Medicare and some private insurance policies do not automatically include prescription drug coverage. (kidneyfund.org)
  • If you do not enroll in Medicare Part D or in your private insurance company's prescription drug plan, you will need to pay out-of-pocket for any medicines your doctor prescribes. (kidneyfund.org)
  • If you are not enrolled in Medicare Part D or do not have prescription drug coverage as a part of your private health insurance policy, and you cannot afford to pay for your prescriptions, you may be eligible for programs that help you pay for your medicine. (kidneyfund.org)
  • As Congress continues to debate whether and how to add prescription drug coverage to Medicare, beneficiaries with incomes near the poverty level are in danger of being overlooked. (commonwealthfund.org)
  • Will Medicare Advantage Plan With Prescription Drugs Prevent "Extra" Part D Premium? (canyon-news.com)
  • What happens if I do not apply for a Medicare prescription drug plan? (canyon-news.com)
  • You will have to pay more on your Medicare Part B Medical premium and Part D Medicare Prescription Drug premium when you have enrolled in a Medicare Part D prescription drug plan. (canyon-news.com)
  • The bottom line is if your income is over these amounts and you have your Medicare prescription drug plan from either a Medicare Advantage (Part C) or Stand-alone Medicare Prescription Drug plan (Part D), you will pay the additional IRMAA premium, whether you are deducting your premiums from your Social Security check or paying direct to Social Security because you have not started taking your Social Security check. (canyon-news.com)
  • Mike, since you are self-employed and not covered by "true" employer's group health insurance, during a Toni Says Medicare consultation, we advise everyone to enroll in a Part D prescription drug plan whether you are taking no prescriptions or a lot of prescriptions. (canyon-news.com)
  • Learn more about our Medicare Part D prescription drug plan. (bcbsks.com)
  • At the request of McCaskill, minority staff of the Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs reviewed price increases for the 5-year-period, 2012 to 2017, across the top 20 most-prescribed brand-name drugs for seniors in the Medicare Part D program. (medscape.com)
  • According to the most recent National Heath Expenditure data published by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, retail prescription drug spending grew at an average pace of 4.8% between 2006 and 2015, with two of the highest-growth years occurring in 2014 and 2015 at 12.4% and 9.0%, respectively. (medscape.com)
  • Even with Medicare coverage, many older individuals also face substantial out-of-pocket costs, particularly for specialty and brand-name drugs. (medscape.com)
  • According to one independent study, Medicare beneficiaries' out-of-pocket spending on prescription drugs is expected to increase from 41% of per capita Social Security income in 2013 to 50% in 2030, the report notes. (medscape.com)
  • Some drugs covered by Medicare Part B may be subject to the Step Therapy process. (metroplus.org)
  • If you are currently a MetroPlusHealth Medicare member and are receiving any Part B drugs, this does not apply to you. (metroplus.org)
  • The reason for this difference in substance control is the potential scope of misuse, from drug abuse to practicing medicine without a license and without sufficient education. (wikipedia.org)
  • As previous studies have found, most people who misuse prescription pain relievers do not do so as a consequence of standard pain treatment, but because they started taking the drugs on the street to get high or in an attempt to self-medicate. (time.com)
  • However, the risks for those who had tried opioids recreationally firs t - before receiving a prescription for medical use - were far greater: they were eight times more likely to binge drinking or smoke, 12 more likely to use marijuana, and a whopping 28 times more likely to misuse other prescription drugs, compared with their peers who had no exposure to painkillers. (time.com)
  • RAND was not asked to assess prescription drug misuse. (myalphabaymarket.com)
  • Background: Prescription sedatives are efficient in the treatment of anxiety and sleeping disorders, but are associated with a risk of misuse and dependence, as well as an increased risk of accidents, injuries and overdoses, both in the general population and especially in individuals with other substance misuse. (lu.se)
  • The present thesis aims to investigate prescription sedative use and misuse in two kinds of samples - in the general population, with focus on its association with subjective health and quality life, and in the subpopulation of individuals with opioid dependence, with focus on treatment outcome in opioid maintenance treatment and mortality. (lu.se)
  • Materials and Methods: Prescription sedative misuse was studied in three Swedish. (lu.se)
