The three approximately equal periods of a normal human PREGNANCY. Each trimester is about three months or 13 to 14 weeks in duration depending on the designation of the first day of gestation.
The beginning third of a human PREGNANCY, from the first day of the last normal menstrual period (MENSTRUATION) through the completion of 14 weeks (98 days) of gestation.
The last third of a human PREGNANCY, from the beginning of the 29th through the 42nd completed week (197 to 294 days) of gestation.
The middle third of a human PREGNANCY, from the beginning of the 15th through the 28th completed week (99 to 196 days) of gestation.
The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.
Conditions or pathological processes associated with pregnancy. They can occur during or after pregnancy, and range from minor discomforts to serious diseases that require medical interventions. They include diseases in pregnant females, and pregnancies in females with diseases.
Results of conception and ensuing pregnancy, including LIVE BIRTH; STILLBIRTH; SPONTANEOUS ABORTION; INDUCED ABORTION. The outcome may follow natural or artificial insemination or any of the various ASSISTED REPRODUCTIVE TECHNIQUES, such as EMBRYO TRANSFER or FERTILIZATION IN VITRO.
The process of bearing developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero in non-human mammals, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.
A potentially life-threatening condition in which EMBRYO IMPLANTATION occurs outside the cavity of the UTERUS. Most ectopic pregnancies (>96%) occur in the FALLOPIAN TUBES, known as TUBAL PREGNANCY. They can be in other locations, such as UTERINE CERVIX; OVARY; and abdominal cavity (PREGNANCY, ABDOMINAL).
The co-occurrence of pregnancy and a cardiovascular disease. The disease may precede or follow FERTILIZATION and it may or may not have a deleterious effect on the pregnant woman or FETUS.
The age of the conceptus, beginning from the time of FERTILIZATION. In clinical obstetrics, the gestational age is often estimated as the time from the last day of the last MENSTRUATION which is about 2 weeks before OVULATION and fertilization.
The ratio of the number of conceptions (CONCEPTION) including LIVE BIRTH; STILLBIRTH; and fetal losses, to the mean number of females of reproductive age in a population during a set time period.
The visualization of tissues during pregnancy through recording of the echoes of ultrasonic waves directed into the body. The procedure may be applied with reference to the mother or the fetus and with reference to organs or the detection of maternal or fetal disease.
Expulsion of the product of FERTILIZATION before completing the term of GESTATION and without deliberate interference.
The state of PREGNANCY in women with DIABETES MELLITUS. This does not include either symptomatic diabetes or GLUCOSE INTOLERANCE induced by pregnancy (DIABETES, GESTATIONAL) which resolves at the end of pregnancy.
The co-occurrence of pregnancy and NEOPLASMS. The neoplastic disease may precede or follow FERTILIZATION.
The co-occurrence of pregnancy and an INFECTION. The infection may precede or follow FERTILIZATION.
The condition of carrying two or more FETUSES simultaneously.
Tests to determine whether or not an individual is pregnant.
A highly vascularized mammalian fetal-maternal organ and major site of transport of oxygen, nutrients, and fetal waste products. It includes a fetal portion (CHORIONIC VILLI) derived from TROPHOBLASTS and a maternal portion (DECIDUA) derived from the uterine ENDOMETRIUM. The placenta produces an array of steroid, protein and peptide hormones (PLACENTAL HORMONES).
The most common (>96%) type of ectopic pregnancy in which the extrauterine EMBRYO IMPLANTATION occurs in the FALLOPIAN TUBE, usually in the ampullary region where FERTILIZATION takes place.
A complication of PREGNANCY, characterized by a complex of symptoms including maternal HYPERTENSION and PROTEINURIA with or without pathological EDEMA. Symptoms may range between mild and severe. Pre-eclampsia usually occurs after the 20th week of gestation, but may develop before this time in the presence of trophoblastic disease.
An infant during the first month after birth.
Pregnancy in human adolescent females under the age of 19.
Pregnancy in which the mother and/or FETUS are at greater than normal risk of MORBIDITY or MORTALITY. Causes include inadequate PRENATAL CARE, previous obstetrical history (ABORTION, SPONTANEOUS), pre-existing maternal disease, pregnancy-induced disease (GESTATIONAL HYPERTENSION), and MULTIPLE PREGNANCY, as well as advanced maternal age above 35.
Proteins produced by organs of the mother or the PLACENTA during PREGNANCY. These proteins may be pregnancy-specific (present only during pregnancy) or pregnancy-associated (present during pregnancy or under other conditions such as hormone therapy or certain malignancies.)
Intentional removal of a fetus from the uterus by any of a number of techniques. (POPLINE, 1978)
The co-occurrence of pregnancy and a blood disease (HEMATOLOGIC DISEASES) which involves BLOOD CELLS or COAGULATION FACTORS. The hematologic disease may precede or follow FERTILIZATION and it may or may not have a deleterious effect on the pregnant woman or FETUS.
Cells lining the outside of the BLASTOCYST. After binding to the ENDOMETRIUM, trophoblasts develop into two distinct layers, an inner layer of mononuclear cytotrophoblasts and an outer layer of continuous multinuclear cytoplasm, the syncytiotrophoblasts, which form the early fetal-maternal interface (PLACENTA).
Death of the developing young in utero. BIRTH of a dead FETUS is STILLBIRTH.
Pathophysiological conditions of the FETUS in the UTERUS. Some fetal diseases may be treated with FETAL THERAPIES.
Determination of the nature of a pathological condition or disease in the postimplantation EMBRYO; FETUS; or pregnant female before birth.
Unintended accidental pregnancy, including pregnancy resulting from failed contraceptive measures.
Care provided the pregnant woman in order to prevent complications, and decrease the incidence of maternal and prenatal mortality.
Pregnancy, usually accidental, that is not desired by the parent or parents.
Exchange of substances between the maternal blood and the fetal blood at the PLACENTA via PLACENTAL CIRCULATION. The placental barrier excludes microbial or viral transmission.
The threadlike, vascular projections of the chorion. Chorionic villi may be free or embedded within the DECIDUA forming the site for exchange of substances between fetal and maternal blood (PLACENTA).
The hormone-responsive glandular layer of ENDOMETRIUM that sloughs off at each menstrual flow (decidua menstrualis) or at the termination of pregnancy. During pregnancy, the thickest part of the decidua forms the maternal portion of the PLACENTA, thus named decidua placentalis. The thin portion of the decidua covering the rest of the embryo is the decidua capsularis.
The unborn young of a viviparous mammal, in the postembryonic period, after the major structures have been outlined. In humans, the unborn young from the end of the eighth week after CONCEPTION until BIRTH, as distinguished from the earlier EMBRYO, MAMMALIAN.
Morphological and physiological development of FETUSES.
The failure of a FETUS to attain its expected FETAL GROWTH at any GESTATIONAL AGE.
Congenital abnormalities caused by medicinal substances or drugs of abuse given to or taken by the mother, or to which she is inadvertently exposed during the manufacture of such substances. The concept excludes abnormalities resulting from exposure to non-medicinal chemicals in the environment.
The condition of carrying TWINS simultaneously.
The mass or quantity of heaviness of an individual at BIRTH. It is expressed by units of pounds or kilograms.
The consequences of exposing the FETUS in utero to certain factors, such as NUTRITION PHYSIOLOGICAL PHENOMENA; PHYSIOLOGICAL STRESS; DRUGS; RADIATION; and other physical or chemical factors. These consequences are observed later in the offspring after BIRTH.
The hollow thick-walled muscular organ in the female PELVIS. It consists of the fundus (the body) which is the site of EMBRYO IMPLANTATION and FETAL DEVELOPMENT. Beyond the isthmus at the perineal end of fundus, is CERVIX UTERI (the neck) opening into VAGINA. Beyond the isthmi at the upper abdominal end of fundus, are the FALLOPIAN TUBES.
The co-occurrence of pregnancy and parasitic diseases. The parasitic infection may precede or follow FERTILIZATION.
A clear, yellowish liquid that envelopes the FETUS inside the sac of AMNION. In the first trimester, it is likely a transudate of maternal or fetal plasma. In the second trimester, amniotic fluid derives primarily from fetal lung and kidney. Cells or substances in this fluid can be removed for prenatal diagnostic tests (AMNIOCENTESIS).
The age of the mother in PREGNANCY.
Non-steroidal chemical compounds with abortifacient activity.
The number of offspring a female has borne. It is contrasted with GRAVIDITY, which refers to the number of pregnancies, regardless of outcome.
A condition in pregnant women with elevated systolic (>140 mm Hg) and diastolic (>90 mm Hg) blood pressure on at least two occasions 6 h apart. HYPERTENSION complicates 8-10% of all pregnancies, generally after 20 weeks of gestation. Gestational hypertension can be divided into several broad categories according to the complexity and associated symptoms, such as EDEMA; PROTEINURIA; SEIZURES; abnormalities in BLOOD COAGULATION and liver functions.
Exposure of the female parent, human or animal, to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents in the environment or to environmental factors that may include ionizing radiation, pathogenic organisms, or toxic chemicals that may affect offspring. It includes pre-conception maternal exposure.
In utero measurement corresponding to the sitting height (crown to rump) of the fetus. Length is considered a more accurate criterion of the age of the fetus than is the weight. The average crown-rump length of the fetus at term is 36 cm. (From Williams Obstetrics, 18th ed, p91)
A term used to describe pregnancies that exceed the upper limit of a normal gestational period. In humans, a prolonged pregnancy is defined as one that extends beyond 42 weeks (294 days) after the first day of the last menstrual period (MENSTRUATION), or birth with gestational age of 41 weeks or more.
CHILDBIRTH before 37 weeks of PREGNANCY (259 days from the first day of the mother's last menstrual period, or 245 days after FERTILIZATION).
Physiological mechanisms that sustain the state of PREGNANCY.
A type of ectopic pregnancy in which the EMBRYO, MAMMALIAN implants in the ABDOMINAL CAVITY instead of in the ENDOMETRIUM of the UTERUS.
Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.
Extraction of the FETUS by means of abdominal HYSTEROTOMY.
The beta subunit of human CHORIONIC GONADOTROPIN. Its structure is similar to the beta subunit of LUTEINIZING HORMONE, except for the additional 30 amino acids at the carboxy end with the associated carbohydrate residues. HCG-beta is used as a diagnostic marker for early detection of pregnancy, spontaneous abortion (ABORTION, SPONTANEOUS); ECTOPIC PREGNANCY; HYDATIDIFORM MOLE; CHORIOCARCINOMA; or DOWN SYNDROME.
Endometrial implantation of EMBRYO, MAMMALIAN at the BLASTOCYST stage.
An assisted reproductive technique that includes the direct handling and manipulation of oocytes and sperm to achieve fertilization in vitro.
Abortion induced to save the life or health of a pregnant woman. (From Dorland, 28th ed)
Three or more consecutive spontaneous abortions.
Onset of OBSTETRIC LABOR before term (TERM BIRTH) but usually after the FETUS has become viable. In humans, it occurs sometime during the 29th through 38th week of PREGNANCY. TOCOLYSIS inhibits premature labor and can prevent the BIRTH of premature infants (INFANT, PREMATURE).
Malformations of organs or body parts during development in utero.
The transfer of mammalian embryos from an in vivo or in vitro environment to a suitable host to improve pregnancy or gestational outcome in human or animal. In human fertility treatment programs, preimplantation embryos ranging from the 4-cell stage to the blastocyst stage are transferred to the uterine cavity between 3-5 days after FERTILIZATION IN VITRO.
A chromosome disorder associated either with an extra chromosome 21 or an effective trisomy for chromosome 21. Clinical manifestations include hypotonia, short stature, brachycephaly, upslanting palpebral fissures, epicanthus, Brushfield spots on the iris, protruding tongue, small ears, short, broad hands, fifth finger clinodactyly, Simian crease, and moderate to severe INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY. Cardiac and gastrointestinal malformations, a marked increase in the incidence of LEUKEMIA, and the early onset of ALZHEIMER DISEASE are also associated with this condition. Pathologic features include the development of NEUROFIBRILLARY TANGLES in neurons and the deposition of AMYLOID BETA-PROTEIN, similar to the pathology of ALZHEIMER DISEASE. (Menkes, Textbook of Child Neurology, 5th ed, p213)
The development of the PLACENTA, a highly vascularized mammalian fetal-maternal organ and major site of transport of oxygen, nutrients, and fetal waste products between mother and FETUS. The process begins at FERTILIZATION, through the development of CYTOTROPHOBLASTS and SYNCYTIOTROPHOBLASTS, the formation of CHORIONIC VILLI, to the progressive increase in BLOOD VESSELS to support the growing fetus.
Diabetes mellitus induced by PREGNANCY but resolved at the end of pregnancy. It does not include previously diagnosed diabetics who become pregnant (PREGNANCY IN DIABETICS). Gestational diabetes usually develops in late pregnancy when insulin antagonistic hormones peaks leading to INSULIN RESISTANCE; GLUCOSE INTOLERANCE; and HYPERGLYCEMIA.
A synthetic analog of natural prostaglandin E1. It produces a dose-related inhibition of gastric acid and pepsin secretion, and enhances mucosal resistance to injury. It is an effective anti-ulcer agent and also has oxytocic properties.
A gonadotropic glycoprotein hormone produced primarily by the PLACENTA. Similar to the pituitary LUTEINIZING HORMONE in structure and function, chorionic gonadotropin is involved in maintaining the CORPUS LUTEUM during pregnancy. CG consists of two noncovalently linked subunits, alpha and beta. Within a species, the alpha subunit is virtually identical to the alpha subunits of the three pituitary glycoprotein hormones (TSH, LH, and FSH), but the beta subunit is unique and confers its biological specificity (CHORIONIC GONADOTROPIN, BETA SUBUNIT, HUMAN).
The repetitive uterine contraction during childbirth which is associated with the progressive dilation of the uterine cervix (CERVIX UTERI). Successful labor results in the expulsion of the FETUS and PLACENTA. Obstetric labor can be spontaneous or induced (LABOR, INDUCED).
An infant having a birth weight of 2500 gm. (5.5 lb.) or less but INFANT, VERY LOW BIRTH WEIGHT is available for infants having a birth weight of 1500 grams (3.3 lb.) or less.
Percutaneous transabdominal puncture of the uterus during pregnancy to obtain amniotic fluid. It is commonly used for fetal karyotype determination in order to diagnose abnormal fetal conditions.
Two individuals derived from two FETUSES that were fertilized at or about the same time, developed in the UTERUS simultaneously, and born to the same mother. Twins are either monozygotic (TWINS, MONOZYGOTIC) or dizygotic (TWINS, DIZYGOTIC).
The circulation of BLOOD, of both the mother and the FETUS, through the PLACENTA.
Chemical substances that interrupt pregnancy after implantation.
Pathological processes or abnormal functions of the PLACENTA.
Selective abortion of one or more embryos or fetuses in a multiple gestation pregnancy. The usual goal is to improve the outcome for the remaining embryos or fetuses.
Bleeding from blood vessels in the UTERUS, sometimes manifested as vaginal bleeding.
The major progestational steroid that is secreted primarily by the CORPUS LUTEUM and the PLACENTA. Progesterone acts on the UTERUS, the MAMMARY GLANDS and the BRAIN. It is required in EMBRYO IMPLANTATION; PREGNANCY maintenance, and the development of mammary tissue for MILK production. Progesterone, converted from PREGNENOLONE, also serves as an intermediate in the biosynthesis of GONADAL STEROID HORMONES and adrenal CORTICOSTEROIDS.
Human females who are pregnant, as cultural, psychological, or sociological entities.
Disorders or diseases associated with PUERPERIUM, the six-to-eight-week period immediately after PARTURITION in humans.
The heart of the fetus of any viviparous animal. It refers to the heart in the postembryonic period and is differentiated from the embryonic heart (HEART/embryology) only on the basis of time.
An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.
Trophoblastic hyperplasia associated with normal gestation, or molar pregnancy. It is characterized by the swelling of the CHORIONIC VILLI and elevated human CHORIONIC GONADOTROPIN. Hydatidiform moles or molar pregnancy may be categorized as complete or partial based on their gross morphology, histopathology, and karyotype.
Nutrition of a mother which affects the health of the FETUS and INFANT as well as herself.
Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.
The processes of milk secretion by the maternal MAMMARY GLANDS after PARTURITION. The proliferation of the mammary glandular tissue, milk synthesis, and milk expulsion or let down are regulated by the interactions of several hormones including ESTRADIOL; PROGESTERONE; PROLACTIN; and OXYTOCIN.
An infant having a birth weight lower than expected for its gestational age.
The retention in the UTERUS of a dead FETUS two months or more after its DEATH.
A method for diagnosis of fetal diseases by sampling the cells of the placental chorionic villi for DNA analysis, presence of bacteria, concentration of metabolites, etc. The advantage over amniocentesis is that the procedure can be carried out in the first trimester.
Morphological and physiological development of EMBRYOS or FETUSES.
Delivery of the FETUS and PLACENTA under the care of an obstetrician or a health worker. Obstetric deliveries may involve physical, psychological, medical, or surgical interventions.
A branch arising from the internal iliac artery in females, that supplies blood to the uterus.
A product of the PLACENTA, and DECIDUA, secreted into the maternal circulation during PREGNANCY. It has been identified as an IGF binding protein (IGFBP)-4 protease that proteolyzes IGFBP-4 and thus increases IGF bioavailability. It is found also in human FIBROBLASTS, ovarian FOLLICULAR FLUID, and GRANULOSA CELLS. The enzyme is a heterotetramer of about 500-kDa.
Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.
Diminished or absent ability of a female to achieve conception.
An organized and comprehensive program of health care that identifies and reduces a woman's reproductive risks before conception through risk assessment, health promotion, and interventions. Preconception care programs may be designed to include the male partner in providing counseling and educational information in preparation for fatherhood, such as genetic counseling and testing, financial and family planning, etc. This concept is different from PRENATAL CARE, which occurs during pregnancy.
The mucous membrane lining of the uterine cavity that is hormonally responsive during the MENSTRUAL CYCLE and PREGNANCY. The endometrium undergoes cyclic changes that characterize MENSTRUATION. After successful FERTILIZATION, it serves to sustain the developing embryo.
Termination of pregnancy under conditions allowed under local laws. (POPLINE Thesaurus, 1991)
Nutrition of FEMALE during PREGNANCY.
In females, the period that is shortly after giving birth (PARTURITION).
Dilatation of the cervix uteri followed by a scraping of the endometrium with a curette.
A prenatal ultrasonography measurement of the soft tissue behind the fetal neck. Either the translucent area below the skin in the back of the fetal neck (nuchal translucency) or the distance between occipital bone to the outer skin line (nuchal fold) is measured.
The event that a FETUS is born dead or stillborn.
The heart rate of the FETUS. The normal range at term is between 120 and 160 beats per minute.
The outermost extra-embryonic membrane surrounding the developing embryo. In REPTILES and BIRDS, it adheres to the shell and allows exchange of gases between the egg and its environment. In MAMMALS, the chorion evolves into the fetal contribution of the PLACENTA.
Blood of the fetus. Exchange of nutrients and waste between the fetal and maternal blood occurs via the PLACENTA. The cord blood is blood contained in the umbilical vessels (UMBILICAL CORD) at the time of delivery.
Steroidal compounds with abortifacient activity.
UTERINE BLEEDING from a GESTATION of less than 20 weeks without any CERVICAL DILATATION. It is characterized by vaginal bleeding, lower back discomfort, or midline pelvic cramping and a risk factor for MISCARRIAGE.
The weight of the FETUS in utero. It is usually estimated by various formulas based on measurements made during PRENATAL ULTRASONOGRAPHY.
An assisted fertilization technique consisting of the microinjection of a single viable sperm into an extracted ovum. It is used principally to overcome low sperm count, low sperm motility, inability of sperm to penetrate the egg, or other conditions related to male infertility (INFERTILITY, MALE).
Three individuals derived from three FETUSES that were fertilized at or about the same time, developed in the UTERUS simultaneously, and born to the same mother.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
The process of giving birth to one or more offspring.
Intractable VOMITING that develops in early PREGNANCY and persists. This can lead to DEHYDRATION and WEIGHT LOSS.
The number of pregnancies, complete or incomplete, experienced by a female. It is different from PARITY, which is the number of offspring borne. (From Stedman, 26th ed)
Specialized arterial vessels in the umbilical cord. They carry waste and deoxygenated blood from the FETUS to the mother via the PLACENTA. In humans, there are usually two umbilical arteries but sometimes one.
Physiologic or biochemical monitoring of the fetus. It is usually done during LABOR, OBSTETRIC and may be performed in conjunction with the monitoring of uterine activity. It may also be performed prenatally as when the mother is undergoing surgery.
A condition of fetal overgrowth leading to a large-for-gestational-age FETUS. It is defined as BIRTH WEIGHT greater than 4,000 grams or above the 90th percentile for population and sex-specific growth curves. It is commonly seen in GESTATIONAL DIABETES; PROLONGED PREGNANCY; and pregnancies complicated by pre-existing diabetes mellitus.
Female parents, human or animal.
The event that a FETUS is born alive with heartbeats or RESPIRATION regardless of GESTATIONAL AGE. Such liveborn is called a newborn infant (INFANT, NEWBORN).
Clinical and laboratory techniques used to enhance fertility in humans and animals.
The capacity to conceive or to induce conception. It may refer to either the male or female.
Physical activity of the FETUS in utero. Gross or fine fetal body movement can be monitored by the mother, PALPATION, or ULTRASONOGRAPHY.
Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.
Artificial introduction of SEMEN or SPERMATOZOA into the VAGINA to facilitate FERTILIZATION.
The insertion of drugs into the vagina to treat local infections, neoplasms, or to induce labor. The dosage forms may include medicated pessaries, irrigation fluids, and suppositories.
The transmission of infectious disease or pathogens from one generation to another. It includes transmission in utero or intrapartum by exposure to blood and secretions, and postpartum exposure via breastfeeding.
The range or frequency distribution of a measurement in a population (of organisms, organs or things) that has not been selected for the presence of disease or abnormality.
The smooth muscle coat of the uterus, which forms the main mass of the organ.
A condition of abnormally low AMNIOTIC FLUID volume. Principal causes include malformations of fetal URINARY TRACT; FETAL GROWTH RETARDATION; GESTATIONAL HYPERTENSION; nicotine poisoning; and PROLONGED PREGNANCY.
Inability to reproduce after a specified period of unprotected intercourse. Reproductive sterility is permanent infertility.
Ultrasonography applying the Doppler effect, with frequency-shifted ultrasound reflections produced by moving targets (usually red blood cells) in the bloodstream along the ultrasound axis in direct proportion to the velocity of movement of the targets, to determine both direction and velocity of blood flow. (Stedman, 25th ed)
The neck portion of the UTERUS between the lower isthmus and the VAGINA forming the cervical canal.
Spontaneous tearing of the membranes surrounding the FETUS any time before the onset of OBSTETRIC LABOR. Preterm PROM is membrane rupture before 37 weeks of GESTATION.
Abnormal placentation in which all or parts of the PLACENTA are attached directly to the MYOMETRIUM due to a complete or partial absence of DECIDUA. It is associated with POSTPARTUM HEMORRHAGE because of the failure of placental separation.
Clinical conditions caused by an abnormal chromosome constitution in which there is extra or missing chromosome material (either a whole chromosome or a chromosome segment). (from Thompson et al., Genetics in Medicine, 5th ed, p429)
Symptoms of NAUSEA and VOMITING in pregnant women that usually occur in the morning during the first 2 to 3 months of PREGNANCY. Severe persistent vomiting during pregnancy is called HYPEREMESIS GRAVIDARUM.
Congenital malformations of the central nervous system and adjacent structures related to defective neural tube closure during the first trimester of pregnancy generally occurring between days 18-29 of gestation. Ectodermal and mesodermal malformations (mainly involving the skull and vertebrae) may occur as a result of defects of neural tube closure. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1992, Ch55, pp31-41)
The possession of a third chromosome of any one type in an otherwise diploid cell.
Abortion performed because of possible fetal defects.
The innermost membranous sac that surrounds and protects the developing embryo which is bathed in the AMNIOTIC FLUID. Amnion cells are secretory EPITHELIAL CELLS and contribute to the amniotic fluid.
The part of a human or animal body connecting the HEAD to the rest of the body.
Ultrasonography applying the Doppler effect, with the superposition of flow information as colors on a gray scale in a real-time image. This type of ultrasonography is well-suited to identifying the location of high-velocity flow (such as in a stenosis) or of mapping the extent of flow in a certain region.
A complete separation or tear in the wall of the UTERUS with or without expulsion of the FETUS. It may be due to injuries, multiple pregnancies, large fetus, previous scarring, or obstruction.
A syndrome of HEMOLYSIS, elevated liver ENZYMES, and low blood platelets count (THROMBOCYTOPENIA). HELLP syndrome is observed in pregnant women with PRE-ECLAMPSIA or ECLAMPSIA who also exhibit LIVER damage and abnormalities in BLOOD COAGULATION.
Organized efforts by communities or organizations to improve the health and well-being of the mother.
An umbrella term used to describe a pattern of disabilities and abnormalities that result from fetal exposure to ETHANOL during pregnancy. It encompasses a phenotypic range that can vary greatly between individuals, but reliably includes one or more of the following: characteristic facial dysmorphism, FETAL GROWTH RETARDATION, central nervous system abnormalities, cognitive and/or behavioral dysfunction, BIRTH DEFECTS. The level of maternal alcohol consumption does not necessarily correlate directly with disease severity.
Increase in BODY WEIGHT over existing weight.
Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.
Techniques for the artifical induction of ovulation, the rupture of the follicle and release of the ovum.
Measurable and quantifiable biological parameters (e.g., specific enzyme concentration, specific hormone concentration, specific gene phenotype distribution in a population, presence of biological substances) which serve as indices for health- and physiology-related assessments, such as disease risk, psychiatric disorders, environmental exposure and its effects, disease diagnosis, metabolic processes, substance abuse, pregnancy, cell line development, epidemiologic studies, etc.
The thick green-to-black mucilaginous material found in the intestines of a full-term fetus. It consists of secretions of the INTESTINAL GLANDS; BILE PIGMENTS; FATTY ACIDS; AMNIOTIC FLUID; and intrauterine debris. It constitutes the first stools passed by a newborn.
A polypeptide hormone of approximately 25 kDa that is produced by the SYNCYTIOTROPHOBLASTS of the PLACENTA, also known as chorionic somatomammotropin. It has both GROWTH HORMONE and PROLACTIN activities on growth, lactation, and luteal steroid production. In women, placental lactogen secretion begins soon after implantation and increases to 1 g or more a day in late pregnancy. Placental lactogen is also an insulin antagonist.
Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.
Methods of detecting pregnancy by examining the levels of human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) in plasma or urine.
Transfer of preovulatory oocytes from donor to a suitable host. Oocytes are collected, fertilized in vitro, and transferred to a host that can be human or animal.
Products in capsule, tablet or liquid form that provide dietary ingredients, and that are intended to be taken by mouth to increase the intake of nutrients. Dietary supplements can include macronutrients, such as proteins, carbohydrates, and fats; and/or MICRONUTRIENTS, such as VITAMINS; MINERALS; and PHYTOCHEMICALS.
A malignant metastatic form of trophoblastic tumors. Unlike the HYDATIDIFORM MOLE, choriocarcinoma contains no CHORIONIC VILLI but rather sheets of undifferentiated cytotrophoblasts and syncytiotrophoblasts (TROPHOBLASTS). It is characterized by the large amounts of CHORIONIC GONADOTROPIN produced. Tissue origins can be determined by DNA analyses: placental (fetal) origin or non-placental origin (CHORIOCARCINOMA, NON-GESTATIONAL).
Premature loss of PREGNANCY in which not all the products of CONCEPTION have been expelled.
Cyst occurring in a persistent portion of the urachus, presenting as an extraperitoneal mass in the umbilical region. It is characterized by abdominal pain, and fever if infected. It may rupture, leading to peritonitis, or it may drain through the umbilicus.
The 17-beta-isomer of estradiol, an aromatized C18 steroid with hydroxyl group at 3-beta- and 17-beta-position. Estradiol-17-beta is the most potent form of mammalian estrogenic steroids.
Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.
Prevention of CONCEPTION by blocking fertility temporarily, or permanently (STERILIZATION, REPRODUCTIVE). Common means of reversible contraception include NATURAL FAMILY PLANNING METHODS; CONTRACEPTIVE AGENTS; or CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES.
Tumors or cancer of the UTERUS.
Inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning TOBACCO.
Onset of HYPERREFLEXIA; SEIZURES; or COMA in a previously diagnosed pre-eclamptic patient (PRE-ECLAMPSIA).
The period from onset of one menstrual bleeding (MENSTRUATION) to the next in an ovulating woman or female primate. The menstrual cycle is regulated by endocrine interactions of the HYPOTHALAMUS; the PITUITARY GLAND; the ovaries; and the genital tract. The menstrual cycle is divided by OVULATION into two phases. Based on the endocrine status of the OVARY, there is a FOLLICULAR PHASE and a LUTEAL PHASE. Based on the response in the ENDOMETRIUM, the menstrual cycle is divided into a proliferative and a secretory phase.
A member of the vitamin B family that stimulates the hematopoietic system. It is present in the liver and kidney and is found in mushrooms, spinach, yeast, green leaves, and grasses (POACEAE). Folic acid is used in the treatment and prevention of folate deficiencies and megaloblastic anemia.
Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the fetus and amniotic cavity through abdominal or uterine entry.
The beginning of true OBSTETRIC LABOR which is characterized by the cyclic uterine contractions of increasing frequency, duration, and strength causing CERVICAL DILATATION to begin (LABOR STAGE, FIRST ).
Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)
The ratio of two odds. The exposure-odds ratio for case control data is the ratio of the odds in favor of exposure among cases to the odds in favor of exposure among noncases. The disease-odds ratio for a cohort or cross section is the ratio of the odds in favor of disease among the exposed to the odds in favor of disease among the unexposed. The prevalence-odds ratio refers to an odds ratio derived cross-sectionally from studies of prevalent cases.
Developmental abnormalities involving structures of the heart. These defects are present at birth but may be discovered later in life.
The visualization of deep structures of the body by recording the reflections or echoes of ultrasonic pulses directed into the tissues. Use of ultrasound for imaging or diagnostic purposes employs frequencies ranging from 1.6 to 10 megahertz.
The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.
Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.
The probability that an event will occur. It encompasses a variety of measures of the probability of a generally unfavorable outcome.
The first alpha-globulins to appear in mammalian sera during FETAL DEVELOPMENT and the dominant serum proteins in early embryonic life.
Medical problems associated with OBSTETRIC LABOR, such as BREECH PRESENTATION; PREMATURE OBSTETRIC LABOR; HEMORRHAGE; or others. These complications can affect the well-being of the mother, the FETUS, or both.
Hormones produced by the placenta include CHORIONIC GONADOTROPIN, and PLACENTAL LACTOGEN as well as steroids (ESTROGENS; PROGESTERONE), and neuropeptide hormones similar to those found in the hypothalamus (HYPOTHALAMIC HORMONES).
Premature separation of the normally implanted PLACENTA from the UTERUS. Signs of varying degree of severity include UTERINE BLEEDING, uterine MUSCLE HYPERTONIA, and FETAL DISTRESS or FETAL DEATH.
Any of the ruminant mammals with curved horns in the genus Ovis, family Bovidae. They possess lachrymal grooves and interdigital glands, which are absent in GOATS.
The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)
The flexible rope-like structure that connects a developing FETUS to the PLACENTA in mammals. The cord contains blood vessels which carry oxygen and nutrients from the mother to the fetus and waste products away from the fetus.
A progestational and glucocorticoid hormone antagonist. Its inhibition of progesterone induces bleeding during the luteal phase and in early pregnancy by releasing endogenous prostaglandins from the endometrium or decidua. As a glucocorticoid receptor antagonist, the drug has been used to treat hypercortisolism in patients with nonpituitary CUSHING SYNDROME.
Conjoined twins are a rare type of monozygotic twinning where genetically identical individuals form a single organism with varying degrees of physical connection and shared anatomy due to incomplete division during embryonic development.
Methods pertaining to the generation of new individuals, including techniques used in selective BREEDING, cloning (CLONING, ORGANISM), and assisted reproduction (REPRODUCTIVE TECHNIQUES, ASSISTED).
A pair of highly specialized muscular canals extending from the UTERUS to its corresponding OVARY. They provide the means for OVUM collection, and the site for the final maturation of gametes and FERTILIZATION. The fallopian tube consists of an interstitium, an isthmus, an ampulla, an infundibulum, and fimbriae. Its wall consists of three histologic layers: serous, muscular, and an internal mucosal layer lined with both ciliated and secretory cells.
Passage of blood from one fetus to another via an arteriovenous communication or other shunt, in a monozygotic twin pregnancy. It results in anemia in one twin and polycythemia in the other. (Lee et al., Wintrobe's Clinical Hematology, 9th ed, p737-8)
Abnormal accumulation of serous fluid in two or more fetal compartments, such as SKIN; PLEURA; PERICARDIUM; PLACENTA; PERITONEUM; AMNIOTIC FLUID. General fetal EDEMA may be of non-immunologic origin, or of immunologic origin as in the case of ERYTHROBLASTOSIS FETALIS.
Either one of the two small elongated rectangular bones that together form the bridge of the nose.
In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.
Ultrasonography applying the Doppler effect, with velocity detection combined with range discrimination. Short bursts of ultrasound are transmitted at regular intervals and the echoes are demodulated as they return.
Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.
Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.
The potential of the FETUS to survive outside the UTERUS after birth, natural or induced. Fetal viability depends largely on the FETAL ORGAN MATURITY, and environmental conditions.
The number of births in a given population per year or other unit of time.

Myometrial constitutive nitric oxide synthase expression is increased during human pregnancy. (1/257)

Nitric oxide (NO), derived from L-arginine by the action of nitric oxide synthase (NOS), is a mediator of many diverse biological activities, including vasodilation, neurotransmission and inhibition of platelet adhesion. A role for NO in the maintenance of rat and rabbit pregnancy is supported by a variety of studies. A recent study in women demonstrated that myometrial inducible NOS (iNOS) expression was greater in the early third trimester than either the late third trimester or in the non-pregnant condition, suggesting that increased iNOS expression is involved in the maintenance of human pregnancy. Constitutive NOS (cNOS) expression was not determined. The aim of this study was to compare constitutive NOS (both eNOS and bNOS) expression in the human non-pregnant uterus, preterm pregnant uterus (25-34 weeks gestation) and term pregnant uterus (>37 weeks gestation) using immunohistochemistry and Western blotting. Preterm pregnant samples were taken from women with a variety of pathologies necessitating early delivery. We found that eNOS and bNOS protein concentrations were greater in the preterm pregnant myometrium than non-pregnant myometrium. eNOS, but not bNOS, protein concentration was lower in myometrial samples obtained at term compared with those obtained preterm. We conclude that the constitutive isoforms of NOS are also up-regulated in human pregnancy and may play a role in the maintenance of myometrial quiescence.  (+info)

Prostaglandin endoperoxide H synthase mRNA expression in the human amnion and decidua during pregnancy and in the amnion at preterm labour. (2/257)

We have examined the expression of prostaglandin endoperoxide H synthase (PGHS) isoenzymes in the amnion and the decidua during gestation, and the abundance of PGHS mRNA in the amnion at idiopathic preterm labour. PGHS-1 and -2 mRNA abundance in the amnion, determined with ribonuclease protection assays, was significantly (P< 0.05) higher at term than earlier during pregnancy. In contrast, neither PGHS-1 and -2 mRNA values, nor PGHS-specific activity, measured with a cell-free assay, was different in the decidua at term as compared to earlier gestational ages. In individual term patients, PGHS-2 mRNA values in the amnion were positively correlated with PGHS-2 mRNA values in the chorion laeve. PGHS-1 and -2 mRNA abundance was higher (P < 0.05) in the amnion after idiopathic preterm labour than in the absence of labour at the same gestational age (28-35 weeks). Thus, PGHS-1 and -2 are induced in the amnion at term. Furthermore, amniotic PGHS-2 changes in co-ordination with PGHS-2 concentrations in the chorion laeve. PGHS is not induced in the decidua at term. Increased amniotic PGHS expression may contribute to the enhanced intrauterine prostaglandin synthesis before term labour. Both PGHS isoenzymes may participate in the increase of PGHS activity in the amnion at preterm birth.  (+info)

Energy intake and expenditure of free-living, pregnant Colombian women in an urban setting. (3/257)

BACKGROUND: This study examined the components of energy balance in poor, free-living pregnant women living in an urban setting of a developing country. OBJECTIVES: We tested the following hypotheses: 1) energy intake increases in pregnancy and is greater than when nonpregnant and nonlactating (NPNL), 2) basal metabolic rate (BMR) increases in pregnancy and the increase is positively correlated with prepregnancy fatness, and 3) energy expenditure in activity decreases in pregnancy and is lower than in NPNL women. DESIGN: Pregnant women were studied at 14.8 +/- 3.4 (n = 40), 25.0 +/- 3.2 (n = 54), and 34.9 +/- 2.4 (n = 43) wk gestation, and NPNL women at baseline (n = 114) and at 3 (n = 103) and 6 (n = 93) mo. Energy intake was measured by using estimated diet records and energy expenditure by using the flex heart rate method. Time allocation in physical activity was assessed by observation. RESULTS: In pregnant women, body weight, BMR, and energy intake increased but total daily energy expenditure (TDEE) did not change significantly. There were no significant changes in time allocation to selected activities except for lying down. In comparison with NPNL control subjects, women in late pregnancy had higher energy intakes and BMRs. Values for TDEE were not significantly different, but pregnant women expended less energy in activity and allocated more time to 2 energy-saving activities and less time to 2 energy-demanding activities. CONCLUSION: A decrease in energy expenditure in activity and changes in time allocation are important ways in which pregnant women meet the energy demands of pregnancy.  (+info)

Usefulness of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in pregnant women with type 1 diabetes. (4/257)

OBJECTIVE: Pregnancy in type 1 diabetes is associated with an increased risk of developing pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH). Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) has been used to screen for preeclampsia in nondiabetic pregnancy. To date, there are no data regarding ABPM during pregnancy in normotensive type 1 diabetic women. This study sought to establish blood pressure (BP) profiles for pregnant type 1 diabetic women using ABPM and determine whether the BP pattern can define a population at risk for developing PIH. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: ABPM was carried out for one 24-h period during each trimester--in the first trimester between weeks 7 and 12, in the second trimester between weeks 20 and 24, and in the third trimester between weeks 30 and 34--in 22 normotensive pregnant type 1 diabetic and 10 pregnant nondiabetic women. RESULTS: The incidence of PIH was fourfold greater in type 1 diabetic women than in control subjects. Diabetic women showed higher daily diastolic BP in the third trimester compared with nondiabetic pregnant women. Diabetic women who developed PIH in the third trimester showed significantly higher BP profiles throughout gestation than those who remained normotensive. Receiver operator characteristics curves for nighttime systolic BP showed the best predictive capacity for PIH, with a cutoff > 105 mmHg (85% sensitivity and 92% specificity). CONCLUSIONS: Our study confirms the early increase of BP in patients who will develop PIH and suggests that nighttime systolic BP >105 mmHg in the second trimester is a useful predictor of PIH. ABPM may be useful in screening for PIH in pregnant diabetic women.  (+info)

Antenatal screening for Down's syndrome in assisted reproductive pregnancies. (5/257)

The wide use of assisted conception methods has risen dramatically. The greater proportion of singletons, twins and high order of multiplicity conceived by those methods have already focused the medical community to various obstetric complications. Recently, there have been suggestions that the levels of mid-gestation serum markers, particularly human chorionic gonadotrophin (HCG), might be affected by assisted conception, leading to higher false-positive results. Furthermore, women who conceived after assisted reproduction methods are on average older, and in many cases their current pregnancy was achieved after long-standing infertility and might even be their last one. This is why they are extremely wary of any invasive fetal karyotyping. Therefore, every effort should be made to provide them with the most accurate screening of Down's syndrome (DS) risk. In this respect, nuchal translucency (NT) measurement, which has been reported to be another effective screening method, might be a more reliable marker in these pregnancies. This review explores the problematic issue of antenatal DS screening in assisted conception pregnancies. For the singletons and twins, a sequential NT and second-trimester serum marker screening can be offered, thus producing a single risk estimation which seems to be more accurate. For the high order of multiplicity, the NT offers additional important data, which can be taken in consideration both as a screening tool for DS and if fetal reduction is planned.  (+info)

Outdoor air pollution, low birth weight, and prematurity. (6/257)

This study tested the hypothesis, suggested by several recent reports, that air pollution may increase the risk of adverse birth outcomes. This study analyzed all singleton live births registered by the Czech national birth register in 1991 in 67 districts where at least one pollutant was monitored in 1990-1991 (n = 108,173). Maternal exposures to sulfur dioxide (SO(2)), total suspended particles (TSP), and nitrous oxides (NO(x)) in each trimester of pregnancy were estimated as the arithmetic means of all daily measurements taken by all monitors in the district of birth of each infant. Odds ratios of low birth weight (< 2,500 g), prematurity (< 37 weeks of gestation), and intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR; < 10th percentile of birth weight for gestational age and sex) were estimated by robust logistic regression. The median (and 25th and 75th percentile) trimester exposures were 32 (18, 56) microg/m(3) for SO(2); 72 (55, 87) microg/m(3) for TSP; and 38 (23, 59) microg/m(3) for NO(x). Low birth weight (prevalence 5.2%) and prematurity (prevalence 4.8%) were associated with SO(2) and somewhat less strongly with TSP. IUGR was not associated with any pollutant. The effects on low birth weight and prematurity were marginally stronger for exposures in the first trimester, and were not attenuated at all by adjustment for socioeconomic factors or the month of birth. Adjusted odds ratios of low birth weight were 1.20 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.11-1.30] and 1.15 (CI, 1.07-1.24) for a 50 microg/m(3) increase in SO(2) and TSP, respectively, in the first trimester; adjusted odds ratios of prematurity were 1.27 (CI, 1.16-1.39) and 1.18 (CI, 1.05-1.31) for a 50 microg/m(3) increase in SO(2) and TSP, respectively, in the first trimester. Low gestational age accounted for the association between SO(2) and low birth weight. These findings provide further support for the hypothesis that air pollution can affect the outcome of pregnancy.  (+info)

Submicroscopic Plasmodium falciparum infections in pregnancy in Ghana. (7/257)

Malarial parasitaemia below the threshold of microscopy but detectable by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays is common in endemic regions. This study was conducted to examine prevalence, predictors, and effects of submicroscopic Plasmodium falciparum infections in pregnancy. In a cross-sectional study among 530 pregnant women in Ghana, plasmodial infections were assessed by microscopy and PCR assays. Concentrations of haemoglobin and C-reactive protein (CRP) were measured and antimalarial drugs (chloroquine, pyrimethamine) in urine were demonstrated by ELISA dipsticks. By microscopy, 32% of the women were found to harbour malaria parasites. This rate increased to 63% adding the results of the parasite-specific PCR. P. falciparum was present in all but one infection. With increasing gravidity, infection rates and parasite densities decreased and the proportions of submicroscopic parasitaemia among infected women grew. Correspondingly, anaemia, fever and evidence of inflammation (CRP > 0.6 mg/dl) were more frequent in primigravidae than in multigravidae. Antimalarial drugs were detected in 65% of the women and were associated with a reduced prevalence of P. falciparum infections and a raised proportion of submicroscopic parasitaemia. Both gravidity and antimalarial drug use were independent predictors of submicroscopic P. falciparum infections. These infections caused a slight reduction of Hb levels and considerably increased serum concentrations of CRP. Conventional microscopy underestimates the actual extent of malarial infections in pregnancy in endemic regions. Submicroscopic P. falciparum infections are frequent and may contribute to mild anaemia and inflammation in seemingly aparasitaemic pregnant women.  (+info)

Induced abortion and low birthweight in the following pregnancy. (8/257)

BACKGROUND: To examine whether induced abortion increases the risk of low birthweight in subsequent singleton live births. METHODS: Cohort study using the Danish Medical Birth Registry (MBR), the Hospital Discharge Registry (HDR), and the Induced Abortion Registry (IAR). All women who had their first pregnancy during 1980-1982 were identified in the MBR, the HDR, and the IAR. We included all 15,727 women whose pregnancy was terminated by a first trimester induced abortion in the induced abortion cohort and 46,026 women whose pregnancy was not terminated by an induced abortion were selected for the control cohort. All subsequent pregnancies until 1994 were identified by register record linkage. RESULTS: Low birthweight (<2500 g) in singleton term live births occurred more frequently in women with one, two, three or more previous induced abortions, compared with women without any previous induced abortion of similar gravidity, 2.2% versus 1.5%, 2.4% versus 1.7%, and 1.8% versus 1.6%, respectively. Adjusting for maternal age and residence at time of pregnancy, interpregnancy interval, gender of newborn, number of previous spontaneous abortions and number of previous low birthweight infants (control cohort only), the odds ratios (OR) of low birthweight in singleton term live births in women with one, two or more previous first trimester induced abortions were 1.9 (95% CI: 1.6, 2.3), and 1.9 (95% CI: 1.3, 2.7), respectively, compared with the control cohort of similar gravidity. High risks were mainly seen in women with an interpregnancy interval of more than 6 months. CONCLUSIONS: The findings suggest a positive association between one or more first trimester induced abortions and the risk of low birthweight in subsequent singleton term live births when the interpregnancy interval is longer than 6 months. This result was unexpected and confounding cannot be ruled out.  (+info)

Pregnancy trimesters are a way to divide the duration of pregnancy into three 3-month (or approximately 13-week) segments. This division can help healthcare providers monitor and discuss specific developmental stages, symptoms, and care needs during each phase of the pregnancy. Here's a brief overview of what typically occurs in each trimester:

1. First Trimester (Week 1 - Week 12): During this period, major organs and structures begin to form in the developing fetus. Common symptoms experienced by the pregnant individual may include morning sickness, fatigue, breast tenderness, and frequent urination. Regular prenatal care should start during these early weeks to monitor both the mother's and baby's health.

