Family Practice: A medical specialty concerned with the provision of continuing, comprehensive primary health care for the entire family.Physician's Practice Patterns: Patterns of practice related to diagnosis and treatment as especially influenced by cost of the service requested and provided.Practice Guidelines as Topic: Directions or principles presenting current or future rules of policy for assisting health care practitioners in patient care decisions regarding diagnosis, therapy, or related clinical circumstances. The guidelines may be developed by government agencies at any level, institutions, professional societies, governing boards, or by the convening of expert panels. The guidelines form a basis for the evaluation of all aspects of health care and delivery.General Practice: Patient-based medical care provided across age and gender or specialty boundaries.Professional Practice: The use of one's knowledge in a particular profession. It includes, in the case of the field of biomedicine, professional activities related to health care and the actual performance of the duties related to the provision of health care.Practice Management, Medical: The organization and operation of the business aspects of a physician's practice.Private Practice: Practice of a health profession by an individual, offering services on a person-to-person basis, as opposed to group or partnership practice.Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).Practice (Psychology): Performance of an act one or more times, with a view to its fixation or improvement; any performance of an act or behavior that leads to learning.Disease Eradication: Termination of all transmission of infection by global extermination of the infectious agent through surveillance and containment (From Porta, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 5th ed).Half-Life: The time it takes for a substance (drug, radioactive nuclide, or other) to lose half of its pharmacologic, physiologic, or radiologic activity.Evidence-Based Practice: A way of providing health care that is guided by a thoughtful integration of the best available scientific knowledge with clinical expertise. This approach allows the practitioner to critically assess research data, clinical guidelines, and other information resources in order to correctly identify the clinical problem, apply the most high-quality intervention, and re-evaluate the outcome for future improvement.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Attitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.Professional Practice Location: Geographic area in which a professional person practices; includes primarily physicians and dentists.Partnership Practice: A voluntary contract between two or more doctors who may or may not share responsibility for the care of patients, with proportional sharing of profits and losses.Primary Health Care: Care which provides integrated, accessible health care services by clinicians who are accountable for addressing a large majority of personal health care needs, developing a sustained partnership with patients, and practicing in the context of family and community. (JAMA 1995;273(3):192)Practice Management: Business management of medical, dental and veterinary practices that may include capital financing, utilization management, and arrangement of capitation agreements with other parties.United StatesEnglandGreat BritainEvidence-Based Medicine: An approach of practicing medicine with the goal to improve and evaluate patient care. It requires the judicious integration of best research evidence with the patient's values to make decisions about medical care. This method is to help physicians make proper diagnosis, devise best testing plan, choose best treatment and methods of disease prevention, as well as develop guidelines for large groups of patients with the same disease. (from JAMA 296 (9), 2006)Guideline Adherence: Conformity in fulfilling or following official, recognized, or institutional requirements, guidelines, recommendations, protocols, pathways, or other standards.Clinical Competence: The capability to perform acceptably those duties directly related to patient care.Physicians, Family: Those physicians who have completed the education requirements specified by the American Academy of Family Physicians.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Dentist's Practice Patterns: Patterns of practice in dentistry related to diagnosis and treatment.Health Care Surveys: Statistical measures of utilization and other aspects of the provision of health care services including hospitalization and ambulatory care.Referral and Consultation: The practice of sending a patient to another program or practitioner for services or advice which the referring source is not prepared to provide.General Practice, Dental: Nonspecialized dental practice which is concerned with providing primary and continuing dental care.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Metabolic Clearance Rate: Volume of biological fluid completely cleared of drug metabolites as measured in unit time. Elimination occurs as a result of metabolic processes in the kidney, liver, saliva, sweat, intestine, heart, brain, or other site.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Physicians: Individuals licensed to practice medicine.Practice Management, Dental: The organization and operation of the business aspects of a dental practice.Education, Medical, Continuing: Educational programs designed to inform physicians of recent advances in their field.Quality Assurance, Health Care: Activities and programs intended to assure or improve the quality of care in either a defined medical setting or a program. The concept includes the assessment or evaluation of the quality of care; identification of problems or shortcomings in the delivery of care; designing activities to overcome these deficiencies; and follow-up monitoring to ensure effectiveness of corrective steps.Physician-Patient Relations: The interactions between physician and patient.Nurse's Practice Patterns: Patterns of practice in nursing related to provision of services including diagnosis and treatment.Australia: The smallest continent and an independent country, comprising six states and two territories. Its capital is Canberra.