  • Materials and Methods: Prescription sedative misuse was studied in three Swedish datasets: 1) a general population survey (n =22,095), 2) a clinical pilot study for the treatment of opioid dependence (n =44 and 36, for the original study and the follow-up study, respectively), and 3) a national register-based study of individuals in opioid maintenance treatment ( n= 4,501). (lu.se)
  • Common types of drugs that are misused include depressants, opioids, and stimulants. (medlineplus.gov)
  • The 2022 CDC Clinical Practice Guideline for Prescribing Opioids for Pain (2022 Clinical Practice Guideline) recommends that clinicians who are prescribing initial opioid therapy should first review a patient's history of controlled substance prescriptions using a state PDMP ( Recommendation 9 in the 2022 Clinical Practice Guideline). (cdc.gov)
  • The researchers write: "These findings, along with results from three earlier smaller studies, should provide some reassurance to clinicians that prescription opioids can be safely prescribed to adolescents. (time.com)
  • That means, the authors suggest, "that the quantity of prescription opioids and/or limiting refills [for teens] should be carefully considered by prescribers. (time.com)
  • Previous research suggests that mental health and patterns of prescription of opioids and other prescription drugs are associated with increased opioid-related mortality. (lu.se)
  • The present study therefore aimed to investigate what drugs were prescribed during the last six months of life to individuals with a history of illicit substance use who died with opioids present in their blood, the relationship between drugs prescribed and drugs found in blood at time of death, and if prescription of specific drugs was temporally associated with death. (lu.se)
  • Opioids and tranquilizers in combination were found in a vast majority of deaths, and prescription data suggested that the use of these drugs was illicit in a majority of cases. (lu.se)
  • Prescription of certain drugs, especially alprazolam and diazepam, should be made with great caution to patients with a history of illicit substance use or concurrent use of opioids. (lu.se)
  • Ideally, PDMP data should be reviewed before every opioid prescription for acute, subacute, or chronic pain. (cdc.gov)
  • Black market sales of opioid prescription drugs online have significantly increased since the DEA (Drug Enforcement Administration). (myalphabaymarket.com)
  • A prescription drug monitoring program (PDMP) is an electronic database that tracks controlled substance prescriptions . (cdc.gov)
  • Schedule 6 - Poison Schedule 7 - Dangerous Poison Schedule 8 - Controlled Drug (Possession without authority illegal) Schedule 9 - Prohibited Substance (Possession illegal without a license legal only for research purposes) Schedule 10 - Controlled Poison. (wikipedia.org)
  • Goals: To enhance the capacity of regulatory and law enforcement agencies to collect and analyze controlled substance prescription data through a centralized database administered by an authorized state agency and federally recognized Indian tribal governments. (federalgrantswire.com)
  • The following entities are eligible to apply: o State governments and U.S. territories that have an enabling statute or regulation (pending or enacted) requiring the submission of controlled substance prescription data to an authorized state agency. (federalgrantswire.com)
  • Further, teens who reported only ever using prescription painkillers as directed by the doctor had no higher substance-use risks than those who never used them at all. (time.com)
  • Among the prevention measures Institute 2004 and EP12 the FDAs MedWatch Adverse about the drug substance dangerous products from other. (onlinehome.us)
  • According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), people with substance abuse histories are particularly vulnerable to overdose and adverse events related to illicit prescription drug use. (atforum.com)
  • People who have this disorder take the drugs because the chemicals in the medicines have psychoactive effects. (medlineplus.gov)
  • The Patient Advocate Foundation has a list of financial assistance programs offered by drug companies to help people who can't afford their medicines. (kidneyfund.org)
  • The Partnership for Prescription Assistance also has a list of patient assistance programs for prescription medicines. (kidneyfund.org)
  • In Australia, the Standard for the Uniform Scheduling of Medicines and Poisons (SUSMP) governs the manufacture and supply of drugs with several categories: Schedule 1 - Defunct Drug. (wikipedia.org)