2. Second Trimester (Week 13 - Week 26): This phase is often considered more comfortable for many pregnant individuals as some symptoms from the first trimester improve. The fetus continues to grow, and movement can be felt. Organs and systems continue to develop, and the fetus becomes more active. Common symptoms during this time include back pain, stretch marks, and swelling of the ankles and feet.

3. Third Trimester (Week 27 - Birth): The final trimester is marked by significant growth and weight gain for both the mother and baby. The fetus will turn into a head-down position in preparation for birth. Common symptoms during this time include shortness of breath, heartburn, difficulty sleeping, and contractions (which can indicate early labor). Regular prenatal care remains crucial to monitor the health of both the mother and baby as delivery approaches.

The first trimester of pregnancy is defined as the period of gestational development that extends from conception (fertilization of the egg by sperm) to the end of the 13th week. This critical phase marks significant transformations in both the mother's body and the growing embryo/fetus.

During the first trimester, the fertilized egg implants into the uterine lining (implantation), initiating a series of complex interactions leading to the formation of the placenta - an organ essential for providing nutrients and oxygen to the developing fetus while removing waste products. Simultaneously, the embryo undergoes rapid cell division and differentiation, giving rise to various organs and systems. By the end of the first trimester, most major structures are present, although they continue to mature and grow throughout pregnancy.

The mother may experience several physiological changes during this time, including:
- Morning sickness (nausea and vomiting)
- Fatigue
- Breast tenderness
- Frequent urination
- Food aversions or cravings
- Mood swings

Additionally, hormonal shifts can cause various symptoms and prepare the body for potential changes in lactation, posture, and pelvic alignment as pregnancy progresses. Regular prenatal care is crucial during this period to monitor both maternal and fetal wellbeing, identify any potential complications early on, and provide appropriate guidance and support throughout the pregnancy.

The third trimester of pregnancy is the final stage of pregnancy that lasts from week 29 until birth, which typically occurs around the 40th week. During this period, the fetus continues to grow and mature, gaining weight rapidly. The mother's body also prepares for childbirth by dilating the cervix and producing milk in preparation for breastfeeding. Regular prenatal care is crucial during this time to monitor the health of both the mother and the developing fetus, as well as to prepare for delivery.

The second trimester of pregnancy is the period between the completion of 12 weeks (the end of the first trimester) and 26 weeks (the beginning of the third trimester) of gestational age. It is often considered the most comfortable period for many pregnant women as the risk of miscarriage decreases significantly, and the symptoms experienced during the first trimester, such as nausea and fatigue, typically improve.

During this time, the uterus expands above the pubic bone, allowing more space for the growing fetus. The fetal development in the second trimester includes significant growth in size and weight, formation of all major organs, and the beginning of movement sensations that the mother can feel. Additionally, the fetus starts to hear, swallow and kick, and the skin is covered with a protective coating called vernix.

Prenatal care during this period typically includes regular prenatal appointments to monitor the mother's health and the baby's growth and development. These appointments may include measurements of the uterus, fetal heart rate monitoring, and screening tests for genetic disorders or other potential issues.

Pregnancy is a physiological state or condition where a fertilized egg (zygote) successfully implants and grows in the uterus of a woman, leading to the development of an embryo and finally a fetus. This process typically spans approximately 40 weeks, divided into three trimesters, and culminates in childbirth. Throughout this period, numerous hormonal and physical changes occur to support the growing offspring, including uterine enlargement, breast development, and various maternal adaptations to ensure the fetus's optimal growth and well-being.

Pregnancy complications refer to any health problems that arise during pregnancy which can put both the mother and the baby at risk. These complications may occur at any point during the pregnancy, from conception until childbirth. Some common pregnancy complications include:

1. Gestational diabetes: a type of diabetes that develops during pregnancy in women who did not have diabetes before becoming pregnant.
2. Preeclampsia: a pregnancy complication characterized by high blood pressure and damage to organs such as the liver or kidneys.
3. Placenta previa: a condition where the placenta covers the cervix, which can cause bleeding and may require delivery via cesarean section.
4. Preterm labor: when labor begins before 37 weeks of gestation, which can lead to premature birth and other complications.
5. Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR): a condition where the fetus does not grow at a normal rate inside the womb.
6. Multiple pregnancies: carrying more than one baby, such as twins or triplets, which can increase the risk of premature labor and other complications.
7. Rh incompatibility: a condition where the mother's blood type is different from the baby's, which can cause anemia and jaundice in the newborn.
8. Pregnancy loss: including miscarriage, stillbirth, or ectopic pregnancy, which can be emotionally devastating for the parents.

It is important to monitor pregnancy closely and seek medical attention promptly if any concerning symptoms arise. With proper care and management, many pregnancy complications can be treated effectively, reducing the risk of harm to both the mother and the baby.

Pregnancy outcome refers to the final result or status of a pregnancy, including both the health of the mother and the newborn baby. It can be categorized into various types such as:

1. Live birth: The delivery of one or more babies who show signs of life after separation from their mother.
2. Stillbirth: The delivery of a baby who has died in the womb after 20 weeks of pregnancy.
3. Miscarriage: The spontaneous loss of a pregnancy before the 20th week.
4. Abortion: The intentional termination of a pregnancy before the fetus can survive outside the uterus.
5. Ectopic pregnancy: A pregnancy that develops outside the uterus, usually in the fallopian tube, which is not viable and requires medical attention.
6. Preterm birth: The delivery of a baby before 37 weeks of gestation, which can lead to various health issues for the newborn.
7. Full-term birth: The delivery of a baby between 37 and 42 weeks of gestation.
8. Post-term pregnancy: The delivery of a baby after 42 weeks of gestation, which may increase the risk of complications for both mother and baby.

The pregnancy outcome is influenced by various factors such as maternal age, health status, lifestyle habits, genetic factors, and access to quality prenatal care.

"Animal pregnancy" is not a term that is typically used in medical definitions. However, in biological terms, animal pregnancy refers to the condition where a fertilized egg (or eggs) implants and develops inside the reproductive tract of a female animal, leading to the birth of offspring (live young).

The specific details of animal pregnancy can vary widely between different species, with some animals exhibiting phenomena such as placental development, gestation periods, and hormonal changes that are similar to human pregnancy, while others may have very different reproductive strategies.

It's worth noting that the study of animal pregnancy and reproduction is an important area of biological research, as it can provide insights into fundamental mechanisms of embryonic development, genetics, and evolution.

Ectopic pregnancy is a type of abnormal pregnancy that occurs outside the uterine cavity. The most common site for an ectopic pregnancy is the fallopian tube, accounting for about 95% of cases. This condition is also known as tubal pregnancy. Other less common sites include the ovary, cervix, and abdominal cavity.

In a normal pregnancy, the fertilized egg travels down the fallopian tube and implants itself in the lining of the uterus. However, in an ectopic pregnancy, the fertilized egg implants and starts to develop somewhere other than the uterus. The growing embryo cannot survive outside the uterus, and if left untreated, an ectopic pregnancy can cause life-threatening bleeding due to the rupture of the fallopian tube or other organs.

Symptoms of ectopic pregnancy may include abdominal pain, vaginal bleeding, shoulder pain, lightheadedness, fainting, and in severe cases, shock. Diagnosis is usually made through a combination of medical history, physical examination, ultrasound, and blood tests to measure the levels of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), a hormone produced during pregnancy.

Treatment for ectopic pregnancy depends on several factors, including the location, size, and growth rate of the ectopic mass, as well as the patient's overall health and desire for future pregnancies. Treatment options may include medication to stop the growth of the embryo or surgery to remove the ectopic tissue. In some cases, both methods may be used together. Early diagnosis and treatment can help prevent serious complications and improve the chances of preserving fertility in future pregnancies.

Cardiovascular complications in pregnancy refer to conditions that affect the heart and blood vessels, which can arise during pregnancy, childbirth, or after delivery. These complications can be pre-existing or new-onset and can range from mild to severe, potentially threatening the life of both the mother and the fetus. Some examples of cardiovascular complications in pregnancy include:

1. Hypertension disorders: This includes chronic hypertension (high blood pressure before pregnancy), gestational hypertension (high blood pressure that develops after 20 weeks of pregnancy), and preeclampsia/eclampsia (a pregnancy-specific disorder characterized by high blood pressure, proteinuria, and potential organ damage).

2. Cardiomyopathy: A condition in which the heart muscle becomes weakened, leading to an enlarged heart and reduced pumping efficiency. Peripartum cardiomyopathy is a specific type that occurs during pregnancy or in the months following delivery.

3. Arrhythmias: Irregularities in the heart's rhythm, such as tachycardia (rapid heartbeat) or bradycardia (slow heartbeat), can occur during pregnancy and may require medical intervention.

4. Valvular heart disease: Pre-existing valve disorders, like mitral stenosis or aortic insufficiency, can worsen during pregnancy due to increased blood volume and cardiac output. Additionally, new valve issues might develop during pregnancy.

5. Venous thromboembolism (VTE): Pregnancy increases the risk of developing blood clots in the veins, particularly deep vein thrombosis (DVT) or pulmonary embolism (PE).

6. Ischemic heart disease: Although rare, coronary artery disease and acute coronary syndrome can occur during pregnancy, especially in women with risk factors such as obesity, diabetes, or smoking history.

7. Heart failure: Severe cardiac dysfunction leading to fluid accumulation, shortness of breath, and reduced exercise tolerance may develop due to any of the above conditions or other underlying heart diseases.

Early recognition, monitoring, and appropriate management of these cardiovascular complications in pregnancy are crucial for maternal and fetal well-being.

Gestational age is the length of time that has passed since the first day of the last menstrual period (LMP) in pregnant women. It is the standard unit used to estimate the age of a pregnancy and is typically expressed in weeks. This measure is used because the exact date of conception is often not known, but the start of the last menstrual period is usually easier to recall.

It's important to note that since ovulation typically occurs around two weeks after the start of the LMP, gestational age is approximately two weeks longer than fetal age, which is the actual time elapsed since conception. Medical professionals use both gestational and fetal age to track the development and growth of the fetus during pregnancy.

The pregnancy rate is a measure used in reproductive medicine to determine the frequency or efficiency of conception following certain treatments, interventions, or under specific conditions. It is typically defined as the number of pregnancies per 100 women exposed to the condition being studied over a specified period of time. A pregnancy is confirmed when a woman has a positive result on a pregnancy test or through the detection of a gestational sac on an ultrasound exam.

In clinical trials and research, the pregnancy rate helps healthcare professionals evaluate the effectiveness of various fertility treatments such as in vitro fertilization (IVF), intrauterine insemination (IUI), or ovulation induction medications. The pregnancy rate can also be used to assess the impact of lifestyle factors, environmental exposures, or medical conditions on fertility and conception.

It is important to note that pregnancy rates may vary depending on several factors, including age, the cause of infertility, the type and quality of treatment provided, and individual patient characteristics. Therefore, comparing pregnancy rates between different studies should be done cautiously, considering these potential confounding variables.

Prenatal ultrasonography, also known as obstetric ultrasound, is a medical diagnostic procedure that uses high-frequency sound waves to create images of the developing fetus, placenta, and amniotic fluid inside the uterus. It is a non-invasive and painless test that is widely used during pregnancy to monitor the growth and development of the fetus, detect any potential abnormalities or complications, and determine the due date.

During the procedure, a transducer (a small handheld device) is placed on the mother's abdomen and moved around to capture images from different angles. The sound waves travel through the mother's body and bounce back off the fetus, producing echoes that are then converted into electrical signals and displayed as images on a screen.

Prenatal ultrasonography can be performed at various stages of pregnancy, including early pregnancy to confirm the pregnancy and detect the number of fetuses, mid-pregnancy to assess the growth and development of the fetus, and late pregnancy to evaluate the position of the fetus and determine if it is head down or breech. It can also be used to guide invasive procedures such as amniocentesis or chorionic villus sampling.

Overall, prenatal ultrasonography is a valuable tool in modern obstetrics that helps ensure the health and well-being of both the mother and the developing fetus.

Spontaneous abortion, also known as miscarriage, is the unintentional expulsion of a nonviable fetus from the uterus before the 20th week of gestation. It is a common complication of early pregnancy, with most miscarriages occurring during the first trimester. Spontaneous abortion can have various causes, including chromosomal abnormalities, maternal health conditions, infections, hormonal imbalances, and structural issues of the uterus or cervix. In many cases, the exact cause may remain unknown.

The symptoms of spontaneous abortion can vary but often include vaginal bleeding, which may range from light spotting to heavy bleeding; abdominal pain or cramping; and the passing of tissue or clots from the vagina. While some miscarriages occur suddenly and are immediately noticeable, others may progress slowly over several days or even weeks.

In medical practice, healthcare providers often use specific terminology to describe different stages and types of spontaneous abortion. For example:

* Threatened abortion: Vaginal bleeding during early pregnancy, but the cervix remains closed, and there is no evidence of fetal demise or passing of tissue.
* Inevitable abortion: Vaginal bleeding with an open cervix, indicating that a miscarriage is imminent or already in progress.
* Incomplete abortion: The expulsion of some but not all products of conception from the uterus, requiring medical intervention to remove any remaining tissue.
* Complete abortion: The successful passage of all products of conception from the uterus, often confirmed through an ultrasound or pelvic examination.
* Missed abortion: The death of a fetus in the uterus without any expulsion of the products of conception, which may be discovered during routine prenatal care.
* Septic abortion: A rare and life-threatening complication of spontaneous abortion characterized by infection of the products of conception and the surrounding tissues, requiring prompt medical attention and antibiotic treatment.

Healthcare providers typically monitor patients who experience a spontaneous abortion to ensure that all products of conception have been expelled and that there are no complications, such as infection or excessive bleeding. In some cases, medication or surgical intervention may be necessary to remove any remaining tissue or address other issues related to the miscarriage. Counseling and support services are often available for individuals and couples who experience a spontaneous abortion, as they may face emotional challenges and concerns about future pregnancies.

'Pregnancy in Diabetics' refers to the condition where an individual with pre-existing diabetes mellitus becomes pregnant. This can be further categorized into two types:

1. Pre-gestational diabetes: This is when a woman is diagnosed with diabetes before she becomes pregnant. It includes both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. Proper control of blood sugar levels prior to conception and during pregnancy is crucial to reduce the risk of complications for both the mother and the baby.

2. Gestational diabetes: This is when a woman develops high blood sugar levels during pregnancy, typically in the second or third trimester. While it usually resolves after delivery, women with gestational diabetes have a higher risk of developing Type 2 diabetes later in life. Proper management of gestational diabetes is essential to ensure a healthy pregnancy and reduce the risk of complications for both the mother and the baby.

Neoplastic pregnancy complications refer to the abnormal growth of cells (neoplasia) that can occur during pregnancy. These growths can be benign or malignant and can arise from any type of tissue in the body. However, when they occur in pregnant women, they can pose unique challenges due to the potential effects on the developing fetus and the changes in the mother's body.

Some common neoplastic pregnancy complications include:

1. Gestational trophoblastic disease (GTD): This is a group of rare tumors that occur in the uterus during pregnancy. GTD can range from benign conditions like hydatidiform mole to malignant forms like choriocarcinoma.
2. Breast cancer: Pregnancy-associated breast cancer (PABC) is a type of breast cancer that occurs during pregnancy or within one year after delivery. It can be aggressive and challenging to diagnose due to the changes in the breast tissue during pregnancy.
3. Cervical cancer: Cervical cancer can occur during pregnancy, and its management depends on the stage of the disease and the gestational age. In some cases, treatment may need to be delayed until after delivery.
4. Lung cancer: Pregnancy does not increase the risk of lung cancer, but it can make diagnosis and treatment more challenging.
5. Melanoma: Melanoma is the most common malignant skin cancer during pregnancy. It can spread quickly and requires prompt treatment.

The management of neoplastic pregnancy complications depends on several factors, including the type and stage of the tumor, gestational age, and the patient's wishes. In some cases, surgery, chemotherapy, or radiation therapy may be necessary. However, these treatments can have potential risks to the developing fetus, so a multidisciplinary team of healthcare providers is often involved in the care of pregnant women with neoplastic complications.

Infectious pregnancy complications refer to infections that occur during pregnancy and can affect the mother, fetus, or both. These infections can lead to serious consequences such as preterm labor, low birth weight, birth defects, stillbirth, or even death. Some common infectious agents that can cause pregnancy complications include:

1. Bacteria: Examples include group B streptococcus, Escherichia coli, and Listeria monocytogenes, which can cause sepsis, meningitis, or pneumonia in the mother and lead to preterm labor or stillbirth.
2. Viruses: Examples include cytomegalovirus, rubella, varicella-zoster, and HIV, which can cause congenital anomalies, developmental delays, or transmission of the virus to the fetus.
3. Parasites: Examples include Toxoplasma gondii, which can cause severe neurological damage in the fetus if transmitted during pregnancy.
4. Fungi: Examples include Candida albicans, which can cause fungal infections in the mother and lead to preterm labor or stillbirth.

Preventive measures such as vaccination, good hygiene practices, and avoiding high-risk behaviors can help reduce the risk of infectious pregnancy complications. Prompt diagnosis and treatment of infections during pregnancy are also crucial to prevent adverse outcomes.

Multiple pregnancy is a type of gestation where more than one fetus is carried simultaneously in the uterus. The most common forms of multiple pregnancies are twins (two fetuses), triplets (three fetuses), and quadruplets (four fetuses). Multiple pregnancies can occur when a single fertilized egg splits into two or more embryos (monozygotic) or when more than one egg is released and gets fertilized during ovulation (dizygotic). The risk of multiple pregnancies increases with the use of assisted reproductive technologies, such as in vitro fertilization. Multiple pregnancies are associated with higher risks for both the mother and the fetuses, including preterm labor, low birth weight, and other complications.

A pregnancy test is a medical diagnostic tool used to determine whether or not a woman is pregnant. These tests detect the presence of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), a hormone produced by the placenta after fertilization. Pregnancy tests can be performed using a variety of methods, including urine tests and blood tests.

Urine pregnancy tests are typically performed at home and involve either dipping a test strip into a sample of urine or holding the strip under a stream of urine for several seconds. The test strip contains antibodies that react with hCG, producing a visual signal such as a line or plus sign if hCG is present.

Blood pregnancy tests are performed by a healthcare provider and can detect lower levels of hCG than urine tests. There are two types of blood pregnancy tests: qualitative and quantitative. Qualitative tests simply detect the presence or absence of hCG, while quantitative tests measure the exact amount of hCG present in the blood.

Pregnancy tests are generally very accurate when used correctly, but false positives and false negatives can occur. False positives may occur due to certain medical conditions or medications that contain hCG. False negatives may occur if the test is taken too early or if it is not performed correctly. It is important to follow the instructions carefully and consult with a healthcare provider if there is any uncertainty about the results.

The placenta is an organ that develops in the uterus during pregnancy and provides oxygen and nutrients to the growing baby through the umbilical cord. It also removes waste products from the baby's blood. The placenta attaches to the wall of the uterus, and the baby's side of the placenta contains many tiny blood vessels that connect to the baby's circulatory system. This allows for the exchange of oxygen, nutrients, and waste between the mother's and baby's blood. After the baby is born, the placenta is usually expelled from the uterus in a process called afterbirth.

Tubal pregnancy, also known as an ectopic pregnancy, is a type of pregnancy that occurs outside the uterus, usually in the fallopian tube. The fertilized egg implants and starts to develop in the tube instead of the uterine lining. This condition is not viable and can be life-threatening if not treated promptly.

The symptoms of a tubal pregnancy may include abdominal pain, vaginal bleeding, shoulder pain, dizziness or fainting, and pelvic discomfort or tenderness. If you suspect that you have a tubal pregnancy, it is important to seek medical attention immediately. Treatment options for tubal pregnancies include medication or surgery to remove the embryo and repair or remove the affected fallopian tube.

Pre-eclampsia is a pregnancy-related disorder, typically characterized by the onset of high blood pressure (hypertension) and damage to organs, such as the kidneys, after the 20th week of pregnancy. It is often accompanied by proteinuria, which is the presence of excess protein in the urine. Pre-eclampsia can lead to serious complications for both the mother and the baby if left untreated or unmanaged.

The exact causes of pre-eclampsia are not fully understood, but it is believed that placental issues, genetic factors, and immune system problems may contribute to its development. Risk factors include first-time pregnancies, history of pre-eclampsia in previous pregnancies, chronic hypertension, obesity, older age (35 or older), and assisted reproductive technology (ART) pregnancies.

Pre-eclampsia can progress to a more severe form called eclampsia, which is characterized by the onset of seizures. HELLP syndrome, another severe complication, involves hemolysis (breaking down of red blood cells), elevated liver enzymes, and low platelet count.

Early detection and management of pre-eclampsia are crucial to prevent severe complications. Regular prenatal care, including frequent blood pressure checks and urine tests, can help identify early signs of the condition. Treatment typically involves close monitoring, medication to lower blood pressure, corticosteroids to promote fetal lung maturity, and, in some cases, delivery of the baby if the mother's or baby's health is at risk.

A newborn infant is a baby who is within the first 28 days of life. This period is also referred to as the neonatal period. Newborns require specialized care and attention due to their immature bodily systems and increased vulnerability to various health issues. They are closely monitored for signs of well-being, growth, and development during this critical time.

Pregnancy in adolescence, also known as teenage pregnancy, refers to a pregnancy that occurs in females under the age of 20. This can be further categorized into early adolescent pregnancy (occurring between ages 10-14), middle adolescent pregnancy (occurring between ages 15-17), and late adolescent pregnancy (occurring between ages 18-19). Teenage pregnancy is associated with higher risks of complications for both the mother and the baby, including preterm birth, low birth weight, and increased risk of neonatal mortality. Additionally, teenage mothers are more likely to drop out of school and face socioeconomic challenges.

High-risk pregnancy is a term used to describe a situation where the mother or the fetus has an increased risk of developing complications during pregnancy, labor, delivery, or in the postpartum period. These risks may be due to pre-existing medical conditions in the mother, such as diabetes, hypertension, heart disease, kidney disease, autoimmune disorders, or infectious diseases like HIV/AIDS. Other factors that can contribute to a high-risk pregnancy include advanced maternal age (35 years and older), obesity, multiple gestations (twins, triplets, etc.), fetal growth restriction, placental issues, and a history of previous pregnancy complications or preterm labor.

High-risk pregnancies require specialized care and monitoring by healthcare professionals, often involving maternal-fetal medicine specialists, obstetricians, perinatologists, and neonatologists. Regular prenatal care, frequent checkups, ultrasound monitoring, and sometimes additional testing and interventions may be necessary to ensure the best possible outcomes for both the mother and the baby.

"Pregnancy proteins" is not a standard medical term, but it may refer to specific proteins that are produced or have increased levels during pregnancy. Two common pregnancy-related proteins are:

1. Human Chorionic Gonadotropin (hCG): A hormone produced by the placenta shortly after fertilization. It is often detected in urine or blood tests to confirm pregnancy. Its primary function is to maintain the corpus luteum, which produces progesterone and estrogen during early pregnancy until the placenta takes over these functions.

2. Pregnancy-Specific beta-1 Glycoprotein (SP1): A protein produced by the placental trophoblasts during pregnancy. Its function is not well understood, but it may play a role in implantation, placentation, and protection against the mother's immune system. SP1 levels increase throughout pregnancy and are used as a marker for fetal growth and well-being.

These proteins have clinical significance in monitoring pregnancy progression, detecting potential complications, and diagnosing certain pregnancy-related conditions.

Induced abortion is a medical procedure that intentionally terminates a pregnancy before the fetus can survive outside the womb. It can be performed either surgically or medically through the use of medications. The timing of an induced abortion is typically based on the gestational age of the pregnancy, with different methods used at different stages.

The most common surgical procedure for induced abortion is vacuum aspiration, which is usually performed during the first trimester (up to 12-13 weeks of gestation). This procedure involves dilating the cervix and using a vacuum device to remove the pregnancy tissue from the uterus. Other surgical procedures, such as dilation and evacuation (D&E), may be used in later stages of pregnancy.

Medical abortion involves the use of medications to induce the termination of a pregnancy. The most common regimen involves the use of two drugs: mifepristone and misoprostol. Mifepristone works by blocking the action of progesterone, a hormone necessary for maintaining pregnancy. Misoprostol causes the uterus to contract and expel the pregnancy tissue. This method is typically used during the first 10 weeks of gestation.

Induced abortion is a safe and common medical procedure, with low rates of complications when performed by trained healthcare providers in appropriate settings. Access to induced abortion varies widely around the world, with some countries restricting or prohibiting the practice entirely.

Hematologic pregnancy complications refer to disorders related to the blood and blood-forming tissues that occur during pregnancy. These complications can have serious consequences for both the mother and the fetus if not properly managed. Some common hematologic pregnancy complications include:

1. Anemia: A condition characterized by a decrease in the number of red blood cells or hemoglobin in the blood, which can lead to fatigue, weakness, and shortness of breath. Iron-deficiency anemia is the most common type of anemia during pregnancy.
2. Thrombocytopenia: A condition characterized by a decrease in the number of platelets (cells that help blood clot) in the blood. Mild thrombocytopenia is relatively common during pregnancy, but severe thrombocytopenia can increase the risk of bleeding during delivery.
3. Gestational thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (GTTP): A rare but serious disorder that can cause blood clots to form in small blood vessels throughout the body, leading to a decrease in the number of platelets and red blood cells. GTTP can cause serious complications such as stroke, kidney failure, and even death if not promptly diagnosed and treated.
4. Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC): A condition characterized by abnormal clotting and bleeding throughout the body. DIC can be triggered by various conditions such as severe infections, pregnancy complications, or cancer.
5. Hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelets (HELLP) syndrome: A serious complication of pregnancy that can cause damage to the liver and lead to bleeding. HELLP syndrome is often associated with preeclampsia, a condition characterized by high blood pressure and damage to organs such as the liver and kidneys.

It's important for pregnant women to receive regular prenatal care to monitor for these and other potential complications, and to seek prompt medical attention if any concerning symptoms arise.

Trophoblasts are specialized cells that make up the outer layer of a blastocyst, which is a hollow ball of cells that forms in the earliest stages of embryonic development. In humans, this process occurs about 5-6 days after fertilization. The blastocyst consists of an inner cell mass (which will eventually become the embryo) and an outer layer of trophoblasts.

Trophoblasts play a crucial role in implantation, which is the process by which the blastocyst attaches to and invades the lining of the uterus. Once implanted, the trophoblasts differentiate into two main layers: the cytotrophoblasts (which are closer to the inner cell mass) and the syncytiotrophoblasts (which form a multinucleated layer that is in direct contact with the maternal tissues).

The cytotrophoblasts proliferate and fuse to form the syncytiotrophoblasts, which have several important functions. They secrete enzymes that help to degrade and remodel the extracellular matrix of the uterine lining, allowing the blastocyst to implant more deeply. They also form a barrier between the maternal and fetal tissues, helping to protect the developing embryo from the mother's immune system.

Additionally, trophoblasts are responsible for the formation of the placenta, which provides nutrients and oxygen to the developing fetus and removes waste products. The syncytiotrophoblasts in particular play a key role in this process by secreting hormones such as human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), which helps to maintain pregnancy, and by forming blood vessels that allow for the exchange of nutrients and waste between the mother and fetus.

Abnormalities in trophoblast development or function can lead to a variety of pregnancy-related complications, including preeclampsia, intrauterine growth restriction, and gestational trophoblastic diseases such as hydatidiform moles and choriocarcinomas.

Fetal death, also known as stillbirth or intrauterine fetal demise, is defined as the death of a fetus at 20 weeks of gestation or later. The criteria for defining fetal death may vary slightly by country and jurisdiction, but in general, it refers to the loss of a pregnancy after the point at which the fetus is considered viable outside the womb.

Fetal death can occur for a variety of reasons, including chromosomal abnormalities, placental problems, maternal health conditions, infections, and umbilical cord accidents. In some cases, the cause of fetal death may remain unknown.

The diagnosis of fetal death is typically made through ultrasound or other imaging tests, which can confirm the absence of a heartbeat or movement in the fetus. Once fetal death has been diagnosed, medical professionals will work with the parents to determine the best course of action for managing the pregnancy and delivering the fetus. This may involve waiting for labor to begin naturally, inducing labor, or performing a cesarean delivery.

Experiencing a fetal death can be a very difficult and emotional experience for parents, and it is important for them to receive supportive care from their healthcare providers, family members, and friends. Grief counseling and support groups may also be helpful in coping with the loss.

Fetal diseases are medical conditions or abnormalities that affect a fetus during pregnancy. These diseases can be caused by genetic factors, environmental influences, or a combination of both. They can range from mild to severe and may impact various organ systems in the developing fetus. Examples of fetal diseases include congenital heart defects, neural tube defects, chromosomal abnormalities such as Down syndrome, and infectious diseases such as toxoplasmosis or rubella. Fetal diseases can be diagnosed through prenatal testing, including ultrasound, amniocentesis, and chorionic villus sampling. Treatment options may include medication, surgery, or delivery of the fetus, depending on the nature and severity of the disease.

Prenatal diagnosis is the medical testing of fetuses, embryos, or pregnant women to detect the presence or absence of certain genetic disorders or birth defects. These tests can be performed through various methods such as chorionic villus sampling (CVS), amniocentesis, or ultrasound. The goal of prenatal diagnosis is to provide early information about the health of the fetus so that parents and healthcare providers can make informed decisions about pregnancy management and newborn care. It allows for early intervention, treatment, or planning for the child's needs after birth.

Unplanned pregnancy is a pregnancy that is not intended or expected by the woman or couple. It is also sometimes referred to as an "unintended" or "unwanted" pregnancy. This can occur when contraceptive methods fail or are not used, or when there is a lack of knowledge about or access to effective family planning resources. Unplanned pregnancies can present various physical, emotional, and social challenges for the individuals involved, and may also have implications for public health and societal well-being. It's important to note that unplanned pregnancies can still result in wanted and loved children, but the circumstances surrounding their conception may bring additional stressors and considerations.

Prenatal care is a type of preventive healthcare that focuses on providing regular check-ups and medical care to pregnant women, with the aim of ensuring the best possible health outcomes for both the mother and the developing fetus. It involves routine prenatal screenings and tests, such as blood pressure monitoring, urine analysis, weight checks, and ultrasounds, to assess the progress of the pregnancy and identify any potential health issues or complications early on.

Prenatal care also includes education and counseling on topics such as nutrition, exercise, and lifestyle choices that can affect pregnancy outcomes. It may involve referrals to specialists, such as obstetricians, perinatologists, or maternal-fetal medicine specialists, for high-risk pregnancies.

Overall, prenatal care is an essential component of ensuring a healthy pregnancy and reducing the risk of complications during childbirth and beyond.

Unwanted pregnancy is a situation where a person becomes pregnant despite not planning or desiring to conceive at that time. This can occur due to various reasons such as lack of access to effective contraception, failure of contraceptive methods, sexual assault, or a change in circumstances that makes the pregnancy untimely or inconvenient. Unwanted pregnancies can have significant physical, emotional, and socioeconomic impacts on individuals and families. It is important to address unwanted pregnancies through comprehensive sexuality education, access to affordable and effective contraception, and supportive services for those who experience unintended pregnancies.

Maternal-fetal exchange, also known as maternal-fetal transport or placental transfer, refers to the physiological process by which various substances are exchanged between the mother and fetus through the placenta. This exchange includes the transfer of oxygen and nutrients from the mother's bloodstream to the fetal bloodstream, as well as the removal of waste products and carbon dioxide from the fetal bloodstream to the mother's bloodstream.

The process occurs via passive diffusion, facilitated diffusion, and active transport mechanisms across the placental barrier, which is composed of fetal capillary endothelial cells, the extracellular matrix, and the syncytiotrophoblast layer of the placenta. The maternal-fetal exchange is crucial for the growth, development, and survival of the fetus throughout pregnancy.

Chorionic villi are finger-like projections of the chorion, which is the outermost extraembryonic membrane in a developing embryo. These structures are composed of both fetal and maternal tissues and play a crucial role in the early stages of pregnancy by providing a site for exchange of nutrients and waste products between the mother and the developing fetus.

Chorionic villi contain fetal blood vessels that are surrounded by stromal cells, trophoblasts, and connective tissue. They are formed during the process of implantation, when the fertilized egg attaches to the uterine wall. The chorionic villi continue to grow and multiply as the placenta develops, eventually forming a highly vascular and specialized organ that supports fetal growth and development throughout pregnancy.

One important function of chorionic villi is to serve as the site for the production of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), a hormone that can be detected in the mother's blood and urine during early pregnancy. This hormone plays a critical role in maintaining pregnancy by signaling the corpus luteum to continue producing progesterone, which helps to prevent menstruation and support fetal growth.

Abnormalities in chorionic villi can lead to various pregnancy complications, such as miscarriage, stillbirth, or intrauterine growth restriction. For this reason, chorionic villus sampling (CVS) is a diagnostic procedure that may be performed during early pregnancy to obtain fetal cells for genetic testing and diagnosis of chromosomal abnormalities or other genetic disorders.

The decidua is a specialized type of tissue that lines the uterus during pregnancy. It forms after the implantation of a fertilized egg (embryo) into the uterine lining, and it plays an important role in supporting the growth and development of the embryo and fetus.

The decidua is composed of several layers, including the decidual capsularis, which surrounds the embryo, and the decidual parietalis, which lines the rest of the uterus. The tissue is rich in blood vessels and contains a variety of immune cells that help to protect the developing fetus from infection.

During pregnancy, the decidua produces various hormones and growth factors that support the growth of the placenta, which provides nutrients and oxygen to the fetus. After the birth of the baby, the decidua is shed along with the placenta in a process called childbirth or parturition.

It's worth noting that abnormalities in the decidua can contribute to pregnancy complications such as preeclampsia, preterm labor, and miscarriage.

A fetus is the developing offspring in a mammal, from the end of the embryonic period (approximately 8 weeks after fertilization in humans) until birth. In humans, the fetal stage of development starts from the eleventh week of pregnancy and continues until childbirth, which is termed as full-term pregnancy at around 37 to 40 weeks of gestation. During this time, the organ systems become fully developed and the body grows in size. The fetus is surrounded by the amniotic fluid within the amniotic sac and is connected to the placenta via the umbilical cord, through which it receives nutrients and oxygen from the mother. Regular prenatal care is essential during this period to monitor the growth and development of the fetus and ensure a healthy pregnancy and delivery.

