Tablets: Solid dosage forms, of varying weight, size, and shape, which may be molded or compressed, and which contain a medicinal substance in pure or diluted form. (Dorland, 28th ed)Tablets, Enteric-Coated: Tablets coated with material that delays release of the medication until after they leave the stomach. (Dorland, 28th ed)Chemistry, Pharmaceutical: Chemistry dealing with the composition and preparation of agents having PHARMACOLOGIC ACTIONS or diagnostic use.Excipients: Usually inert substances added to a prescription in order to provide suitable consistency to the dosage form. These include binders, matrix, base or diluent in pills, tablets, creams, salves, etc.Drug Compounding: The preparation, mixing, and assembling of a drug. (From Remington, The Science and Practice of Pharmacy, 19th ed, p1814)Delayed-Action Preparations: Dosage forms of a drug that act over a period of time by controlled-release processes or technology.Technology, Pharmaceutical: The application of scientific knowledge or technology to pharmacy and the pharmaceutical industry. It includes methods, techniques, and instrumentation in the manufacture, preparation, compounding, dispensing, packaging, and storing of drugs and other preparations used in diagnostic and determinative procedures, and in the treatment of patients.Methylcellulose: Methylester of cellulose. Methylcellulose is used as an emulsifying and suspending agent in cosmetics, pharmaceutics and the chemical industry. It is used therapeutically as a bulk laxative.Powders: Substances made up of an aggregation of small particles, as that obtained by grinding or trituration of a solid drug. In pharmacy it is a form in which substances are administered. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Solubility: The ability of a substance to be dissolved, i.e. to form a solution with another substance. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Hardness: The mechanical property of material that determines its resistance to force. HARDNESS TESTS measure this property.Administration, Oral: The giving of drugs, chemicals, or other substances by mouth.Lubricants: Compounds that provide LUBRICATION between surfaces in order to reduce FRICTION.Dosage Forms: Completed forms of the pharmaceutical preparation in which prescribed doses of medication are included. They are designed to resist action by gastric fluids, prevent vomiting and nausea, reduce or alleviate the undesirable taste and smells associated with oral administration, achieve a high concentration of drug at target site, or produce a delayed or long-acting drug effect.Therapeutic Equivalency: The relative equivalency in the efficacy of different modes of treatment of a disease, most often used to compare the efficacy of different pharmaceuticals to treat a given disease.Capsules: Hard or soft soluble containers used for the oral administration of medicine.Cellulose: A polysaccharide with glucose units linked as in CELLOBIOSE. It is the chief constituent of plant fibers, cotton being the purest natural form of the substance. As a raw material, it forms the basis for many derivatives used in chromatography, ion exchange materials, explosives manufacturing, and pharmaceutical preparations.Povidone: A polyvinyl polymer of variable molecular weight; used as suspending and dispersing agent and vehicle for pharmaceuticals; also used as blood volume expander.Drug Stability: The chemical and physical integrity of a pharmaceutical product.Biological Availability: The extent to which the active ingredient of a drug dosage form becomes available at the site of drug action or in a biological medium believed to reflect accessibility to a site of action.Hardness Tests: A test to determine the relative hardness of a metal, mineral, or other material according to one of several scales, such as Brinell, Mohs, Rockwell, Vickers, or Shore. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Administration, Buccal: Administration of a soluble dosage form between the cheek and gingiva. It may involve direct application of a drug onto the buccal mucosa, as by painting or spraying.Compressive Strength: The maximum compression a material can withstand without failure. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 5th ed, p427)Carboxymethylcellulose Sodium: A cellulose derivative which is a beta-(1,4)-D-glucopyranose polymer. It is used as a bulk laxative and as an emulsifier and thickener in cosmetics and pharmaceuticals and as a stabilizer for reagents.Suspensions: Colloids with liquid continuous phase and solid dispersed phase; the term is used loosely also for solid-in-gas (AEROSOLS) and other colloidal systems; water-insoluble drugs may be given as suspensions.Polymethacrylic Acids: Poly-2-methylpropenoic acids. Used in the manufacture of methacrylate resins and plastics in the form of pellets and granules, as absorbent for biological materials and as filters; also as biological membranes and as hydrogens. Synonyms: methylacrylate polymer; poly(methylacrylate); acrylic acid methyl ester polymer.Pharmaceutic Aids: Substances which are of little or no therapeutic value, but are necessary in the manufacture, compounding, storage, etc., of pharmaceutical preparations or drug dosage forms. They include SOLVENTS, diluting agents, and suspending agents, and emulsifying