  • Many prescriptions issued by health practitioners in Australia are covered by the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme, a scheme that provides subsidised prescription drugs to residents of Australia to ensure that all Australians have affordable and reliable access to a wide range of necessary medicines. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the United Kingdom, the Medicines Act 1968 and the Prescription Only Medicines (Human Use) Order 1997 contain regulations that cover the supply of sale, use, prescribing and production of medicines. (wikipedia.org)
  • until then, prescriptions for dressings and simple medicines had to be signed by a doctor. (wikipedia.org)
  • The government's Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) has launched a consultation on reclassifying opioid-containing cough medicines as prescription-only. (drinkanddrugsnews.com)
  • These actions include a proposed framework that encourages agencies to use march-in rights to lower the price of prescription medicines. (ssti.org)
  • By GG Plata 2024 The BMJ contacted the MHRA about the website and a spokesperson said, Websites that offer to supply prescription only medicines without black market prescription drugs a. (myalphabaymarket.com)
  • This means that by purchasing medicines from a Canadian pharmacy, Americans can often secure significant savings on their monthly prescription costs. (universalmedications.com)
  • Essential Drugs and Medicines Policy. (who.int)
  • Two Brentwood-based brothers were arrested today on federal drug of prescription narcotics, including OxyContin, to black-market. (myalphabaymarket.com)
  • A Deer Park osteopathic doctor was informed by the state Thursday that his medical license has been suspended because of allegations that include prescribing narcotics to known drug abusers. (spokesman.com)
  • Using data from 2000 to 2024 for each drug, the study estimated the number of users. (myalphabaymarket.com)
  • Gray Market, Black Heart: Pharmaceutical Gray Market Finds a Disturbing Niche legit darknet markets 2024 During the Drug Shortage Crisis.5. (myalphabaymarket.com)
  • Another study found that receiving treatment for mental health problems and the use of marijuana and other illegal drugs were legit darknet markets 2024 correlated among adolescents with. (myalphabaymarket.com)
  • By M Chapman 2024 Cited by 2 Research on Illegal Prescription Drug Market Interventions. (myalphabaymarket.com)
  • Neisseria gonorrhoeae , the causative pathogen of gon- proach, we sought to investigate the potential geographic orrhea, has been designated an urgent antimicrobial and temporal association between antimicrobial drug sus- drug resistance threat by the Centers for Disease Control ceptibility among US N. gonorrhoeae isolates and domes- and Prevention (CDC) ( 1 ). (cdc.gov)
  • Prescription of sedatives was associated with mortality in individuals with opioid dependence, including associations between prescriptions of 'z-drug' hypnotics and pregabalin and overdose death. (lu.se)
  • Of the teens who reported recreational use of painkillers, one-third had previously been prescribed the drugs for a legitimate medical reason. (time.com)
  • The majority, two-thirds, said their first experience with painkillers had been recreational use (before subsequently being prescribed the drugs legitimately) or they had never received a legitimate prescription at all. (time.com)
  • The older someone gets, the greater the odds are that they will receive at least one legitimate prescription for painkillers. (time.com)
  • The Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) warned the public Monday of an increase in black market painkillers that are laced with fentanyl. (myalphabaymarket.com)
  • As doctors make it increasingly difficult for patients on prescription painkillers to obtain them, the nation's opiate crisis has turned. (myalphabaymarket.com)
  • A formulary is a list of covered drugs selected by MetroPlusHealth in consultation with a team of health care providers, which represents the prescription therapies believed to be a necessary part of a quality treatment program. (metroplus.org)
  • MetroPlusHealth will generally cover the drugs listed in our formulary as long as the drug is medically necessary, the prescription is filled at a MetroPlusHealth network pharmacy, and other plan rules are followed. (metroplus.org)
  • Generally, if you are taking a drug on our formulary that was covered at the beginning of the year, we will not discontinue or reduce coverage of the drug during the coverage year except when a new, less expensive generic drug becomes available or when new adverse information about the safety or effectiveness of a drug is released. (metroplus.org)
  • Other types of formulary changes, such as removing a drug from our formulary, will not affect members who are currently taking the drug. (metroplus.org)
  • We feel it is important that you have continued access for the remainder of the coverage year to the formulary drugs that were available when you chose our plan, except for cases in which you can save additional money or improve the safety of your drugs. (metroplus.org)