Fetal development is the process in which a fertilized egg grows and develops into a fetus, which is a developing human being from the end of the eighth week after conception until birth. This complex process involves many different stages, including:

1. Fertilization: The union of a sperm and an egg to form a zygote.
2. Implantation: The movement of the zygote into the lining of the uterus, where it will begin to grow and develop.
3. Formation of the embryo: The development of the basic structures of the body, including the neural tube (which becomes the brain and spinal cord), heart, gastrointestinal tract, and sensory organs.
4. Differentiation of tissues and organs: The process by which different cells and tissues become specialized to perform specific functions.
5. Growth and maturation: The continued growth and development of the fetus, including the formation of bones, muscles, and other tissues.

Fetal development is a complex and highly regulated process that involves the interaction of genetic and environmental factors. Proper nutrition, prenatal care, and avoidance of harmful substances such as tobacco, alcohol, and drugs are important for ensuring healthy fetal development.

Fetal growth retardation, also known as intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), is a condition in which a fetus fails to grow at the expected rate during pregnancy. This can be caused by various factors such as maternal health problems, placental insufficiency, chromosomal abnormalities, and genetic disorders. The fetus may be smaller than expected for its gestational age, have reduced movement, and may be at risk for complications during labor and delivery. It is important to monitor fetal growth and development closely throughout pregnancy to detect any potential issues early on and provide appropriate medical interventions.

"Drug-induced abnormalities" refer to physical or physiological changes that occur as a result of taking medication or drugs. These abnormalities can affect various organs and systems in the body and can range from minor symptoms, such as nausea or dizziness, to more serious conditions, such as liver damage or heart rhythm disturbances.

Drug-induced abnormalities can occur for several reasons, including:

1. Direct toxicity: Some drugs can directly damage cells and tissues in the body, leading to abnormalities.
2. Altered metabolism: Drugs can interfere with normal metabolic processes in the body, leading to the accumulation of harmful substances or the depletion of essential nutrients.
3. Hormonal imbalances: Some drugs can affect hormone levels in the body, leading to abnormalities.
4. Allergic reactions: Some people may have allergic reactions to certain drugs, which can cause a range of symptoms, including rashes, swelling, and difficulty breathing.
5. Interactions with other drugs: Taking multiple medications or drugs at the same time can increase the risk of drug-induced abnormalities.

It is important for healthcare providers to monitor patients closely for signs of drug-induced abnormalities and to adjust medication dosages or switch to alternative treatments as necessary. Patients should also inform their healthcare providers of any symptoms they experience while taking medication, as these may be related to drug-induced abnormalities.

Twin pregnancy refers to a type of multiple pregnancy where a woman is carrying two fetuses simultaneously. There are two types of twin pregnancies: monozygotic (identical) and dizygotic (fraternal). Monoygotic twins occur when a single fertilized egg (zygote) splits and develops into two separate embryos, resulting in identical twins who share the same genetic material. Dizygotic twins, on the other hand, result from the fertilization of two separate eggs by two different sperm cells, leading to non-identical twins who have their own unique genetic material.

Twin pregnancies are associated with higher risks of complications compared to singleton pregnancies, including preterm labor, low birth weight, gestational diabetes, and preeclampsia. Close monitoring by healthcare providers is essential to ensure the best possible outcomes for both the mother and the twins.

Birth weight refers to the first weight of a newborn infant, usually taken immediately after birth. It is a critical vital sign that indicates the baby's health status and is used as a predictor for various short-term and long-term health outcomes.

Typically, a full-term newborn's weight ranges from 5.5 to 8.8 pounds (2.5 to 4 kg), although normal birth weights can vary significantly based on factors such as gestational age, genetics, maternal health, and nutrition. Low birth weight is defined as less than 5.5 pounds (2.5 kg), while high birth weight is greater than 8.8 pounds (4 kg).

Low birth weight babies are at a higher risk for various medical complications, including respiratory distress syndrome, jaundice, infections, and developmental delays. High birth weight babies may face challenges with delivery, increased risk of obesity, and potential metabolic issues later in life. Regular prenatal care is essential to monitor fetal growth and ensure a healthy pregnancy and optimal birth weight for the baby.

"Prenatal exposure delayed effects" refer to the adverse health outcomes or symptoms that become apparent in an individual during their development or later in life, which are caused by exposure to certain environmental factors or substances while they were still in the womb. These effects may not be immediately observable at birth and can take weeks, months, years, or even decades to manifest. They can result from maternal exposure to various agents such as infectious diseases, medications, illicit drugs, tobacco smoke, alcohol, or environmental pollutants during pregnancy. The delayed effects can impact multiple organ systems and may include physical, cognitive, behavioral, and developmental abnormalities. It is important to note that the risk and severity of these effects can depend on several factors, including the timing, duration, and intensity of the exposure, as well as the individual's genetic susceptibility.

The uterus, also known as the womb, is a hollow, muscular organ located in the female pelvic cavity, between the bladder and the rectum. It has a thick, middle layer called the myometrium, which is composed of smooth muscle tissue, and an inner lining called the endometrium, which provides a nurturing environment for the fertilized egg to develop into a fetus during pregnancy.

The uterus is where the baby grows and develops until it is ready for birth through the cervix, which is the lower, narrow part of the uterus that opens into the vagina. The uterus plays a critical role in the menstrual cycle as well, by shedding its lining each month if pregnancy does not occur.

Parasitic pregnancy complications refer to a rare condition where a parasitic twin takes over the development of the dominant twin's reproductive system and becomes pregnant. This condition is also known as fetus in fetu or vanishing twin syndrome with a parasitic twin. The parasitic twin may have some organs developed, but it is not fully formed and relies on the dominant twin for survival. The pregnancy can pose risks to the dominant twin, such as abnormal growth patterns, organ damage, and complications during childbirth. This condition is usually detected during prenatal ultrasound examinations.

Amniotic fluid is a clear, slightly yellowish liquid that surrounds and protects the developing baby in the uterus. It is enclosed within the amniotic sac, which is a thin-walled sac that forms around the embryo during early pregnancy. The fluid is composed of fetal urine, lung secretions, and fluids that cross over from the mother's bloodstream through the placenta.

Amniotic fluid plays several important roles in pregnancy:

1. It provides a shock-absorbing cushion for the developing baby, protecting it from injury caused by movement or external forces.
2. It helps to maintain a constant temperature around the fetus, keeping it warm and comfortable.
3. It allows the developing baby to move freely within the uterus, promoting normal growth and development of the muscles and bones.
4. It provides a source of nutrients and hydration for the fetus, helping to support its growth and development.
5. It helps to prevent infection by providing a barrier between the fetus and the outside world.

Throughout pregnancy, the volume of amniotic fluid increases as the fetus grows. The amount of fluid typically peaks around 34-36 weeks of gestation, after which it begins to gradually decrease. Abnormalities in the volume of amniotic fluid can indicate problems with the developing baby or the pregnancy itself, and may require medical intervention.

Maternal age is a term used to describe the age of a woman at the time she becomes pregnant or gives birth. It is often used in medical and epidemiological contexts to discuss the potential risks, complications, and outcomes associated with pregnancy and childbirth at different stages of a woman's reproductive years.

Advanced maternal age typically refers to women who become pregnant or give birth at 35 years of age or older. This group faces an increased risk for certain chromosomal abnormalities, such as Down syndrome, and other pregnancy-related complications, including gestational diabetes, preeclampsia, and cesarean delivery.

On the other end of the spectrum, adolescent pregnancies (those that occur in women under 20 years old) also come with their own set of potential risks and complications, such as preterm birth, low birth weight, and anemia.

It's important to note that while maternal age can influence pregnancy outcomes, many other factors – including genetics, lifestyle choices, and access to quality healthcare – can also play a significant role in determining the health of both mother and baby during pregnancy and childbirth.

Non-steroidal abortifacient agents are medications or substances that can cause abortion by interfering with the normal functioning of the hormones in the reproductive system. These agents do not contain steroids and work primarily by preventing the implantation of a fertilized egg in the uterus or by causing the shedding of the uterine lining, leading to the termination of an early pregnancy.

Examples of non-steroidal abortifacient agents include:

1. Mifepristone (RU-486): This medication works by blocking the action of progesterone, a hormone necessary for maintaining pregnancy. When used in combination with another medication called misoprostol, it can cause an abortion during the early stages of pregnancy.
2. Misoprostol: This medication is primarily used to prevent and treat stomach ulcers but can also be used as an abortifacient agent. It causes uterine contractions and cervical dilation, leading to the expulsion of the contents of the uterus.
3. High-dose estrogen and progestin: These hormones can interfere with the normal functioning of the reproductive system and cause an early abortion when taken in high doses.
4. Herbal remedies: Certain herbs, such as pennyroyal, tansy, and savin, have been used traditionally as abortifacient agents. However, their effectiveness and safety are not well-established, and they can cause serious side effects or even death when taken in large quantities.

It is important to note that the use of non-steroidal abortifacient agents for the purpose of inducing an abortion should only be done under the supervision of a licensed healthcare provider, as there are potential risks and complications associated with their use. Additionally, some of these agents may be restricted or illegal in certain jurisdictions, so it is essential to comply with local laws and regulations regarding their use.

In medical terms, parity refers to the number of times a woman has given birth to a viable fetus, usually defined as a pregnancy that reaches at least 20 weeks' gestation. It is often used in obstetrics and gynecology to describe a woman's childbearing history and to assess potential risks associated with childbirth.

Parity is typically categorized as follows:

* Nulliparous: A woman who has never given birth to a viable fetus.
* Primiparous: A woman who has given birth to one viable fetus.
* Multiparous: A woman who has given birth to more than one viable fetus.

In some cases, parity may also consider the number of pregnancies that resulted in stillbirths or miscarriages, although this is not always the case. It's important to note that parity does not necessarily reflect the total number of pregnancies a woman has had, only those that resulted in viable births.

Pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH), also known as gestational hypertension, is a condition characterized by the new onset of high blood pressure (≥140 mm Hg systolic or ≥90 mm Hg diastolic) after 20 weeks of pregnancy in a woman who was normotensive before. It can sometimes progress to more severe conditions like preeclampsia and eclampsia, which are associated with damage to other organ systems such as the liver and kidneys.

PIH is typically classified into two types:

1. Gestational hypertension: This is when a woman develops high blood pressure after 20 weeks of pregnancy without any protein in the urine or evidence of damage to other organ systems. Women with gestational hypertension are at increased risk for preeclampsia and may require closer monitoring.

2. Preeclampsia: This is a more severe form of PIH, characterized by high blood pressure and proteinuria (≥0.3 g in a 24-hour urine collection) after 20 weeks of pregnancy. Preeclampsia can also involve damage to other organ systems, such as the liver, kidneys, or brain, and may progress to eclampsia, a life-threatening condition characterized by seizures.

The exact causes of PIH are not fully understood, but it is thought to be related to problems with the development and function of the blood vessels that supply the placenta. Risk factors for developing PIH include first-time pregnancies, obesity, older age, a history of chronic hypertension or kidney disease, and carrying multiples (twins, triplets, etc.).

Treatment for PIH depends on the severity of the condition and the gestational age of the pregnancy. In mild cases, close monitoring of blood pressure, urine protein levels, and fetal growth may be sufficient. More severe cases may require medication to lower blood pressure, corticosteroids to promote fetal lung maturity, or early delivery of the baby to prevent further complications.

"Maternal exposure" is a medical term that refers to the contact or interaction of a pregnant woman with various environmental factors, such as chemicals, radiation, infectious agents, or physical environments, which could potentially have an impact on the developing fetus. This exposure can occur through different routes, including inhalation, ingestion, dermal contact, or even transplacentally. The effects of maternal exposure on the fetus can vary widely depending on the type, duration, and intensity of the exposure, as well as the stage of pregnancy at which it occurs. It is important to monitor and minimize maternal exposure to potentially harmful substances or environments during pregnancy to ensure the best possible outcomes for both the mother and developing fetus.

Crown-rump length (CRL) is a medical measurement used in obstetrics to estimate the age of a developing fetus. It refers to the length from the top of the head (crown) to the bottom of the buttocks (rump). This measurement is typically taken during an ultrasound examination in the first trimester of pregnancy, between 8 and 13 weeks of gestation.

The CRL is used to calculate the estimated due date and to monitor fetal growth and development. It can also help identify potential issues or abnormalities in fetal development. As the pregnancy progresses, other measurements such as head circumference, abdominal circumference, and femur length are used to assess fetal growth and development.

Prolonged pregnancy, also known as post-term pregnancy, is a medical condition defined as a pregnancy that continues beyond 42 weeks (294 days) of gestation from the first day of the last menstrual period. It is important to note that this definition is based on the estimated date of delivery and not the actual conception date. Prolonged pregnancies are associated with increased risks for both the mother and the fetus, including stillbirth, meconium aspiration, fetal distress, and difficulty during labor and delivery. Therefore, healthcare providers closely monitor pregnant women who reach 41 weeks of gestation to ensure timely delivery if necessary.

A premature birth is defined as the delivery of a baby before 37 weeks of gestation. This can occur spontaneously or as a result of medical intervention due to maternal or fetal complications. Premature babies, also known as preemies, may face various health challenges depending on how early they are born and their weight at birth. These challenges can include respiratory distress syndrome, jaundice, anemia, issues with feeding and digestion, developmental delays, and vision problems. With advancements in medical care and neonatal intensive care units (NICUs), many premature babies survive and go on to lead healthy lives.

Pregnancy maintenance refers to the ongoing process and care required to support and sustain a healthy pregnancy until childbirth. This includes regular prenatal check-ups to monitor the health of both the mother and the developing fetus, proper nutrition, regular exercise, and avoiding harmful behaviors such as smoking or consuming alcohol. In some cases, pregnancy maintenance may also include medical interventions such as hormone treatments or bed rest. The goal of pregnancy maintenance is to ensure the best possible outcome for both the mother and the baby.

"Abdominal pregnancy" is a type of ectopic pregnancy, which is a rare and potentially life-threatening condition in which a fertilized egg implants outside the uterus. In an abdominal pregnancy, the embryo implants and grows in the abdominal cavity, rather than in the fallopian tube or uterus.

Abdominal pregnancies can be caused by various factors, including previous abdominal surgeries, pelvic inflammatory disease, or a history of ectopic pregnancies. They are often difficult to diagnose and can pose significant risks to both the mother and the fetus, as they can lead to internal bleeding, infection, and other complications.

Treatment for abdominal pregnancy typically involves surgery to remove the embryo and repair any damage to surrounding organs. In some cases, it may be possible to preserve the fallopian tube and uterus, but in others, removal of one or both may be necessary. It is important for women who have had an ectopic pregnancy to receive appropriate follow-up care and counseling to reduce their risk of future ectopic pregnancies.

Prospective studies, also known as longitudinal studies, are a type of cohort study in which data is collected forward in time, following a group of individuals who share a common characteristic or exposure over a period of time. The researchers clearly define the study population and exposure of interest at the beginning of the study and follow up with the participants to determine the outcomes that develop over time. This type of study design allows for the investigation of causal relationships between exposures and outcomes, as well as the identification of risk factors and the estimation of disease incidence rates. Prospective studies are particularly useful in epidemiology and medical research when studying diseases with long latency periods or rare outcomes.

A Cesarean section, often referred to as a C-section, is a surgical procedure used to deliver a baby. It involves making an incision through the mother's abdomen and uterus to remove the baby. This procedure may be necessary when a vaginal delivery would put the mother or the baby at risk.

There are several reasons why a C-section might be recommended, including:

* The baby is in a breech position (feet first) or a transverse position (sideways) and cannot be turned to a normal head-down position.
* The baby is too large to safely pass through the mother's birth canal.
* The mother has a medical condition, such as heart disease or high blood pressure, that could make vaginal delivery risky.
* The mother has an infection, such as HIV or herpes, that could be passed to the baby during a vaginal delivery.
* The labor is not progressing and there are concerns about the health of the mother or the baby.

C-sections are generally safe for both the mother and the baby, but like any surgery, they do carry some risks. These can include infection, bleeding, blood clots, and injury to nearby organs. In addition, women who have a C-section are more likely to experience complications in future pregnancies, such as placenta previa or uterine rupture.

If you have questions about whether a C-section is necessary for your delivery, it's important to discuss your options with your healthcare provider.

Chorionic Gonadotropin, beta Subunit, Human (β-hCG) is a protein that is produced by the placenta during pregnancy. It is a component of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), which is a hormone that is composed of two subunits: alpha and beta. The β-hCG subunit is specific to hCG and is not found in other hormones, making it a useful marker for pregnancy and certain medical conditions.

During early pregnancy, the levels of β-hCG increase rapidly and can be detected in the blood and urine. This has led to the development of pregnancy tests that detect the presence of β-hCG to confirm pregnancy. In addition to its role in pregnancy, β-hCG is also used as a tumor marker for certain types of cancer, such as germ cell tumors and choriocarcinoma.

Elevated levels of β-hCG may indicate the presence of a molar pregnancy, a condition in which a fertilized egg implants in the uterus but does not develop properly. In some cases, a molar pregnancy can become cancerous and require treatment. Therefore, monitoring β-hCG levels during pregnancy is important for detecting any potential complications.

Embryo implantation is the process by which a fertilized egg, or embryo, becomes attached to the wall of the uterus (endometrium) and begins to receive nutrients from the mother's blood supply. This process typically occurs about 6-10 days after fertilization and is a critical step in the establishment of a successful pregnancy.

During implantation, the embryo secretes enzymes that help it to burrow into the endometrium, while the endometrium responds by producing receptors for the embryo's enzymes and increasing blood flow to the area. The embryo then begins to grow and develop, eventually forming the placenta, which will provide nutrients and oxygen to the developing fetus throughout pregnancy.

Implantation is a complex process that requires precise timing and coordination between the embryo and the mother's body. Factors such as age, hormonal imbalances, and uterine abnormalities can affect implantation and increase the risk of miscarriage or difficulty becoming pregnant.

Fertilization in vitro, also known as in-vitro fertilization (IVF), is a medical procedure where an egg (oocyte) and sperm are combined in a laboratory dish to facilitate fertilization. The fertilized egg (embryo) is then transferred to a uterus with the hope of establishing a successful pregnancy. This procedure is often used when other assisted reproductive technologies have been unsuccessful or are not applicable, such as in cases of blocked fallopian tubes, severe male factor infertility, and unexplained infertility. The process involves ovarian stimulation, egg retrieval, fertilization, embryo culture, and embryo transfer. In some cases, additional techniques such as intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) or preimplantation genetic testing (PGT) may be used to increase the chances of success.

A therapeutic abortion is the deliberate termination of a pregnancy before viability (the ability of the fetus to survive outside the womb), which is generally considered to be around 24 weeks of gestation. The term "therapeutic" is used to describe abortions that are performed for medical reasons, such as to protect the life or health of the pregnant individual, or in cases where the fetus has a severe abnormality and cannot survive outside the womb.

Therapeutic abortions may be recommended in situations where continuing the pregnancy poses a significant risk to the health or life of the pregnant individual. For example, if a pregnant person has a serious medical condition such as heart disease, cancer, or severe pre-eclampsia, continuing the pregnancy could worsen their condition and put them at risk of serious complications or even death. In these cases, a therapeutic abortion may be necessary to protect the health or life of the pregnant individual.

Therapeutic abortions may also be recommended in cases where the fetus has a severe abnormality that is not compatible with life outside the womb. For example, if the fetus has a condition such as anencephaly (a neural tube defect where the brain and skull do not form properly), or a chromosomal abnormality such as Trisomy 13 or 18, continuing the pregnancy may result in a stillbirth or a short, painful life for the infant after birth. In these cases, a therapeutic abortion may be considered a compassionate option to prevent unnecessary suffering.

It's important to note that the decision to undergo a therapeutic abortion is a deeply personal one, and should be made in consultation with medical professionals and trusted family members or support networks. Ultimately, the decision should be based on what is best for the physical and emotional health of the pregnant individual, taking into account their values, beliefs, and circumstances.

The medical definition of "Habitual Abortion" refers to a woman who has three or more consecutive pregnancies that end in spontaneous miscarriages before 20 weeks of gestation. The cause of habitual abortions can be difficult to determine and may involve genetic, anatomical, hormonal, or immune system factors. Treatment is often aimed at addressing any underlying issues that may be contributing to the recurrent miscarriages. It's important to note that the terminology has changed over time and the term "recurrent pregnancy loss" is now more commonly used in place of "habitual abortion".

Premature obstetric labor, also known as preterm labor, is defined as regular contractions leading to cervical changes that begin before 37 weeks of gestation. This condition can result in premature birth and potentially complications for the newborn, depending on how early the delivery occurs. It's important to note that premature labor requires medical attention and intervention to try to stop or delay it, if possible, to allow for further fetal development.

Congenital abnormalities, also known as birth defects, are structural or functional anomalies that are present at birth. These abnormalities can develop at any point during fetal development, and they can affect any part of the body. They can be caused by genetic factors, environmental influences, or a combination of both.

Congenital abnormalities can range from mild to severe and may include structural defects such as heart defects, neural tube defects, and cleft lip and palate, as well as functional defects such as intellectual disabilities and sensory impairments. Some congenital abnormalities may be visible at birth, while others may not become apparent until later in life.

In some cases, congenital abnormalities may be detected through prenatal testing, such as ultrasound or amniocentesis. In other cases, they may not be diagnosed until after the baby is born. Treatment for congenital abnormalities varies depending on the type and severity of the defect, and may include surgery, therapy, medication, or a combination of these approaches.

Embryo transfer is a medical procedure that involves the transfer of an embryo, which is typically created through in vitro fertilization (IVF), into the uterus of a woman with the aim of establishing a pregnancy. The embryo may be created using the intended parent's own sperm and eggs or those from donors. After fertilization and early cell division, the resulting embryo is transferred into the uterus of the recipient mother through a thin catheter that is inserted through the cervix. This procedure is typically performed under ultrasound guidance to ensure proper placement of the embryo. Embryo transfer is a key step in assisted reproductive technology (ART) and is often used as a treatment for infertility.

Down syndrome is a genetic disorder caused by the presence of all or part of a third copy of chromosome 21. It is characterized by intellectual and developmental disabilities, distinctive facial features, and sometimes physical growth delays and health problems. The condition affects approximately one in every 700 babies born in the United States.

Individuals with Down syndrome have varying degrees of cognitive impairment, ranging from mild to moderate or severe. They may also have delayed development, including late walking and talking, and may require additional support and education services throughout their lives.

People with Down syndrome are at increased risk for certain health conditions, such as congenital heart defects, respiratory infections, hearing loss, vision problems, gastrointestinal issues, and thyroid disorders. However, many individuals with Down syndrome live healthy and fulfilling lives with appropriate medical care and support.

The condition is named after John Langdon Down, an English physician who first described the syndrome in 1866.

Placentation is the process by which the placenta, an organ that provides nutrients and oxygen to the developing fetus and removes waste products, is formed and develops during pregnancy. It involves the attachment of the fertilized egg (embryo) to the uterine wall and the development of specialized structures that facilitate the exchange of gases, nutrients, and waste between the mother and the fetus.

In humans, placentation begins when the embryo implants into the endometrium, or the lining of the uterus, about 6-10 days after fertilization. The outer layer of the embryo, called the trophoblast, invades the endometrial tissue and forms a structure called the placenta.

The placenta consists of both maternal and fetal tissues. The fetal portion of the placenta is derived from the chorionic villi, which are finger-like projections that develop on the surface of the embryo and increase the surface area for exchange. The maternal portion of the placenta is made up of modified endometrial tissue called decidua.

The placenta grows and develops throughout pregnancy, providing a vital connection between the mother and fetus. Proper placentation is essential for a healthy pregnancy and fetal development. Abnormalities in placentation can lead to complications such as preeclampsia, preterm labor, and intrauterine growth restriction.

Gestational diabetes is a type of diabetes that occurs during pregnancy. It is characterized by an increase in blood sugar levels that begins or is first recognized during pregnancy. The condition usually develops around the 24th week of gestation and is caused by the body's inability to produce enough insulin to meet the increased demands of pregnancy.

Gestational diabetes typically resolves after delivery, but women who have had gestational diabetes are at an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes later in life. It is important for women with gestational diabetes to manage their blood sugar levels during pregnancy to reduce the risk of complications for both the mother and the baby.

Management of gestational diabetes may include lifestyle modifications such as dietary changes and exercise, as well as monitoring blood sugar levels and potentially using insulin or other medications to control blood sugar levels. Regular prenatal care is essential for women with gestational diabetes to ensure that their blood sugar levels are properly managed and to monitor the growth and development of the fetus.

Misoprostol is a synthetic prostaglandin E1 analog used in obstetrics and gynecology to prevent and treat ulcers caused by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), reduce the risk of gastric ulcers in patients taking NSAIDs long term, induce labor, manage postpartum hemorrhage, and cause abortion. It is also used off-label for cervical ripening before gynecologic surgery and to treat miscarriage.

In addition, Misoprostol has been found to be effective in reducing the risk of gastric ulcers and NSAID-induced dyspepsia (upper abdominal pain or discomfort) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and other inflammatory conditions who require long-term NSAID therapy.

It is important to note that Misoprostol should not be used during pregnancy unless under the supervision of a healthcare provider for specific medical indications, such as preventing or treating stomach ulcers in pregnant women taking NSAIDs or inducing labor. It can cause miscarriage and birth defects if taken during early pregnancy.

Chorionic Gonadotropin (hCG) is a hormone that is produced during pregnancy. It is produced by the placenta after implantation of the fertilized egg in the uterus. The main function of hCG is to prevent the disintegration of the corpus luteum, which is a temporary endocrine structure that forms in the ovary after ovulation and produces progesterone during early pregnancy. Progesterone is essential for maintaining the lining of the uterus and supporting the pregnancy.

hCG can be detected in the blood or urine as early as 10 days after conception, and its levels continue to rise throughout the first trimester of pregnancy. In addition to its role in maintaining pregnancy, hCG is also used as a clinical marker for pregnancy and to monitor certain medical conditions such as gestational trophoblastic diseases.

'Labor, Obstetric' refers to the physiological process that occurs during childbirth, leading to the expulsion of the fetus from the uterus. It is divided into three stages:

1. The first stage begins with the onset of regular contractions and cervical dilation and effacement (thinning and shortening) until full dilation is reached (approximately 10 cm). This stage can last from hours to days, particularly in nulliparous women (those who have not given birth before).
2. The second stage starts with complete cervical dilation and ends with the delivery of the baby. During this stage, the mother experiences strong contractions that help push the fetus down the birth canal. This stage typically lasts from 20 minutes to two hours but can take longer in some cases.
3. The third stage involves the delivery of the placenta (afterbirth) and membranes, which usually occurs within 15-30 minutes after the baby's birth. However, it can sometimes take up to an hour for the placenta to be expelled completely.

Obstetric labor is a complex process that requires careful monitoring and management by healthcare professionals to ensure the safety and well-being of both the mother and the baby.

Low birth weight is a term used to describe babies who are born weighing less than 5 pounds, 8 ounces (2,500 grams). It's often defined as a birth weight of 2,499 grams or less. This can be further categorized into very low birth weight (less than 1,500 grams) and extremely low birth weight (less than 1,000 grams). Low birth weight is most commonly caused by premature birth, but it can also be caused by growth restriction in the womb. These babies are at risk for numerous health complications, both in the short and long term.

Amniocentesis is a medical procedure in which a small amount of amniotic fluid, which contains fetal cells, is withdrawn from the uterus through a hollow needle inserted into the abdomen of a pregnant woman. This procedure is typically performed between the 16th and 20th weeks of pregnancy.

The main purpose of amniocentesis is to diagnose genetic disorders and chromosomal abnormalities in the developing fetus, such as Down syndrome, Edwards syndrome, and neural tube defects. The fetal cells obtained from the amniotic fluid can be cultured and analyzed for various genetic characteristics, including chromosomal structure and number, as well as specific gene mutations.

Amniocentesis carries a small risk of complications, such as miscarriage, infection, or injury to the fetus. Therefore, it is generally offered to women who have an increased risk of having a baby with a genetic disorder or chromosomal abnormality, such as those over the age of 35, those with a family history of genetic disorders, or those who have had a previous pregnancy affected by a genetic condition.

It's important to note that while amniocentesis can provide valuable information about the health of the fetus, it does not guarantee a completely normal baby, and there are some risks associated with the procedure. Therefore, the decision to undergo amniocentesis should be made carefully, in consultation with a healthcare provider, taking into account the individual circumstances and preferences of each woman.

In the field of medicine, twins are defined as two offspring produced by the same pregnancy. They can be either monozygotic (identical) or dizygotic (fraternal). Monozygotic twins develop from a single fertilized egg that splits into two separate embryos, resulting in individuals who share identical genetic material. Dizygotic twins, on the other hand, result from the fertilization of two separate eggs by two different sperm cells, leading to siblings who share about 50% of their genetic material, similar to non-twin siblings.

Placental circulation refers to the specialized circulatory system that develops during pregnancy to allow for the exchange of nutrients, oxygen, and waste products between the mother's blood and the fetal blood in the placenta. The placenta is a highly vascular organ that grows within the uterus and is connected to the developing fetus via the umbilical cord.

In the maternal side of the placenta, the spiral arteries branch into smaller vessels called the intervillous spaces, where they come in close contact with the fetal blood vessels within the villi (finger-like projections) of the placenta. The intervillous spaces are filled with maternal blood that flows around the villi, allowing for the exchange of gases and nutrients between the two circulations.

On the fetal side, the umbilical cord contains two umbilical arteries that carry oxygen-depleted blood from the fetus to the placenta, and one umbilical vein that returns oxygenated blood back to the fetus. The umbilical arteries branch into smaller vessels within the villi, where they exchange gases and nutrients with the maternal blood in the intervillous spaces.

Overall, the placental circulation is a crucial component of fetal development, allowing for the growing fetus to receive the necessary oxygen and nutrients to support its growth and development.

An abortifacient agent is a substance or drug that causes abortion by inducing the uterus to contract and expel a fetus. These agents can be chemical or herbal substances, and they work by interfering with the implantation of the fertilized egg in the uterine lining or by stimulating uterine contractions to expel the developing embryo or fetus.

Examples of abortifacient agents include misoprostol, mifepristone, and certain herbs such as pennyroyal, tansy, and black cohosh. It is important to note that the use of abortifacient agents can have serious health consequences, including infection, bleeding, and damage to the reproductive system. Therefore, it is essential to consult with a healthcare provider before using any abortifacient agent.

Placental diseases, also known as placental pathologies, refer to a group of conditions that affect the development and function of the placenta during pregnancy. The placenta is an organ that develops in the uterus during pregnancy and provides oxygen and nutrients to the developing fetus while removing waste products.

Placental diseases can have serious consequences for both the mother and the fetus, including preterm labor, growth restriction, stillbirth, and long-term health problems for the child. Some common placental diseases include:

1. Placental abruption: This occurs when the placenta separates from the uterine wall before delivery, causing bleeding and potentially harming the fetus.
2. Placental previa: This is a condition where the placenta implants in the lower part of the uterus, covering the cervix. It can cause bleeding and may require cesarean delivery.
3. Preeclampsia: This is a pregnancy-related disorder characterized by high blood pressure and damage to organs such as the liver and kidneys. Placental dysfunction is thought to play a role in its development.
4. Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR): This occurs when the fetus does not grow properly due to poor placental function, leading to low birth weight and potential health problems.
5. Chorioamnionitis: This is an infection of the membranes surrounding the fetus, which can lead to preterm labor and other complications.
6. Placental infarction: This occurs when a portion of the placenta dies due to a lack of blood flow, which can lead to growth restriction or stillbirth.

Prompt diagnosis and treatment of placental diseases are essential for ensuring the best possible outcomes for both the mother and the fetus.

Pregnancy reduction, multifetal refers to the medical procedure used to decrease the number of fetuses in a multiple pregnancy, such as twins or higher-order multiples (triplets, quadruplets, etc.). This is also known as selective reduction or selective termination. The goal of this procedure is to reduce the risk of complications associated with multifetal pregnancies, including preterm labor, low birth weight, and pregnancy loss.

The procedure typically involves an ultrasound-guided injection of a medication that stops the development of one or more fetuses. This is usually performed during the first trimester of pregnancy. The decision to undergo pregnancy reduction is often based on a variety of factors, including maternal age, medical history, and personal preferences. It's important to note that this procedure carries its own risks, such as infection, bleeding, and loss of the remaining fetuses, so it should be carefully considered and discussed with healthcare providers.

Uterine hemorrhage, also known as uterine bleeding or gynecological bleeding, is an abnormal loss of blood from the uterus. It can occur in various clinical settings such as menstruation (known as menorrhagia), postpartum period (postpartum hemorrhage), or in non-pregnant women (dysfunctional uterine bleeding). The bleeding may be light to heavy, intermittent or continuous, and can be accompanied by symptoms such as pain, dizziness, or fainting. Uterine hemorrhage is a common gynecological problem that can have various underlying causes, including hormonal imbalances, structural abnormalities, coagulopathies, and malignancies. It is important to seek medical attention if experiencing heavy or prolonged uterine bleeding to determine the cause and receive appropriate treatment.

Progesterone is a steroid hormone that is primarily produced in the ovaries during the menstrual cycle and in pregnancy. It plays an essential role in preparing the uterus for implantation of a fertilized egg and maintaining the early stages of pregnancy. Progesterone works to thicken the lining of the uterus, creating a nurturing environment for the developing embryo.

During the menstrual cycle, progesterone is produced by the corpus luteum, a temporary structure formed in the ovary after an egg has been released from a follicle during ovulation. If pregnancy does not occur, the levels of progesterone will decrease, leading to the shedding of the uterine lining and menstruation.

In addition to its reproductive functions, progesterone also has various other effects on the body, such as helping to regulate the immune system, supporting bone health, and potentially influencing mood and cognition. Progesterone can be administered medically in the form of oral pills, intramuscular injections, or vaginal suppositories for various purposes, including hormone replacement therapy, contraception, and managing certain gynecological conditions.

'Pregnant women' refers to female individuals who have conceived and are in the process of carrying a developing fetus inside their womb (uterus) until childbirth. This state is typically marked by various physiological changes, including hormonal fluctuations, weight gain, and growth of the uterus and breasts, among others. Pregnancy usually lasts for about 40 weeks, starting from the first day of the woman's last menstrual period (LMP) and is divided into three trimesters. Each trimester is characterized by different developmental milestones in the fetus. Regular prenatal care is essential to monitor the health and wellbeing of both the mother and the developing fetus, and to address any potential complications that may arise during pregnancy.

Puerperal disorders are a group of medical conditions that can affect women during the period following childbirth, also known as the puerperium. The puerperium typically lasts for six to eight weeks after delivery. These disorders can be complications of childbirth or postpartum infections and include:

1. Puerperal fever: This is a febrile illness that occurs during the puerperium, usually caused by a bacterial infection. The most common causative organisms are group A streptococcus, Staphylococcus aureus, and Escherichia coli.

2. Puerperal sepsis: This is a severe form of puerperal fever characterized by the presence of bacteria in the blood (bacteremia) and widespread inflammation throughout the body. It can lead to organ failure and even death if not treated promptly with antibiotics.

3. Puerperal endometritis: This is an infection of the lining of the uterus (endometrium) that occurs during the puerperium. Symptoms may include fever, abdominal pain, and foul-smelling vaginal discharge.

4. Puerperal mastitis: This is an inflammation of the breast tissue that can occur during lactation, often caused by a bacterial infection. It is more common in women who are breastfeeding but can also occur in non-lactating women.

5. Puerperal psychosis: This is a rare but serious mental health disorder that can occur after childbirth. It is characterized by symptoms such as delusions, hallucinations, and disorganized thinking.

6. Puerperal thromboembolism: This is a blood clot that forms during the puerperium, usually in the deep veins of the legs (deep vein thrombosis) or in the lungs (pulmonary embolism). It can be a serious complication of childbirth and requires prompt medical attention.

Overall, puerperal disorders are a significant cause of maternal morbidity and mortality worldwide, particularly in low-income countries where access to healthcare is limited. Prompt diagnosis and treatment are essential for improving outcomes and reducing the risk of long-term complications.

The fetal heart is the cardiovascular organ that develops in the growing fetus during pregnancy. It starts to form around 22 days after conception and continues to develop throughout the first trimester. By the end of the eighth week of gestation, the fetal heart has developed enough to pump blood throughout the body.

The fetal heart is similar in structure to the adult heart but has some differences. It is smaller and more compact, with a four-chambered structure that includes two atria and two ventricles. The fetal heart also has unique features such as the foramen ovale, which is a hole between the right and left atria that allows blood to bypass the lungs, and the ductus arteriosus, a blood vessel that connects the pulmonary artery to the aorta and diverts blood away from the lungs.

The fetal heart is responsible for pumping oxygenated blood from the placenta to the rest of the body and returning deoxygenated blood back to the placenta for re-oxygenation. The rate of the fetal heartbeat is faster than that of an adult, typically ranging from 120 to 160 beats per minute. Fetal heart rate monitoring is a common method used during pregnancy and childbirth to assess the health and well-being of the developing fetus.

Medical Definition:

"Risk factors" are any attribute, characteristic or exposure of an individual that increases the likelihood of developing a disease or injury. They can be divided into modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors. Modifiable risk factors are those that can be changed through lifestyle choices or medical treatment, while non-modifiable risk factors are inherent traits such as age, gender, or genetic predisposition. Examples of modifiable risk factors include smoking, alcohol consumption, physical inactivity, and unhealthy diet, while non-modifiable risk factors include age, sex, and family history. It is important to note that having a risk factor does not guarantee that a person will develop the disease, but rather indicates an increased susceptibility.

A hydatidiform mole, also known as a molar pregnancy, is a type of gestational trophoblastic disease (GTD), which is a group of rare disorders that involve abnormal growth of the placental tissue.

In a hydatidiform mole, there is an abnormal fertilization event leading to the growth of a mass of grapelike cysts in the uterus instead of a normal pregnancy. The chromosomes from the sperm and egg do not combine properly, resulting in an extra set of chromosomes, which leads to the development of the mole.

Hydatidiform moles can be complete or partial:

* Complete hydatidiform mole (CHM): This type arises when an egg without a nucleus is fertilized by one or two sperm, leading to the growth of abnormal placental tissue with no embryo. The chromosomes come from the father only, and there are typically 46 chromosomes, all of paternal origin.
* Partial hydatidiform mole (PHM): This type occurs when an egg is fertilized by two sperm or a single sperm that duplicates itself, resulting in an abnormal placenta with some fetal tissue. The chromosomes are of both maternal and paternal origin, and the placental tissue has a mix of normal and abnormal cells.

Hydatidiform moles can cause vaginal bleeding, rapid uterine enlargement, and high levels of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) hormone in the blood. They are usually detected during an ultrasound exam and require medical treatment to prevent complications such as gestational trophoblastic neoplasia, a malignant form of GTD that can spread to other organs.

Maternal nutritional physiological phenomena refer to the various changes and processes that occur in a woman's body during pregnancy, lactation, and postpartum periods to meet the increased nutritional demands and support the growth and development of the fetus or infant. These phenomena involve complex interactions between maternal nutrition, hormonal regulation, metabolism, and physiological functions to ensure optimal pregnancy outcomes and offspring health.

Examples of maternal nutritional physiological phenomena include:

1. Adaptations in maternal nutrient metabolism: During pregnancy, the mother's body undergoes various adaptations to increase the availability of essential nutrients for fetal growth and development. For instance, there are increased absorption and utilization of glucose, amino acids, and fatty acids, as well as enhanced storage of glycogen and lipids in maternal tissues.
2. Placental transfer of nutrients: The placenta plays a crucial role in facilitating the exchange of nutrients between the mother and fetus. It selectively transports essential nutrients such as glucose, amino acids, fatty acids, vitamins, and minerals from the maternal circulation to the fetal compartment while removing waste products.
3. Maternal weight gain: Pregnant women typically experience an increase in body weight due to the growth of the fetus, placenta, amniotic fluid, and maternal tissues such as the uterus and breasts. Adequate gestational weight gain is essential for ensuring optimal pregnancy outcomes and reducing the risk of adverse perinatal complications.
4. Changes in maternal hormonal regulation: Pregnancy is associated with significant changes in hormonal profiles, including increased levels of estrogen, progesterone, human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), and other hormones that regulate various physiological functions such as glucose metabolism, appetite regulation, and maternal-fetal immune tolerance.
5. Lactation: Following childbirth, the mother's body undergoes further adaptations to support lactation and breastfeeding. This involves the production and secretion of milk, which contains essential nutrients and bioactive components that promote infant growth, development, and immunity.
6. Nutrient requirements: Pregnancy and lactation increase women's nutritional demands for various micronutrients such as iron, calcium, folate, vitamin D, and omega-3 fatty acids. Meeting these increased nutritional needs is crucial for ensuring optimal pregnancy outcomes and supporting maternal health during the postpartum period.