agents. Also, ANTIOXIDANTS; PRESERVATIVES, PHARMACEUTICAL; COLORING AGENTS; FLAVORING AGENTS; VEHICLES; EXCIPIENTS; OINTMENT BASES.Cross-Over Studies: Studies comparing two or more treatments or interventions in which the subjects or patients, upon completion of the course of one treatment, are switched to another. In the case of two treatments, A and B, half the subjects are randomly allocated to receive these in the order A, B and half to receive them in the order B, A. A criticism of this design is that effects of the first treatment may carry over into the period when the second is given. (Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Administration, Sublingual: Administration of a soluble dosage form by placement under the tongue.Drug Combinations: Single preparations containing two or more active agents, for the purpose of their concurrent administration as a fixed dose mixture.Acetaminophen: Analgesic antipyretic derivative of acetanilide. It has weak anti-inflammatory properties and is used as a common analgesic, but may cause liver, blood cell, and kidney damage.Porosity: Condition of having pores or open spaces. This often refers to bones, bone implants, or bone cements, but can refer to the porous state of any solid substance.Drug Storage: The process of keeping pharmaceutical products in an appropriate location.Drug Packaging: Containers, packaging, and packaging materials for drugs and BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS. These include those in ampule, capsule, tablet, solution or other forms. Packaging includes immediate-containers, secondary-containers, and cartons. In the United States, such packaging is controlled under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act which also stipulates requirements for tamper-resistance and child-resistance. Similar laws govern use elsewhere. (From Code of Federal Regulations, 21 CFR 1 Section 210, 1993) DRUG LABELING is also available.Stearic Acids: A group of compounds that are derivatives of octadecanoic acid which is one of the most abundant fatty acids found in animal lipids. (Stedman, 25th ed)Pharmaceutical Preparations: Drugs intended for human or veterinary use, presented in their finished dosage form. Included here are materials used in the preparation and/or formulation of the finished dosage form.Tensile Strength: The maximum stress a material subjected to a stretching load can withstand without tearing. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 5th ed, p2001)Carisoprodol: A centrally acting skeletal muscle relaxant whose mechanism of action is not completely understood but may be related to its sedative actions. It is used as an adjunct in the symptomatic treatment of musculoskeletal conditions associated with painful muscle spasm. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p1202)Meprobamate: A carbamate with hypnotic, sedative, and some muscle relaxant properties, although in therapeutic doses reduction of anxiety rather than a direct effect may be responsible for muscle relaxation. Meprobamate has been reported to have anticonvulsant actions against petit mal seizures, but not against grand mal seizures (which may be exacerbated). It is used in the treatment of ANXIETY DISORDERS, and also for the short-term management of INSOMNIA but has largely been superseded by the BENZODIAZEPINES. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p603)Low Back Pain: Acute or chronic pain in the lumbar or sacral regions, which may be associated with musculo-ligamentous SPRAINS AND STRAINS; INTERVERTEBRAL DISK DISPLACEMENT; and other conditions.Promethazine: A phenothiazine derivative with histamine H1-blocking, antimuscarinic, and sedative properties. It is used as an antiallergic, in pruritus, for motion sickness and sedation, and also in animals.Back Pain: Acute or chronic pain located in the posterior regions of the THORAX; LUMBOSACRAL REGION; or the adjacent regions.Muscle Relaxants, Central: A heterogeneous group of drugs used to produce muscle relaxation, excepting the neuromuscular blocking agents. They have their primary clinical and therapeutic uses in the treatment of muscle spasm and immobility associated with strains, sprains, and injuries of the back and, to a lesser degree, injuries to the neck. They have been used also for the treatment of a variety of clinical conditions that have in common only the presence of skeletal muscle hyperactivity, for example, the muscle spasms that can occur in MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS. (From Smith and Reynard, Textbook of Pharmacology, 1991, p358)Spondylolisthesis: Forward displacement of a superior vertebral body over the vertebral body below.Nitrofurantoin: A urinary anti-infective agent effective against most gram-positive and gram-negative organisms. Although sulfonamides and antibiotics are usually the agents of choice for urinary tract infections, nitrofurantoin is widely used for prophylaxis and long-term suppression.Urinary Tract Infections: Inflammatory responses of the epithelium of the URINARY TRACT to microbial invasions. They are often bacterial infections with associated BACTERIURIA and PYURIA.Anti-Infective Agents, Urinary: Substances capable of killing agents causing urinary tract infections or of preventing them from spreading.Urinary Tract: The duct which coveys URINE from the