  • MetroPlusHealth will provide at least 60 days notice prior to making changes to the formulary except in cases of safety where we have been notified of a possible safety issue by the FDA or the drug manufacturer has removed the drug. (metroplus.org)
  • For example, we will provide up to a 30-day supply per 30-day period for a formulary drug. (metroplus.org)
  • This step towards improved prescription affordability is a win for American consumers, and I thank President Trump for the swift action from his administration. (flgov.com)
  • Addressing a host of economic issues, the landmark Inflation Reduction Act, signed into law in August 2022, contains measures that promise to significantly cut prescription drug prices. (aarp.org)
  • The only factor significantly associated with sharing drugs of abuse was younger age. (atforum.com)
  • It offers prescription drugs and other healthcare products at significantly lower prices compared to brick-and-mortar pharmacies in countries like the United States. (universalmedications.com)
  • Calculate the total morphine milligram equivalents (MME)/day for concurrent opioid prescriptions to help assess the patient's overdose risk. (cdc.gov)
  • At a recent appointment, Katz Sand learned about a patient's drug rationing only after a routine MRI showed new brain lesions that regular treatment might have prevented. (medscape.com)
  • Prescription drugs are causing more overdose deaths in Spokane County than illegal drugs like methamphetamine, the county's medical examiner said Friday. (spokesman.com)
  • Under the leadership of President Trump, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) published a rule and guidance allowing states to submit their drug importation program proposals for review and authorization by the FDA. (flgov.com)
  • Under Governor DeSantis' leadership, Florida has prioritized paving a pathway forward for the importation of safe, affordable prescription drugs," said the Agency for Health Care Administration (AHCA) Secretary Mary Mayhew . (flgov.com)
  • In July 2020, Governor DeSantis joined President Trump for the announcement of a historic executive order instructing HHS Secretary Alex Azar to complete the rulemaking process to allow for the importation of certain prescription drugs from Canada to lower health care costs. (flgov.com)
  • AHCA released an Invitation to Negotiate for the Canadian Drug Importation Program on the state's vendor bid system in June 2020, with an anticipated award date of December 2020 for a vendor to assist with implementation of the program. (flgov.com)
  • N. gonorrhoeae antimi- lates from gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with crobial drug susceptibility data from the Gonococcal men (MSM) than those from men who have sex only with Isolate Surveillance Project (GISP), antimicrobial drug women (MSW), and prevalence is often highest in the West consumption data from IMS Health, and US Census data for population denominators. (cdc.gov)
  • As in other developed countries, the person requiring a prescription drug attends the clinic of a qualified health practitioner, such as a physician, who may write the prescription for the required drug. (wikipedia.org)
  • Develop and enhance public safety, behavioral health, and public health information sharing partnerships that leverage key public health and public safety data sets (e.g., identified PDMP data, naloxone administrations, fatal and non-fatal overdose data, drug arrests) and develop interventions based on this information. (federalgrantswire.com)
  • I am in excellent health and take NO prescriptions. (canyon-news.com)
  • We know prescription drugs can sometimes make up a large part of your overall health care spending. (bcbsks.com)
  • The Biden-Harris administration recently announced new actions to lower health care and prescription drug costs by promoting competition. (ssti.org)
  • Each year, U.S. taxpayers contribute more than $40 billion to the National Institutes of Health, according to the NIH budget webpage , while, as the White House fact sheet announcing the new actions points out, nearly three in ten individuals struggle to pay for the drugs they need. (ssti.org)
  • RateADrug.com provides a self-evaluation tool that encourages its users to be more proactive about their health decisions, and helps doctors and caregivers keep track of their patients' experiences with drugs. (rateadrug.com)
  • ABSTRACT The aim of this study was to analyse drug prescribing practices in primary health care centres in Bahrain. (who.int)
  • We retrospectively evaluated 600 prescriptions selected randomly from all primary health care centres in Bahrain (n = 20) in 2004. (who.int)
  • The prescribing pattern in primary health care centres in Bahrain is associated with polypharmacy, over-prescribing of antibiotics and an under-prescribing of drugs by generic names. (who.int)