Understanding these physiological adaptations and their implications for maternal and fetal health is essential for developing evidence-based interventions to promote positive pregnancy outcomes, reduce the risk of adverse perinatal complications, and support women's health throughout the reproductive lifespan.

A cohort study is a type of observational study in which a group of individuals who share a common characteristic or exposure are followed up over time to determine the incidence of a specific outcome or outcomes. The cohort, or group, is defined based on the exposure status (e.g., exposed vs. unexposed) and then monitored prospectively to assess for the development of new health events or conditions.

Cohort studies can be either prospective or retrospective in design. In a prospective cohort study, participants are enrolled and followed forward in time from the beginning of the study. In contrast, in a retrospective cohort study, researchers identify a cohort that has already been assembled through medical records, insurance claims, or other sources and then look back in time to assess exposure status and health outcomes.

Cohort studies are useful for establishing causality between an exposure and an outcome because they allow researchers to observe the temporal relationship between the two. They can also provide information on the incidence of a disease or condition in different populations, which can be used to inform public health policy and interventions. However, cohort studies can be expensive and time-consuming to conduct, and they may be subject to bias if participants are not representative of the population or if there is loss to follow-up.

Lactation is the process by which milk is produced and secreted from the mammary glands of female mammals, including humans, for the nourishment of their young. This physiological function is initiated during pregnancy and continues until it is deliberately stopped or weaned off. The primary purpose of lactation is to provide essential nutrients, antibodies, and other bioactive components that support the growth, development, and immune system of newborns and infants.

The process of lactation involves several hormonal and physiological changes in a woman's body. During pregnancy, the hormones estrogen and progesterone stimulate the growth and development of the mammary glands. After childbirth, the levels of these hormones drop significantly, allowing another hormone called prolactin to take over. Prolactin is responsible for triggering the production of milk in the alveoli, which are tiny sacs within the breast tissue.

Another hormone, oxytocin, plays a crucial role in the release or "let-down" of milk from the alveoli to the nipple during lactation. This reflex is initiated by suckling or thinking about the baby, which sends signals to the brain to release oxytocin. The released oxytocin then binds to receptors in the mammary glands, causing the smooth muscles around the alveoli to contract and push out the milk through the ducts and into the nipple.

Lactation is a complex and highly regulated process that ensures the optimal growth and development of newborns and infants. It provides not only essential nutrients but also various bioactive components, such as immunoglobulins, enzymes, and growth factors, which protect the infant from infections and support their immune system.

In summary, lactation is the physiological process by which milk is produced and secreted from the mammary glands of female mammals for the nourishment of their young. It involves hormonal changes, including the actions of prolactin, oxytocin, estrogen, and progesterone, to regulate the production, storage, and release of milk.

Small for Gestational Age (SGA) is a term used in pediatrics to describe newborn infants who are smaller in size than expected for the number of weeks they have been in the womb. It is typically defined as a baby whose weight is below the 10th percentile for its gestational age. SGA can be further classified into two categories: constitutionally small (also known as physiologically small) and pathologically small. Constitutionally small infants are those who are genetically predisposed to being smaller, while pathologically small infants have a growth restriction due to factors such as placental insufficiency, maternal hypertension, or chromosomal abnormalities.

It is important to note that SGA is not the same as premature birth. Premature babies are those born before 37 weeks of gestation, regardless of their size. However, a baby can be both premature and SGA.

A "missed abortion" is a medical term used to describe a pregnancy in which the fetus has died or failed to develop, but the products of conception (i.e., the placenta and gestational sac) remain in the uterus. This condition is also sometimes referred to as a "silent miscarriage" or "delayed miscarriage." In a missed abortion, there may be no symptoms or only very mild ones, such as vaginal bleeding or the passing of tissue. The diagnosis is typically made through an ultrasound exam that shows an empty gestational sac or a non-viable fetus. Treatment options include waiting for the body to expel the products of conception naturally, taking medication to induce expulsion, or undergoing a surgical procedure to remove the products of conception.

Chorionic villi sampling (CVS) is a prenatal testing procedure that involves taking a small sample of the chorionic villi, which are finger-like projections of the placenta that contain fetal cells. The sample is then tested for genetic disorders and chromosomal abnormalities, such as Down syndrome.

CVS is typically performed between the 10th and 12th weeks of pregnancy and carries a small risk of miscarriage (about 1 in 100 to 1 in 200 procedures). The results of CVS can provide important information about the health of the fetus, allowing parents to make informed decisions about their pregnancy. However, it is important to note that CVS does not detect all genetic disorders and may produce false positive or false negative results in some cases. Therefore, follow-up testing may be necessary.

Embryonic and fetal development is the process of growth and development that occurs from fertilization of the egg (conception) to birth. The terms "embryo" and "fetus" are used to describe different stages of this development:

* Embryonic development: This stage begins at fertilization and continues until the end of the 8th week of pregnancy. During this time, the fertilized egg (zygote) divides and forms a blastocyst, which implants in the uterus and begins to develop into a complex structure called an embryo. The embryo consists of three layers of cells that will eventually form all of the organs and tissues of the body. During this stage, the basic structures of the body, including the nervous system, heart, and gastrointestinal tract, begin to form.
* Fetal development: This stage begins at the end of the 8th week of pregnancy and continues until birth. During this time, the embryo is called a fetus, and it grows and develops rapidly. The organs and tissues that were formed during the embryonic stage continue to mature and become more complex. The fetus also begins to move and kick, and it can hear and respond to sounds from outside the womb.

Overall, embryonic and fetal development is a complex and highly regulated process that involves the coordinated growth and differentiation of cells and tissues. It is a critical period of development that lays the foundation for the health and well-being of the individual throughout their life.

"Delivery, Obstetric" is a medical term that refers to the process of giving birth to a baby. It involves the passage of the fetus through the mother's vagina or via Caesarean section (C-section), which is a surgical procedure.

The obstetric delivery process typically includes three stages:

1. The first stage begins with the onset of labor and ends when the cervix is fully dilated.
2. The second stage starts with full dilation of the cervix and ends with the birth of the baby.
3. The third stage involves the delivery of the placenta, which is the organ that provides oxygen and nutrients to the developing fetus during pregnancy.

Obstetric delivery requires careful monitoring and management by healthcare professionals to ensure the safety and well-being of both the mother and the baby. Various interventions and techniques may be used during the delivery process to facilitate a safe and successful outcome, including the use of medications, assisted delivery with forceps or vacuum extraction, and C-section.

The uterine artery is a paired branch of the internal iliac (hip) artery that supplies blood to the uterus and vagina. It anastomoses (joins) with the ovarian artery to form a rich vascular network that nourishes the female reproductive organs. The right and left uterine arteries run along the sides of the uterus, where they divide into several branches to supply oxygenated blood and nutrients to the myometrium (uterine muscle), endometrium (lining), and cervix. These arteries undergo significant changes in size and structure during pregnancy to accommodate the growing fetus and placenta, making them crucial for maintaining a healthy pregnancy.

Pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A) is a protease that is often used as a biomarker in early pregnancy. It is a protein that is produced by the placenta and can be detected in the mother's bloodstream during pregnancy.

In early pregnancy, low levels of PAPP-A may indicate an increased risk for certain complications, such as preeclampsia or fetal growth restriction. High levels of PAPP-A, on the other hand, may be associated with an increased risk of chromosomal abnormalities, such as Down syndrome.

It is important to note that while PAPP-A levels can provide valuable information about the health of a pregnancy, they are just one piece of the puzzle and should be considered in conjunction with other factors, such as maternal age, medical history, and ultrasound results. Your healthcare provider will use this information along with other tests to assess your risk for certain complications and develop an appropriate plan of care.

Retrospective studies, also known as retrospective research or looking back studies, are a type of observational study that examines data from the past to draw conclusions about possible causal relationships between risk factors and outcomes. In these studies, researchers analyze existing records, medical charts, or previously collected data to test a hypothesis or answer a specific research question.

Retrospective studies can be useful for generating hypotheses and identifying trends, but they have limitations compared to prospective studies, which follow participants forward in time from exposure to outcome. Retrospective studies are subject to biases such as recall bias, selection bias, and information bias, which can affect the validity of the results. Therefore, retrospective studies should be interpreted with caution and used primarily to generate hypotheses for further testing in prospective studies.

Female infertility is a condition characterized by the inability to conceive after 12 months or more of regular, unprotected sexual intercourse or the inability to carry a pregnancy to a live birth. The causes of female infertility can be multifactorial and may include issues with ovulation, damage to the fallopian tubes or uterus, endometriosis, hormonal imbalances, age-related factors, and other medical conditions.

Some common causes of female infertility include:

1. Ovulation disorders: Conditions such as polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), thyroid disorders, premature ovarian failure, and hyperprolactinemia can affect ovulation and lead to infertility.
2. Damage to the fallopian tubes: Pelvic inflammatory disease, endometriosis, or previous surgeries can cause scarring and blockages in the fallopian tubes, preventing the egg and sperm from meeting.
3. Uterine abnormalities: Structural issues with the uterus, such as fibroids, polyps, or congenital defects, can interfere with implantation and pregnancy.
4. Age-related factors: As women age, their fertility declines due to a decrease in the number and quality of eggs.
5. Other medical conditions: Certain medical conditions, such as diabetes, celiac disease, and autoimmune disorders, can contribute to infertility.

In some cases, female infertility can be treated with medications, surgery, or assisted reproductive technologies (ART) like in vitro fertilization (IVF). A thorough evaluation by a healthcare professional is necessary to determine the underlying cause and develop an appropriate treatment plan.

Preconception care (PCC) refers to a set of interventions that aim to identify and modify biomedical, behavioral, and social risks to a woman's health or pregnancy outcome through prevention and management, before conception. PCC is designed to optimize the health status of women of reproductive age, and includes counseling and education about lifestyle modifications such as improving nutrition, achieving a healthy weight, stopping smoking and alcohol consumption, controlling chronic diseases, and avoiding teratogenic exposures. The goal of PCC is to reduce risks and improve the chances of a healthy pregnancy and baby.

The endometrium is the innermost layer of the uterus, which lines the uterine cavity and has a critical role in the menstrual cycle and pregnancy. It is composed of glands and blood vessels that undergo cyclic changes under the influence of hormones, primarily estrogen and progesterone. During the menstrual cycle, the endometrium thickens in preparation for a potential pregnancy. If fertilization does not occur, it will break down and be shed, resulting in menstruation. In contrast, if implantation takes place, the endometrium provides essential nutrients to support the developing embryo and placenta throughout pregnancy.

A legal abortion is the deliberate termination of a pregnancy through medical or surgical means, carried out in accordance with the laws and regulations of a particular jurisdiction. In countries where abortion is legal, it is typically restricted to certain circumstances, such as:

* To protect the life or health of the pregnant person
* In cases of fetal anomalies that are incompatible with life outside the womb
* When the pregnancy is the result of rape or incest
* When the continuation of the pregnancy would pose a significant risk to the physical or mental health of the pregnant person

The specific circumstances under which abortion is legal, as well as the procedures and regulations that govern it, vary widely from one country to another. In some places, such as the United States, abortion is protected as a fundamental right under certain conditions; while in other countries, such as those with highly restrictive abortion laws, it may only be allowed in very limited circumstances or not at all.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Prenatal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena" is not a standard or widely recognized medical term. It seems to be a rather broad and vague phrase that combines several concepts: prenatal (occurring before birth), nutritional (relating to nutrition), physiological (relating to the functioning of living organisms and their parts), and phenomena (observable events or occurrences).

If you're interested in a specific aspect of maternal and fetal nutrition, physiology, or related processes during pregnancy, I would be happy to help further if you could provide a more precise term or question. For example, prenatal nutritional physiological phenomena could refer to the process of how certain nutrients are transported across the placenta, how maternal nutrition affects fetal growth and development, or how various hormonal and metabolic changes occur during pregnancy.

The postpartum period refers to the time frame immediately following childbirth, typically defined as the first 6-12 weeks. During this time, significant physical and emotional changes occur as the body recovers from pregnancy and delivery. Hormone levels fluctuate dramatically, leading to various symptoms such as mood swings, fatigue, and breast engorgement. The reproductive system also undergoes significant changes, with the uterus returning to its pre-pregnancy size and shape, and the cervix closing.

It is essential to monitor physical and emotional health during this period, as complications such as postpartum depression, infection, or difficulty breastfeeding may arise. Regular check-ups with healthcare providers are recommended to ensure a healthy recovery and address any concerns. Additionally, proper rest, nutrition, and support from family and friends can help facilitate a smooth transition into this new phase of life.

Dilatation and Curettage (D&C) is a medical procedure commonly performed on the uterus. The term "dilatation" refers to the widening or opening of the cervix, which is the lower part of the uterus that opens into the vagina. This is achieved using dilators, which are gradually inserted into the cervical canal to stretch it open.

The term "curettage" refers to the scraping or suctioning out of tissue from the lining of the uterus (endometrium). A curette, a long, loop-shaped surgical instrument, is used to scrape the lining, or suction equipment may be used to remove the tissue.

A D&C procedure is typically performed to diagnose and treat various conditions affecting the uterus, such as abnormal uterine bleeding, heavy menstrual periods, endometrial hyperplasia, or to remove residual tissue after a miscarriage or abortion. It's usually a minor surgical procedure that can be done in a hospital, clinic, or doctor's office, and is often performed under local anesthesia, conscious sedation, or general anesthesia depending on the situation and patient preference.

Nuchal translucency measurement (NT) is a prenatal ultrasound assessment used to screen for chromosomal abnormalities, particularly Down syndrome (Trisomy 21), and other fetal abnormalities. The nuchal translucency refers to the sonolucent space or fluid-filled area at the back of the neck of a developing fetus. During the first trimester of pregnancy, an increased nuchal translucency measurement may indicate an increased risk for certain genetic disorders and structural defects.

The procedure involves measuring the thickness of this fluid-filled space using ultrasound imaging, typically between 11 and 14 weeks of gestation. A larger nuchal translucency measurement (usually greater than 3 mm) may suggest an increased risk for chromosomal abnormalities or structural issues in the fetus. The NT measurement is often combined with maternal age, biochemical markers (such as PAPP-A and free beta-hCG), and sometimes first-trimester fetal heart rate assessment to calculate the overall risk of chromosomal abnormalities in the fetus.

It's important to note that while an increased nuchal translucency measurement can indicate a higher risk for genetic disorders, it does not confirm their presence. Further diagnostic testing, such as chorionic villus sampling (CVS) or amniocentesis, may be recommended to obtain a definitive diagnosis.

A stillbirth is defined as the delivery of a baby who has died in the womb after 20 weeks of pregnancy. The baby may die at any time during the pregnancy, but death must occur after 20 weeks to be classified as a stillbirth. Stillbirths can have many different causes, including problems with the placenta or umbilical cord, chromosomal abnormalities, infections, and birth defects. In some cases, the cause of a stillbirth may not be able to be determined.

Stillbirth is a tragic event that can have significant emotional and psychological impacts on the parents and other family members. It is important for healthcare providers to offer support and resources to help families cope with their loss. This may include counseling, support groups, and information about memorializing their baby.

Fetal heart rate (FHR) is the number of times a fetus's heart beats in one minute. It is measured through the use of a fetoscope, Doppler ultrasound device, or cardiotocograph (CTG). A normal FHR ranges from 120 to 160 beats per minute (bpm), although it can vary throughout pregnancy and is usually faster than an adult's heart rate. Changes in the FHR pattern may indicate fetal distress, hypoxia, or other conditions that require medical attention. Regular monitoring of FHR during pregnancy, labor, and delivery helps healthcare providers assess fetal well-being and ensure a safe outcome for both the mother and the baby.

The chorion is the outermost fetal membrane that surrounds the developing conceptus (the embryo or fetus and its supporting structures). It forms early in pregnancy as an extraembryonic structure, meaning it arises from cells that will not become part of the actual body of the developing organism. The chorion plays a crucial role in pregnancy by contributing to the formation of the placenta, which provides nutrients and oxygen to the growing embryo/fetus and removes waste products.

One of the most important functions of the chorion is to produce human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), a hormone that signals the presence of pregnancy and maintains the corpus luteum, a temporary endocrine structure in the ovary that produces progesterone during early pregnancy. Progesterone is essential for preparing the uterus for implantation and maintaining the pregnancy.

The chorion consists of two layers: an inner cytotrophoblast layer and an outer syncytiotrophoblast layer. The cytotrophoblast layer is made up of individual cells, while the syncytiotrophoblast layer is a multinucleated mass of fused cytotrophoblast cells. These layers interact with the maternal endometrium (the lining of the uterus) to form the placenta and facilitate exchange between the mother and the developing fetus.

In summary, the chorion is a vital extraembryonic structure in pregnancy that contributes to the formation of the placenta, produces hCG, and interacts with the maternal endometrium to support fetal development.

Fetal blood refers to the blood circulating in a fetus during pregnancy. It is essential for the growth and development of the fetus, as it carries oxygen and nutrients from the placenta to the developing tissues and organs. Fetal blood also removes waste products, such as carbon dioxide, from the fetal tissues and transports them to the placenta for elimination.

Fetal blood has several unique characteristics that distinguish it from adult blood. For example, fetal hemoglobin (HbF) is the primary type of hemoglobin found in fetal blood, whereas adults primarily have adult hemoglobin (HbA). Fetal hemoglobin has a higher affinity for oxygen than adult hemoglobin, which allows it to more efficiently extract oxygen from the maternal blood in the placenta.

Additionally, fetal blood contains a higher proportion of reticulocytes (immature red blood cells) and nucleated red blood cells compared to adult blood. These differences reflect the high turnover rate of red blood cells in the developing fetus and the need for rapid growth and development.

Examination of fetal blood can provide important information about the health and well-being of the fetus during pregnancy. For example, fetal blood sampling (also known as cordocentesis or percutaneous umbilical blood sampling) can be used to diagnose genetic disorders, infections, and other conditions that may affect fetal development. However, this procedure carries risks, including preterm labor, infection, and fetal loss, and is typically only performed when there is a significant risk of fetal compromise or when other diagnostic tests have been inconclusive.

Abortifacient agents, steroidal, refer to a type of medication or substance that is capable of inducing abortion or causing the termination of pregnancy by interfering with the implantation and maintenance of the fertilized ovum (embryo) or the development of the placenta. Steroidal abortifacient agents are synthetic derivatives of steroids, which have a similar structure to naturally occurring hormones in the human body.

The most commonly used steroidal abortifacient agent is mifepristone, also known as RU-486. Mifepristone works by blocking the action of progesterone, a hormone that is essential for maintaining pregnancy. By blocking the action of progesterone, mifepristone causes the shedding of the uterine lining and the expulsion of the embryo or fetus from the uterus.

Steroidal abortifacient agents are typically used in the early stages of pregnancy, up to 10 weeks after the last menstrual period. They may be used alone or in combination with other medications, such as misoprostol, which helps to stimulate uterine contractions and expel the embryo or fetus from the uterus.

It is important to note that steroidal abortifacient agents are not the same as emergency contraceptives, which are used to prevent pregnancy after unprotected sexual intercourse. Steroidal abortifacient agents are intended for use in cases where pregnancy has already occurred and is unwanted or poses a risk to the health of the mother or fetus.

A "threatened abortion" is a medical term used to describe a situation in which there are symptoms that suggest an impending miscarriage, such as vaginal bleeding and/or cramping during early pregnancy, but the cervix remains closed and the fetal heartbeat is still present. This condition is estimated to occur in up to 20-30% of all pregnancies, and while it can be a source of anxiety for pregnant individuals, it does not necessarily mean that a miscarriage will definitely occur.

It's important to note that if you are experiencing any symptoms of a threatened abortion, you should contact your healthcare provider right away for evaluation and guidance on how to manage the situation. They may recommend bed rest, pelvic rest, or other treatments to help support the pregnancy and reduce the risk of miscarriage.

Fetal weight is the calculated weight of a fetus during pregnancy, typically estimated through ultrasound measurements. It is a crucial indicator of fetal growth and development throughout pregnancy. The weight is determined by measuring various parameters such as the head circumference, abdominal circumference, and femur length, which are then used in conjunction with specific formulas to estimate the fetal weight. Regular monitoring of fetal weight helps healthcare providers assess fetal health, identify potential growth restrictions or abnormalities, and determine appropriate delivery timing. Low fetal weight can indicate intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), while high fetal weight might suggest macrosomia, both of which may require specialized care and management.

Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection (ICSI) is a specialized form of assisted reproductive technology (ART), specifically used in the context of in vitro fertilization (IVF). It involves the direct injection of a single sperm into the cytoplasm of a mature egg (oocyte) to facilitate fertilization. This technique is often used when there are issues with male infertility, such as low sperm count or poor sperm motility, to increase the chances of successful fertilization. The resulting embryos can then be transferred to the uterus in hopes of achieving a pregnancy.

In medical terms, triplets are a type of multiple pregnancy, where three offsprings (fetuses) develop simultaneously in the uterus of a single pregnant woman. This occurs when a woman releases more than one egg during ovulation, and all three eggs get fertilized by separate sperm cells. Triplets can also occur through the use of assisted reproductive technologies such as in vitro fertilization (IVF) where multiple embryos are transferred into the uterus.

Triplet pregnancies carry a higher risk of complications for both the mother and the offsprings compared to singleton or twin pregnancies, including preterm labor, low birth weight, and developmental issues. As such, they often require close monitoring and specialized care throughout the pregnancy.

In the field of medicine, "time factors" refer to the duration of symptoms or time elapsed since the onset of a medical condition, which can have significant implications for diagnosis and treatment. Understanding time factors is crucial in determining the progression of a disease, evaluating the effectiveness of treatments, and making critical decisions regarding patient care.

For example, in stroke management, "time is brain," meaning that rapid intervention within a specific time frame (usually within 4.5 hours) is essential to administering tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a clot-busting drug that can minimize brain damage and improve patient outcomes. Similarly, in trauma care, the "golden hour" concept emphasizes the importance of providing definitive care within the first 60 minutes after injury to increase survival rates and reduce morbidity.

Time factors also play a role in monitoring the progression of chronic conditions like diabetes or heart disease, where regular follow-ups and assessments help determine appropriate treatment adjustments and prevent complications. In infectious diseases, time factors are crucial for initiating antibiotic therapy and identifying potential outbreaks to control their spread.

Overall, "time factors" encompass the significance of recognizing and acting promptly in various medical scenarios to optimize patient outcomes and provide effective care.

Parturition is the process of giving birth, or the act of delivering newborn offspring. In medical terms, it refers to the expulsion of the products of conception (such as the fetus, placenta, and membranes) from the uterus of a pregnant woman during childbirth. This process is regulated by hormonal changes and involves complex interactions between the mother's body and the developing fetus. Parturition typically occurs after a full-term pregnancy, which is approximately 40 weeks in humans.

Hyperemesis Gravidarum is a severe form of nausea and vomiting in pregnancy that is more extreme than the typical morning sickness. It's characterized by persistent vomiting, dehydration, weight loss, and electrolyte imbalance. If left untreated, it can lead to serious complications for both the mother and the baby. The exact cause is not known, but it may be related to high levels of hormones or other substances in the pregnant woman's body. Treatment often involves hospitalization for rehydration, medication to control vomiting, and nutritional support.

Gravidity is a medical term that refers to the number of times a woman has been pregnant, regardless of the outcome of the pregnancies. It's a way to quantify a woman's childbearing experience and is often used in obstetrics and gynecology to assess potential risks and complications during pregnancy and childbirth.

For example, a woman who has been pregnant once before would have a gravidity of 1, while a woman who has been pregnant twice would have a gravidity of 2. This term is distinct from parity, which refers to the number of pregnancies that have reached a viable gestational age and resulted in a live birth.

The umbilical arteries are a pair of vessels that develop within the umbilical cord during fetal development. They carry oxygenated and nutrient-rich blood from the mother to the developing fetus through the placenta. These arteries arise from the internal iliac arteries in the fetus and pass through the umbilical cord to connect with the two umbilical veins within the placenta. After birth, the umbilical arteries become ligaments (the medial umbilical ligaments) that run along the inner abdominal wall.

Fetal monitoring is a procedure used during labor and delivery to assess the well-being of the fetus. It involves the use of electronic devices to measure and record the fetal heart rate and uterine contractions. The information obtained from fetal monitoring can help healthcare providers identify any signs of fetal distress, such as a decreased fetal heart rate, which may indicate the need for interventions or an emergency cesarean delivery.

There are two main types of fetal monitoring: external and internal. External fetal monitoring involves placing sensors on the mother's abdomen to detect the fetal heart rate and uterine contractions. Internal fetal monitoring, which is typically used during high-risk deliveries, involves inserting an electrode into the fetus' scalp to measure the fetal heart rate more accurately.

Fetal monitoring can provide valuable information about the fetus's well-being during labor and delivery, but it is important to note that it has limitations and may not always detect fetal distress in a timely manner. Therefore, healthcare providers must use their clinical judgment and other assessment tools, such as fetal movement counting and visual examination of the fetus, to ensure the safe delivery of the baby.

Fetal macrosomia is a medical condition where the fetus in the womb is significantly larger than normal. While there is no consensus on an exact weight that defines macrosomia, it is generally defined as a fetus with an estimated weight of 4,000 grams (8 pounds 13 ounces) or more at birth.

Fetal macrosomia can be caused by several factors, including maternal diabetes, post-term pregnancy, excessive weight gain during pregnancy, and prior history of macrosomic infants. Macrosomic infants are at an increased risk for complications during labor and delivery, such as shoulder dystocia, birth injuries, and hypoglycemia.

It is important for healthcare providers to monitor fetal growth carefully during pregnancy, particularly in women who have risk factors for macrosomia. Regular prenatal care, including ultrasound measurements of the fetus, can help identify cases of fetal macrosomia and allow for appropriate management and delivery planning.

I believe there may be a misunderstanding in your question. "Mothers" is a term that refers to individuals who have given birth to and raised children. It is not a medical term with a specific definition. If you are referring to a different word or term, please clarify so I can provide a more accurate response.

A live birth is the complete expulsion or extraction from its mother of a product of human conception, irrespective of the duration of the pregnancy, that, after such separation, breathes or shows any other evidence of life - such as beating of the heart, pulsation of the umbilical cord, or definite movement of voluntary muscles - whether or not the umbilical cord has been cut or the placenta is attached.

This definition is used by the World Health Organization (WHO) and most national statistical agencies to distinguish live births from stillbirths. It's important to note that in some medical contexts, a different definition of live birth may be used.

Assisted reproductive techniques (ART) are medical procedures that involve the handling of human sperm and ova to establish a pregnancy. These techniques are used when other methods of achieving pregnancy have failed or are not available. Examples of ART include in vitro fertilization (IVF), intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), gamete intrafallopian transfer (GIFT), and zygote intrafallopian transfer (ZIFT). These procedures may be used to treat infertility, prevent genetic disorders, or to help same-sex couples or single people have children. It is important to note that the use of ART can involve significant physical, emotional, and financial costs, and it may not always result in a successful pregnancy.

Fertility is the natural ability to conceive or to cause conception of offspring. In humans, it is the capacity of a woman and a man to reproduce through sexual reproduction. For women, fertility usually takes place during their reproductive years, which is from adolescence until menopause. A woman's fertility depends on various factors including her age, overall health, and the health of her reproductive system.

For men, fertility can be affected by a variety of factors such as age, genetics, general health, sexual function, and environmental factors that may affect sperm production or quality. Factors that can negatively impact male fertility include exposure to certain chemicals, radiation, smoking, alcohol consumption, drug use, and sexually transmitted infections (STIs).

Infertility is a common medical condition affecting about 10-15% of couples trying to conceive. Infertility can be primary or secondary. Primary infertility refers to the inability to conceive after one year of unprotected sexual intercourse, while secondary infertility refers to the inability to conceive following a previous pregnancy.

Infertility can be treated with various medical and surgical interventions depending on the underlying cause. These may include medications to stimulate ovulation, intrauterine insemination (IUI), in vitro fertilization (IVF), or surgery to correct anatomical abnormalities.

Fetal movement, also known as quickening, refers to the first perceived movements of the fetus in the uterus during pregnancy. These movements are often described as a fluttering sensation in the lower abdomen and are usually felt by pregnant individuals between 18 and 25 weeks of gestation, although they may occur earlier or later depending on various factors such as the position of the placenta and whether it is a first-time pregnancy.

Fetal movements are an important sign of fetal well-being, and pregnant individuals are typically advised to monitor them regularly starting from around 28 weeks of gestation. A decrease in fetal movement or the absence of fetal movement for an extended period may indicate a problem and should be reported to a healthcare provider immediately.

Fetal movements can be described as kicks, rolls, jabs, or turns, and they become stronger and more frequent as the pregnancy progresses. By 32 weeks of gestation, most fetuses move around 10 times per hour, and by 37 weeks, they typically move around 30 times per day. However, it is important to note that every fetus has its own pattern of movements, and what is normal for one may not be normal for another.

A case-control study is an observational research design used to identify risk factors or causes of a disease or health outcome. In this type of study, individuals with the disease or condition (cases) are compared with similar individuals who do not have the disease or condition (controls). The exposure history or other characteristics of interest are then compared between the two groups to determine if there is an association between the exposure and the disease.

Case-control studies are often used when it is not feasible or ethical to conduct a randomized controlled trial, as they can provide valuable insights into potential causes of diseases or health outcomes in a relatively short period of time and at a lower cost than other study designs. However, because case-control studies rely on retrospective data collection, they are subject to biases such as recall bias and selection bias, which can affect the validity of the results. Therefore, it is important to carefully design and conduct case-control studies to minimize these potential sources of bias.

Artificial insemination (AI) is a medical procedure that involves the introduction of sperm into a female's cervix or uterus for the purpose of achieving pregnancy. This procedure can be performed using sperm from a partner or a donor. It is often used when there are issues with male fertility, such as low sperm count or poor sperm motility, or in cases where natural conception is not possible due to various medical reasons.

There are two types of artificial insemination: intracervical insemination (ICI) and intrauterine insemination (IUI). ICI involves placing the sperm directly into the cervix, while IUI involves placing the sperm directly into the uterus using a catheter. The choice of procedure depends on various factors, including the cause of infertility and the preferences of the individuals involved.

Artificial insemination is a relatively simple and low-risk procedure that can be performed in a doctor's office or clinic. It may be combined with fertility drugs to increase the chances of pregnancy. The success rate of artificial insemination varies depending on several factors, including the age and fertility of the individuals involved, the cause of infertility, and the type of procedure used.

Intravaginal administration refers to the delivery of medications or other substances directly into the vagina. This route of administration can be used for local treatment of vaginal infections or inflammation, or to deliver systemic medication that is absorbed through the vaginal mucosa.

Medications can be administered intravaginally using a variety of dosage forms, including creams, gels, foams, suppositories, and films. The choice of dosage form depends on several factors, such as the drug's physicochemical properties, the desired duration of action, and patient preference.

Intravaginal administration offers several advantages over other routes of administration. It allows for direct delivery of medication to the site of action, which can result in higher local concentrations and fewer systemic side effects. Additionally, some medications may be more effective when administered intravaginally due to their ability to bypass first-pass metabolism in the liver.

However, there are also potential disadvantages to intravaginal administration. Some women may find it uncomfortable or inconvenient to use this route of administration, and there is a risk of leakage or expulsion of the medication. Additionally, certain medications may cause local irritation or allergic reactions when administered intravaginally.

Overall, intravaginal administration can be a useful route of administration for certain medications and conditions, but it is important to consider the potential benefits and risks when choosing this method.

Vertical transmission of infectious diseases refers to the spread of an infection from an infected mother to her offspring during pregnancy, childbirth, or breastfeeding. This mode of transmission can occur through several pathways:

1. Transplacental transmission: The infection crosses the placenta and reaches the fetus while it is still in the womb. Examples include HIV, syphilis, and toxoplasmosis.
2. Intrauterine infection: The mother's infection causes direct damage to the developing fetus or its surrounding tissues, leading to complications such as congenital defects. Examples include rubella and cytomegalovirus (CMV).
3. Perinatal transmission: This occurs during childbirth when the infant comes into contact with the mother's infected genital tract or bodily fluids. Examples include group B streptococcus, herpes simplex virus (HSV), and hepatitis B.
4. Postnatal transmission: This occurs after birth, often through breastfeeding, when the infant ingests infected milk or comes into contact with the mother's contaminated bodily fluids. Examples include HIV and HTLV-I (human T-lymphotropic virus type I).

Vertical transmission is a significant concern in public health, as it can lead to severe complications, congenital disabilities, or even death in newborns. Preventive measures, such as prenatal screening, vaccination, and antimicrobial treatment, are crucial for reducing the risk of vertical transmission and ensuring better outcomes for both mothers and their offspring.

Reference values, also known as reference ranges or reference intervals, are the set of values that are considered normal or typical for a particular population or group of people. These values are often used in laboratory tests to help interpret test results and determine whether a patient's value falls within the expected range.

The process of establishing reference values typically involves measuring a particular biomarker or parameter in a large, healthy population and then calculating the mean and standard deviation of the measurements. Based on these statistics, a range is established that includes a certain percentage of the population (often 95%) and excludes extreme outliers.

It's important to note that reference values can vary depending on factors such as age, sex, race, and other demographic characteristics. Therefore, it's essential to use reference values that are specific to the relevant population when interpreting laboratory test results. Additionally, reference values may change over time due to advances in measurement technology or changes in the population being studied.

The myometrium is the middle and thickest layer of the uterine wall, composed mainly of smooth muscle cells. It is responsible for the strong contractions during labor and can also contribute to bleeding during menstruation or childbirth. The myometrium is able to stretch and expand to accommodate a growing fetus and then contract during labor to help push the baby out. It also plays a role in maintaining the structure and shape of the uterus, and in protecting the internal organs within the pelvic cavity.

Oligohydramnios is a medical condition that refers to an abnormally low amount of amniotic fluid surrounding the fetus in the uterus during pregnancy. The amniotic fluid is essential for the protection and development of the fetus, including lung maturation and joint mobility. Oligohydramnios is often diagnosed through ultrasound measurements of the pocket depth of the amniotic fluid and is defined as an amniotic fluid index (AFI) of less than 5 cm or a single deepest pocket (SDP) of less than 2 cm after 24 weeks of gestation.

The condition can be caused by various factors, such as fetal growth restriction, maternal high blood pressure, placental insufficiency, rupture of membranes, and genetic disorders. Oligohydramnios may increase the risk of complications during pregnancy and childbirth, including preterm labor, fetal distress, and stillbirth. The management of oligohydramnios depends on the underlying cause and gestational age, and may include close monitoring, delivery, or treatment of the underlying condition.

Infertility is a reproductive health disorder defined as the failure to achieve a clinical pregnancy after 12 months or more of regular, unprotected sexual intercourse or due to an impairment of a person's capacity to reproduce either as an individual or with their partner. It can be caused by various factors in both men and women, including hormonal imbalances, structural abnormalities, genetic issues, infections, age, lifestyle factors, and others. Infertility can have significant emotional and psychological impacts on individuals and couples experiencing it, and medical intervention may be necessary to help them conceive.

Ultrasonography, Doppler refers to a non-invasive diagnostic medical procedure that uses high-frequency sound waves to create real-time images of the movement of blood flow through vessels, tissues, or heart valves. The Doppler effect is used to measure the frequency shift of the ultrasound waves as they bounce off moving red blood cells, which allows for the calculation of the speed and direction of blood flow. This technique is commonly used to diagnose and monitor various conditions such as deep vein thrombosis, carotid artery stenosis, heart valve abnormalities, and fetal heart development during pregnancy. It does not use radiation or contrast agents and is considered safe with minimal risks.

The cervix uteri, often simply referred to as the cervix, is the lower part of the uterus (womb) that connects to the vagina. It has an opening called the external os through which menstrual blood exits the uterus and sperm enters during sexual intercourse. During childbirth, the cervix dilates or opens to allow for the passage of the baby through the birth canal.

Premature rupture of fetal membranes (PROM) is a medical condition that occurs when the amniotic sac, which surrounds and protects the developing fetus, breaks or ruptures prematurely before labor begins. The amniotic sac is made up of two layers of fetal membranes - the inner amnion and the outer chorion.

In a normal pregnancy, the fetal membranes rupture spontaneously during labor as a sign that the delivery process has begun. However, if the membranes rupture before 37 weeks of gestation, it is considered premature rupture of membranes. PROM can lead to complications such as preterm labor, infection, and fetal distress.

PROM can be classified into two types based on the timing of membrane rupture:

1. Preterm Premature Rupture of Membranes (PPROM): When the membranes rupture before 37 weeks of gestation, it is called preterm premature rupture of membranes. PPROM increases the risk of preterm labor and delivery, which can lead to various complications for the newborn, such as respiratory distress syndrome, brain bleeding, and developmental delays.
2. Term Premature Rupture of Membranes (TPROM): When the membranes rupture at or after 37 weeks of gestation, it is called term premature rupture of membranes. TPROM may not necessarily lead to complications if labor begins soon after the membrane rupture and there are no signs of infection. However, if labor does not start within 24 hours of membrane rupture, the risk of infection increases, and the healthcare provider may consider inducing labor or performing a cesarean delivery.

The exact cause of premature rupture of fetal membranes is not always known, but several factors can increase the risk, including previous PROM, bacterial infections, smoking, substance abuse, and trauma to the uterus. Healthcare providers monitor women with PROM closely for signs of infection and preterm labor and may recommend treatments such as antibiotics, corticosteroids, or hospitalization to reduce the risk of complications.

Placenta accreta is a medical condition where the placenta grows too deeply into the uterine wall, beyond the normal depth. In a healthy pregnancy, the placenta attaches to the uterus and provides oxygen and nutrients to the growing fetus through the umbilical cord. However, in placenta accreta, the placental tissue invades the muscle of the uterus, which can cause complications during childbirth.

There are three types of placenta accreta:

1. Placenta Accreta: The placenta attaches too deeply into the uterine wall but does not penetrate the uterine muscle.
2. Placenta Increta: The placenta grows into and partially penetrates the uterine muscle.
3. Placenta Percreta: The placenta fully penetrates the uterine muscle and can grow into nearby organs, such as the bladder or bowel.

Placenta accreta is a serious condition that can cause severe bleeding during childbirth, which may require an emergency hysterectomy (removal of the uterus) to control the bleeding. It is more common in women who have had previous cesarean sections or other uterine surgeries.

Chromosome disorders are a group of genetic conditions caused by abnormalities in the number or structure of chromosomes. Chromosomes are thread-like structures located in the nucleus of cells that contain most of the body's genetic material, which is composed of DNA and proteins. Normally, humans have 23 pairs of chromosomes, for a total of 46 chromosomes.

Chromosome disorders can result from changes in the number of chromosomes (aneuploidy) or structural abnormalities in one or more chromosomes. Some common examples of chromosome disorders include:

1. Down syndrome: a condition caused by an extra copy of chromosome 21, resulting in intellectual disability, developmental delays, and distinctive physical features.
2. Turner syndrome: a condition that affects only females and is caused by the absence of all or part of one X chromosome, resulting in short stature, lack of sexual development, and other symptoms.
3. Klinefelter syndrome: a condition that affects only males and is caused by an extra copy of the X chromosome, resulting in tall stature, infertility, and other symptoms.
4. Cri-du-chat syndrome: a condition caused by a deletion of part of the short arm of chromosome 5, resulting in intellectual disability, developmental delays, and a distinctive cat-like cry.
5. Fragile X syndrome: a condition caused by a mutation in the FMR1 gene on the X chromosome, resulting in intellectual disability, behavioral problems, and physical symptoms.