pelvis of the KIDNEY through the URETERS, BLADDER, and URETHRA.Bacteriuria: The presence of bacteria in the urine which is normally bacteria-free. These bacteria are from the URINARY TRACT and are not contaminants of the surrounding tissues. Bacteriuria can be symptomatic or asymptomatic. Significant bacteriuria is an indicator of urinary tract infection.Cystitis: Inflammation of the URINARY BLADDER, either from bacterial or non-bacterial causes. Cystitis is usually associated with painful urination (dysuria), increased frequency, urgency, and suprapubic pain.Analgesics: Compounds capable of relieving pain without the loss of CONSCIOUSNESS.Journal Impact Factor: A quantitative measure of the frequency on average with which articles in a journal have been cited in a given period of time.Muscular Dystrophy, Emery-Dreifuss: A heterogenous group of inherited muscular dystrophy without the involvement of nervous system. The disease is characterized by MUSCULAR ATROPHY; MUSCLE WEAKNESS; CONTRACTURE of the elbows; ACHILLES TENDON; and posterior cervical muscles; with or without cardiac features. There are several INHERITANCE PATTERNS including X-linked (X CHROMOSOME), autosomal dominant, and autosomal recessive gene mutations.Thymopoietins: Two closely related polypeptides (molecular weight 7,000) isolated from the thymus gland. These hormones induce the differentiation of prothymocytes to thymocytes within the thymus. They also cause a delayed impairment of neuromuscular transmission in vivo and are therefore believed to be the agent responsible for myasthenia gravis.Physicians: Individuals licensed to practice medicine.Emergency Service, Hospital: Hospital department responsible for the administration and provision of immediate medical or surgical care to the emergency patient.Emergencies: Situations or conditions requiring immediate intervention to avoid serious adverse results.
  • A study by investigators from Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and Newton-Wellesley Hospital (NWH) found that patients prescribed opioid medications after inguinal (groin) hernia surgery used significantly fewer tablets than prescribed, even though they had received fewer than typically administered for such surgery. (massgeneral.org)
  • The implication of our study is that, even though surgeons have been careful to limit the number of opioid tablets that we prescribe following operations, we may still be prescribing more medication than is actually needed by our patients," says Peter Masiakos, MD, Department of Pediatric Surgery , MassGeneral Hospital for Children , senior author of the paper that has been published online in the journal Surgery . (massgeneral.org)
  • Noting the significant impact of the opioid epidemic throughout society - with a quadrupling of deaths caused by prescription opioid overdoses during the past decade - the authors cite recent data indicating that the risk of postoperative opioid prescriptions leading to dependence may be as high as 6 percent and even higher if patients are prescribed longer-term, higher-dose opioid treatment. (massgeneral.org)
  • One recent study reported that patients routinely were prescribed an average of 30 opioid tablets after inguinal hernia repair surgery and recommended a reduction to 15 tablets. (massgeneral.org)
  • For postoperative pain relief, each patient was given a prescription for 10 tablets of the opioid medication Vicodin but also was encouraged to use nonopioid medications like acetaminophen or ibuprofen to manage their pain whenever possible. (massgeneral.org)
  • At their follow-up appointments two to three weeks after surgery, participants were surveyed regarding the levels of postoperative pain they experienced, how it had affected their functioning and how many opioid tablets they had taken. (massgeneral.org)
  • While 13 patients reported needing nine or more opioid tablets, 159 (86 percent) took four or fewer tablets, and 110 (60 percent) took none. (massgeneral.org)
  • The patients who reported taking no opioid tablets were least likely to report having experienced a high level of pain or curtailing their daily activities because of pain. (massgeneral.org)
  • The patients given more drugs were only 3 percent more likely to show up at a hospital within 12 months with an opioid-related drug problem, but the rates were high in both groups - 9.96 percent with high-prescribing doctors versus 9.73 percent with low-prescribing physicians. (reuters.com)
  • These data are coming from the peak of opioid prescribing because I think we've started to see a downturn, starting in 2015 or so," Schwarz said. (reuters.com)
  • New Opioid Prescribing Guidelines in Practice addresses the new Opioid Therapy and Physician Communication Guidelines. (massmed.org)
  • The course is recommended for all prescribers who are seeking guidance in best practices in opioid prescribing, both in acute and chronic pain situations. (massmed.org)
  • Topics include recognizing, prescribing, and treating patients at risk for opioid addiction, utilizing the MA Prescription Monitoring Program, identifying effective screening tools and patient communication strategies, and becoming familiar with pain consultations and resources for alternative pain treatment therapies. (massmed.org)