  • Determination of the drug use indicators in a country, region or individual health facility allows health planners, managers and researchers to make basic comparisons between situations in different areas or at different times [2]. (who.int)
  • How to investigate drug use in health facilities : selected drug use indicators. (who.int)
  • The range of drugs used, the variations in response to these drugs and other health and behavioral confounders mean that drug use may be an important contributor to individualized periodontal diagnoses . (bvsalud.org)
  • Overall, further studies of adverse drug reactions on the periodontal tissues are required as this continues to be an important and increasing factor in periodontal health determination . (bvsalud.org)
  • This was a retrospective, register-based observational study that utilized data from the National Board of Forensic Medicine, the Prescribed Drug Registry, regional health care services, and municipal social services. (lu.se)
  • Although some of the more common adverse drug reactions on periodontal tissues are well described, in many other cases the evidence for these drug effects is quite limited and based on small case series or isolated reports . (bvsalud.org)
  • It highlights ethical concerns from high drug costs, policy proposals that might temper the problem, and how clinicians can adjust to the current reality of pharmaceutical pricing and better advocate for changes to the healthcare system. (medscape.com)
  • Commenting on the statement for Medscape Medical News, Ilana Katz Sand, MD, associate director of the Dickinson Center for Multiple Sclerosis at Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York City, noted that clinicians are already acutely aware of the effect high drug costs have on their patients' medical decisions. (medscape.com)
  • A patient can consolidate prescription charges by using a prescription payment certificate (informally a "season ticket"), effectively capping costs at £31.25 a quarter or £111.60 for a year. (wikipedia.org)
  • Prescription drug coverage can help you manage those costs. (bcbsks.com)
  • Drafted by the Ethics, Law, and Humanities Committee - a joint committee that includes the AAN, the American Neurological Association, and the Child Neurology Society - the statement was prompted by a 2018 report from the AAN Neurology Drug Pricing Task Force to address challenges associated with high drug costs. (medscape.com)
  • Soaring drug prices are driving up healthcare costs each year, the report notes. (medscape.com)
  • McCaskill has made tackling rising healthcare and prescription drug costs a top priority in the Senate. (medscape.com)
  • In addition, McCaskill's bipartisan legislation to boost competition for generic drugs and help lower prescription costs was signed into law by Trump. (medscape.com)
  • Prescription drug costs have become a significant burden for many Americans. (universalmedications.com)
  • The rising costs of prescription drugs like Cefixime 200mg online (Cefixime) pose significant challenges for Americans. (universalmedications.com)
  • Taxpayer money is crucial for the development of prescription drugs. (ssti.org)
  • However, Conti and David point out that although the role of taxpayer money is critical to the early stages of research, it is not what takes these drugs over the finish line into commercialization. (ssti.org)
  • She joined Senator Susan Collins (R-ME) to launch an in-depth investigation into prescription drug price increases and recently introduced legislation to end taxpayer subsidies to end taxpayer subsidies drug companies receive for the billions of dollars they spend on prescription drug advertising each year, which currently is fully tax-deductible. (medscape.com)
  • Public research funding and pharmaceutical prices: do Americans pay twice for drugs? (ssti.org)
  • The following status describes submitted unfinished drugs, including the marketing categories of Active Pharmaceutical Ingredient (API), Drug for Further Processing, Bulk for Human Drug Compounding, and Bulk for Animal Drug Compounding. (hipaaspace.com)
  • They are branded drugs, produced by the original pharmaceutical developers as opposed to lower-priced generic drugs, but are acquired unlawfully through fraud. (myalphabaymarket.com)
  • By encouraging the use of generic and biosimilar drugs, leveraging government programs, facilitating competitive pricing and negotiation, improving prescription drug coverage, promoting transparency, and fostering access to pharmaceutical assistance programs, individuals can save substantial amounts of money on prescription drugs. (universalmedications.com)
  • This price discrepancy can be attributed to several factors, including government regulations, negotiated drug pricing, and a more competitive pharmaceutical market. (universalmedications.com)