Chromosome disorders can be diagnosed through various genetic tests, such as karyotyping, chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA), or fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Treatment for these conditions depends on the specific disorder and its associated symptoms and may include medical interventions, therapies, and educational support.

Morning sickness is a common condition during pregnancy, typically characterized by nausea and vomiting. It usually occurs in the morning, although it can happen at any time of the day. The exact cause is not known, but it's thought to be due to the hormonal changes that occur during early pregnancy. For most women, morning sickness improves or goes away after the first trimester. However, for some, it may last longer. While it can be unpleasant and uncomfortable, morning sickness is generally not harmful to the mother or baby, unless it's severe and leads to dehydration or weight loss. In such cases, medical attention is required.

Neural Tube Defects (NTDs) are a group of birth defects that affect the brain, spine, or spinal cord. They occur when the neural tube, which forms the early brain and spinal cord of the embryo, does not close properly during fetal development. This can result in various conditions such as:

1. Anencephaly: a severe defect where most of the brain and skull are missing. Infants with anencephaly are usually stillborn or die shortly after birth.
2. Spina bifida: a condition where the spine does not close properly, leaving a portion of the spinal cord and nerves exposed. This can result in various neurological problems, including paralysis, bladder and bowel dysfunction, and hydrocephalus (fluid buildup in the brain).
3. Encephalocele: a condition where the skull does not close properly, allowing the brain to protrude through an opening in the skull. This can result in various neurological problems, including developmental delays, vision and hearing impairments, and seizures.

NTDs are thought to be caused by a combination of genetic and environmental factors, such as folic acid deficiency, obesity, diabetes, and exposure to certain medications during pregnancy. Folic acid supplementation before and during early pregnancy has been shown to reduce the risk of NTDs.

Trisomy is a genetic condition where there is an extra copy of a particular chromosome, resulting in 47 chromosomes instead of the typical 46 in a cell. This usually occurs due to an error in cell division during the development of the egg, sperm, or embryo.

Instead of the normal pair, there are three copies (trisomy) of that chromosome. The most common form of trisomy is Trisomy 21, also known as Down syndrome, where there is an extra copy of chromosome 21. Other forms include Trisomy 13 (Patau syndrome) and Trisomy 18 (Edwards syndrome), which are associated with more severe developmental issues and shorter lifespans.

Trisomy can also occur in a mosaic form, where some cells have the extra chromosome while others do not, leading to varying degrees of symptoms depending on the proportion of affected cells.

An "eugenic abortion" is not a medical term, but rather a descriptive phrase that combines two concepts: eugenics and abortion.

Eugenics refers to the belief and practice of improving the human species by encouraging reproduction of individuals with desired traits and preventing reproduction of those with undesired traits. This concept has been widely criticized for its potential to be used as a tool for discrimination and oppression.

Abortion, on the other hand, is the medical procedure to end a pregnancy before the fetus can survive outside the womb.

A "eugenic abortion," therefore, generally refers to the practice of terminating a pregnancy based on the perceived genetic traits or characteristics of the fetus, such as disability, race, or sex. This phrase is often used in discussions about the ethics and morality of selective abortions, and it raises important questions about discrimination, reproductive rights, and medical ethics. It's worth noting that the vast majority of abortions are not performed for eugenic reasons, but rather due to a variety of personal, medical, and socioeconomic factors.

The amnion is the innermost fetal membrane in mammals, forming a sac that contains and protects the developing embryo and later the fetus within the uterus. It is one of the extraembryonic membranes that are derived from the outer cell mass of the blastocyst during early embryonic development. The amnion is filled with fluid (amniotic fluid) that allows for the freedom of movement and protection of the developing fetus.

The primary function of the amnion is to provide a protective environment for the growing fetus, allowing for expansion and preventing physical damage from outside forces. Additionally, the amniotic fluid serves as a medium for the exchange of waste products and nutrients between the fetal membranes and the placenta. The amnion also contributes to the formation of the umbilical cord and plays a role in the initiation of labor during childbirth.

In medical terms, the "neck" is defined as the portion of the body that extends from the skull/head to the thorax or chest region. It contains 7 cervical vertebrae, muscles, nerves, blood vessels, lymphatic vessels, and glands (such as the thyroid gland). The neck is responsible for supporting the head, allowing its movement in various directions, and housing vital structures that enable functions like respiration and circulation.

Ultrasonography, Doppler, color is a type of diagnostic ultrasound technique that uses the Doppler effect to produce visual images of blood flow in vessels and the heart. The Doppler effect is the change in frequency or wavelength of a wave in relation to an observer who is moving relative to the source of the wave. In this context, it refers to the change in frequency of the ultrasound waves as they reflect off moving red blood cells.

In color Doppler ultrasonography, different colors are used to represent the direction and speed of blood flow. Red typically represents blood flowing toward the transducer (the device that sends and receives sound waves), while blue represents blood flowing away from the transducer. The intensity or brightness of the color is proportional to the velocity of blood flow.

Color Doppler ultrasonography is often used in conjunction with grayscale ultrasound imaging, which provides information about the structure and composition of tissues. Together, these techniques can help diagnose a wide range of conditions, including heart disease, blood clots, and abnormalities in blood flow.

Uterine rupture is a serious obstetrical complication characterized by the disruption or tearing of all layers of the uterine wall, including the serosa (outer covering), myometrium (middle layer of muscle), and endometrium (inner lining). This can occur during pregnancy, labor, or delivery. In some cases, it may also involve the rupture of the adjacent structures such as bladder or broad ligament. Uterine rupture is a medical emergency that requires immediate surgical intervention to prevent maternal and fetal mortality or morbidity.

The symptoms of uterine rupture might include severe abdominal pain, vaginal bleeding, loss of fetal heart rate, changes in the mother's vital signs, and shock. The risk factors for uterine rupture include previous cesarean delivery, grand multiparity (having given birth to five or more pregnancies), use of labor-inducing drugs like oxytocin, and instrumental deliveries with vacuum extractors or forceps.

The management of uterine rupture typically involves an emergency laparotomy (open abdominal surgery) to repair the tear and stop any bleeding. In some cases, a hysterectomy (removal of the uterus) may be necessary if the damage is too severe or if there are other complications. The prognosis for both mother and baby depends on various factors like the extent of the injury, timeliness of treatment, and the overall health status of the patient before the event.

HELLP syndrome is a serious complication in pregnancy, characterized by Hemolysis (the breakdown of red blood cells), Elevated Liver enzymes, and Low Platelet count. It is often considered a variant of severe preeclampsia or eclampsia, although it can also occur without these conditions.

The symptoms of HELLP syndrome include headache, nausea and vomiting, upper right abdominal pain, and visual disturbances. It can lead to serious complications for both the mother and the baby, such as liver failure, placental abruption, disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), and even death if not promptly diagnosed and treated.

The exact cause of HELLP syndrome is not known, but it is thought to be related to problems with the blood vessels that supply the placenta. Treatment typically involves delivering the baby as soon as possible, even if the baby is premature. Women who have had HELLP syndrome are at increased risk for complications in future pregnancies.

Maternal welfare is not a term that has a specific medical definition. However, in a general sense, it refers to the physical, mental, and social well-being of a woman during pregnancy, childbirth, and the postpartum period. It encompasses various factors such as access to quality healthcare services, nutrition, emotional support, and a safe and healthy environment.

Maternal welfare is an essential component of maternal health, which aims to ensure that women have a positive and safe pregnancy and childbirth experience, free from complications and harm. It involves addressing issues related to maternal mortality and morbidity, prenatal care, family planning, and reproductive rights.

Promoting maternal welfare requires a multidisciplinary approach that includes healthcare providers, policymakers, community leaders, and families working together to ensure that women have access to the resources and support they need to maintain their health and well-being during pregnancy and beyond.

Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD) is a term used to describe a range of effects that can occur in an individual whose mother drank alcohol during pregnancy. These effects may include physical, mental, and behavioral abnormalities, and can vary in severity and combination from one individual to another.

The four diagnostic categories within FASD are:

1. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS): This is the most severe form of FASD and is characterized by a specific pattern of facial features, growth deficiencies, and central nervous system dysfunction.
2. Partial Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (pFAS): This category includes individuals who have some, but not all, of the features of FAS.
3. Alcohol-Related Neurodevelopmental Disorder (ARND): This category includes individuals who have functional or cognitive impairments due to prenatal alcohol exposure, but do not meet the criteria for FAS or pFAS.
4. Alcohol-Related Birth Defects (ARBD): This category includes individuals who have physical birth defects due to prenatal alcohol exposure.

It is important to note that FASD is a completely preventable condition, and there is no known safe amount or safe time to drink alcohol during pregnancy.

Weight gain is defined as an increase in body weight over time, which can be attributed to various factors such as an increase in muscle mass, fat mass, or total body water. It is typically measured in terms of pounds or kilograms and can be intentional or unintentional. Unintentional weight gain may be a cause for concern if it's significant or accompanied by other symptoms, as it could indicate an underlying medical condition such as hypothyroidism, diabetes, or heart disease.

It is important to note that while body mass index (BMI) can be used as a general guideline for weight status, it does not differentiate between muscle mass and fat mass. Therefore, an increase in muscle mass through activities like strength training could result in a higher BMI, but this may not necessarily be indicative of increased health risks associated with excess body fat.

Logistic models, specifically logistic regression models, are a type of statistical analysis used in medical and epidemiological research to identify the relationship between the risk of a certain health outcome or disease (dependent variable) and one or more independent variables, such as demographic factors, exposure variables, or other clinical measurements.

In contrast to linear regression models, logistic regression models are used when the dependent variable is binary or dichotomous in nature, meaning it can only take on two values, such as "disease present" or "disease absent." The model uses a logistic function to estimate the probability of the outcome based on the independent variables.

Logistic regression models are useful for identifying risk factors and estimating the strength of associations between exposures and health outcomes, adjusting for potential confounders, and predicting the probability of an outcome given certain values of the independent variables. They can also be used to develop clinical prediction rules or scores that can aid in decision-making and patient care.

Ovulation induction is a medical procedure that involves the stimulation of ovulation (the release of an egg from the ovaries) in women who have difficulties conceiving due to ovulatory disorders. This is typically achieved through the use of medications such as clomiphene citrate or gonadotropins, which promote the development and maturation of follicles in the ovaries containing eggs. The process is closely monitored through regular ultrasounds and hormone tests to ensure appropriate response and minimize the risk of complications like multiple pregnancies. Ovulation induction may be used as a standalone treatment or in conjunction with other assisted reproductive technologies (ART), such as intrauterine insemination (IUI) or in vitro fertilization (IVF).

A biological marker, often referred to as a biomarker, is a measurable indicator that reflects the presence or severity of a disease state, or a response to a therapeutic intervention. Biomarkers can be found in various materials such as blood, tissues, or bodily fluids, and they can take many forms, including molecular, histologic, radiographic, or physiological measurements.

In the context of medical research and clinical practice, biomarkers are used for a variety of purposes, such as:

1. Diagnosis: Biomarkers can help diagnose a disease by indicating the presence or absence of a particular condition. For example, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is a biomarker used to detect prostate cancer.
2. Monitoring: Biomarkers can be used to monitor the progression or regression of a disease over time. For instance, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels are monitored in diabetes patients to assess long-term blood glucose control.
3. Predicting: Biomarkers can help predict the likelihood of developing a particular disease or the risk of a negative outcome. For example, the presence of certain genetic mutations can indicate an increased risk for breast cancer.
4. Response to treatment: Biomarkers can be used to evaluate the effectiveness of a specific treatment by measuring changes in the biomarker levels before and after the intervention. This is particularly useful in personalized medicine, where treatments are tailored to individual patients based on their unique biomarker profiles.

It's important to note that for a biomarker to be considered clinically valid and useful, it must undergo rigorous validation through well-designed studies, including demonstrating sensitivity, specificity, reproducibility, and clinical relevance.

Meconium is the first stool passed by a newborn infant, typically within the first 48 hours of life. It is composed of materials ingested during fetal development, including intestinal epithelial cells, lanugo (fine hair), amniotic fluid, mucus, bile, and water. The color of meconium is usually greenish-black, and its consistency can range from a thick paste to a liquid. Meconium staining of the amniotic fluid can occur when the fetus has passed meconium while still in the uterus, which may indicate fetal distress and requires careful medical attention during delivery.

Placental lactogen is a hormone produced by the placenta during pregnancy in humans and some other mammals. It is similar in structure to human growth hormone and prolactin, and has both growth-promoting and lactogenic (milk-producing) properties. Placental lactogen plays an important role in regulating maternal metabolism during pregnancy, promoting the growth and development of the fetus, and preparing the mother's body for lactation after birth. It helps to stimulate the growth of the mammary glands and the production of milk by increasing the availability of nutrients such as glucose, amino acids, and fatty acids in the mother's bloodstream. Placental lactogen also helps to regulate the mother's insulin sensitivity, which can affect her energy levels and the growth of the fetus.

Longitudinal studies are a type of research design where data is collected from the same subjects repeatedly over a period of time, often years or even decades. These studies are used to establish patterns of changes and events over time, and can help researchers identify causal relationships between variables. They are particularly useful in fields such as epidemiology, psychology, and sociology, where the focus is on understanding developmental trends and the long-term effects of various factors on health and behavior.

In medical research, longitudinal studies can be used to track the progression of diseases over time, identify risk factors for certain conditions, and evaluate the effectiveness of treatments or interventions. For example, a longitudinal study might follow a group of individuals over several decades to assess their exposure to certain environmental factors and their subsequent development of chronic diseases such as cancer or heart disease. By comparing data collected at multiple time points, researchers can identify trends and correlations that may not be apparent in shorter-term studies.

Longitudinal studies have several advantages over other research designs, including their ability to establish temporal relationships between variables, track changes over time, and reduce the impact of confounding factors. However, they also have some limitations, such as the potential for attrition (loss of participants over time), which can introduce bias and affect the validity of the results. Additionally, longitudinal studies can be expensive and time-consuming to conduct, requiring significant resources and a long-term commitment from both researchers and study participants.

Immunologic pregnancy tests are a type of diagnostic test used to determine the presence of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) in a patient's urine or blood. hCG is a hormone produced by the placenta during pregnancy, and its levels increase rapidly in early pregnancy. Immunologic pregnancy tests use antibodies to detect the presence of hCG and produce a positive or negative result based on the amount of hCG detected. These tests are widely used as an initial screening tool for pregnancy and can provide accurate results within a few days of missed menstrual period.

Oocyte donation is a medical procedure in which mature oocytes (or immature oocytes that are matured in the lab) are donated by one woman to another woman for the purpose of assisted reproduction. The recipient woman typically receives hormonal treatments to prepare her uterus for embryo implantation. The donated oocytes are then fertilized with sperm from the recipient's partner or a sperm donor in a laboratory, and the resulting embryos are transferred into the recipient's uterus.

Oocyte donation is often recommended for women who have poor ovarian function or who have a high risk of passing on genetic disorders to their offspring. It is also used in cases where previous attempts at in vitro fertilization (IVF) using the woman's own eggs have been unsuccessful.

The process of oocyte donation involves rigorous screening and evaluation of both the donor and recipient, including medical, psychological, and genetic evaluations, to ensure the safety and success of the procedure. The donor's ovaries are stimulated with hormonal medications to produce multiple mature oocytes, which are then retrieved through a minor surgical procedure.

Overall, oocyte donation is a complex and emotionally charged process that requires careful consideration and counseling for both the donor and recipient. It offers hope for many women who would otherwise be unable to conceive a biological child.

A dietary supplement is a product that contains nutrients, such as vitamins, minerals, amino acids, herbs or other botanicals, and is intended to be taken by mouth, to supplement the diet. Dietary supplements can include a wide range of products, such as vitamin and mineral supplements, herbal supplements, and sports nutrition products.

Dietary supplements are not intended to treat, diagnose, cure, or alleviate the effects of diseases. They are intended to be used as a way to add extra nutrients to the diet or to support specific health functions. It is important to note that dietary supplements are not subject to the same rigorous testing and regulations as drugs, so it is important to choose products carefully and consult with a healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns about using them.

Choriocarcinoma is a rapidly growing and invasive type of gestational trophoblastic disease (GTD), which are abnormal growths that develop in the tissues that are supposed to become the placenta during pregnancy. It occurs when a malignant tumor develops from trophoblast cells, which are normally found in the developing embryo and help to form the placenta.

Choriocarcinoma can occur after any type of pregnancy, including normal pregnancies, molar pregnancies (a rare mass that forms inside the uterus after conception), or ectopic pregnancies (when a fertilized egg implants outside the uterus). It is characterized by the presence of both trophoblastic and cancerous cells, which can produce human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) hormone.

Choriocarcinoma can spread quickly to other parts of the body, such as the lungs, liver, brain, or vagina, through the bloodstream. It is important to diagnose and treat choriocarcinoma early to prevent serious complications and improve the chances of a successful treatment outcome. Treatment typically involves surgery, chemotherapy, or radiation therapy.

An incomplete abortion is a medical term used to describe a situation where a pregnancy is expelled or terminated spontaneously or induced, but only partially. This means that some of the products of conception (i.e., the fetus, placenta, and associated membranes) are retained within the uterus.

Incomplete abortions can be caused by various factors, including complications during a medical or surgical abortion, miscarriage, ectopic pregnancy, or infection. Symptoms of an incomplete abortion may include vaginal bleeding, abdominal pain, cramping, and the passage of tissue or clots.

Incomplete abortions are considered a medical emergency because they can lead to complications such as infection, hemorrhage, and infertility if left untreated. Treatment typically involves a surgical procedure called dilatation and curettage (D&C) to remove any remaining products of conception from the uterus. In some cases, medication may also be used to help complete the abortion and prevent infection.

A urachal cyst is a rare type of abdominal wall defect that results from the persistent embryonic remnant of the urachus, which is a canal-like structure that connects the bladder to the umbilicus (belly button) during fetal development. This canal normally obliterates and becomes a fibrous cord known as the median umbilical ligament after birth. However, if it fails to do so, it can result in the formation of various urachal anomalies, including a urachal cyst.

A urachal cyst is a fluid-filled sac that forms along any part of the urachus, usually located between the bladder and the umbilicus. These cysts are typically asymptomatic but can become infected or inflamed, leading to symptoms such as abdominal pain, tenderness, fever, and a palpable mass in the lower abdomen. In some cases, urachal cysts may also cause urinary tract infections or bladder irritation. Diagnosis is usually made through imaging studies such as ultrasound, CT scan, or MRI, and treatment typically involves surgical excision of the cyst to prevent complications.

Estradiol is a type of estrogen, which is a female sex hormone. It is the most potent and dominant form of estrogen in humans. Estradiol plays a crucial role in the development and maintenance of secondary sexual characteristics in women, such as breast development and regulation of the menstrual cycle. It also helps maintain bone density, protect the lining of the uterus, and is involved in cognition and mood regulation.

Estradiol is produced primarily by the ovaries, but it can also be synthesized in smaller amounts by the adrenal glands and fat cells. In men, estradiol is produced from testosterone through a process called aromatization. Abnormal levels of estradiol can contribute to various health issues, such as hormonal imbalances, infertility, osteoporosis, and certain types of cancer.

A questionnaire in the medical context is a standardized, systematic, and structured tool used to gather information from individuals regarding their symptoms, medical history, lifestyle, or other health-related factors. It typically consists of a series of written questions that can be either self-administered or administered by an interviewer. Questionnaires are widely used in various areas of healthcare, including clinical research, epidemiological studies, patient care, and health services evaluation to collect data that can inform diagnosis, treatment planning, and population health management. They provide a consistent and organized method for obtaining information from large groups or individual patients, helping to ensure accurate and comprehensive data collection while minimizing bias and variability in the information gathered.

Contraception is the use of various devices, methods, or medications to prevent pregnancy. The term is derived from the Latin words "contra" meaning "against" and "conceptio" meaning "conception." Contraceptive methods can be broadly categorized into temporary and permanent methods. Temporary methods include barriers such as condoms, diaphragms, cervical caps, and sponges; hormonal methods like the pill, patch, ring, injection, and emergency contraception; and fertility awareness-based methods that involve tracking ovulation and avoiding intercourse during fertile periods. Permanent methods include surgical procedures such as tubal ligation for women and vasectomy for men.

The primary goal of contraception is to prevent the sperm from reaching and fertilizing the egg, thereby preventing pregnancy. However, some contraceptive methods also offer additional benefits such as reducing the risk of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and regulating menstrual cycles. It's important to note that while contraception can prevent pregnancy, it does not protect against STIs, so using condoms is still recommended for individuals who are at risk of contracting STIs.

When choosing a contraceptive method, it's essential to consider factors such as effectiveness, safety, ease of use, cost, and personal preferences. It's also important to consult with a healthcare provider to determine the most appropriate method based on individual health history and needs.

Uterine neoplasms refer to abnormal growths in the uterus, which can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). These growths can originate from different types of cells within the uterus, leading to various types of uterine neoplasms. The two main categories of uterine neoplasms are endometrial neoplasms and uterine sarcomas.

Endometrial neoplasms develop from the endometrium, which is the inner lining of the uterus. Most endometrial neoplasms are classified as endometrioid adenocarcinomas, arising from glandular cells in the endometrium. Other types include serous carcinoma, clear cell carcinoma, and mucinous carcinoma.

Uterine sarcomas, on the other hand, are less common and originate from the connective tissue (stroma) or muscle (myometrium) of the uterus. Uterine sarcomas can be further divided into several subtypes, such as leiomyosarcoma, endometrial stromal sarcoma, and undifferentiated uterine sarcoma.

Uterine neoplasms can cause various symptoms, including abnormal vaginal bleeding or discharge, pelvic pain, and difficulty urinating or having bowel movements. The diagnosis typically involves a combination of imaging tests (such as ultrasound, CT, or MRI scans) and tissue biopsies to determine the type and extent of the neoplasm. Treatment options depend on the type, stage, and patient's overall health but may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or hormone therapy.

Smoking is not a medical condition, but it's a significant health risk behavior. Here is the definition from a public health perspective:

Smoking is the act of inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning tobacco that is commonly consumed through cigarettes, pipes, and cigars. The smoke contains over 7,000 chemicals, including nicotine, tar, carbon monoxide, and numerous toxic and carcinogenic substances. These toxins contribute to a wide range of diseases and health conditions, such as lung cancer, heart disease, stroke, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and various other cancers, as well as adverse reproductive outcomes and negative impacts on the developing fetus during pregnancy. Smoking is highly addictive due to the nicotine content, which makes quitting smoking a significant challenge for many individuals.

Eclampsia is a serious pregnancy complication characterized by the onset of seizures or convulsions in a woman who has already developed preeclampsia, which is a condition marked by high blood pressure and damage to organs such as the liver and kidneys. Eclampsia can occur before, during, or after delivery and is considered a medical emergency that requires immediate treatment. It can pose significant risks to both the mother and the baby, including premature birth, fetal growth restriction, and even maternal and fetal death.

The exact causes of eclampsia are not fully understood, but it is thought to be related to problems with the placenta and abnormal blood vessel development in the uterus. Risk factors for developing eclampsia include preexisting medical conditions such as chronic hypertension or diabetes, a history of preeclampsia or eclampsia in previous pregnancies, multiple gestation (carrying more than one baby), and certain genetic factors.

Treatment for eclampsia typically involves delivering the baby as soon as possible to prevent further complications. In some cases, medication may be given to manage seizures and prevent their recurrence. Close monitoring of both the mother and the baby is essential to ensure the best possible outcomes.

The menstrual cycle is a series of natural changes that occur in the female reproductive system over an approximate 28-day interval, marking the body's preparation for potential pregnancy. It involves the interplay of hormones that regulate the growth and disintegration of the uterine lining (endometrium) and the release of an egg (ovulation) from the ovaries.

The menstrual cycle can be divided into three main phases:

1. Menstrual phase: The cycle begins with the onset of menstruation, where the thickened uterine lining is shed through the vagina, lasting typically for 3-7 days. This shedding occurs due to a decrease in estrogen and progesterone levels, which are hormones essential for maintaining the endometrium during the previous cycle.

2. Follicular phase: After menstruation, the follicular phase commences with the pituitary gland releasing follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH). FSH stimulates the growth of several ovarian follicles, each containing an immature egg. One dominant follicle usually becomes selected to mature and release an egg during ovulation. Estrogen levels rise as the dominant follicle grows, causing the endometrium to thicken in preparation for a potential pregnancy.

3. Luteal phase: Following ovulation, the ruptured follicle transforms into the corpus luteum, which produces progesterone and estrogen to further support the endometrial thickening. If fertilization does not occur within approximately 24 hours after ovulation, the corpus luteum will degenerate, leading to a decline in hormone levels. This drop triggers the onset of menstruation, initiating a new menstrual cycle.

Understanding the menstrual cycle is crucial for monitoring reproductive health and planning or preventing pregnancies. Variations in cycle length and symptoms are common among women, but persistent irregularities may indicate underlying medical conditions requiring further evaluation by a healthcare professional.

Folic acid is the synthetic form of folate, a type of B vitamin (B9). It is widely used in dietary supplements and fortified foods because it is more stable and has a longer shelf life than folate. Folate is essential for normal cell growth and metabolism, and it plays a critical role in the formation of DNA and RNA, the body's genetic material. Folic acid is also crucial during early pregnancy to prevent birth defects of the brain and spine called neural tube defects.

Medical Definition: "Folic acid is the synthetic form of folate (vitamin B9), a water-soluble vitamin involved in DNA synthesis, repair, and methylation. It is used in dietary supplementation and food fortification due to its stability and longer shelf life compared to folate. Folic acid is critical for normal cell growth, development, and red blood cell production."

Fetoscopy is a minimally invasive surgical procedure that allows direct visualization of the fetus and the intrauterine environment through the use of a fiber-optic scope. It is typically performed during the second trimester of pregnancy to diagnose or treat various fetal conditions, such as twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome, congenital diaphragmatic hernia, or spina bifida. The procedure involves inserting a thin tube called a fetoscope through the mother's abdomen and uterus to access the fetus. Fetoscopy can also be used for taking fetal tissue samples for genetic testing.

It is important to note that while fetoscopy can provide valuable information and treatment options, it does carry some risks, including preterm labor, premature rupture of membranes, infection, and bleeding. Therefore, the decision to undergo fetoscopy should be made carefully, in consultation with a medical professional, and based on a thorough evaluation of the potential benefits and risks.

Labor onset, also known as the start of labor, refers to the beginning of regular and coordinated uterine contractions that ultimately result in the delivery of a baby. This is usually marked by the presence of regular contractions that increase in intensity and frequency over time, along with cervical dilation and effacement (thinning and shortening of the cervix).

There are two types of labor onset: spontaneous and induced. Spontaneous labor onset occurs naturally, without any medical intervention, while induced labor onset is initiated by medical professionals using various methods such as medication or mechanical dilation of the cervix.

It's important to note that the onset of labor can be a challenging concept to define precisely, and different healthcare providers may use slightly different criteria to diagnose the start of labor.

Sensitivity and specificity are statistical measures used to describe the performance of a diagnostic test or screening tool in identifying true positive and true negative results.

* Sensitivity refers to the proportion of people who have a particular condition (true positives) who are correctly identified by the test. It is also known as the "true positive rate" or "recall." A highly sensitive test will identify most or all of the people with the condition, but may also produce more false positives.
* Specificity refers to the proportion of people who do not have a particular condition (true negatives) who are correctly identified by the test. It is also known as the "true negative rate." A highly specific test will identify most or all of the people without the condition, but may also produce more false negatives.

In medical testing, both sensitivity and specificity are important considerations when evaluating a diagnostic test. High sensitivity is desirable for screening tests that aim to identify as many cases of a condition as possible, while high specificity is desirable for confirmatory tests that aim to rule out the condition in people who do not have it.

It's worth noting that sensitivity and specificity are often influenced by factors such as the prevalence of the condition in the population being tested, the threshold used to define a positive result, and the reliability and validity of the test itself. Therefore, it's important to consider these factors when interpreting the results of a diagnostic test.

The odds ratio (OR) is a statistical measure used in epidemiology and research to estimate the association between an exposure and an outcome. It represents the odds that an event will occur in one group versus the odds that it will occur in another group, assuming that all other factors are held constant.

In medical research, the odds ratio is often used to quantify the strength of the relationship between a risk factor (exposure) and a disease outcome. An OR of 1 indicates no association between the exposure and the outcome, while an OR greater than 1 suggests that there is a positive association between the two. Conversely, an OR less than 1 implies a negative association.

It's important to note that the odds ratio is not the same as the relative risk (RR), which compares the incidence rates of an outcome in two groups. While the OR can approximate the RR when the outcome is rare, they are not interchangeable and can lead to different conclusions about the association between an exposure and an outcome.

Congenital heart defects (CHDs) are structural abnormalities in the heart that are present at birth. They can affect any part of the heart's structure, including the walls of the heart, the valves inside the heart, and the major blood vessels that lead to and from the heart.

Congenital heart defects can range from mild to severe and can cause various symptoms depending on the type and severity of the defect. Some common symptoms of CHDs include cyanosis (a bluish tint to the skin, lips, and fingernails), shortness of breath, fatigue, poor feeding, and slow growth in infants and children.

There are many different types of congenital heart defects, including:

1. Septal defects: These are holes in the walls that separate the four chambers of the heart. The two most common septal defects are atrial septal defect (ASD) and ventricular septal defect (VSD).
2. Valve abnormalities: These include narrowed or leaky valves, which can affect blood flow through the heart.
3. Obstruction defects: These occur when blood flow is blocked or restricted due to narrowing or absence of a part of the heart's structure. Examples include pulmonary stenosis and coarctation of the aorta.
4. Cyanotic heart defects: These cause a lack of oxygen in the blood, leading to cyanosis. Examples include tetralogy of Fallot and transposition of the great arteries.

The causes of congenital heart defects are not fully understood, but genetic factors and environmental influences during pregnancy may play a role. Some CHDs can be detected before birth through prenatal testing, while others may not be diagnosed until after birth or later in childhood. Treatment for CHDs may include medication, surgery, or other interventions to improve blood flow and oxygenation of the body's tissues.

Ultrasonography, also known as sonography, is a diagnostic medical procedure that uses high-frequency sound waves (ultrasound) to produce dynamic images of organs, tissues, or blood flow inside the body. These images are captured in real-time and can be used to assess the size, shape, and structure of various internal structures, as well as detect any abnormalities such as tumors, cysts, or inflammation.

During an ultrasonography procedure, a small handheld device called a transducer is placed on the patient's skin, which emits and receives sound waves. The transducer sends high-frequency sound waves into the body, and these waves bounce back off internal structures and are recorded by the transducer. The recorded data is then processed and transformed into visual images that can be interpreted by a medical professional.

Ultrasonography is a non-invasive, painless, and safe procedure that does not use radiation like other imaging techniques such as CT scans or X-rays. It is commonly used to diagnose and monitor conditions in various parts of the body, including the abdomen, pelvis, heart, blood vessels, and musculoskeletal system.

Prevalence, in medical terms, refers to the total number of people in a given population who have a particular disease or condition at a specific point in time, or over a specified period. It is typically expressed as a percentage or a ratio of the number of cases to the size of the population. Prevalence differs from incidence, which measures the number of new cases that develop during a certain period.

A cross-sectional study is a type of observational research design that examines the relationship between variables at one point in time. It provides a snapshot or a "cross-section" of the population at a particular moment, allowing researchers to estimate the prevalence of a disease or condition and identify potential risk factors or associations.

In a cross-sectional study, data is collected from a sample of participants at a single time point, and the variables of interest are measured simultaneously. This design can be used to investigate the association between exposure and outcome, but it cannot establish causality because it does not follow changes over time.

Cross-sectional studies can be conducted using various data collection methods, such as surveys, interviews, or medical examinations. They are often used in epidemiology to estimate the prevalence of a disease or condition in a population and to identify potential risk factors that may contribute to its development. However, because cross-sectional studies only provide a snapshot of the population at one point in time, they cannot account for changes over time or determine whether exposure preceded the outcome.

Therefore, while cross-sectional studies can be useful for generating hypotheses and identifying potential associations between variables, further research using other study designs, such as cohort or case-control studies, is necessary to establish causality and confirm any findings.

In the context of medicine, risk is the probability or likelihood of an adverse health effect or the occurrence of a negative event related to treatment or exposure to certain hazards. It is usually expressed as a ratio or percentage and can be influenced by various factors such as age, gender, lifestyle, genetics, and environmental conditions. Risk assessment involves identifying, quantifying, and prioritizing risks to make informed decisions about prevention, mitigation, or treatment strategies.

Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) is a protein produced by the yolk sac and the liver during fetal development. In adults, AFP is normally present in very low levels in the blood. However, abnormal production of AFP can occur in certain medical conditions, such as:

* Liver cancer or hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC)
* Germ cell tumors, including non-seminomatous testicular cancer and ovarian cancer
* Hepatitis or liver inflammation
* Certain types of benign liver disease, such as cirrhosis or hepatic adenomas

Elevated levels of AFP in the blood can be detected through a simple blood test. This test is often used as a tumor marker to help diagnose and monitor certain types of cancer, particularly HCC. However, it's important to note that an elevated AFP level alone is not enough to diagnose cancer, and further testing is usually needed to confirm the diagnosis. Additionally, some non-cancerous conditions can also cause elevated AFP levels, so it's important to interpret the test results in the context of the individual's medical history and other diagnostic tests.

Obstetric labor complications refer to any physical or physiological difficulties that arise during the process of childbirth (labor) and can pose risks to the health of the mother, baby, or both. These complications may result from various factors such as pre-existing medical conditions, fetal distress, prolonged labor, abnormal positioning of the fetus, or issues related to the size or weight of the baby.

Some examples of obstetric labor complications include:

1. Fetal distress: This occurs when the fetus is not receiving adequate oxygen supply or is in danger during labor. It can be caused by various factors such as umbilical cord compression, placental abruption, or maternal anemia.
2. Prolonged labor: When labor lasts for more than 20 hours in first-time mothers or more than 14 hours in subsequent pregnancies, it is considered prolonged labor. This can lead to fatigue, infection, and other complications for both the mother and baby.
3. Abnormal positioning of the fetus: Normally, the fetus should be positioned head-down (vertex) before delivery. However, if the fetus is in a breech or transverse position, it can lead to difficult labor and increased risk of complications during delivery.
4. Shoulder dystocia: This occurs when the baby's shoulders get stuck behind the mother's pubic bone during delivery, making it challenging to deliver the baby. It can cause injuries to both the mother and the baby.
5. Placental abruption: This is a serious complication where the placenta separates from the uterus before delivery, leading to bleeding and potential oxygen deprivation for the fetus.
6. Uterine rupture: A rare but life-threatening complication where the uterus tears during labor, causing severe bleeding and potentially endangering both the mother and baby's lives.
7. Preeclampsia/eclampsia: This is a pregnancy-related hypertensive disorder that can lead to complications such as seizures, organ failure, or even maternal death if left untreated.
8. Postpartum hemorrhage: Excessive bleeding after delivery can be life-threatening and requires immediate medical attention.
9. Infections: Maternal infections during pregnancy or childbirth can lead to complications for both the mother and baby, including preterm labor, low birth weight, and even fetal death.
10. Anesthesia complications: Adverse reactions to anesthesia during delivery can cause respiratory depression, allergic reactions, or other complications that may endanger the mother's life.

Placental hormones are a type of hormones that are produced by the placenta, an organ that develops in the uterus during pregnancy. These hormones play a crucial role in maintaining and supporting a healthy pregnancy. Some of the key placental hormones include:

1. Human Chorionic Gonadotropin (hCG): This hormone is produced after implantation and is detected in the urine or blood to confirm pregnancy. It maintains the corpus luteum, which produces progesterone during early pregnancy.
2. Progesterone: This hormone is critical for preparing the uterus for pregnancy and maintaining the pregnancy. It suppresses maternal immune response to prevent rejection of the developing embryo/fetus.
3. Estrogen: This hormone plays a vital role in the growth and development of the fetal brain, as well as promoting the growth of the uterus and mammary glands during pregnancy.
4. Human Placental Lactogen (hPL): This hormone stimulates maternal metabolism to provide nutrients for the developing fetus and helps prepare the breasts for lactation.
5. Relaxin: This hormone relaxes the pelvic ligaments and softens and widens the cervix in preparation for childbirth.

These hormones work together to support fetal growth, maintain pregnancy, and prepare the mother's body for childbirth and lactation.

Abruptio placentae, also known as placental abruption, is a medical condition that occurs when the placenta separates from the uterus before the baby is born. The placenta is an organ that develops in the uterus during pregnancy to provide oxygen and nutrients to the growing fetus.

In abruptio placentae, the separation of the placenta from the uterus can cause bleeding, which can be serious or life-threatening for both the mother and the baby. The severity of the condition depends on how much of the placenta has separated from the uterus and how much bleeding has occurred.

Abruptio placentae can cause a range of symptoms, including vaginal bleeding, abdominal pain, contractions, and fetal distress. In severe cases, it can lead to preterm labor, low birth weight, and even stillbirth. The exact cause of abruptio placentae is not always known, but risk factors include high blood pressure, smoking, cocaine use, trauma to the abdomen, and advanced maternal age. Treatment may involve hospitalization, bed rest, medication to prevent contractions, or delivery of the baby if the pregnancy is at term.

I apologize, but "sheep" is not a term that has a medical definition. It is a common animal with the scientific name Ovis aries. If you have any medical or health-related questions, I would be happy to try and help answer those for you.

Risk assessment in the medical context refers to the process of identifying, evaluating, and prioritizing risks to patients, healthcare workers, or the community related to healthcare delivery. It involves determining the likelihood and potential impact of adverse events or hazards, such as infectious diseases, medication errors, or medical devices failures, and implementing measures to mitigate or manage those risks. The goal of risk assessment is to promote safe and high-quality care by identifying areas for improvement and taking action to minimize harm.

The umbilical cord is a flexible, tube-like structure that connects the developing fetus to the placenta in the uterus during pregnancy. It arises from the abdomen of the fetus and transports essential nutrients, oxygen, and blood from the mother's circulation to the growing baby. Additionally, it carries waste products, such as carbon dioxide, from the fetus back to the placenta for elimination. The umbilical cord is primarily composed of two arteries (the umbilical arteries) and one vein (the umbilical vein), surrounded by a protective gelatinous substance called Wharton's jelly, and enclosed within a fibrous outer covering known as the umbilical cord coating. Following birth, the umbilical cord is clamped and cut, leaving behind the stump that eventually dries up and falls off, resulting in the baby's belly button.

Mifepristone is a synthetic steroid that is used in the medical termination of pregnancy (also known as medication abortion or RU-486). It works by blocking the action of progesterone, a hormone necessary for maintaining pregnancy. Mifepristone is often used in combination with misoprostol to cause uterine contractions and expel the products of conception from the uterus.

It's also known as an antiprogestin or progesterone receptor modulator, which means it can bind to progesterone receptors in the body and block their activity. In addition to its use in pregnancy termination, mifepristone has been studied for its potential therapeutic uses in conditions such as Cushing's syndrome, endometriosis, uterine fibroids, and hormone-dependent cancers.

It is important to note that Mifepristone should be administered under the supervision of a licensed healthcare professional and it is not available over the counter. Also, it has some contraindications and potential side effects, so it's essential to have a consultation with a doctor before taking this medication.

Conjoined twins, also known as Siamese twins, are a rare type of monozygotic (identical) twins who are born physically connected to each other. They develop from a single fertilized egg that fails to fully separate, resulting in various degrees of fusion between their bodies. The point of connection and the extent of sharing body parts can vary greatly between sets of conjoined twins. Some may be connected at the chest, abdomen, or hips, while others may share vital organs such as the heart or brain. Treatment options depend on the type of conjunction and whether separation is possible without causing harm to either twin. Conjoined twins occur in about 1 in every 200,000 live births.

Reproductive techniques refer to various methods and procedures used to assist individuals or couples in achieving pregnancy, carrying a pregnancy to term, or preserving fertility. These techniques can be broadly categorized into assisted reproductive technology (ART) and fertility preservation.