  • Dr. Alford also directs the Safe and Competent Opioid Prescribing Education Program and Director of the Clinical Addiction Research and Education Unit at the medical school. (massmed.org)
  • Its use has increased in the United States as a result of the Drug Addiction Treatment Act of 2000, which allowed physicians to prescribe certain medications as part of office-based treatment for opioid addiction. (cdc.gov)
  • Objective To describe the contributions of prescribed and non-prescribed opioids to opioid related deaths. (bmj.com)
  • Among people with active opioid prescriptions at time of death, 37.8% (375/993) also had evidence of a non-prescribed opioid on postmortem toxicology. (bmj.com)
  • Conclusions Prescribed, diverted, and illicit opioids all play an important role in opioid related deaths. (bmj.com)
  • 1 In particular, long term and high dose opioid prescribing has been associated with serious adverse events, including risks of developing an opioid use disorder, overdose, and death. (bmj.com)
  • The program was designed to help prevent inappropriate use of fast-acting fentanyl products, like prescribing them to patients without a tolerance to opioid painkillers. (aboutlawsuits.com)
  • However, after a four-year period, 51% of patients who did not have an opioid tolerance were prescribed fentanyl by their doctor. (aboutlawsuits.com)
  • A study by investigators from Massachusetts General Hospital and Newton-Wellesley Hospital found that patients prescribed opioid medications after inguinal hernia surgery used significantly fewer tablets than prescribed. (massgeneral.org)
  • Reuters Health) - A national comparison of emergency room physicians has uncovered a broad range of prescribing patterns for painkillers, and high-volume prescribers may be encouraging long-term use of the drugs among their elderly patients. (reuters.com)
  • Not only did 86 percent of patients use less than half the prescribed tablets, 60 percent of them used no opioids at all, relying totally on other types of pain medication. (massgeneral.org)
  • The number of unintentional overdose deaths from prescribed opioids now vastly exceeds unintentional deaths from all illegal drugs combined, and methadone plays a disproportionate role in such deaths. (apsf.org)
  • Postmortem toxicology results from the Drug and Drug/Alcohol Related Death database were used to characterise deaths on the basis of presence of prescribed and non-prescribed (that is, diverted or illicit) opioids, overall and stratified by year and age. (bmj.com)
  • A Bench of Chief Justice S Manikuma r and Justice Shaji P Chaly reasoned that since the Ministry of AYUSH, Government of India approved the prescription of certain tablets and mixtures as immunity boosters, AYUSH medical practitioners could also prescribe the same as such. (barandbench.com)
  • Dentists in the UK have a statutory duty to reduce the risk of antimicrobial resistance by ensuring appropriate use of antibiotics, and Antimicrobial Prescribing for General Dental Practitioners provides guidance on the prescribing of antimicrobials to adults and children in primary dental care. (fgdp.org.uk)
  • The Union health ministry on Wednesday said that state governments and UTs 'have been advised to facilitate testing at the earliest by enabling all qualified medical practitioners, including private practitioners, to prescribe COVID-19 test to any individual fulfilling the criteria for testing as per ICMR guidelines. (firstpost.com)
  • Prescribed levetiracetam currently, BUT, while waiting delivery of the mailed pills, am hoping to reduce risk of mental seizures, by taking 'over the counter' med. (justanswer.com)
  • It is usually taken at the first sign of a migraine headache.If your symptoms improve after you take sumatriptan but return after 2 hours or longer, you may take a second tablet. (epnet.com)
  • However, if your symptoms do not improve after you take sumitriptan, do not take a second tablet without calling your doctor. (epnet.com)
  • The tablets are coming thanks to an initiative launched by the Leadership Alumni Programs (LAP), a group of young adults who attended programs run by the Joint Distribution Committee (JDC) in the former Soviet Union. (timesofisrael.com)
  • Carisoprodol tablets, USP is indicated for the relief of discomfort associated with acute, painful musculoskeletal conditions in adults. (nih.gov)
  • Prevalence of hearing loss and dif-ference by demographic characteristics among US adults: Data from theNational Health and Nutrition Examination Survey prescribing Lamictal tablets australia 1999-2004. (jasonjacksontrombone.com)
  • Prochlorperazine tablets are usually taken three to four times a day by adults and are usually given to children one to three times a day. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Linagliptin, marketed in the U.S. as Tradjenta ® , is a once-daily tablet used along with diet and exercise to improve glycemic control in adults with type 2 diabetes. (cnbc.com)
  • Finasteride causes an increase in hair retention, the arsenal alongside Winstrol purchase Winstrol tablets and Oxandrolone when it comes to competition preparation in humans. (disabilityworld.org)
  • At .03 PSA in 2011 my Urologist prescribed Finasteride to stop the conversion of dihydrotestosteone and the PSA dropped to .02 and remained there for several years. (medhelp.org)