  • Nearly 1 in 4 high school seniors has ever taken a prescription opioid pain reliever either medically or recreationally, according to a new study. (time.com)
  • In 2016 alone, spending on prescription drugs topped $328 billion. (medscape.com)
  • Yet AARP discovered many older adults are unfamiliar with the legislation and specifically its potential impact on prescription drug prices. (aarp.org)
  • Information from prescription drug monitoring programs (PDMPs) can alert you to opportunities to provide potentially lifesaving information and interventions. (cdc.gov)
  • This indicator represents the response to the survey question 3.41 Do you collect information about the number of drug prescriptions to children and adolescents under 18? (who.int)
  • Learn what drugs require prior authorization. (bcbsks.com)
  • Prior Authorization: We require you to get prior authorization (prior approval) for certain drugs. (metroplus.org)
  • If we don't get the necessary information to satisfy the prior authorization, we may not cover the drug. (metroplus.org)
  • Automated Telephone Refill Request · Specialty Mail Service Refills · Online drugs for sale without prescription . (onlinehome.us)
  • Schedule 2 - Pharmacy Medicine Schedule 3 - Pharmacist-Only Medicine Schedule 4 - Prescription-Only Medicine/Prescription Animal Remedy Schedule 5 - Caution/Poison. (wikipedia.org)
  • Once issued, a prescription is taken by the patient to a pharmacy, which dispenses the medicine. (wikipedia.org)
  • When you are buying medicine online, the safest way to purchase drugs is through a pharmacy accredited by the NABP VIPPS® (Verified Internet Pharmacy drugs for sale without prescription . (onlinehome.us)
  • The Swiss Pharmacy supplies generic as well as branded drugs online at very attractive prices. (onlinehome.us)
  • We'll contact your pharmacy to transfer your prescription. (healthwarehouse.com)
  • McCaskill has also introduced legislation with Collins to prohibit pharmacy gag laws that lead to consumers overpaying for prescription drugs. (medscape.com)
  • According to Cost Plus Drugs' website, the online pharmacy fills and delivers prescriptions at our cost a fixed 15 margin. (myalphabaymarket.com)
  • However, it is commonly cited that Americans can save between 50% to 80% on prescription drugs by purchasing them from a Canadian pharmacy compared to the prices in the United States. (universalmedications.com)
  • Twelve of the 20 most commonly prescribed brand-name drugs for seniors had price increases of over 50% during the 5-year period. (medscape.com)
  • Psychoactive drugs : improving prescribing practices / edited by Hamid Ghodse and Inayat Khan. (who.int)
  • Americans are worried about the high cost of prescription drugs. (aarp.org)
  • Over the past 5 years, the cost of many of the most popular brand-name prescription drugs used by older Americans increased at nearly 10 times the rate of inflation, according to a new report from US Senator Claire McCaskill (D-MO). (medscape.com)
  • However, there are various strategies and initiatives that can help Americans save on prescription drugs and improve their overall well-being. (universalmedications.com)
  • Methadone, alprazolam, and buprenorphine were the drugs most often found in the blood. (lu.se)
  • Some adults offset the cost of prescription drugs by reducing the dosage and frequency of the recommended pharmacotherapy. (cdc.gov)
  • General information about the drug product, including the proprietary and established name of the drug, the type of dosage form and route of administration to which the label applies, qualitative and quantitative ingredient information, the pharmacologic or therapeutic class of the drug, and the chemical name and structural formula of the drug. (hipaaspace.com)
  • RateADrug.com is a commmunity-driven information source for prescription drugs, side effects and alternative therapies. (rateadrug.com)
  • Users can evaluate and share their experiences about a broad range of medical treatments, alternative therapies and prescription drugs by participating in RateADrug's ongoing surveys. (rateadrug.com)
  • When purchasing a drug under the PBS, the consumer pays no more than the patient co-payment contribution, which, as of January 1, 2022, is A$42.50 for general patients. (wikipedia.org)
  • That was no surprise, but Social Security also said that the monthly adjustment for prescription drug coverage would be an additional $31.90. (canyon-news.com)
  • Remember… if you are not enrolled in a Part D prescription drug plan at the right time, you will not have prescription drug coverage and will receive a Part D late enrollment penalty when you sign up at a later date and will not be a happy-camper! (canyon-news.com)
  • Ensuring a fair system for drug pricing and coverage rules that balance the goods of individual patients with the needs of broader populations when resources are limited remains more important than ever," Tsou said. (medscape.com)