Assisted reproductive technology (ART) includes procedures such as:

1. In vitro fertilization (IVF): A process where an egg is fertilized by sperm outside the body in a laboratory dish, and then the resulting embryo is transferred to a woman's uterus.
2. Intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI): A procedure where a single sperm is directly injected into an egg to facilitate fertilization.
3. Embryo culture and cryopreservation: The process of growing embryos in a laboratory for a few days before freezing them for later use.
4. Donor gametes: Using eggs, sperm, or embryos from a known or anonymous donor to achieve pregnancy.
5. Gestational surrogacy: A method where a woman carries and gives birth to a baby for another individual or couple who cannot carry a pregnancy themselves.

Fertility preservation techniques include:

1. Sperm banking: The process of freezing and storing sperm for future use in artificial reproduction.
2. Egg (oocyte) freezing: A procedure where a woman's eggs are extracted, frozen, and stored for later use in fertility treatments.
3. Embryo freezing: The cryopreservation of embryos created through IVF for future use.
4. Ovarian tissue cryopreservation: The freezing and storage of ovarian tissue to restore fertility after cancer treatment or other conditions that may affect fertility.
5. Testicular tissue cryopreservation: The collection and storage of testicular tissue in prepubertal boys undergoing cancer treatment to preserve their future fertility potential.

The Fallopian tubes, also known as uterine tubes or oviducts, are a pair of slender tubular structures in the female reproductive system. They play a crucial role in human reproduction by providing a passageway for the egg (ovum) from the ovary to the uterus (womb).

Each Fallopian tube is typically around 7.6 to 10 centimeters long and consists of four parts: the interstitial part, the isthmus, the ampulla, and the infundibulum. The fimbriated end of the infundibulum, which resembles a fringe or frill, surrounds and captures the released egg from the ovary during ovulation.

Fertilization usually occurs in the ampulla when sperm meets the egg after sexual intercourse. Once fertilized, the zygote (fertilized egg) travels through the Fallopian tube toward the uterus for implantation and further development. The cilia lining the inner surface of the Fallopian tubes help propel the egg and the zygote along their journey.

In some cases, abnormalities or blockages in the Fallopian tubes can lead to infertility or ectopic pregnancies, which are pregnancies that develop outside the uterus, typically within the Fallopian tube itself.

Fetofetal transfusion is a medical condition that can occur in pregnancies with multiple fetuses, such as twins or higher-order multiples. It refers to the transfer of blood from one fetus (donor) to another (recipient) through anastomotic connections in their shared placenta.

In some cases, these anastomoses can result in an imbalance in blood flow between the fetuses, leading to a net transfer of blood from one fetus to the other. This situation is more likely to occur when there is a significant weight or size difference between the fetuses, known as twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS).

In TTTS, the recipient fetus receives an excess of blood, which can lead to high-output cardiac failure, hydrops, and potential intrauterine demise. Meanwhile, the donor fetus may become anemic, growth-restricted, and at risk for hypovolemia and intrauterine demise as well. Fetofetal transfusion can be diagnosed through ultrasound evaluation and managed with various interventions, including laser ablation of anastomotic vessels or fetoscopic surgery, depending on the severity and gestational age at diagnosis.

Hydrops Fetalis is a serious condition characterized by the accumulation of excessive fluid in two or more fetal compartments, including the abdomen (ascites), around the heart (pericardial effusion), and/or within the lungs (pleural effusion). This accumulation can also affect the skin, causing it to become edematous. Hydrops Fetalis is often associated with various underlying causes, such as chromosomal abnormalities, congenital infections, genetic disorders, and structural defects that impair the fetus's ability to maintain fluid balance. In some cases, the cause may remain unknown. The prognosis for Hydrops Fetalis is generally poor, with a high mortality rate, although early detection and appropriate management can improve outcomes in certain situations.

The nasal bones are a pair of small, thin bones located in the upper part of the face, specifically in the middle of the nose. They articulate with each other at the nasal bridge and with the frontal bone above, the maxillae (upper jaw bones) on either side, and the septal cartilage inside the nose. The main function of the nasal bones is to form the bridge of the nose and protect the nasal cavity. Any damage to these bones can result in a fracture or broken nose.

The Predictive Value of Tests, specifically the Positive Predictive Value (PPV) and Negative Predictive Value (NPV), are measures used in diagnostic tests to determine the probability that a positive or negative test result is correct.

Positive Predictive Value (PPV) is the proportion of patients with a positive test result who actually have the disease. It is calculated as the number of true positives divided by the total number of positive results (true positives + false positives). A higher PPV indicates that a positive test result is more likely to be a true positive, and therefore the disease is more likely to be present.

Negative Predictive Value (NPV) is the proportion of patients with a negative test result who do not have the disease. It is calculated as the number of true negatives divided by the total number of negative results (true negatives + false negatives). A higher NPV indicates that a negative test result is more likely to be a true negative, and therefore the disease is less likely to be present.

The predictive value of tests depends on the prevalence of the disease in the population being tested, as well as the sensitivity and specificity of the test. A test with high sensitivity and specificity will generally have higher predictive values than a test with low sensitivity and specificity. However, even a highly sensitive and specific test can have low predictive values if the prevalence of the disease is low in the population being tested.

Ultrasonography, Doppler, Pulsed is a type of diagnostic ultrasound technique that uses the Doppler effect to measure blood flow in the body. In this technique, short bursts of ultrasound are emitted and then listened for as they bounce back off moving red blood cells. By analyzing the frequency shift of the returning sound waves, the velocity and direction of blood flow can be determined. This information is particularly useful in evaluating conditions such as deep vein thrombosis, carotid artery stenosis, and fetal heart abnormalities. Pulsed Doppler ultrasonography provides more detailed information about blood flow than traditional color Doppler imaging, making it a valuable tool for diagnosing and monitoring various medical conditions.

Immunohistochemistry (IHC) is a technique used in pathology and laboratory medicine to identify specific proteins or antigens in tissue sections. It combines the principles of immunology and histology to detect the presence and location of these target molecules within cells and tissues. This technique utilizes antibodies that are specific to the protein or antigen of interest, which are then tagged with a detection system such as a chromogen or fluorophore. The stained tissue sections can be examined under a microscope, allowing for the visualization and analysis of the distribution and expression patterns of the target molecule in the context of the tissue architecture. Immunohistochemistry is widely used in diagnostic pathology to help identify various diseases, including cancer, infectious diseases, and immune-mediated disorders.

Socioeconomic factors are a range of interconnected conditions and influences that affect the opportunities and resources a person or group has to maintain and improve their health and well-being. These factors include:

1. Economic stability: This includes employment status, job security, income level, and poverty status. Lower income and lack of employment are associated with poorer health outcomes.
2. Education: Higher levels of education are generally associated with better health outcomes. Education can affect a person's ability to access and understand health information, as well as their ability to navigate the healthcare system.
3. Social and community context: This includes factors such as social support networks, discrimination, and community safety. Strong social supports and positive community connections are associated with better health outcomes, while discrimination and lack of safety can negatively impact health.
4. Healthcare access and quality: Access to affordable, high-quality healthcare is an important socioeconomic factor that can significantly impact a person's health. Factors such as insurance status, availability of providers, and cultural competency of healthcare systems can all affect healthcare access and quality.
5. Neighborhood and built environment: The physical conditions in which people live, work, and play can also impact their health. Factors such as housing quality, transportation options, availability of healthy foods, and exposure to environmental hazards can all influence health outcomes.

Socioeconomic factors are often interrelated and can have a cumulative effect on health outcomes. For example, someone who lives in a low-income neighborhood with limited access to healthy foods and safe parks may also face challenges related to employment, education, and healthcare access that further impact their health. Addressing socioeconomic factors is an important part of promoting health equity and reducing health disparities.

Fetal viability is the point in pregnancy at which a fetus is considered capable of surviving outside the uterus, given appropriate medical support. Although there is no precise gestational age that defines fetal viability, it is generally considered to occur between 24 and 28 weeks of gestation. At this stage, the fetus has developed sufficient lung maturity and body weight, and the risk of neonatal mortality and morbidity significantly decreases. However, the exact definition of fetal viability may vary depending on regional standards, medical facilities, and individual clinical assessments.

The birth rate is the number of live births that occur in a population during a specific period, usually calculated as the number of live births per 1,000 people per year. It is an important demographic indicator used to measure the growth or decline of a population over time. A higher birth rate indicates a younger population and faster population growth, while a lower birth rate suggests an older population and slower growth.

The birth rate can be affected by various factors, including socioeconomic conditions, cultural attitudes towards childbearing, access to healthcare services, and government policies related to family planning and reproductive health. It is also influenced by the age structure of the population, as women in their reproductive years (typically ages 15-49) are more likely to give birth.

It's worth noting that while the birth rate is an important indicator of population growth, it does not provide a complete picture of fertility rates or demographic trends. Other measures, such as the total fertility rate (TFR), which estimates the average number of children a woman would have during her reproductive years, are also used to analyze fertility patterns and population dynamics.

An ovary is a part of the female reproductive system in which ova or eggs are produced through the process of oogenesis. They are a pair of solid, almond-shaped structures located one on each side of the uterus within the pelvic cavity. Each ovary measures about 3 to 5 centimeters in length and weighs around 14 grams.

The ovaries have two main functions: endocrine (hormonal) function and reproductive function. They produce and release eggs (ovulation) responsible for potential fertilization and development of an embryo/fetus during pregnancy. Additionally, they are essential in the production of female sex hormones, primarily estrogen and progesterone, which regulate menstrual cycles, sexual development, and reproduction.

During each menstrual cycle, a mature egg is released from one of the ovaries into the fallopian tube, where it may be fertilized by sperm. If not fertilized, the egg, along with the uterine lining, will be shed, leading to menstruation.

Messenger RNA (mRNA) is a type of RNA (ribonucleic acid) that carries genetic information copied from DNA in the form of a series of three-base code "words," each of which specifies a particular amino acid. This information is used by the cell's machinery to construct proteins, a process known as translation. After being transcribed from DNA, mRNA travels out of the nucleus to the ribosomes in the cytoplasm where protein synthesis occurs. Once the protein has been synthesized, the mRNA may be degraded and recycled. Post-transcriptional modifications can also occur to mRNA, such as alternative splicing and addition of a 5' cap and a poly(A) tail, which can affect its stability, localization, and translation efficiency.

Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-1 (VEGFR-1), also known as Flt-1 (Fms-like tyrosine kinase-1), is a receptor tyrosine kinase that plays a crucial role in the regulation of angiogenesis, vasculogenesis, and lymphangiogenesis. It is primarily expressed on vascular endothelial cells, hematopoietic stem cells, and monocytes/macrophages. VEGFR-1 binds to several ligands, including Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor-A (VEGF-A), VEGF-B, and Placental Growth Factor (PlGF). The binding of these ligands to VEGFR-1 triggers intracellular signaling cascades that modulate various cellular responses, such as proliferation, migration, survival, and vascular permeability. While VEGFR-1 is known to have a role in promoting angiogenesis under certain conditions, it primarily acts as a negative regulator of angiogenesis by sequestering VEGF-A, preventing its binding to the more proangiogenic VEGFR-2 receptor. Dysregulation of VEGFR-1 signaling has been implicated in various pathological conditions, including cancer, inflammation, and vascular diseases.

Postpartum depression is a type of depressive disorder that occurs in a woman after giving birth (the postpartum period). The symptoms are similar to those of other forms of depression, such as low mood, loss of interest or pleasure in activities, changes in appetite and sleep patterns, feelings of guilt or worthlessness, difficulty thinking, concentrating or making decisions, and thoughts of death or suicide. However, in postpartum depression, these symptoms are more severe and last longer than those typically experienced after childbirth. Postpartum depression can make it difficult for a woman to care for herself or her baby and can affect the bonding between mother and child. It is important to seek medical help if you think you may be experiencing postpartum depression. Treatment may include counseling, medication, or a combination of both.

Extraembryonic membranes are specialized structures that form around the developing embryo in utero and provide vital support and protection during fetal development. There are three main extraembryonic membranes: the amnion, the chorion, and the allantois.

The amnion is the innermost membrane that surrounds the embryo itself, forming a fluid-filled sac known as the amniotic cavity. This sac provides a protective cushion for the developing embryo and helps to regulate its temperature and moisture levels.

The chorion is the outermost of the extraembryonic membranes, and it forms the boundary between the developing fetus and the mother's uterine wall. The chorion contains blood vessels that exchange nutrients and waste products with the mother's circulation, allowing for the growth and development of the fetus.

The allantois is a small membranous sac that arises from the developing fetal gut and eventually becomes part of the umbilical cord. It serves as a reservoir for fetal urine and helps to exchange waste products between the fetal and maternal circulations.

Together, these extraembryonic membranes play a critical role in supporting fetal development and ensuring a healthy pregnancy.

Fetal resorption, also known as fetal demise or intrauterine fetal death, is a medical term that refers to the absorption of a nonviable fetus by the mother's body after its death in utero. This process typically occurs before the 20th week of gestation and may go unnoticed if it happens early in pregnancy.

During fetal resorption, the fetal tissue is broken down and absorbed by the mother's body, leaving no visible remains of the fetus. The placenta and other surrounding tissues may still be present, but they often undergo changes as well. In some cases, a small amount of fetal tissue may be expelled from the uterus during the resorption process.

The causes of fetal resorption can vary, including chromosomal abnormalities, maternal health conditions, infections, and environmental factors. It is essential to seek medical attention if a woman suspects fetal resorption or experiences any unusual symptoms during pregnancy, such as vaginal bleeding or decreased fetal movement, to ensure proper diagnosis and management.

Placenta previa is a medical condition that occurs during pregnancy where the placenta partially or fully covers the cervix, which is the lower part of the uterus that opens into the birth canal. This condition can cause severe bleeding during pregnancy and delivery, and it may lead to other complications such as preterm labor and delivery. Placenta previa is typically diagnosed through an ultrasound exam and managed with close monitoring, bed rest, and sometimes cesarean delivery.

Breastfeeding is the process of providing nutrition to an infant or young child by feeding them breast milk directly from the mother's breast. It is also known as nursing. Breast milk is the natural food for newborns and infants, and it provides all the nutrients they need to grow and develop during the first six months of life.

Breastfeeding has many benefits for both the mother and the baby. For the baby, breast milk contains antibodies that help protect against infections and diseases, and it can also reduce the risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), allergies, and obesity. For the mother, breastfeeding can help her lose weight after pregnancy, reduce the risk of certain types of cancer, and promote bonding with her baby.

Breastfeeding is recommended exclusively for the first six months of an infant's life, and then continued along with appropriate complementary foods until the child is at least two years old or beyond. However, it is important to note that every mother and baby pair is unique, and what works best for one may not work as well for another. It is recommended that mothers consult with their healthcare provider to determine the best feeding plan for themselves and their baby.

Menstruation is the regular, cyclical shedding of the uterine lining (endometrium) in women and female individuals of reproductive age, accompanied by the discharge of blood and other materials from the vagina. It typically occurs every 21 to 35 days and lasts for approximately 2-7 days. This process is a part of the menstrual cycle, which is under the control of hormonal fluctuations involving follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), estrogen, and progesterone.

The menstrual cycle can be divided into three main phases:

1. Menstruation phase: The beginning of the cycle is marked by the start of menstrual bleeding, which signals the breakdown and shedding of the endometrium due to the absence of pregnancy and low levels of estrogen and progesterone. This phase typically lasts for 2-7 days.

2. Proliferative phase: After menstruation, under the influence of rising estrogen levels, the endometrium starts to thicken and regenerate. The uterine lining becomes rich in blood vessels and glands, preparing for a potential pregnancy. This phase lasts from day 5 until around day 14 of an average 28-day cycle.

3. Secretory phase: Following ovulation (release of an egg from the ovaries), which usually occurs around day 14, increased levels of progesterone cause further thickening and maturation of the endometrium. The glands in the lining produce nutrients to support a fertilized egg. If pregnancy does not occur, both estrogen and progesterone levels will drop, leading to menstruation and the start of a new cycle.

Understanding menstruation is essential for monitoring reproductive health, identifying potential issues such as irregular periods or menstrual disorders, and planning family planning strategies.

Contraception behavior refers to the actions and decisions made by individuals or couples to prevent pregnancy. This can include the use of various contraceptive methods, such as hormonal birth control (e.g., pills, patches, rings), barrier methods (e.g., condoms, diaphragms), intrauterine devices (IUDs), and natural family planning techniques (e.g., fertility awareness-based methods).

Contraception behavior can be influenced by various factors, including personal beliefs, cultural norms, relationship dynamics, access to healthcare services, and knowledge about contraceptive options. It is an important aspect of sexual and reproductive health, as it allows individuals and couples to plan their families and make informed choices about whether and when to have children.

It's worth noting that while the term "contraception behavior" typically refers to actions taken specifically to prevent pregnancy, some contraceptive methods may also provide protection against sexually transmitted infections (STIs). For example, condoms are effective at preventing both pregnancy and STIs when used consistently and correctly.

The corpus luteum is a temporary endocrine structure that forms in the ovary after an oocyte (egg) has been released from a follicle during ovulation. It's formed by the remaining cells of the ruptured follicle, which transform into large, hormone-secreting cells.

The primary function of the corpus luteum is to produce progesterone and, to a lesser extent, estrogen during the menstrual cycle or pregnancy. Progesterone plays a crucial role in preparing the uterus for potential implantation of a fertilized egg and maintaining the early stages of pregnancy. If pregnancy does not occur, the corpus luteum will typically degenerate and stop producing hormones after approximately 10-14 days, leading to menstruation.

However, if pregnancy occurs, the developing embryo starts to produce human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), which signals the corpus luteum to continue secreting progesterone and estrogen until the placenta takes over hormonal production, usually around the end of the first trimester.

Maternal behavior refers to the nurturing and protective behaviors exhibited by a female animal towards its offspring. In humans, this term is often used to describe the natural instincts and actions of a woman during pregnancy, childbirth, and early child-rearing. It encompasses a broad range of activities such as feeding, grooming, protecting, and teaching the young.

In the context of medical and psychological research, maternal behavior is often studied to understand the factors that influence its development, expression, and outcomes for both the mother and offspring. Factors that can affect maternal behavior include hormonal changes during pregnancy and childbirth, as well as social, cultural, and environmental influences.

Abnormal or atypical maternal behavior may indicate underlying mental health issues, such as postpartum depression or anxiety, and can have negative consequences for both the mother and the child's development and well-being. Therefore, it is important to monitor and support healthy maternal behaviors in new mothers to promote positive outcomes for both parties.

The Apgar score is a quick assessment of the physical condition of a newborn infant, assessed by measuring heart rate, respiratory effort, muscle tone, reflex irritability, and skin color. It is named after Virginia Apgar, an American anesthesiologist who developed it in 1952. The score is usually given at one minute and five minutes after birth, with a possible range of 0 to 10. Scores of 7 and above are considered normal, while scores of 4-6 indicate moderate distress, and scores below 4 indicate severe distress. The Apgar score can provide important information for making decisions about the need for resuscitation or other medical interventions after birth.

Follow-up studies are a type of longitudinal research that involve repeated observations or measurements of the same variables over a period of time, in order to understand their long-term effects or outcomes. In medical context, follow-up studies are often used to evaluate the safety and efficacy of medical treatments, interventions, or procedures.

In a typical follow-up study, a group of individuals (called a cohort) who have received a particular treatment or intervention are identified and then followed over time through periodic assessments or data collection. The data collected may include information on clinical outcomes, adverse events, changes in symptoms or functional status, and other relevant measures.

The results of follow-up studies can provide important insights into the long-term benefits and risks of medical interventions, as well as help to identify factors that may influence treatment effectiveness or patient outcomes. However, it is important to note that follow-up studies can be subject to various biases and limitations, such as loss to follow-up, recall bias, and changes in clinical practice over time, which must be carefully considered when interpreting the results.

Body weight is the measure of the force exerted on a scale or balance by an object's mass, most commonly expressed in units such as pounds (lb) or kilograms (kg). In the context of medical definitions, body weight typically refers to an individual's total weight, which includes their skeletal muscle, fat, organs, and bodily fluids.

Healthcare professionals often use body weight as a basic indicator of overall health status, as it can provide insights into various aspects of a person's health, such as nutritional status, metabolic function, and risk factors for certain diseases. For example, being significantly underweight or overweight can increase the risk of developing conditions like malnutrition, diabetes, heart disease, and certain types of cancer.

It is important to note that body weight alone may not provide a complete picture of an individual's health, as it does not account for factors such as muscle mass, bone density, or body composition. Therefore, healthcare professionals often use additional measures, such as body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, and blood tests, to assess overall health status more comprehensively.

An aborted fetus refers to a developing human organism that is expelled or removed from the uterus before it is viable, typically as a result of an induced abortion. An abortion is a medical procedure that intentionally ends a pregnancy and can be performed through various methods, depending on the stage of the pregnancy.

It's important to note that the term "abortion" is often used in different contexts and may carry different connotations depending on one's perspective. In medical terminology, an abortion refers specifically to the intentional ending of a pregnancy before viability. However, in other contexts, the term may be used more broadly to refer to any spontaneous or induced loss of a pregnancy, including miscarriages and stillbirths.

The definition of "viable" can vary, but it generally refers to the point at which a fetus can survive outside the uterus with medical assistance, typically around 24 weeks of gestation. Fetal viability is a complex issue that depends on many factors, including the availability and accessibility of medical technology and resources.

In summary, an aborted fetus is a developing human organism that is intentionally expelled or removed from the uterus before it is viable, typically as a result of a medical procedure called an abortion.

A premature infant is a baby born before 37 weeks of gestation. They may face various health challenges because their organs are not fully developed. The earlier a baby is born, the higher the risk of complications. Prematurity can lead to short-term and long-term health issues, such as respiratory distress syndrome, jaundice, anemia, infections, hearing problems, vision problems, developmental delays, and cerebral palsy. Intensive medical care and support are often necessary for premature infants to ensure their survival and optimal growth and development.

A diet, in medical terms, refers to the planned and regular consumption of food and drinks. It is a balanced selection of nutrient-rich foods that an individual eats on a daily or periodic basis to meet their energy needs and maintain good health. A well-balanced diet typically includes a variety of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, lean proteins, and low-fat dairy products.

A diet may also be prescribed for therapeutic purposes, such as in the management of certain medical conditions like diabetes, hypertension, or obesity. In these cases, a healthcare professional may recommend specific restrictions or modifications to an individual's regular diet to help manage their condition and improve their overall health.

It is important to note that a healthy and balanced diet should be tailored to an individual's age, gender, body size, activity level, and any underlying medical conditions. Consulting with a healthcare professional, such as a registered dietitian or nutritionist, can help ensure that an individual's dietary needs are being met in a safe and effective way.

A "newborn infant" refers to a baby in the first 28 days of life outside of the womb. This period is crucial for growth and development, but also poses unique challenges as the infant's immune system is not fully developed, making them more susceptible to various diseases.

"Newborn diseases" are health conditions that specifically affect newborn infants. These can be categorized into three main types:

1. Congenital disorders: These are conditions that are present at birth and may be inherited or caused by factors such as infection, exposure to harmful substances during pregnancy, or chromosomal abnormalities. Examples include Down syndrome, congenital heart defects, and spina bifida.

2. Infectious diseases: Newborn infants are particularly vulnerable to infections due to their immature immune systems. Common infectious diseases in newborns include sepsis (bloodstream infection), pneumonia, and meningitis. These can be acquired from the mother during pregnancy or childbirth, or from the environment after birth.

3. Developmental disorders: These are conditions that affect the normal growth and development of the newborn infant. Examples include cerebral palsy, intellectual disabilities, and vision or hearing impairments.

It is important to note that many newborn diseases can be prevented or treated with appropriate medical care, including prenatal care, proper hygiene practices, and timely vaccinations. Regular check-ups and monitoring of the newborn's health by a healthcare provider are essential for early detection and management of any potential health issues.

Estrus is a term used in veterinary medicine to describe the physiological and behavioral state of female mammals that are ready to mate and conceive. It refers to the period of time when the female's reproductive system is most receptive to fertilization.

During estrus, the female's ovaries release one or more mature eggs (ovulation) into the fallopian tubes, where they can be fertilized by sperm from a male. This phase of the estrous cycle is often accompanied by changes in behavior and physical appearance, such as increased vocalization, restlessness, and swelling of the genital area.

The duration and frequency of estrus vary widely among different species of mammals. In some animals, such as dogs and cats, estrus occurs regularly at intervals of several weeks or months, while in others, such as cows and mares, it may only occur once or twice a year.

It's important to note that the term "estrus" is not used to describe human reproductive physiology. In humans, the equivalent phase of the menstrual cycle is called ovulation.

Infant Mortality is the death of a baby before their first birthday. The infant mortality rate is typically expressed as the number of deaths per 1,000 live births. This is a key indicator of the overall health of a population and is often used to measure the well-being of children in a society.

Infant mortality can be further categorized into neonatal mortality (death within the first 28 days of life) and postneonatal mortality (death after 28 days of life but before one year). The main causes of infant mortality vary by country and region, but generally include premature birth, low birth weight, congenital anomalies, sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), and infectious diseases.

Reducing infant mortality is a major public health goal for many countries, and efforts to improve maternal and child health, access to quality healthcare, and socioeconomic conditions are crucial in achieving this goal.

Family planning services refer to comprehensive healthcare programs and interventions that aim to help individuals and couples prevent or achieve pregnancies, according to their desired number and spacing of children. These services typically include:

1. Counseling and education: Providing information about various contraceptive methods, their effectiveness, side effects, and appropriate use. This may also include counseling on reproductive health, sexually transmitted infections (STIs), and preconception care.
2. Contraceptive services: Making a wide range of contraceptive options available to clients, including barrier methods (condoms, diaphragms), hormonal methods (pills, patches, injectables, implants), intrauterine devices (IUDs), and permanent methods (tubal ligation, vasectomy).
3. Screening and testing: Offering STI screening and testing, as well as cervical cancer screening for eligible clients.
4. Preconception care: Providing counseling and interventions to help women achieve optimal health before becoming pregnant, including folic acid supplementation, management of chronic conditions, and avoidance of harmful substances (tobacco, alcohol, drugs).
5. Fertility services: Addressing infertility issues through diagnostic testing, counseling, and medical or surgical treatments when appropriate.
6. Menstrual regulation: Providing manual vacuum aspiration or medication to safely and effectively manage incomplete miscarriages or unwanted pregnancies within the first trimester.
7. Pregnancy options counseling: Offering unbiased information and support to help individuals make informed decisions about their pregnancy, including parenting, adoption, or abortion.
8. Community outreach and education: Engaging in community-based initiatives to increase awareness of family planning services and promote reproductive health.
9. Advocacy: Working to remove barriers to accessing family planning services, such as policy changes, reducing stigma, and increasing funding for programs.

Family planning services are an essential component of sexual and reproductive healthcare and contribute significantly to improving maternal and child health outcomes, reducing unintended pregnancies, and empowering individuals to make informed choices about their reproductive lives.

Obstetrics is a branch of medicine and surgery concerned with the care of women during pregnancy, childbirth, and the postnatal period. It involves managing potential complications that may arise during any stage of pregnancy or delivery, as well as providing advice and guidance on prenatal care, labor and delivery, and postpartum care. Obstetricians are medical doctors who specialize in obstetrics and can provide a range of services including routine check-ups, ultrasounds, genetic testing, and other diagnostic procedures to monitor the health and development of the fetus. They also perform surgical procedures such as cesarean sections when necessary.

The peripartum period is a term used to describe the time frame surrounding childbirth, specifically it refers to the weeks starting from the 20th week of pregnancy up to 4-6 weeks after giving birth. It is a critical period for both the mother and the baby, as many physical and emotional changes occur during this time. The peripartum period includes the late stages of pregnancy (intrapartum) and the postpartum phase. This is the time when medical professionals pay close attention to the health of the mother and the newborn, monitoring for any potential complications or issues that may arise.

Anthropometry is the scientific study of measurements and proportions of the human body. It involves the systematic measurement and analysis of various physical characteristics, such as height, weight, blood pressure, waist circumference, and other body measurements. These measurements are used in a variety of fields, including medicine, ergonomics, forensics, and fashion design, to assess health status, fitness level, or to design products and environments that fit the human body. In a medical context, anthropometry is often used to assess growth and development, health status, and disease risk factors in individuals and populations.

Maternal health services refer to the preventative, diagnostic, and treatment-based healthcare services provided during pregnancy, childbirth, and postnatal period. These services aim to ensure the best possible health outcomes for mothers throughout their reproductive years, including family planning, preconception care, antenatal care, delivery, postpartum care, and management of chronic conditions or complications that may arise during pregnancy and childbirth.

The World Health Organization (WHO) outlines several critical components of maternal health services:

1. Antenatal care: Regular check-ups to monitor the mother's and fetus's health, identify potential risks, provide essential interventions, and offer counseling on nutrition, breastfeeding, and birth preparedness.
2. Delivery care: Skilled attendance during childbirth, including normal vaginal delivery and assisted deliveries (forceps or vacuum extraction), and access to emergency obstetric care for complications such as hemorrhage, eclampsia, obstructed labor, and sepsis.
3. Postnatal care: Continuum of care for mothers and newborns during the first six weeks after childbirth, focusing on recovery, early detection and management of complications, immunization, family planning, and psychosocial support.
4. Family planning: Access to modern contraceptive methods, counseling on fertility awareness, and safe abortion services where legal, to enable women to plan their pregnancies and space their children according to their reproductive intentions.
5. Management of chronic conditions: Comprehensive care for pregnant women with pre-existing or pregnancy-induced medical conditions such as hypertension, diabetes, HIV/AIDS, and mental health disorders.
6. Preconception care: Identification and management of risk factors before conception to optimize maternal and fetal health outcomes.
7. Prevention and management of gender-based violence: Screening, counseling, and referral services for women experiencing intimate partner violence or sexual violence during pregnancy and childbirth.
8. Health promotion and education: Community-based interventions to raise awareness about the importance of maternal health, promote positive health behaviors, and reduce barriers to accessing healthcare services.

Maternal health services should be accessible, affordable, acceptable, and equitable for all women, regardless of their age, race, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, or geographical location. Adequate investment in maternal health infrastructure, human resources, and service delivery models is essential to achieve universal health coverage and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) by 2030.

Regression analysis is a statistical technique used in medicine, as well as in other fields, to examine the relationship between one or more independent variables (predictors) and a dependent variable (outcome). It allows for the estimation of the average change in the outcome variable associated with a one-unit change in an independent variable, while controlling for the effects of other independent variables. This technique is often used to identify risk factors for diseases or to evaluate the effectiveness of medical interventions. In medical research, regression analysis can be used to adjust for potential confounding variables and to quantify the relationship between exposures and health outcomes. It can also be used in predictive modeling to estimate the probability of a particular outcome based on multiple predictors.

I'm not sure I understand your question. "Denmark" is a country located in Northern Europe, and it is not a medical term or concept. It is the southernmost of the Nordic countries, and it consists of the Jutland peninsula and several islands in the Baltic Sea. The capital city of Denmark is Copenhagen.

If you are looking for information about a medical condition that may be associated with Denmark, could you please provide more context or clarify your question? I would be happy to help you with more specific information if I can.

In epidemiology, the incidence of a disease is defined as the number of new cases of that disease within a specific population over a certain period of time. It is typically expressed as a rate, with the number of new cases in the numerator and the size of the population at risk in the denominator. Incidence provides information about the risk of developing a disease during a given time period and can be used to compare disease rates between different populations or to monitor trends in disease occurrence over time.

Karyotyping is a medical laboratory test used to study the chromosomes in a cell. It involves obtaining a sample of cells from a patient, usually from blood or bone marrow, and then staining the chromosomes so they can be easily seen under a microscope. The chromosomes are then arranged in pairs based on their size, shape, and other features to create a karyotype. This visual representation allows for the identification and analysis of any chromosomal abnormalities, such as extra or missing chromosomes, or structural changes like translocations or inversions. These abnormalities can provide important information about genetic disorders, diseases, and developmental problems.

Aneuploidy is a medical term that refers to an abnormal number of chromosomes in a cell. Chromosomes are thread-like structures located inside the nucleus of cells that contain genetic information in the form of genes.

In humans, the normal number of chromosomes in a cell is 46, arranged in 23 pairs. Aneuploidy occurs when there is an extra or missing chromosome in one or more of these pairs. For example, Down syndrome is a condition that results from an extra copy of chromosome 21, also known as trisomy 21.

Aneuploidy can arise during the formation of gametes (sperm or egg cells) due to errors in the process of cell division called meiosis. These errors can result in eggs or sperm with an abnormal number of chromosomes, which can then lead to aneuploidy in the resulting embryo.

Aneuploidy is a significant cause of birth defects and miscarriages. The severity of the condition depends on which chromosomes are affected and the extent of the abnormality. In some cases, aneuploidy may have no noticeable effects, while in others it can lead to serious health problems or developmental delays.

Cryopreservation is a medical procedure that involves the preservation of cells, tissues, or organs by cooling them to very low temperatures, typically below -150°C. This is usually achieved using liquid nitrogen. The low temperature slows down or stops biological activity, including chemical reactions and cellular metabolism, which helps to prevent damage and decay.

The cells, tissues, or organs that are being cryopreserved must be treated with a cryoprotectant solution before cooling to prevent the formation of ice crystals, which can cause significant damage. Once cooled, the samples are stored in specialized containers or tanks until they are needed for use.

Cryopreservation is commonly used in assisted reproductive technologies, such as the preservation of sperm, eggs, and embryos for fertility treatments. It is also used in research, including the storage of cell lines and stem cells, and in clinical settings, such as the preservation of skin grafts and corneas for transplantation.

Superfetation is an extremely rare medical condition where a second pregnancy occurs during an existing pregnancy. In this unusual case, a fertilized egg implants itself into the uterus while another embryo or fetus is already present in the womb, resulting in two separate gestational sacs. This phenomenon is not to be confused with superfecundation, which refers to the fertilization of two or more eggs from one menstrual cycle by different sexual partners. Superfetation is very unusual because it typically requires a woman to ovulate twice within a single menstrual cycle, and both eggs must then be fertilized and implanted at distinct times. This condition is not generally associated with human pregnancies due to the complex hormonal changes that occur during pregnancy, which usually prevent further ovulation. However, superfetation has been reported in some animal species, such as cats, dogs, and marsupials.

Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a condition that occurs when there's an imbalance or overgrowth of bacteria in the vagina. It's not technically considered a sexually transmitted infection (STI), but certain activities such as unprotected sex can increase the risk of developing BV. The normal balance of bacteria in the vagina is disrupted, leading to symptoms such as abnormal vaginal discharge with a strong fishy odor, burning during urination, and itching or irritation around the outside of the vagina. Bacterial vaginosis is diagnosed through a pelvic examination and laboratory tests to identify the type of bacteria present in the vagina. Treatment typically involves antibiotics, either in the form of pills or creams that are inserted into the vagina. It's important to seek medical attention if you suspect you have bacterial vaginosis, as it can increase the risk of complications such as pelvic inflammatory disease and preterm labor during pregnancy.

Nutritional status is a concept that refers to the condition of an individual in relation to their nutrient intake, absorption, metabolism, and excretion. It encompasses various aspects such as body weight, muscle mass, fat distribution, presence of any deficiencies or excesses of specific nutrients, and overall health status.

A comprehensive assessment of nutritional status typically includes a review of dietary intake, anthropometric measurements (such as height, weight, waist circumference, blood pressure), laboratory tests (such as serum albumin, total protein, cholesterol levels, vitamin and mineral levels), and clinical evaluation for signs of malnutrition or overnutrition.

Malnutrition can result from inadequate intake or absorption of nutrients, increased nutrient requirements due to illness or injury, or excessive loss of nutrients due to medical conditions. On the other hand, overnutrition can lead to obesity and related health problems such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and certain types of cancer.

Therefore, maintaining a good nutritional status is essential for overall health and well-being, and it is an important consideration in the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of various medical conditions.

Uterine diseases refer to a range of medical conditions that affect the uterus, which is the reproductive organ in females where fetal development occurs. These diseases can be categorized into structural abnormalities, infectious diseases, and functional disorders. Here are some examples:

1. Structural abnormalities: These include congenital malformations such as septate uterus or bicornuate uterus, as well as acquired conditions like endometrial polyps, fibroids (benign tumors of the muscular wall), and adenomyosis (where the endometrial tissue grows into the muscular wall).

2. Infectious diseases: The uterus can be affected by various infections, including bacterial, viral, fungal, or parasitic agents. Examples include pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), tuberculosis, and candidiasis.

3. Functional disorders: These are conditions that affect the normal functioning of the uterus without any apparent structural abnormalities or infections. Examples include dysmenorrhea (painful periods), menorrhagia (heavy periods), and endometriosis (where the endometrial tissue grows outside the uterus).

4. Malignant diseases: Uterine cancer, including endometrial cancer and cervical cancer, are significant health concerns for women.

5. Other conditions: Miscarriage, ectopic pregnancy, and infertility can also be considered as uterine diseases since they involve the abnormal functioning or structural issues of the uterus.

Perinatal mortality is the death of a baby around the time of birth. It specifically refers to stillbirths (fetal deaths at 28 weeks of gestation or more) and deaths in the first week of life (early neonatal deaths). The perinatal period is defined as beginning at 22 weeks (154 days) of gestation and ending 7 completed days after birth. Perinatal mortality rate is the number of perinatal deaths during this period, expressed per 1000 total births (live births + stillbirths). High perinatal mortality rates can indicate poor quality of care during pregnancy and childbirth.

The term "Fathers" is a general term used to describe male parents or parental figures. It does not have a specific medical definition. In the context of genetics and reproduction, the father is the biological male who contributes his sperm to fertilize an egg, resulting in conception and pregnancy. However, it's important to note that there are many different types of families and parental relationships, and not all fathers are biological parents or male.

Vacuum curettage is a medical procedure that involves the use of suction to remove tissue from the uterus. It is often used as a method of first-trimester abortion, or to treat abnormal uterine conditions such as miscarriage or retained placental tissue after childbirth. The cervix is dilated and a vacuum aspirator is inserted into the uterus to remove the contents using suction. This procedure may also be referred to as vacuum aspiration or suction curettage.

A mammalian embryo is the developing offspring of a mammal, from the time of implantation of the fertilized egg (blastocyst) in the uterus until the end of the eighth week of gestation. During this period, the embryo undergoes rapid cell division and organ differentiation to form a complex structure with all the major organs and systems in place. This stage is followed by fetal development, which continues until birth. The study of mammalian embryos is important for understanding human development, evolution, and reproductive biology.

Anencephaly is a serious birth defect that affects the neural tube, which is the structure that develops into the brain and spinal cord. In anencephaly, the neural tube fails to close properly during fetal development, resulting in the absence of a major portion of the brain, skull, and scalp.

Anencephaly is typically diagnosed through prenatal ultrasound or other imaging tests. Unfortunately, it is a fatal condition, and most babies with anencephaly do not survive birth or live for more than a few hours or days after birth.

The exact cause of anencephaly is not fully understood, but it is believed to be related to genetic factors as well as environmental influences such as folic acid deficiency and exposure to certain medications or chemicals during pregnancy. Pregnant women are often advised to take folic acid supplements to reduce the risk of neural tube defects, including anencephaly.

Estriol is a type of estrogen, which is a female sex hormone. It is produced in the placenta during pregnancy and is used as a marker for fetal growth and development. Estriol levels can be measured in the mother's urine or blood to assess fetal well-being during pregnancy. Additionally, synthetic forms of estriol are sometimes used in hormone replacement therapy to treat symptoms of menopause.

Polyhydramnios is a medical condition characterized by an excessive accumulation of amniotic fluid in the sac surrounding the fetus during pregnancy, typically defined as an amniotic fluid index (AFI) greater than 24 cm or a single deepest pocket (SDP) measurement of more than 8 cm. It occurs in approximately 1-2% of pregnancies and can be associated with various maternal, fetal, and genetic conditions. If left untreated, polyhydramnios may increase the risk of premature labor, premature rupture of membranes, and other pregnancy complications. Proper diagnosis and management are essential to ensure a healthy pregnancy outcome.

Spina Bifida Cystica is a type of neural tube defect that occurs when the bones of the spine (vertebrae) do not form properly around the developing spinal cord, resulting in a sac-like protrusion of the spinal cord and its surrounding membranes through an opening in the spine. This sac, called a meningocele or myelomeningocele, can be covered with skin or exposed, and it may contain cerebrospinal fluid, nerve roots, or portions of the spinal cord.

Myelomeningocele is the most severe form of Spina Bifida Cystica, where the sac contains a portion of the spinal cord and nerves. This can lead to various neurological complications such as weakness or paralysis below the level of the spine affected, loss of sensation, bladder and bowel dysfunction, and hydrocephalus (accumulation of cerebrospinal fluid in the brain). Early diagnosis and intervention, including prenatal surgery, can help improve outcomes for individuals with Spina Bifida Cystica.

Uterine perforation is a medical condition that refers to the piercing or puncturing of the uterine wall. This can occur during various medical procedures such as dilatation and curettage (D&C), insertion of an intrauterine device (IUD), or during childbirth. It can also be caused by trauma or infection. Uterine perforation can lead to serious complications, such as bleeding, infection, and damage to surrounding organs. If left untreated, it can be life-threatening. Symptoms of uterine perforation may include severe abdominal pain, heavy vaginal bleeding, fever, and signs of shock. Immediate medical attention is required for proper diagnosis and treatment.

Pseudopregnancy, also known as pseudocyesis or phantom pregnancy, is a psychological condition where an individual (most commonly in women) believes they are pregnant when they are not. This belief is often accompanied by various physical symptoms such as weight gain, abdominal distention, and breast enlargement that mimic those of a genuine pregnancy, despite there being no actual fetal development. These symptoms are caused by the body's hormonal and physiological responses to the individual's strong belief of being pregnant. It is important to note that this condition is rare and can be resolved with proper medical evaluation, counseling, and support.

A "false positive reaction" in medical testing refers to a situation where a diagnostic test incorrectly indicates the presence of a specific condition or disease in an individual who does not actually have it. This occurs when the test results give a positive outcome, while the true health status of the person is negative or free from the condition being tested for.

False positive reactions can be caused by various factors including:

1. Presence of unrelated substances that interfere with the test result (e.g., cross-reactivity between similar molecules).
2. Low specificity of the test, which means it may detect other conditions or irrelevant factors as positive.
3. Contamination during sample collection, storage, or analysis.
4. Human errors in performing or interpreting the test results.

False positive reactions can have significant consequences, such as unnecessary treatments, anxiety, and increased healthcare costs. Therefore, it is essential to confirm any positive test result with additional tests or clinical evaluations before making a definitive diagnosis.

Fetal distress is a term used to describe situations where a fetus is experiencing problems during labor or delivery that are causing significant physiological changes. These changes may include an abnormal heart rate, decreased oxygen levels, or the presence of meconium (the baby's first stool) in the amniotic fluid. Fetal distress can be caused by a variety of factors, such as problems with the umbilical cord, placental abruption, maternal high blood pressure, or prolonged labor. It is important to monitor fetal well-being during labor and delivery to detect and address any signs of fetal distress promptly. Treatment may include changing the mother's position, administering oxygen, giving intravenous fluids, or performing an emergency cesarean section.

Cervical ripening is a medical term that refers to the process of softening, thinning, and dilating (opening) the cervix, which is the lower part of the uterus that opens into the vagina. This process typically occurs naturally in preparation for childbirth, as the body prepares for labor.

Cervical ripening can also be induced medically, using various methods such as prostaglandin gels or medications, or mechanical means such as a Foley catheter or dilators. These interventions are used to help prepare the cervix for delivery in cases where labor is not progressing on its own or when there is a medical indication to induce labor.

It's important to note that cervical ripening is different from labor induction, which involves stimulating uterine contractions to begin or strengthen labor. Cervical ripening may be a necessary step before labor induction can occur.

Treatment outcome is a term used to describe the result or effect of medical treatment on a patient's health status. It can be measured in various ways, such as through symptoms improvement, disease remission, reduced disability, improved quality of life, or survival rates. The treatment outcome helps healthcare providers evaluate the effectiveness of a particular treatment plan and make informed decisions about future care. It is also used in clinical research to compare the efficacy of different treatments and improve patient care.

The vagina is the canal that joins the cervix (the lower part of the uterus) to the outside of the body. It also is known as the birth canal because babies pass through it during childbirth. The vagina is where sexual intercourse occurs and where menstrual blood exits the body. It has a flexible wall that can expand and retract. During sexual arousal, the vaginal walls swell with blood to become more elastic in order to accommodate penetration.

It's important to note that sometimes people use the term "vagina" to refer to the entire female genital area, including the external structures like the labia and clitoris. But technically, these are considered part of the vulva, not the vagina.

Arteries are blood vessels that carry oxygenated blood away from the heart to the rest of the body. They have thick, muscular walls that can withstand the high pressure of blood being pumped out of the heart. Arteries branch off into smaller vessels called arterioles, which further divide into a vast network of tiny capillaries where the exchange of oxygen, nutrients, and waste occurs between the blood and the body's cells. After passing through the capillary network, deoxygenated blood collects in venules, then merges into veins, which return the blood back to the heart.

A "term birth" is a medical term that refers to a delivery or pregnancy that has reached 37 weeks or more. It is the normal length of a full-term pregnancy and is considered a healthy and low-risk period for childbirth. Babies born at term have the best chance of being healthy and not experiencing any significant medical issues, compared to those born preterm (before 37 weeks) or postterm (after 42 weeks). The different types of term births are:

* Early Term: Between 37 weeks and 38 weeks, 6 days.
* Full Term: Between 39 weeks and 40 weeks, 6 days.
* Late Term: Between 41 weeks and 41 weeks, 6 days.
* Postterm: 42 weeks or later.

It is important to note that while a term birth is generally considered low-risk, there can still be variations in the health of babies born at different points within this range. For example, research has shown that babies born at 39 weeks have better outcomes than those born at 37 or 38 weeks. Therefore, it is always best to consult with a healthcare provider for individualized guidance and recommendations regarding pregnancy and childbirth.

Pulsatile flow is a type of fluid flow that occurs in a rhythmic, wave-like pattern, typically seen in the cardiovascular system. It refers to the periodic variation in the volume or velocity of a fluid (such as blood) that is caused by the regular beating of the heart. In pulsatile flow, there are periods of high flow followed by periods of low or no flow, which creates a distinct pattern on a graph or tracing. This type of flow is important for maintaining proper function and health in organs and tissues throughout the body.

Chromosome aberrations refer to structural and numerical changes in the chromosomes that can occur spontaneously or as a result of exposure to mutagenic agents. These changes can affect the genetic material encoded in the chromosomes, leading to various consequences such as developmental abnormalities, cancer, or infertility.

Structural aberrations include deletions, duplications, inversions, translocations, and rings, which result from breaks and rearrangements of chromosome segments. Numerical aberrations involve changes in the number of chromosomes, such as aneuploidy (extra or missing chromosomes) or polyploidy (multiples of a complete set of chromosomes).

Chromosome aberrations can be detected and analyzed using various cytogenetic techniques, including karyotyping, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), and comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). These methods allow for the identification and characterization of chromosomal changes at the molecular level, providing valuable information for genetic counseling, diagnosis, and research.

Prolactin is a hormone produced by the pituitary gland, a small gland located at the base of the brain. Its primary function is to stimulate milk production in women after childbirth, a process known as lactation. However, prolactin also plays other roles in the body, including regulating immune responses, metabolism, and behavior. In men, prolactin helps maintain the sexual glands and contributes to paternal behaviors.

Prolactin levels are usually low in both men and non-pregnant women but increase significantly during pregnancy and after childbirth. Various factors can affect prolactin levels, including stress, sleep, exercise, and certain medications. High prolactin levels can lead to medical conditions such as amenorrhea (absence of menstruation), galactorrhea (spontaneous milk production not related to childbirth), infertility, and reduced sexual desire in both men and women.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "United States" is a geopolitical entity, specifically the name of the country consisting of 50 states, and it is not a medical term or concept. Therefore, I can't provide a medical definition for it. If you have any questions related to health, medicine, or biology, I would be happy to try to help answer those!

Perinatal care refers to the health care provided to pregnant individuals, fetuses, and newborn infants during the time immediately before and after birth. This period is defined as beginning at approximately 20 weeks of gestation and ending 4 weeks after birth. Perinatal care includes preventative measures, medical and supportive services, and treatment for complications during pregnancy, childbirth, and in the newborn period. It encompasses a wide range of services including prenatal care, labor and delivery management, postpartum care, and neonatal care. The goal of perinatal care is to ensure the best possible outcomes for both the mother and the baby by preventing, diagnosing, and treating any potential health issues that may arise during this critical period.

Blood flow velocity is the speed at which blood travels through a specific part of the vascular system. It is typically measured in units of distance per time, such as centimeters per second (cm/s) or meters per second (m/s). Blood flow velocity can be affected by various factors, including cardiac output, vessel diameter, and viscosity of the blood. Measuring blood flow velocity is important in diagnosing and monitoring various medical conditions, such as heart disease, stroke, and peripheral vascular disease.

Vacuum extraction, obstetrical is a medical procedure used during childbirth to help deliver the baby when there are signs of fetal distress or if the mother is experiencing exhaustion during labor. This assisted delivery technique involves the application of suction through a vacuum device that attaches to the baby's head, allowing the healthcare provider to gently pull the baby out as the mother pushes.

The vacuum extractor consists of a soft or rigid cup connected to a pump, which creates negative pressure inside the cup. The cup is placed on the fetal scalp and engaged during a contraction when the cervix is fully dilated and the baby's head has descended into the pelvis. The healthcare provider then uses controlled traction to help deliver the baby while monitoring both the mother and the infant for any signs of distress or complications.

Vacuum extraction should only be performed by experienced healthcare providers, as it carries risks such as scalp trauma, cephalohematoma (a collection of blood under the skin on the baby's head), subgaleal hematoma (a more serious type of bleeding beneath the scalp), and intracranial hemorrhage (bleeding inside the skull). Proper evaluation, technique, and monitoring are crucial to minimize these risks and ensure a safe delivery for both mother and baby.

Child development is a multidisciplinary field that examines the biological, psychological, emotional, and social growth and changes that occur in human beings between birth and the onset of adulthood. It involves a complex interaction of genetics, environment, culture, and experiences that shape a child's growth and development over time.

Child development is typically divided into several domains, including:

1. Physical Development: This refers to the growth and changes in a child's body, including their motor skills, sensory abilities, and overall health.
2. Cognitive Development: This involves the development of a child's thinking, learning, problem-solving, memory, language, and other mental processes.
3. Emotional Development: This refers to the development of a child's emotional awareness, expression, understanding, and regulation.
4. Social Development: This involves the development of a child's ability to interact with others, form relationships, communicate effectively, and understand social norms and expectations.

Child development is an ongoing process that occurs at different rates and in different ways for each child. Understanding typical patterns of child development can help parents, educators, and healthcare providers support children's growth and identify any potential delays or concerns.

Hemoperitoneum is a medical condition characterized by the presence of blood in the peritoneal cavity, which is the space between the lining of the abdominal wall and the organs within it. This can occur due to various reasons such as trauma, rupture of an abdominal aortic aneurysm, ectopic pregnancy, or other conditions that cause bleeding into the abdomen.

The accumulation of blood in the peritoneal cavity can lead to symptoms such as abdominal pain, tenderness, distension, and hypovolemic shock due to blood loss. Hemoperitoneum is a serious medical condition that requires prompt diagnosis and treatment to prevent further complications.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Linear Models" is actually a term from the field of statistics and machine learning, rather than medicine. A linear model is a type of statistical model that is used to analyze the relationship between two or more variables. In a linear model, the relationship between the dependent variable (the outcome or result) and the independent variable(s) (the factors being studied) is assumed to be linear, meaning that it can be described by a straight line on a graph.

The equation for a simple linear model with one independent variable (x) and one dependent variable (y) looks like this:

y = β0 + β1*x + ε

In this equation, β0 is the y-intercept or the value of y when x equals zero, β1 is the slope or the change in y for each unit increase in x, and ε is the error term or the difference between the actual values of y and the predicted values of y based on the linear model.

Linear models are widely used in medical research to study the relationship between various factors (such as exposure to a risk factor or treatment) and health outcomes (such as disease incidence or mortality). They can also be used to adjust for confounding variables, which are factors that may influence both the independent variable and the dependent variable, and thus affect the observed relationship between them.

The estrous cycle is the reproductive cycle in certain mammals, characterized by regular changes in the reproductive tract and behavior, which are regulated by hormonal fluctuations. It is most commonly observed in non-primate mammals such as dogs, cats, cows, pigs, and horses.

The estrous cycle consists of several stages:

1. Proestrus: This stage lasts for a few days and is characterized by the development of follicles in the ovaries and an increase in estrogen levels. During this time, the female may show signs of sexual receptivity, but will not allow mating to occur.
2. Estrus: This is the period of sexual receptivity, during which the female allows mating to take place. It typically lasts for a few days and is marked by a surge in luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), which triggers ovulation.
3. Metestrus: This stage follows ovulation and is characterized by the formation of a corpus luteum, a structure that produces progesterone to support pregnancy. If fertilization does not occur, the corpus luteum will eventually regress, leading to the next phase.
4. Diestrus: This is the final stage of the estrous cycle and can last for several weeks or months. During this time, the female's reproductive tract returns to its resting state, and she is not sexually receptive. If pregnancy has occurred, the corpus luteum will continue to produce progesterone until the placenta takes over this function later in pregnancy.

It's important to note that the human menstrual cycle is different from the estrous cycle. While both cycles involve hormonal fluctuations and changes in the reproductive tract, the menstrual cycle includes a shedding of the uterine lining (menstruation) if fertilization does not occur, which is not a feature of the estrous cycle.

"Age factors" refer to the effects, changes, or differences that age can have on various aspects of health, disease, and medical care. These factors can encompass a wide range of issues, including:

1. Physiological changes: As people age, their bodies undergo numerous physical changes that can affect how they respond to medications, illnesses, and medical procedures. For example, older adults may be more sensitive to certain drugs or have weaker immune systems, making them more susceptible to infections.
2. Chronic conditions: Age is a significant risk factor for many chronic diseases, such as heart disease, diabetes, cancer, and arthritis. As a result, age-related medical issues are common and can impact treatment decisions and outcomes.
3. Cognitive decline: Aging can also lead to cognitive changes, including memory loss and decreased decision-making abilities. These changes can affect a person's ability to understand and comply with medical instructions, leading to potential complications in their care.
4. Functional limitations: Older adults may experience physical limitations that impact their mobility, strength, and balance, increasing the risk of falls and other injuries. These limitations can also make it more challenging for them to perform daily activities, such as bathing, dressing, or cooking.
5. Social determinants: Age-related factors, such as social isolation, poverty, and lack of access to transportation, can impact a person's ability to obtain necessary medical care and affect their overall health outcomes.

Understanding age factors is critical for healthcare providers to deliver high-quality, patient-centered care that addresses the unique needs and challenges of older adults. By taking these factors into account, healthcare providers can develop personalized treatment plans that consider a person's age, physical condition, cognitive abilities, and social circumstances.

Maternal Serum Screening (MSS) tests are a type of prenatal screening tests that measure the levels of certain substances in the mother's blood during pregnancy to assess the risk of birth defects or chromosomal abnormalities in the fetus. These tests typically measure the levels of two proteins, human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) and alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), as well as a hormone called inhibin A.

The levels of these substances can vary depending on factors such as the gestational age of the fetus, the mother's weight, and the presence of certain medical conditions. By comparing the measured levels to established norms, healthcare providers can estimate the risk of chromosomal abnormalities such as Down syndrome (trisomy 21), Edwards syndrome (trisomy 18), and neural tube defects like spina bifida.

It is important to note that MSS tests do not provide a definitive diagnosis but rather an estimate of the risk. If the results suggest an increased risk, further diagnostic testing such as amniocentesis or chorionic villus sampling (CVS) may be recommended to confirm the diagnosis.

"Cattle" is a term used in the agricultural and veterinary fields to refer to domesticated animals of the genus *Bos*, primarily *Bos taurus* (European cattle) and *Bos indicus* (Zebu). These animals are often raised for meat, milk, leather, and labor. They are also known as bovines or cows (for females), bulls (intact males), and steers/bullocks (castrated males). However, in a strict medical definition, "cattle" does not apply to humans or other animals.

Micronutrients are essential nutrients that our body requires in small quantities to support various bodily functions, such as growth, development, and overall health. They include vitamins and minerals, which are vital for the production of hormones, enzymes, and other substances necessary for optimal health.

Unlike macronutrients (carbohydrates, proteins, and fats), micronutrients do not provide energy or calories but play a crucial role in maintaining the balance and functioning of our body systems. They support immune function, bone health, wound healing, eyesight, skin health, and reproductive processes, among other functions.

Examples of micronutrients include vitamins A, C, D, E, and K, as well as minerals like calcium, iron, magnesium, zinc, and iodine. While our bodies need only small amounts of these nutrients, deficiencies in any of them can lead to serious health problems over time. Therefore, it's essential to consume a balanced and varied diet that includes adequate amounts of micronutrients to support overall health and well-being.

'Abnormalities, Multiple' is a broad term that refers to the presence of two or more structural or functional anomalies in an individual. These abnormalities can be present at birth (congenital) or can develop later in life (acquired). They can affect various organs and systems of the body and can vary greatly in severity and impact on a person's health and well-being.

Multiple abnormalities can occur due to genetic factors, environmental influences, or a combination of both. Chromosomal abnormalities, gene mutations, exposure to teratogens (substances that cause birth defects), and maternal infections during pregnancy are some of the common causes of multiple congenital abnormalities.

Examples of multiple congenital abnormalities include Down syndrome, Turner syndrome, and VATER/VACTERL association. Acquired multiple abnormalities can result from conditions such as trauma, infection, degenerative diseases, or cancer.

The medical evaluation and management of individuals with multiple abnormalities depend on the specific abnormalities present and their impact on the individual's health and functioning. A multidisciplinary team of healthcare professionals is often involved in the care of these individuals to address their complex needs.

Body Mass Index (BMI) is a measure used to assess whether a person has a healthy weight for their height. It's calculated by dividing a person's weight in kilograms by the square of their height in meters. Here is the medical definition:

Body Mass Index (BMI) = weight(kg) / [height(m)]^2

According to the World Health Organization, BMI categories are defined as follows:

* Less than 18.5: Underweight
* 18.5-24.9: Normal or healthy weight
* 25.0-29.9: Overweight
* 30.0 and above: Obese

It is important to note that while BMI can be a useful tool for identifying weight issues in populations, it does have limitations when applied to individuals. For example, it may not accurately reflect body fat distribution or muscle mass, which can affect health risks associated with excess weight. Therefore, BMI should be used as one of several factors when evaluating an individual's health status and risk for chronic diseases.

Fertilization is the process by which a sperm cell (spermatozoon) penetrates and fuses with an egg cell (ovum), resulting in the formation of a zygote. This fusion of genetic material from both the male and female gametes initiates the development of a new organism. In human biology, fertilization typically occurs in the fallopian tube after sexual intercourse, when a single sperm out of millions is able to reach and penetrate the egg released from the ovary during ovulation. The successful fusion of these two gametes marks the beginning of pregnancy.

Birth intervals refer to the length of time between the birth of one child and the conception of the next child. It is the duration from the delivery of one baby to the initiation of the pregnancy that results in another birth. This interval is an essential measure in reproductive health, as it can impact the health and well-being of both the mother and the children.

The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends a minimum birth interval of 24 months between pregnancies to reduce the risk of adverse maternal and perinatal outcomes. Shorter birth intervals are associated with increased risks for preterm birth, low birth weight, small for gestational age, and neonatal mortality. Additionally, short birth intervals can also negatively affect the mother's health, increasing the risk of maternal depletion syndrome, which may lead to nutritional deficiencies, anemia, and fatigue.

Birth intervals are influenced by various factors, including cultural norms, socioeconomic status, access to family planning services, and individual preferences. Encouraging longer birth intervals through improved access to family planning resources and education can contribute to better maternal and child health outcomes.

Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome (NAS) is a postnatal drug withdrawal syndrome that occurs in newborns who were exposed to opioids or other addictive substances while in the mother's womb. It happens when a pregnant woman uses drugs such as heroin, oxycodone, methadone, or buprenorphine. After birth, when the baby is no longer receiving the drug through the placenta, withdrawal symptoms can occur.

NAS symptoms may include:

* Tremors, seizures, or muscle stiffness
* Excessive crying or high-pitched crying
* Sleep disturbances, poor feeding, and poor growth
* Fever, diarrhea, vomiting, and sneezing
* Rapid breathing or breath-holding
* Increased sweating, yawning, or stuffiness

The severity of NAS can vary depending on the type and amount of drug used during pregnancy, the timing and length of exposure, and the newborn's individual characteristics. Treatment typically involves a slow and careful weaning from the drug using medication such as morphine or methadone, along with supportive care to manage symptoms and promote healthy development.

Reproduction, in the context of biology and medicine, refers to the process by which organisms produce offspring. It is a complex process that involves the creation, development, and growth of new individuals from parent organisms. In sexual reproduction, this process typically involves the combination of genetic material from two parents through the fusion of gametes (sex cells) such as sperm and egg cells. This results in the formation of a zygote, which then develops into a new individual with a unique genetic makeup.

In contrast, asexual reproduction does not involve the fusion of gametes and can occur through various mechanisms such as budding, fragmentation, or parthenogenesis. Asexual reproduction results in offspring that are genetically identical to the parent organism.

Reproduction is a fundamental process that ensures the survival and continuation of species over time. It is also an area of active research in fields such as reproductive medicine, where scientists and clinicians work to understand and address issues related to human fertility, contraception, and genetic disorders.

Quadruplets are defined in medicine as a type of multiple birth where four offspring are produced from the same pregnancy. This occurs when a single fertilized egg divides into four embryos, or more rarely, when four separate eggs are each fertilized by different sperm. Quadruplets face higher risks of preterm birth and other complications compared to singleton pregnancies.

Relaxin is a hormone produced by the ovaries and, during pregnancy, also by the placenta and the fetal membranes. Its primary function is to relax the uterus and pelvic joints in preparation for childbirth, hence its name. It does this by softening the connective tissues and increasing their elasticity, which allows them to stretch more easily. Relaxin also plays a role in the cardiovascular system during pregnancy, helping to maintain healthy blood pressure levels.

Additionally, relaxin has been shown to have effects on other parts of the body, such as reducing muscle stiffness and joint pain, increasing flexibility, and potentially even playing a role in bone metabolism. However, more research is needed to fully understand all of its functions and potential therapeutic uses.

Contraceptive agents are substances or medications that are used to prevent pregnancy by interfering with the normal process of conception and fertilization or the development and implantation of the fertilized egg. They can be divided into two main categories: hormonal and non-hormonal methods.

Hormonal contraceptive agents include combined oral contraceptives (COCs), progestin-only pills, patches, rings, injections, and implants. These methods work by releasing synthetic hormones that mimic the natural hormones estrogen and progesterone in a woman's body. By doing so, they prevent ovulation, thicken cervical mucus to make it harder for sperm to reach the egg, and thin the lining of the uterus to make it less likely for a fertilized egg to implant.

Non-hormonal contraceptive agents include barrier methods such as condoms, diaphragms, cervical caps, and sponges, which prevent sperm from reaching the egg by creating a physical barrier. Other non-hormonal methods include intrauterine devices (IUDs), which are inserted into the uterus to prevent pregnancy, and fertility awareness-based methods, which involve tracking ovulation and avoiding intercourse during fertile periods.

Emergency contraceptive agents, such as Plan B or ella, can also be used to prevent pregnancy after unprotected sex or contraceptive failure. These methods work by preventing or delaying ovulation, preventing fertilization, or preventing implantation of a fertilized egg.

It's important to note that while contraceptive agents are effective at preventing pregnancy, they do not protect against sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Using condoms in addition to other forms of contraception can help reduce the risk of STIs.

Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) is a statistical technique used to compare the means of two or more groups and determine whether there are any significant differences between them. It is a way to analyze the variance in a dataset to determine whether the variability between groups is greater than the variability within groups, which can indicate that the groups are significantly different from one another.

ANOVA is based on the concept of partitioning the total variance in a dataset into two components: variance due to differences between group means (also known as "between-group variance") and variance due to differences within each group (also known as "within-group variance"). By comparing these two sources of variance, ANOVA can help researchers determine whether any observed differences between groups are statistically significant, or whether they could have occurred by chance.

ANOVA is a widely used technique in many areas of research, including biology, psychology, engineering, and business. It is often used to compare the means of two or more experimental groups, such as a treatment group and a control group, to determine whether the treatment had a significant effect. ANOVA can also be used to compare the means of different populations or subgroups within a population, to identify any differences that may exist between them.

Fetomaternal transfusion, also known as fetal-maternal hemorrhage, is a medical condition where there is a transfer of fetal blood cells into the maternal circulation. This can occur during pregnancy, childbirth, or in the postpartum period due to various reasons such as placental abnormalities, trauma, or invasive procedures like amniocentesis. In some cases, it may lead to complications for both the fetus and the mother, including fetal anemia, hydrops fetalis, and maternal alloimmunization.

I. Definition:

An abortion in a veterinary context refers to the intentional or unintentional termination of pregnancy in a non-human animal before the fetus is capable of surviving outside of the uterus. This can occur spontaneously (known as a miscarriage) or be induced through medical intervention (induced abortion).

II. Common Causes:

Spontaneous abortions may result from genetic defects, hormonal imbalances, infections, exposure to toxins, trauma, or other maternal health issues. Induced abortions are typically performed for population control, humane reasons (such as preventing the birth of a severely deformed or non-viable fetus), or when the pregnancy poses a risk to the mother's health.

III. Methods:

Veterinarians may use various methods to induce abortion depending on the species, stage of gestation, and reason for the procedure. These can include administering drugs that stimulate uterine contractions (such as prostaglandins), physically removing the fetus through surgery (dilation and curettage or hysterectomy), or using techniques specific to certain animal species (e.g., intrauterine infusion of hypertonic saline in equids).

IV. Ethical Considerations:

The ethics surrounding veterinary abortions are complex and multifaceted, often involving considerations related to animal welfare, conservation, population management, and human-animal relationships. Veterinarians must weigh these factors carefully when deciding whether to perform an abortion and which method to use. In some cases, legal regulations may also influence the decision-making process.

V. Conclusion:

Abortion in veterinary medicine is a medical intervention that can be used to address various clinical scenarios, ranging from unintentional pregnancy loss to deliberate termination of pregnancy for humane or population control reasons. Ethical considerations play a significant role in the decision-making process surrounding veterinary abortions, and veterinarians must carefully evaluate each situation on a case-by-case basis.

Medical mass screening, also known as population screening, is a public health service that aims to identify and detect asymptomatic individuals in a given population who have or are at risk of a specific disease. The goal is to provide early treatment, reduce morbidity and mortality, and prevent the spread of diseases within the community.

A mass screening program typically involves offering a simple, quick, and non-invasive test to a large number of people in a defined population, regardless of their risk factors or symptoms. Those who test positive are then referred for further diagnostic tests and appropriate medical interventions. Examples of mass screening programs include mammography for breast cancer detection, PSA (prostate-specific antigen) testing for prostate cancer, and fecal occult blood testing for colorectal cancer.

It is important to note that mass screening programs should be evidence-based, cost-effective, and ethically sound, with clear benefits outweighing potential harms. They should also consider factors such as the prevalence of the disease in the population, the accuracy and reliability of the screening test, and the availability and effectiveness of treatment options.

Obstetrical anesthesia refers to the use of anesthetic techniques and medications during childbirth or obstetrical procedures. The goal is to provide pain relief and comfort to the birthing person while ensuring the safety of both the mother and the baby. There are different types of obstetrical anesthesia, including:

1. Local anesthesia: Injection of a local anesthetic agent to numb a specific area, such as the perineum (the area between the vagina and the anus) during childbirth.
2. Regional anesthesia: Numbing a larger region of the body using techniques like spinal or epidural anesthesia. These methods involve injecting local anesthetic agents near the spinal cord to block nerve impulses, providing pain relief in the lower half of the body.
3. General anesthesia: Using inhaled gases or intravenous medications to render the birthing person unconscious during cesarean sections (C-sections) or other surgical procedures related to childbirth.

The choice of anesthetic technique depends on various factors, including the type of delivery, the mother's medical history, and the preferences of both the mother and the healthcare team. Obstetrical anesthesia requires specialized training and expertise to ensure safe and effective pain management during labor and delivery.

Reproducibility of results in a medical context refers to the ability to obtain consistent and comparable findings when a particular experiment or study is repeated, either by the same researcher or by different researchers, following the same experimental protocol. It is an essential principle in scientific research that helps to ensure the validity and reliability of research findings.

In medical research, reproducibility of results is crucial for establishing the effectiveness and safety of new treatments, interventions, or diagnostic tools. It involves conducting well-designed studies with adequate sample sizes, appropriate statistical analyses, and transparent reporting of methods and findings to allow other researchers to replicate the study and confirm or refute the results.

The lack of reproducibility in medical research has become a significant concern in recent years, as several high-profile studies have failed to produce consistent findings when replicated by other researchers. This has led to increased scrutiny of research practices and a call for greater transparency, rigor, and standardization in the conduct and reporting of medical research.

Litter size is a term used in veterinary medicine, particularly in relation to breeding of animals. It refers to the number of offspring that are born to an animal during one pregnancy. For example, in the case of dogs or cats, it would be the number of kittens or puppies born in a single litter. The size of the litter can vary widely depending on the species, breed, age, and health status of the parent animals.

Antiphospholipid antibodies are a type of autoantibody that targets and binds to certain proteins found in the blood that attach to phospholipids (a type of fat molecule). These antibodies are associated with an increased risk of developing antiphospholipid syndrome, a disorder characterized by abnormal blood clotting.

There are several types of antiphospholipid antibodies, including:

1. Lupus anticoagulant: This type of antiphospholipid antibody can interfere with blood clotting tests and may increase the risk of thrombosis (blood clots) in both arteries and veins.
2. Anticardiolipin antibodies: These antibodies target a specific phospholipid called cardiolipin, which is found in the inner membrane of mitochondria. High levels of anticardiolipin antibodies are associated with an increased risk of thrombosis and pregnancy complications such as recurrent miscarriage.
3. Anti-β2 glycoprotein I antibodies: These antibodies target a protein called β2 glycoprotein I, which binds to negatively charged phospholipids on the surface of cells. High levels of anti-β2 glycoprotein I antibodies are associated with an increased risk of thrombosis and pregnancy complications.

The exact mechanism by which antiphospholipid antibodies cause blood clotting is not fully understood, but it is thought to involve the activation of platelets, the inhibition of natural anticoagulants, and the promotion of inflammation. Antiphospholipid syndrome can be treated with medications that thin the blood or prevent clots from forming, such as aspirin, warfarin, or heparin.

A confidence interval (CI) is a range of values that is likely to contain the true value of a population parameter with a certain level of confidence. It is commonly used in statistical analysis to express the uncertainty associated with estimates derived from sample data.

For example, if we calculate a 95% confidence interval for the mean height of a population based on a sample of individuals, we can say that we are 95% confident that the true population mean height falls within the calculated range. The width of the confidence interval gives us an idea of how precise our estimate is - narrower intervals indicate more precise estimates, while wider intervals suggest greater uncertainty.

Confidence intervals are typically calculated using statistical formulas that take into account the sample size, standard deviation, and level of confidence desired. They can be used to compare different groups or to evaluate the effectiveness of interventions in medical research.

Maternal mortality is defined by the World Health Organization (WHO) as "the death of a woman while pregnant or within 42 days of termination of pregnancy, irrespective of the duration and site of the pregnancy, from any cause related to or aggravated by the pregnancy or its management but not from accidental or incidental causes."

This definition highlights that maternal mortality is a preventable death that occurs during pregnancy, childbirth, or in the postpartum period, and it can be caused by various factors related to or worsened by the pregnancy or its management. The WHO also collects data on maternal deaths due to direct obstetric causes (such as hemorrhage, hypertensive disorders, sepsis, and unsafe abortion) and indirect causes (such as malaria, anemia, and HIV/AIDS).

Maternal mortality is a significant public health issue worldwide, particularly in low- and middle-income countries. Reducing maternal mortality is one of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) set by the United Nations, with a target to reduce the global maternal mortality ratio to less than 70 per 100,000 live births by 2030.

Male infertility is a condition characterized by the inability to cause pregnancy in a fertile female. It is typically defined as the failure to achieve a pregnancy after 12 months or more of regular unprotected sexual intercourse.

The causes of male infertility can be varied and include issues with sperm production, such as low sperm count or poor sperm quality, problems with sperm delivery, such as obstructions in the reproductive tract, or hormonal imbalances that affect sperm production. Other factors that may contribute to male infertility include genetic disorders, environmental exposures, lifestyle choices, and certain medical conditions or treatments.

It is important to note that male infertility can often be treated or managed with medical interventions, such as medication, surgery, or assisted reproductive technologies (ART). A healthcare provider can help diagnose the underlying cause of male infertility and recommend appropriate treatment options.

Postnatal care is the period of care and medical support provided to the mother and newborn baby following childbirth. This care typically includes monitoring the physical and emotional health of the mother, helping her with breastfeeding, and ensuring the wellbeing of the newborn through regular check-ups and screening for any potential health issues.

The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends that postnatal care should be provided for at least 24 hours after birth in a healthcare facility, and continue for up to six weeks after delivery, with frequent contact during the first week. The specific components of postnatal care may vary depending on the individual needs of the mother and baby, but they typically include:

* Monitoring the mother's vital signs, uterine contractions, and vaginal bleeding
* Checking for signs of infection or complications such as postpartum hemorrhage or puerperal fever
* Providing emotional support and counseling to the mother on topics such as infant care, family planning, and breastfeeding
* Assessing the newborn's health, including weight, temperature, heart rate, and breathing
* Administering necessary vaccinations and screening for conditions such as jaundice or congenital defects
* Providing guidance on feeding, bathing, and other aspects of newborn care

Overall, postnatal care is a critical component of maternal and child health, as it helps to ensure the best possible outcomes for both the mother and baby during the important transition period following childbirth.

Uterine cervical incompetence, also known as cervical insufficiency, is a medical condition where the cervix begins to shorten and dilate (open) without any signs of labor or contractions, usually during the second trimester of pregnancy. This can lead to premature delivery or miscarriage. It is often caused by structural abnormalities or damage to the cervix, such as from a previous surgical procedure, trauma, or congenital defects. In some cases, the cause may be unknown. It's important to note that this condition is different from preterm labor, which involves both contractions and cervical changes.

Sex determination analysis is a medical or biological examination used to establish the genetic or phenotypic sex of an individual. This can be done through various methods, including:

1. Genetic testing: Examination of an individual's DNA to identify the presence of specific sex chromosomes (XX for females and XY for males). This is typically performed through a blood or tissue sample.
2. Chromosomal analysis: Microscopic examination of an individual's chromosomes to determine their number and structure. In humans, females typically have 46 chromosomes, including two X chromosomes (46,XX), while males typically have 46 chromosomes, including one X and one Y chromosome (46,XY).
3. Phenotypic analysis: Observation of an individual's physical characteristics, such as the presence or absence of certain sex organs or secondary sexual characteristics, to determine their phenotypic sex.

Sex determination analysis is used in various medical and research contexts, including prenatal testing, diagnosis of disorders of sex development (DSDs), forensic investigations, and population studies. It's important to note that while sex determination analysis can provide information about an individual's genetic or phenotypic sex, it does not necessarily reflect their gender identity, which is a personal sense of being male, female, or something else.

Placental extracts are substances that are derived from the placenta, which is an organ that connects the developing fetus to the uterine wall during pregnancy. These extracts contain a variety of biologically active compounds, including hormones, growth factors, and nutrients, which can have potential therapeutic effects.

Placental extracts are typically obtained from either human or animal placentas through a process of extraction and purification. They may be used in various medical and cosmetic applications, although their effectiveness and safety are still a subject of ongoing research and debate. Some proponents claim that placental extracts can help to promote healing, reduce inflammation, and improve skin health, among other benefits. However, more rigorous scientific studies are needed to confirm these claims and establish the appropriate uses and dosages of placental extracts in medical practice.