  • For more information on how to fill your prescriptions, please review your Evidence of Coverage. (metroplus.org)
  • A patient visits a medical practitioner or dentist, who may prescribe drugs and certain other medical items, such as blood glucose-testing equipment for diabetics. (wikipedia.org)
  • which is similar to doctors, who require a special license from the Home Office to prescribe schedule 1 drugs. (wikipedia.org)
  • The disease and its treatment is thoroughly described in the medical literature, and an effective and still applied drug for treatment of acute attacks - colchicine - was invented already in the fourth century by Byzantine physicians. (who.int)
  • Although 48 million fewer prescriptions were written for the top 20 most commonly prescribed brand-name drugs for seniors between 2012 and 2017, total sales revenue resulting from these prescriptions increased by almost $8.5 billion during the same period. (medscape.com)
  • For Members of the plan for more than 90 days who are residents of a long-term care facility and need a supply right away: MetroPlusHealth will cover one 31-day supply, or less if your prescription is written for fewer days. (metroplus.org)
  • We used conditional logistic regression to find temporal associations between the prescription and dispensing of drugs and time of death. (lu.se)
  • Patients in methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) exchange a variety of prescription drugs-but little is known about why this happens, and how common it is. (atforum.com)
  • When a medicine is not taken in the way it is meant to be used and a person is addicted to it, the problem is called prescription drug use disorder. (medlineplus.gov)
  • listed as one record per prescription medicine taken. (cdc.gov)
  • In addition to the information listed in "Adultx" and "Youthk", this file also contains the prescription medicine product codes. (cdc.gov)
  • This file contains an overview discussion about the prescription medicine section of the questionnaire as well as specific notes on selected variables. (cdc.gov)
  • In 2005, 35 people in Spokane County died from overdoses of prescription medicine, according to the county medical examiner's annual report, which was released Friday. (spokesman.com)
  • Based on response to the question, "During the past 12 months, was there any time when you needed prescription medicine but didn't get it because you couldn't afford it? (cdc.gov)
  • That's exactly what's happening in the prescription drug industry, where the cost of identical drugs skyrockets year after year. (medscape.com)
  • During 1999--2010, the percentage of working-age adults who reported that in the past 12 months they needed prescription drugs but did not obtain them because of cost was higher among those in families with low income than in families with higher income. (cdc.gov)
  • The percentage that reported not getting needed prescription drugs increased for all income groups during the period 1999--2010. (cdc.gov)
  • Quantity Limits: For certain drugs, we limit the amount of the drug that we will cover per prescription or for a defined period of time. (metroplus.org)
  • Whereas prescribing and N. gonorrhoeae susceptibility for any of the antimicrobial drug prescribing patterns have been clearly studied antimicrobial drugs during 2005-2013. (cdc.gov)
  • Drug use for both therapeutic and recreational purposes is very widespread in most societies . (bvsalud.org)
  • In short, the drugs are used to get high. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Agencies would consider whether a high price hinders the availability of the drug and whether the drug company can explain why they are charging this amount for the drug. (ssti.org)
  • It's a terrible thing and it's happening to all patients," Katz Sand said, adding that the old credo of 'Yeah, the drug prices are high, but they are covered by insurance' is not a sustainable argument anymore. (medscape.com)
  • As reported by Medscape Medical News , the president said that drug prices are too high and said that one of his "greatest priorities" would be to find a way to bring them down, calling them "very, very unfair. (medscape.com)
  • Trump added, "That is why I have directed my administration to make fixing the injustice of high drug prices one of my top priorities for the year. (medscape.com)
  • It sources drugs from reputable Canadian and international pharmacies, ensuring the products meet high quality standards. (universalmedications.com)
  • Tallahassee, Fla. - Today, Governor Ron DeSantis commended President Donald Trump for critical steps taken to expand access to safe and affordable prescription drugs. (flgov.com)
  • In his first State of the Union address, President Donald J Trump pledged to work to reduce prescription drug prices. (medscape.com)

No images available that match "prescription drugs"