... is divided into three trimesters, each lasting for approximately three months. The exact length of each trimester can ... Couvade syndrome Cryptic pregnancy False pregnancy Simulated pregnancy Pregnancy-related anxiety "What are some common signs of ... Pregnancy is divided into three trimesters of approximately three months each. The first trimester includes conception, which ... Globally, 44% of pregnancies are unplanned. Over half (56%) of unplanned pregnancies are aborted. Among unintended pregnancies ...
Pregnancy loss most commonly occurs during the first trimester, when it is referred to as early pregnancy loss. Placenta ... First trimester bleeding is more common than second or third trimester bleeding. First trimester bleeding may be associated ... Common causes of early pregnancy bleeding include ectopic pregnancy, threatened miscarriage, and pregnancy loss. Most ... if the pregnancy was previously seen on imaging) or a pregnancy of unknown location (if the pregnancy was not previously seen ...
When the case was heard in District Court, Hodgson testified that "...one 14-year-old patient, in order to keep her pregnancy ... Hodgson JE, Portmann KC (1974). "Complications of 10,453 consecutive first-trimester abortions: a prospective study". Am. J. ... Paul-Ramsey Hospital (now called Regions Hospital). At the time, abortion was illegal in Minnesota, unless the pregnancy was a ... Hodgson JE (1955). "Use of hyaluronidase in the frog test for pregnancy". Am. J. Clin. Pathol. 25 (9): 1096-8. doi:10.1093/ajcp ...
Romm (January 2010). "Pregnancy: Third Trimester". CHAPTER 15 - Pregnancy: Third Trimester. Churchill Livingstone. pp. 370-397 ... Polymorphic Eruption of Pregnancy, Intrahepatic Cholestasis of Pregnancy, and Atopic Eruption of Pregnancy". Dermatology ... This skin condition occurs mostly in first pregnancies (primigravida), in the third trimester and is more likely with multiple ... However, most people report experiencing symptoms during the third trimester (last few weeks of pregnancy) where 15% of the ...
The thyroid enlarges and may be more easily felt during the first trimester. The increase in kidney clearance during pregnancy ... Total cortisol increases to three times of non-pregnant levels by the third trimester. The increased estrogen in pregnancy ... Levels of sex hormones and SHBG during pregnancy in women. The dashed vertical lines separate the trimesters. Determinations ... A woman's breasts grow during pregnancy, typically 1 to 2 cup sizes. A woman who wore a C cup bra prior to her pregnancy may ...
... the second and third trimesters in pregnancy; and combination with the drug aliskiren in people with diabetes. Common adverse ...
Chien P, Thomson M (15 December 2006). "Medical versus surgical methods for first trimester termination of pregnancy: RHL ... Complications after second trimester abortion are similar to those after first trimester abortion, and depend somewhat on the ... Pregnancy loss". In Gabbe SG, Niebyl JR, Simpson JL (eds.). Obstetrics: Normal and Problem Pregnancies (5th ed.). Churchill ... First trimester procedures can generally be performed using local anesthesia, while second trimester methods may require deep ...
"What is a trimester?". Archived from the original on 2005-11-04. Medical company:The Merck Manuals Online Medical Library (2003 ... such as an ectopic pregnancy. If conception is defined as at implantation, ectopic pregnancies could not be called pregnancies ... Defining pregnancy as beginning at implantation thus makes pregnancy a condition that can be easily tested.[citation needed] ... or pregnancy prevention are not agreed upon. Traditionally, doctors have measured pregnancy from a number of convenient points ...
Trimester means "three months". A normal pregnancy lasts about nine months and has three trimesters. First trimester screening ... In the third trimester the midwife will see the mother every two weeks until week 36 and every week after that. Weight, blood ... Her past pregnancies and family, social, and medical history are discussed. Women may have an ultrasound scan during the first ... Lab tests such as a CBC and UA may be done with additional testing done for at-risk pregnancies. The midwife palpates the ...
For example, morning sickness is a fairly common mild symptom of pregnancy that generally resolves in the second trimester, but ... Most often, nausea and vomiting symptoms during pregnancy resolve in the first trimester, however, some continue to experience ... Complications of pregnancy are health problems that are related to, or arise during pregnancy. Complications that occur ... Complications of pregnancy can sometimes arise from abnormally severe presentations of symptoms and discomforts of pregnancy, ...
"Bleeding During Pregnancy". www.acog.org. Retrieved 30 June 2022. "1st trimester pregnancy: What to expect". Mayo Clinic. ... Pregnancy symptoms may be categorized based on trimester as well as region of the body affected. Many of the early signs of ... Breast tenderness typically improves as the body adjusts to the pregnancy. Fatigue in the first trimester is common due to ... Poole, C. J. (September 1986). "Fatigue during the first trimester of pregnancy". Journal of Obstetric, Gynecologic & Neonatal ...
... , also referred to as third trimester abortion, describes the termination of pregnancy by induced ... A late termination of pregnancy often refers to an induced ending of pregnancy after the 20th week of gestation, i.e. after a ... Medical induction abortion is a safe and effective method for termination of pregnancies beyond the first trimester when ... than full-term pregnancy and childbirth in the United States. Late termination of pregnancy is more controversial than abortion ...
During the 2009 H1N1 pandemic, as well as during interpandemic periods, women in the third trimester of pregnancy were at ... particularly during the third trimester. Also, recurrences of herpes genitalis increase in frequency during pregnancy. The risk ... In pregnancy, there is an increased susceptibility and/or severity of several infectious diseases. There are several potential ... Varicella occurs at an increased rate during pregnancy, but mortality is not higher than that among men and non-pregnant women ...
"First Trimester complications in pregnancy with diabetes". September 2016. Walsh, John (2006). Pumping Insulin. San Diego, ... Diabetes mellitus Gestational diabetes Pregnancy "Pregnancy if You Have Diabetes , NIDDK". National Institute of Diabetes and ... Pathology of pregnancy, childbirth and the puerperium, Diabetes, Health issues in pregnancy). ... During the first weeks of pregnancy less insulin treatment is required due to tight blood sugar control as well as the extra ...
"Nightmare frequency in last trimester of pregnancy". BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth. Springer Science and Business Media LLC. 16 ... Pregnancy-related insomnia is quite common. As pregnancy advances, both subjective and objective assessments reveal a notable ... Sleep disorders are frequently experienced during pregnancy, impacting over 50% of all pregnancies. These issues tend to become ... "Best Sleeping Positions During Pregnancy". American Pregnancy Association. 2021-09-01. Retrieved 2023-09-13. Raphael-Leff, Joan ...
... and during the third trimester of pregnancy. Known mild side effects of mefenamic acid include headaches, nervousness, and ... "FDA Warns that Using a Type of Pain and Fever Medication in Second Half of Pregnancy Could Lead to Complications". U.S. Food ... In 2008 the US label was updated with a warning concerning a risk of premature closure of the ductus arteriosus in pregnancy. ... They recommend avoiding NSAIDs in pregnant women at 20 weeks or later in pregnancy. Symptoms of overdosing include kidney ...
... she is in her last trimester of pregnancy. Akatok and his friend continue their search nearby. While working Amina encounters a ... Soon after Amina and the landlord learn of Amina's pregnancy for which the landlord berates her. Amina cannot have a baby in ...
This surgical incision is used in several medical procedures, including during termination of pregnancy in the second trimester ... Scar ectopic pregnancy is a rare form of ectopic pregnancy, however, when it does occur it causes complications in pregnancy ... In addition, a rare form of ectopic pregnancy known as scar ectopic pregnancy can occur. This is when there is abnormal ... in order to terminate a pregnancy in the second trimester of later. It is typically used as last resort if dilation and ...
It is also effective in the second trimester of pregnancy. It is taken by mouth. The more common adverse effects include ... "Medical methods for mid-trimester termination of pregnancy". The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. 2011 (1): CD005216. ... "Mifepristone Use During Pregnancy". Drugs.com. 20 January 2023. Archived from the original on 23 April 2023. Retrieved 22 April ... Initially, its use was limited to seven weeks into a pregnancy, but this was changed to nine weeks in 2017. The previous ...
Clinical Significance of Subchorionic and Retroplacental Hematomas Detected in the First Trimester of Pregnancy [1]. Obstetrics ... "First-Trimester Intrauterine Hematoma and Outcome of Pregnancy". Obstetrics & Gynecology. 105 (2): 339-44. doi:10.1097/01.AOG. ... It occurs in about 3.1% of all pregnancies, it is the most common sonographic abnormality and the most common cause of first ... Hemorrhage During Pregnancy: Sonography and MR Imaging [3]. Amer J Roentgenology 2001; 176:607-615. Trop I, Levine D. ...
These effects can be magnified especially during the first and third trimester of pregnancy when the baby is growing rapidly. ... Alcohol consumption in the first trimester of pregnancy, which is a crucial developmental stage of fetal growth, can have ... "Drinking and Your Pregnancy". pubs.niaaa.nih.gov. Retrieved 2018-11-16. "WHO , Substance use in pregnancy". www.who.int. ... "UpToDate: Alcohol intake and pregnancy". www.uptodate.com. Retrieved 2021-09-11. CDC (2021-05-24). "Alcohol Use in Pregnancy". ...
Accuracy has been reported at 98.6% in the first trimester of pregnancy. Confirmatory testing by invasive techniques ( ... Zindler, L (Apr-Jun 2005). "Ethical decision making in first trimester pregnancy screening". The Journal of Perinatal & ... screening in both the first and second trimesters is better than just screening in the first trimester. The different screening ... About 92% of pregnancies in Europe with a diagnosis of Down syndrome are terminated. As a result, there is almost no one with ...
It should be taken as at least 0.4 mg/day throughout the first trimester of pregnancy, 0.6 mg/day through the pregnancy, and ... Riley L (2006). Pregnancy: The Ultimate Week-by-Week Pregnancy Guide. Meredith Books. pp. 21-22. ISBN 978-0-696-22221-4. Chen ... Caffeine consumption during pregnancy is associated with increased risk of pregnancy loss and increased risk of low birth ... Caffeine consumption during pregnancy is associated with an increased risk of pregnancy loss. The available research favors the ...
Navarrete, C. D., Fessler, D. M. T., & Eng, S. J. (2007). Elevated ethnocentrism in the first trimester of pregnancy. Evolution ...
The magazine also covers early (first trimester) pregnancy. In addition to the magazine, the Conceive brand included a website ...
17.8%; loss of second-trimester pregnancy, 16.4% vs. 1.7%; ectopic pregnancy, 14.6% vs. 2.9%; preeclampsia, 26.4% vs. 13.7%; ... Women who were prescribed DES during pregnancy have been shown to have a modestly increased risk of breast cancer and breast ... These are the grandchildren of women who were given DES during pregnancy and whose mother or father was therefore exposed to ... These anomalies contribute to an increased risk of infertility and adverse pregnancy outcomes in prenatally DES-exposed ...
... levels during pregnancy in women. The dashed vertical lines separate the trimesters. The pharmacokinetics of progesterone are ... and 17-hydroxyprogesterone in human pregnancy. I. Normal pregnancy". Am. J. Obstet. Gynecol. 112 (8): 1095-100. doi:10.1016/ ... During pregnancy, levels of progesterone in the first 4 to 8 weeks are 25 to 75 ng/mL, and levels are typically around 140 to ... Production of progesterone in the body in late pregnancy is approximately 250 mg per day, 90% of which reaches the maternal ...
"Definition of Pregnancy". MedicineNet. Retrieved 2019-08-30. "Fetal development: What happens during the 1st trimester?". Mayo ... Persistent, acute nausea throughout pregnancy that does not go away after the 1st trimester. Different from morning sickness ... It is divided into three trimesters, each lasting for about 3 months. The 1st trimester is when the developing embryo becomes a ... "Gestational Hypertension: Pregnancy Induced Hypertension". American Pregnancy Association. 2012-04-27. Retrieved 2019-08-30. ...
0.5 to 1 gram/liter during the first two trimesters of pregnancy; and d) >0.5 gram/liter prior to minor surgery. Tranexamic ... 1 to 2 gram/liter at the end of pregnancy and during the postpartum period; b) > 1 gram/liter prior to major surgery; c) > ...
In pregnancy, ALT levels would rise during the second trimester. In one of the studies, measured ALT levels in pregnancy- ... In pregnancy conditions GGT activity is reduced in 2nd and 3rd trimesters. In hyperemesis gravidarum, GGT level value can reach ... Serum NT levels are higher during 2nd and 3rd trimesters in pregnancy. Ceruloplasmin is an acute phase protein synthesized in ... ALP activity is significantly increased in the third trimester of pregnancy. This is due to increased synthesis from the ...
... the third trimester of pregnancy can be an anxious time. Heres a list of concerns you might have, including traveling, ... For many people, the third trimester of pregnancy can be an anxious time. Youre in the home stretch and excited to meet your ... Shortness of breath and swelling (or edema) are both common in the last trimester of pregnancy. Learn some techniques than can ... 2017). Third trimester pregnancy: What to expect.. http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/pregnancy-week-by-week/in-depth/ ...
Missing a period is usually the first signal of a new pregnancy, although women with irregular periods may not initially ... recognize a missed period as pregnancy. During this time, many women experience a need to urinate frequently, extreme fatigue, ... First Trimester. What are the first symptoms of pregnancy?. Missing a period is usually the first signal of a new pregnancy, ... Total sleep time increases during the first trimester of pregnancy, normalizes in the second trimester, and decreases in the ...
I gave you a peek in my pregnancy announcement post but I wanted to update you on all the little things that have been going on ... Sharing a first trimester pregnancy update. Pregnancy symptoms, preparing for baby, and more. ... I am excited to share with you a First Trimester pregnancy update today. ... I am excited to share with you a First Trimester pregnancy update today. I gave you a peek in my pregnancy announcement post ...
... unspecified trimester is a medical classification as listed by WHO under the ran ... ICD-10 code O26.899 for Other specified pregnancy related conditions, ... unspecified trimester O26.899 ICD-10 code O26.899 for Other specified pregnancy related conditions, unspecified trimester is a ... Other specified pregnancy related conditions, unspecified trimester O26.89. Use additional code, if applicable, to identify ...
Pilot study on the use of sublingual misoprostol with mifepristone in termination of first trimester pregnancy up to 9 weeks ... Methods: One hundred women who requested legal termination of pregnancy up to 63 days were given 200 mg of oral mifepristone ... There was one ongoing pregnancy. The median duration of vaginal bleeding was 15 days. There were no serious complications. ... Background: A combination of mifepristone and misoprostol provides an effective method of medical abortion for early pregnancy ...
So in case you observe bleeding during pregnancy first trimester ... No matter in which phase of your pregnancy you are in, spotting ... Home PREGNANCY ISSUES Bleeding During Pregnancy First Trimester and All the Reasons for It ... Bleeding During Pregnancy First Trimester and All the Reasons for It was last modified: November 22nd, 2011 by admin4 ... Such bleeding during pregnancy first trimester can be caused by different infections, such as a urinary tract infection, use of ...
Pregnancy Stages Trimester Guide for Pregnant Women. Congratulations on your pregnancy. You may have some questions about what ... Pregnancy Trimesters Guide for First Time Moms. by dream · September 15, 2010 ... This is a common problem for many women during early pregnancy. Some women do not gain weight during the first trimester but ... Third Trimester:. Mom: You may start feeling more uncomfortable during your third trimester. It may be difficult to get a good ...
Learn the body changes and precautions to observe during the second trimester. ... The second trimester is when the fetus grows more quickly than before. ... Home • Pregnancy • Health. Second Trimester Of Pregnancy: Body Changes & What to Expect. The notable pregnancy symptoms, such ... Infographic: When To Call A Doctor During The Second Trimester?. During the second trimester of pregnancy, you may have some ...
Can you have sex during the third trimester of pregnancy? Generally speaking, the answer is... ... Can you have sex during the third trimester of pregnancy?. Generally speaking, the answer is yes. While orgasms and ... Sex during pregnancy is usually safe for women and not considered a major risk factor for her or the baby. ... Experimental mRNA Vaccine Breaks The "Golden Rule Of Pregnancy" Warns OBGYN Dr. James Thorp w/ Dr. Kelly Victory - Ask Dr. Drew ...
May this pregnancy turn out to be a smooth and healthy transition of you and your spous ... Indian diet plan during each trimester of pregnancy ( 1 week for each Trimester). Share ... This book consists of the recommended dietary allowance during all 3 trimesters of pregnancy. ... May this pregnancy turn out to be a smooth and healthy transition of you and your spouse into lovely parents. ...
Association Between COVID-19 During Pregnancy and Preterm Birth by Trimester of Infection: A Retrospective Cohort Study Using ... Association Between COVID-19 During Pregnancy and Preterm Birth by Trimester of Infection: A Retrospective Cohort Study Using ... Association Between COVID-19 During Pregnancy and Preterm Birth by Trimester of Infection: A Retrospective Cohort Study Using ... Association Between COVID-19 During Pregnancy and Preterm Birth by Trimester of Infection: A Retrospective Cohort Study Using ...
... of the intra-amniotic injection of ethacridine lactate in third trimester pregnancy patients and in patients with a ... so they have to risk pregnancy termination in the third trimester.. Many methods of second trimester pregnancy termination have ... In China, approximately 5% of pregnancy terminations are performed in the second trimester[7]. The risk of pregnancy ... Outcomes of intra-amniotic injection of ethacridine lactate for pregnancy termination in the third trimester or pregnancy ...
Today I enjoyed my 3rd visit to pregnancy treasures during this pregnancy and each visit was absolutely amazing! Everyone from ... I am currently 34 weeks pregnant and have been back to pregnancy treasures four times throughout my pregnancy. The environment ... I am nearing the end of my pregnancy but may try to squeeze in one more visit but I will definitely be recommending pregnancy ... I am SO GLAD a friend told me about this place it truly is a gem! This is my first pregnancy, and Dawn did so great at making ...
Learn when its normal to have a hard belly during pregnancy and when you should the doctor ... During the early stages of pregnancy, the growth of the uterus and the development of the baby can make your belly feel harder ... Causes for a hard belly during pregnancy (sorted by trimester) are as follows:. During the first trimester. The first trimester ... During the third trimester. The third trimester represents the last 3 months of pregnancy. In addition to continuing to ...
Trimester means 3 months. A normal pregnancy is around 10 months and has 3 trimesters. ... A normal pregnancy is around 10 months and has 3 trimesters. ... A normal pregnancy is around 10 months and has 3 trimesters.. ... Your health care provider may talk about your pregnancy in weeks, rather than months or trimesters. The third trimester goes ... In your third trimester, you will have a prenatal visit every 2 weeks until week 36. After that, you will see your provider ...
Here are the pregnancy tips for first trimesters ... Pregnancy is one of the sensitive period especially for the ... first trimester that need to maintain some guideline. ... Pregnancy Tips for First Trimesters. Pregnancy Tips. Fiorenza ... Below are the pregnancy tips for first trimesters:. Take Prenatal Vitamins. Before you become pregnant, start taking prenatal ... During your pregnancy, particularly in the first trimester, it is compelling that you dont eat some particular food. ...
... and posture can all cause headaches during pregnancy. Learn more about the causes, symptoms, and treatments here. ... First trimester. During the first trimester of pregnancy, a womans body goes through several drastic changes in a short space ... A full-term pregnancy lasts about 40 weeks and has three trimesters. Here, learn about the changes for the person and their ... Second and third trimesters. In the second and third trimesters, a woman may be less likely to experience headaches due to ...
Third trimester overview, including symptoms, what to expect at prenatal appointments, to-do items, and your partners role. ... The third trimester can bring challenges as everything gets bigger, heavier, and more squished. Many first-trimester pregnancy ... Fatigue is common during pregnancy, especially in the first and third trimesters. We like to blame hormones for pregnancy ... Your pregnancys third and final trimester starts at week 28 and goes until your baby is born. While your due date is week 40, ...
13 Things I Wish I Had With My 1st Pregnancy (On my Wish List for Baby #2!) ...
... first trimester ICD-10-CM Diagnosis Code O09.A1 Supervision of pregnancy with history of molar pregnancy, first trimester First ... And pregnancy problems include: bleeding during the first trimester and second trimester pregnancy... One woman experienced an ... Fibroid during pregnancy encourage them to grow during pregnancy normal enhanced first trimester occurred 16. That fibroid ... Most fibroid growth occurs in the first trimester. ... Natural Miscarriage After First-Trimester Pregnancy Loss. If you donâ t ...
Our week-by-week illustrated pregnancy calendar is a detailed guide to all the changes taking place in your baby - and in you! ... Another common term youll hear throughout your pregnancy is trimester. A pregnancy is divided into trimesters:. *the first ... A Word About Due Dates and Trimesters. After you announce your pregnancy, the first question youll probably be asked is "When ... the third trimester is from week 27 to the end of the pregnancy ... the second trimester is from week 13 to the end of week 26 ...
Tags back-pain-pregnancy, backache in pregnancy, lower back pain pregnancy, managing back pain during pregnancy, pregnancy ... Back Pain In Pregnancy Second Trimester. March 14, 2023. by chrys Back Pain In Pregnancy Second Trimester: Understanding the ... pregnancy pains, pregnant-back-pain, relieving back pain during pregnancy, second trimester Back Pain in Pregnancy First ... Back pain during pregnancy is a common complaint during the second trimester. Fortunately, there are several treatment options ...
I can hardly believe I am writing this third trimester recap at 39 weeks and 6 days! Pregnancy has truly flown by for me ... Wow, I can hardly believe I am writing this third trimester recap at 39 weeks and 6 days! Pregnancy has truly flown by for me- ... Ive also lived in Lululemon this pregnancy. In my third trimester, I went up 1 size in my shorts and pants. Ive loved their ... Ok, I think that about sums up our third trimester! I have 4 pregnancy highlights over on instagram with tons more info too! ...
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Use our Pregnancy Due Date Calculator to find your estimated due date and see major milestones throughout pregnancy. ... Pregnancy timeline. First. Trimester. Apr 15, 2024. to. Jul 8, 2024. today ... Also, find out how long it usually takes to conceive, how to get pregnant fast, and the top 10 signs of pregnancy. ... With thousands of award-winning articles and community groups, you can track your pregnancy and babys growth, get answers to ...
Sharing all things 1st trimester for my second pregnancy. Every sympton, feeling, what I have been eating and more. ... I would say that my first pregnancy with Ezra was about a level 3 on intensity for first trimester. While this second pregnancy ... Anxiety during pregnancy:. When I shared on Instagram that we were expecting again, one of the most commonly asked questions ... Nausea - I never really had this bad with my first pregnancy. But this time around I cannot even get out of bed until 8:30 or ...
I am in my first trimester of pregnancy and I thought it would be a great idea to keep a diary... Then the sickness kicked in. ... Posted in ParentingTagged diary, first trimester, journey, pregnancy, story Leave a Reply Cancel reply. Your email address will ... My Pregnancy- The First Trimester. Posted on July 13, 2017. July 14, 2020. by Emma Reed ... My Pregnancy: Birth Reflections Meeting When I had Jake on Christmas Day 2013 it ended in a very traumatic emergency c-section ...
First Trimester With Twin Pregnancy. Processed with VSCO with c1 preset. So if you arent aware, I am pregnant with IVF ... So no pregnancy isnt my cup of tea and if it was feasible I would deliver these babies now. But of course if they arrive now ... My pregnancy test was the 14.2.22 and I got the strongest and bluest positive I have ever had. Though I was nervous of miss ... From then on for a while it was a weekly visit to the Early pregnancy unit and it was obvious I was pregnant. I mean how many ...
... is defined as glucose intolerance of variable degree with onset or first recognition during pregnancy. A study by Stuebe et al ... A study by Franzago et al found in a cohort of women in their third trimester of pregnancy that the concentration of adipocyte- ... During the first trimester of pregnancy, women with diabetes should undergo testing (in addition to normal prenatal laboratory ... What is prediabetes and how is it monitored during pregnancy?. Which tests are performed in the first trimester following a ...
  • Medically reviewed by Meredith Shur, MD An Overview of â ¦ Myoma during pregnancy may lead to a number of issues. (dhiimoveis.com.br)
  • A rare complication of a fibroid during pregnancy is a problem known medically as red degeneration. (dhiimoveis.com.br)
  • It happens due to the rapid hormonal changes that occur, particularly in the first trimester, which slow down intestinal flow. (tuasaude.com)
  • During your pregnancy, particularly in the first trimester, it is compelling that you don't eat some particular food. (theblogulator.com)
  • What are the first symptoms of pregnancy? (medscape.com)
  • The notable pregnancy symptoms, such as back and tummy aches, begin in the second trimester. (momjunction.com)
  • This post will tell you about the physical changes you will notice, emergency symptoms to look out for, baby growth milestones, and tips to stay healthy in this trimester. (momjunction.com)
  • What triggers your belly to harden depends on the trimester you are in and can be identified by monitoring for other symptoms. (tuasaude.com)
  • Learn more about symptoms of constipation during pregnancy . (tuasaude.com)
  • Pregnancy causes several significant changes in the body, many of which can give rise to individual symptoms. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • In this article, we discuss the causes, symptoms, and treatment of headaches during pregnancy. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • The female body experiences several quick and drastic changes during pregnancy, which may lead to a few different symptoms. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Some other pregnancy symptoms may also influence these headaches or make them worse. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • These symptoms do not occur in every case of preeclampsia, which is one of the reasons why it is important to check in regularly with a doctor throughout pregnancy. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • This trimester can be challenging as your belly keeps growing, and you have some new symptoms resulting from carrying more weight. (pregnancypodcast.com)
  • Many first-trimester pregnancy symptoms you thought you were done with may be returning, like frequent urination, tender breasts, and fatigue. (pregnancypodcast.com)
  • Many of the symptoms in the third trimester are an extension of things you may have already experienced. (pregnancypodcast.com)
  • Although the data are conflicting and most women â ¦ We compared pregnancy loss rates and modes of delivery in these cases to a maternalâ ageâ matched and gestationalâ ageâ matched control group of women who â ¦ Symptoms were queried in a telephone survey. (dhiimoveis.com.br)
  • Any weird symptoms this trimester? (sarahbridgeman.com)
  • My boobs have been hurting for over 2 weeks, my body has been swollen and I've been quite shivery… all just my normal pre-menstrual symptoms- also common first trimester problems too! (emmareed.net)
  • Signs and symptoms of early pregnancy may include missed periods, tender breasts, morning sickness (nausea and vomiting), hunger, implantation bleeding, and frequent urination. (wikipedia.org)
  • At first, she thought John's symptoms were related to a viral syndrome or were a reaction to her pregnancy, since she has been more fatigued and irritable and therefore a bit short with him. (cdc.gov)
  • You will gain weight at a faster pace during your last trimester. (yusrablog.com)
  • Increased Demand of Obese Women for Protectins, Maresin, and Resolvin D1 in the Last Trimester of Pregnancy. (bvsalud.org)
  • In your third trimester, you will have a prenatal visit every 2 weeks until week 36. (medlineplus.gov)
  • There is no alternative to prenatal visits to get the best results for the first-trimester pregnancy. (theblogulator.com)
  • Learn what to expect at your prenatal appointments this trimester. (pregnancypodcast.com)
  • Prenatal care improves pregnancy outcomes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Also, test results can remain positive for pregnancy weeks after a pregnancy termination, miscarriage, or birth. (medscape.com)
  • In case the cramping and the bleeding has stopped and the ultrasound shows that your uterus is empty, we are talking about a completed miscarriage, that could have been preceded by bleeding during the first trimester of pregnancy, being the most common cause for bleeding. (thepregnancyzone.com)
  • The most common causes can include mild muscle stretching (which is common at the beginning of pregnancy), labor-related contractions or a possible miscarriage. (tuasaude.com)
  • A hard belly in the first trimester can also be a sign of a miscarriage, which most commonly occurs before week 12. (tuasaude.com)
  • Natural Miscarriage After First-Trimester Pregnancy Loss. (dhiimoveis.com.br)
  • A pregnancy may end in a live birth, a miscarriage, an induced abortion, or a stillbirth. (wikipedia.org)
  • During the first trimester, the possibility of miscarriage (natural death of embryo or fetus) is at its highest. (wikipedia.org)
  • The reasons for pregnancy termination include fetal abnormality, intra-uterine fetal death (IUFD), unplanned pregnancy, and serious maternal complications. (researchsquare.com)
  • Reginald Tucker] Cholera infections during pregnancy are associated with high rates of fetal death, especially when women are severely dehydrated. (cdc.gov)
  • Fetal death occurred in 141 of 900 pregnancies. (cdc.gov)
  • Although the relationship between fetal death and maternal age during cholera has not been documented, younger age is associated with increased risk for other adverse pregnancy outcomes. (cdc.gov)
  • The relationship between fetal death and trimester of pregnancy is unclear. (cdc.gov)
  • One hundred women who requested legal termination of pregnancy up to 63 days were given 200 mg of oral mifepristone followed 48 h later by 800 microg (4 x 200 microg tablets) of sublingual misoprostol. (nih.gov)
  • In this case presentation, medical termination of pregnancy is performed using fetal intracardiac potassium chloride â ¦ Torsion is more likely to occur in the first trimester and after delivery, when there is enough space in the abdominal pelvic cavity to permit fibroid twisting. (dhiimoveis.com.br)
  • Participants had an intake interview, transvaginal ultrasonography, computer-assisted telephone interview, and follow-up assessment of ou â ¦ First-trimester termination of pregnancy by medical or surgical route is highly effective with a low complication rate. (dhiimoveis.com.br)
  • If you experience bleeding during pregnancy first trimester you may be thinking about this kind of bleeding. (thepregnancyzone.com)
  • This happens in case the ultrasound shows that the cervix is still open and you experience bleeding during pregnancy first trimester, or passing tissue or clots. (thepregnancyzone.com)
  • As you may see, there are many reasons for which you could experience bleeding during pregnancy first trimester. (thepregnancyzone.com)
  • You will be able to see your baby's heartbeat via ultrasound by around your sixth week of pregnancy and you might hear your babies heartbeat with a doppler by the time you are nine to ten weeks along. (yusrablog.com)
  • By the end of the second trimester all of your baby's major organs are formed. (yusrablog.com)
  • Pregnancy treasures gave us so much peace of mind, seeing our little baby's heartbeat. (pregnancytreasures.com)
  • Your doctor or midwife will check your baby's position toward the end of your pregnancy. (pregnancypodcast.com)
  • Each week of pregnancy includes a description of your baby's development, as well as an explanation of the changes taking place in your body. (kidshealth.org)
  • With thousands of award-winning articles and community groups , you can track your pregnancy and baby's growth, get answers to your toughest questions, and connect with moms, dads, and expectant parents just like you. (babycenter.com)
  • Women with prediabetes identified before pregnancy should be considered at extremely high risk for developing gestational diabetes mellitus during pregnancy. (medscape.com)
  • Missing a period is usually the first signal of a new pregnancy, although women with irregular periods may not initially recognize a missed period as pregnancy. (medscape.com)
  • Urine pregnancy testing kits can produce positive results at the level of 20 mIU/mL, which is 2-3 days before most women expect their next menstrual period. (medscape.com)
  • This is a common problem for many women during early pregnancy. (yusrablog.com)
  • Some women do not gain weight during the first trimester but most women gain about a pound a month during the first trimester. (yusrablog.com)
  • Many pregnant women may experience cramps and aches in the lower belly during the second trimester. (momjunction.com)
  • Sex during pregnancy is usually safe for women and not considered a major risk factor for her or the baby. (drdrew.com)
  • Therefore, the number of women with a history of single or even multiple cesarean sections who have undergone pregnancy termination has also increased. (researchsquare.com)
  • Constipation is another very common problem that can affect women throughout the entire pregnancy. (tuasaude.com)
  • In addition, some women use iron supplements during pregnancy, which can also make stool much harder. (tuasaude.com)
  • Research suggests that 39% of women will experience headaches during or just after pregnancy. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • However, some women continue to experience tension headaches from hormonal changes throughout their pregnancy. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • RESULTS: The 102 women gave birth to 101 healthy infants, weighing 2,974 +/- 579 g at 38.8 +/- 2.6 weeks of pregnancy. (dhiimoveis.com.br)
  • Pregnancy has truly flown by for me- I know that's not the case for some women. (sarahbridgeman.com)
  • Women who have never carried a pregnancy more than 20 weeks are referred to as nulliparous. (wikipedia.org)
  • The number of pregnancies in women aged between 15 and 44 is 133 per 1,000 women. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Brazil Ministry of Health (MoH) established a task force to investigate the possible association of microcephaly with Zika virus infection during pregnancy and a registry for incident microcephaly cases (head circumference ≥2 standard deviations [SD] below the mean for sex and gestational age at birth) and pregnancy outcomes among women suspected to have had Zika virus infection during pregnancy. (cdc.gov)
  • Therefore, the presence of pro-resolving mediators, EPA and DHA derivatives, The aim of this study was to investigate the changes in the levels of anti-inflammatory resolvins and their precursors in different trimesters of pregnancy with consideration of the women 's weight, including overweight and obese women before pregnancy . (bvsalud.org)
  • Absolute other hand, another study reported that the neutrophil count was calculated as fol- phagocytic activity of neutrophils was simi- lows: absolute value (neutrophils/mm3) = lar in women in the 1st and 2nd trimesters total leukocyte count (cells/mm3) × relative of pregnancy and non-pregnant women, but value (%) obtained from the differential significantly decreased during the 3rd tri- count [10]. (who.int)
  • A blood smear was stained with Leish- literature that the numbers of Fc and C3b man stain and was examined to determine receptors on the neutrophil surface increase the differential count and the proportion significantly in the 3rd trimester compared of band forms among the neutrophilic leu- with levels in non-pregnant women of kocytes. (who.int)
  • The number of neutrophils ment of pregnancy, 29% in non-pregnant positive for C. albicans ingestion per 100 women compared with 57% in women neutrophils gives the phagocytic index and the in the 2nd and 3rd trimesters. (who.int)
  • A combination of mifepristone and misoprostol provides an effective method of medical abortion for early pregnancy. (nih.gov)
  • Although the majority of pregnancy terminations are performed in the first trimester, termination during the second trimester accounts for approximately 10-15% of abortions performed worldwide [ 6 ] . (researchsquare.com)
  • In-progress pregnancies, abortions, miscarriages and/or stillbirths account for parity values being less than the gravida number. (wikipedia.org)
  • Such bleeding during pregnancy first trimester can be caused by different infections, such as a urinary tract infection , use of medication or drugs, getting dehydrated, or physical trauma. (thepregnancyzone.com)
  • Further studies are needed to confirm the association of microcephaly with Zika virus infection during pregnancy and to understand any other adverse pregnancy outcomes associated with Zika virus infection. (cdc.gov)
  • During the first trimester of pregnancy, a woman's body goes through several drastic changes in a short space of time. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Pregnancy is the time during which one or more offspring develops (gestates) inside a woman's uterus (womb). (wikipedia.org)
  • However, falsely high readings of the hCG hormone can occur in cases of hydatidiform molar pregnancies or other placental abnormalities. (medscape.com)
  • In fact, a 2017 review in the Journal of Headache and Pain notes that 26% of all headaches that occur during pregnancy are tension headaches. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Migraine headaches may also occur during pregnancy. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Pregnancy usually occurs by sexual intercourse, but can also occur through assisted reproductive technology procedures. (wikipedia.org)
  • With the growth of the uterus and development of the baby, the belly can start to feel firmer, even early on in pregnancy. (tuasaude.com)
  • Similarly, alcohol intake during pregnancy badly affects the growth and development of a baby. (theblogulator.com)
  • Most fibroid growth occurs in the first trimester. (dhiimoveis.com.br)
  • EFFECT OF PREGNANCY ON FIBROID Effect on size Given the hormonal dependence of ï¬ broids, it is expected that pregnancy would promote their growth. (dhiimoveis.com.br)
  • The #1 app for tracking pregnancy and baby growth. (babycenter.com)
  • Nutrition during pregnancy is important to ensure healthy growth of the fetus. (wikipedia.org)
  • Headaches are a common symptom during pregnancy. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • I even emailed my doctor before we knew I was pregnant and asked him and he said it could be a pregnancy symptom. (rachlmansfield.com)
  • Due to developments in molecular biology and ultrasound technology, most fetal abnormalities can be detected early or during the second trimester and terminated on time. (researchsquare.com)
  • We sought to determine the relationship of fibroids to pregnancy loss in a prospective cohort in which fibroid status was uniformly documented in early pregnancy. (dhiimoveis.com.br)
  • A considerable percentage of fibroids (approximately 40%) present in early pregnancy will have gone away and another 75% will be smaller by the time the baby is born. (dhiimoveis.com.br)
  • tp sy ade masalah fibroid â ¦ correlates with size high with fibroids >5cm Timing: in the late first or early second trimester Caused by 1. (dhiimoveis.com.br)
  • 2022. Clinical manifestations and diagnosis of early pregnancy. (babycenter.com)
  • As such, they should receive early (first-trimester) diabetic screening. (medscape.com)
  • Urine dipstick tests were conducted in cases of uncertainty or early stages of pregnancy. (cdc.gov)
  • Your baby undergoes many changes this trimester to prepare for life outside your womb. (pregnancypodcast.com)
  • Your breasts go through many changes during pregnancy. (pregnancypodcast.com)
  • Several changes during pregnancy can contribute to back pain . (pregnancypodcast.com)
  • Hormonal changes during pregnancy can also affect your joints and ligaments, making them more lax and causing further discomfort. (healthspot.org)
  • Some will experience a condition called preeclampsia , which occurs when someone who usually has normal blood pressure levels suddenly develops high blood pressure after 20 weeks of pregnancy. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • The US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends screening for gestational diabetes mellitus after 24 weeks of pregnancy. (medscape.com)
  • Hormonal changes can make the gums more sensitive, swollen, and tender during pregnancy . (momjunction.com)
  • Once the diagnosis of diabetes is established in a pregnant woman, continued testing for glycemic control and diabetic complications is indicated for the remainder of the pregnancy. (medscape.com)
  • Complications of pregnancy may include disorders of high blood pressure, gestational diabetes, iron-deficiency anemia, and severe nausea and vomiting. (wikipedia.org)
  • Further complicating the science of pregnancy detection is that pregnancies which fail to properly implant can lead to brief increases in hCG levels, creating a false-positive result. (medscape.com)
  • The risk of pregnancy termination increases gradually with the number of pregnant weeks. (researchsquare.com)
  • Overall, changes in â ¦ While some studies suggest uterine fibroids to pose threat for pregnancy in the first trimester, others suggest that chances of cesarean section increases with this. (dhiimoveis.com.br)
  • index in the 1st trimester, the increases were bacterial, viral or parasitic) of Vidyasagar statistically significant (Table 1). (who.int)
  • A normal pregnancy is around 10 months and has 3 trimesters. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is defined as glucose intolerance of variable degree with onset or first recognition during pregnancy. (medscape.com)
  • Gestational diabetes mellitus accounts for 90% of cases of diabetes mellitus in pregnancy, while preexisting type 2 diabetes accounts for 8% of such cases. (medscape.com)
  • Preterm and postterm are defined above, whereas premature and postmature have historical meaning and relate more to the infant's size and state of development rather than to the stage of pregnancy. (wikipedia.org)
  • Feeling the belly harden is a normal sensation during all phases of pregnancy and can happen for many reasons. (tuasaude.com)
  • At this point of pregnancy, abdominal muscles and ligaments are continuing to stretch, causing the belly to feel even harder. (tuasaude.com)
  • Most over-the-counter pregnancy tests are sensitive 9-12 days after conception, and they are readily available at most drug stores. (medscape.com)
  • A serum pregnancy test (performed in a provider's office or laboratory facility) can detect pregnancy 8-11 days after conception. (medscape.com)
  • The first trimester includes conception, which is when the sperm fertilizes the egg. (wikipedia.org)
  • I actually ended up losing weight first during my first trimester due to nausea and finally started to gain weight toward the end of the first trimester. (eatsleepwear.com)
  • Rebecca is a pregnancy writer and editor with a passion for delivering research-based and engaging content in areas of fertility, pregnancy, birth, and post-pregnancy. (momjunction.com)
  • There are a few types of pregnancy tests that include professional quantitative serum hCG tests, point-of-care qualitative serum hCG tests, and urine tests for hCG. (medscape.com)
  • Urine pregnancy tests differ in their sensitivity and specificity, which are based on the hCG units set as the cutoff for a positive test result, usually 2-5 mIU/mL. (medscape.com)
  • The levels of all studied parameters showed statistically significant differences between the study group (SG) and the control group (CG) in the different trimesters of pregnancy . (bvsalud.org)
  • different trimesters of pregnancy. (who.int)
  • The phagocytic cells use years) in different trimesters who were at- primitive, non-specific recognition systems tending the outpatient department of J.B. which allow them to bind to a variety of Roy State Ayurvedic Hospital, Kolkata, microbial products. (who.int)
  • Naturally, this is not referring to periods, but abnormal bleedings occurring after a positive pregnancy confirmation. (thepregnancyzone.com)
  • Cox Proportional Hazards models were run for select periods during pregnancy and entire pregnancy averages for E-DII and PM10. (cdc.gov)
  • Serum pregnancy tests can be performed by a variety of methods. (medscape.com)
  • Heartburn and low back pain are also common complaints at this time in pregnancy. (medlineplus.gov)
  • One of the most common complaints during the second trimester is back pain. (healthspot.org)
  • Prior to this time, medications ingested by the mother typically do not affect a pregnancy. (medscape.com)
  • An anonymous blogger mother shares how she felt extreme pain for the first time during the 23rd week of her pregnancy. (momjunction.com)
  • She insisted I didn't because the first trimester is a risky time and, having never been in that situation before, I went along with it. (emmareed.net)
  • A woman who is (or has been only) pregnant for the first time is referred to as a primigravida, and a woman in subsequent pregnancies as a multigravida or as multiparous. (wikipedia.org)
  • when using home pregnancy tests, it is best to wait 1 week after a missed period for a more accurate result. (medscape.com)
  • You can expect to gain about a pound a week during your second trimester. (yusrablog.com)
  • Expect to gain around a pound a week during the last part of your pregnancy. (yusrablog.com)
  • We have given a sample detailed diet plan of 1 week of each trimester. (instamojo.com)
  • The first trimester covers the first week of pregnancy up until the thirteenth week. (tuasaude.com)
  • To get started, simply click below on the week of pregnancy you'd like to view. (kidshealth.org)
  • Check back every week of your pregnancy to see how your baby is developing and to find out what changes you can expect in your own body, too! (kidshealth.org)
  • Irregular, mild contractions can be felt during the second trimester . (momjunction.com)
  • Pregnancy is a physiological state during which inflammation occurs. (bvsalud.org)
  • In this case the baby is still inside the uterus, but the outcome of the pregnancy is not certain. (thepregnancyzone.com)
  • You may have some questions about what to expect during your pregnancy, what is happening with your developing baby , and what you should be doing to prepare for childbirth. (yusrablog.com)
  • By the end of your first trimester your baby will weigh about 1/2 ounce and measure about 3 inches long. (yusrablog.com)
  • Sometime during the second trimester, you may start to feel your baby move . (yusrablog.com)
  • By the end of your second trimester your baby will weigh about 1 ½ to 2 lbs and be around 13 inches long. (yusrablog.com)
  • Towards the end of your pregnancy, as your cervix opens and your baby starts to descend, you may have more pelvic pressure and vaginal discharge. (yusrablog.com)
  • We are looking forward to coming back to see how our baby grows.Thank you Nicole and everyone else at pregnancy treasures! (pregnancytreasures.com)
  • As you get closer to your due date, and your baby grows bigger, you should notice a different pattern of movement than earlier in your pregnancy. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Smoking during pregnancy leads the baby to lower birth weight. (theblogulator.com)
  • If you follow the above-mentioned pregnancy tips for first trimesters, you are surely going to enjoy the best condition of health of your baby and that is the most expected to your loving husband, other family members, friends, and the country as a whole. (theblogulator.com)
  • If your baby is breech (sideways or feet down) towards the end of this trimester, there are some things you can do to try and get them to turn. (pregnancypodcast.com)
  • 13 Things I Wish I Had With My 1st Pregnancy (On my Wish List for Baby #2! (mnmomma.com)
  • Our illustrated pregnancy calendar is a detailed guide to all the changes taking place in your baby - and in you. (kidshealth.org)
  • You will most likely go for appointments once a month through your first trimester. (yusrablog.com)
  • You will most likely continue to have appointments scheduled for once a month during your second trimester. (yusrablog.com)