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Quality of Health Care: The levels of excellence which characterize the health service or health care provided based on accepted standards of quality.Administration, Oral: The giving of drugs, chemicals, or other substances by mouth.Drug Prescriptions: Directions written for the obtaining and use of DRUGS.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Netherlands: Country located in EUROPE. It is bordered by the NORTH SEA, BELGIUM, and GERMANY. Constituent areas are Aruba, Curacao, Sint Maarten, formerly included in the NETHERLANDS ANTILLES.Program Evaluation: Studies designed to assess the efficacy of programs. They may include the evaluation of cost-effectiveness, the extent to which objectives are met, or impact.Area Under Curve: A statistical means of summarizing information from a series of measurements on one individual. It is frequently used in clinical pharmacology where the AUC from serum levels can be interpreted as the total uptake of whatever has been administered. As a plot of the concentration of a drug against time, after a single dose of medicine, producing a standard shape curve, it is a means of comparing the bioavailability of the same drug made by different companies. (From Winslade, Dictionary of Clinical Research, 1992)Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Interprofessional Relations: The reciprocal interaction of two or more professional individuals.Pediatrics: A medical specialty concerned with maintaining health and providing medical care to children from birth to adolescence.Measles: A highly contagious infectious disease caused by MORBILLIVIRUS, common among children but also seen in the nonimmune of any age, in which the virus enters the respiratory tract via droplet nuclei and multiplies in the epithelial cells, spreading throughout the MONONUCLEAR PHAGOCYTE SYSTEM.Public Health Practice: The activities and endeavors of the public health services in a community on any level.Qualitative Research: Any type of research that employs nonnumeric information to explore individual or group characteristics, producing findings not arrived at by statistical procedures or other quantitative means. (Qualitative Inquiry: A Dictionary of Terms Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 1997)Physician's Role: The expected function of a member of the medical profession.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Mass Screening: Organized periodic procedures performed on large groups of people for the purpose of detecting disease.Rural Health Services: Health services, public or private, in rural areas. The services include the promotion of health and the delivery of health care.Nurse's Role: The expected function of a member of the nursing profession.Biological Availability: The extent to which the active ingredient of a drug dosage form becomes available at the site of drug action or in a biological medium believed to reflect accessibility to a site of action.State Medicine: A system of medical care regulated, controlled and financed by the government, in which the government assumes responsibility for the health needs of the population.Canada: The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.Diffusion of Innovation: The broad dissemination of new ideas, procedures, techniques, materials, and devices and the degree to which these are accepted and used.Patient Care Team: Care of patients by a multidisciplinary team usually organized under the leadership of a physician; each member of the team has specific responsibilities and the whole team contributes to the care of the patient.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Elephantiasis, Filarial: Parasitic infestation of the human lymphatic system by WUCHERERIA BANCROFTI or BRUGIA MALAYI. It is also called lymphatic filariasis.Organizational Innovation: Introduction of changes which are new to the organization and are created by management.Communicable Disease Control: Programs of surveillance designed to prevent the transmission of disease by any means from person to person or from animal to man.Patient Satisfaction: The degree to which the individual regards the health care service or product or the manner in which it is delivered by the provider as useful, effective, or beneficial.General Practitioners: Physicians whose practice is not restricted to a specific field of MEDICINE.Ontario: A province of Canada lying between the provinces of Manitoba and Quebec. Its capital is Toronto. It takes its name from Lake Ontario which is said to represent the Iroquois oniatariio, beautiful lake. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p892 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p391)Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.ScotlandVanuatu: A republic consisting of an island group in Melanesia, in the southwest Pacific Ocean. Its capital is Port-Vila. It was called New Hebrides until 1980. It was discovered in 1606 by the Portuguese, forgotten for 160 years, then visited by Bougainville in 1768 and Captain Cook in 1774. It was under joint British and French administration from 1906 until it became independent in 1980 under the name of Vanuatu. The name is native, meaning our land. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p833 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p570)Injections, Intravenous: Injections made into a vein for therapeutic or experimental purposes.Models, Organizational: Theoretical representations and constructs that describe or explain the structure and hierarchy of relationships and interactions within or between formal organizational entities or informal social groups.Group Practice, Prepaid: An organized group of three or more full-time physicians rendering services for a fixed prepayment.Decision Making: The process of making a selective intellectual judgment when presented with several complex alternatives consisting of several variables, and usually defining a course of action or an idea.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Cooperative Behavior: The interaction of two or more persons or organizations directed toward a common goal which is mutually beneficial. An act or instance of working or acting together for a common purpose or benefit, i.e., joint action. (From Random House Dictionary Unabridged, 2d ed)Guidelines as Topic: A systematic statement of policy rules or principles. Guidelines may be developed by government agencies at any level, institutions, professional societies, governing boards, or by convening expert panels. The text may be cursive or in outline form but is generally a comprehensive guide to problems and approaches in any field of activity. For guidelines in the field of health care and clinical medicine, PRACTICE GUIDELINES AS TOPIC is available.Professional Competence: The capability to perform the duties of one's profession generally, or to perform a particular professional task, with skill of an acceptable quality.LondonPatient Acceptance of Health Care: The seeking and acceptance by patients of health service.Curriculum: A course of study offered by an educational institution.Pilot Projects: Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.Specialization: An occupation limited in scope to a subsection of a broader field.Patient-Centered Care: Design of patient care wherein institutional resources and personnel are organized around patients rather than around specialized departments. (From Hospitals 1993 Feb 5;67(3):14)Focus Groups: A method of data collection and a QUALITATIVE RESEARCH tool in which a small group of individuals are brought together and allowed to interact in a discussion of their opinions about topics, issues, or questions.Health Personnel: Men and women working in the provision of health services, whether as individual practitioners or employees of health institutions and programs, whether or not professionally trained, and whether or not subject to public regulation. (From A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, 1976)Evidence-Based Nursing: A way of providing nursing care that is guided by the integration of the best available scientific knowledge with nursing expertise. This approach requires nurses to critically assess relevant scientific data or research evidence, and to implement high-quality interventions for their nursing practice.Societies, Medical: Societies whose membership is limited to physicians.Internship and Residency: Programs of training in medicine and medical specialties offered by hospitals for graduates of medicine to meet the requirements established by accrediting authorities.Outcome Assessment (Health Care): Research aimed at assessing the quality and effectiveness of health care as measured by the attainment of a specified end result or outcome. Measures include parameters such as improved health, lowered morbidity or mortality, and improvement of abnormal states (such as elevated blood pressure).Measles Vaccine: A live attenuated virus vaccine of chick embryo origin, used for routine immunization of children and for immunization of adolescents and adults who have not had measles or been immunized with live measles vaccine and have no serum antibodies against measles. Children are usually immunized with measles-mumps-rubella combination vaccine. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Education, Medical, Graduate: Educational programs for medical graduates entering a specialty. They include formal specialty training as well as academic work in the clinical and basic medical sciences, and may lead to board certification or an advanced medical degree.Patient Education as Topic: The teaching or training of patients concerning their own health needs.Program Development: The process of formulating, improving, and expanding educational, managerial, or service-oriented work plans (excluding computer program development).Communication: The exchange or transmission of ideas, attitudes, or beliefs between individuals or groups.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Benchmarking: Method of measuring performance against established standards of best practice.Health Policy: Decisions, usually developed by government policymakers, for determining present and future objectives pertaining to the health care system.Career Choice: Selection of a type of occupation or profession.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Tissue Distribution: Accumulation of a drug or chemical substance in various organs (including those not relevant to its pharmacologic or therapeutic action). This distribution depends on the blood flow or perfusion rate of the organ, the ability of the drug to penetrate organ membranes, tissue specificity, protein binding. The distribution is usually expressed as tissue to plasma ratios.Research Design: A plan for collecting and utilizing data so that desired information can be obtained with sufficient precision or so that an hypothesis can be tested properly.Hygiene: The science dealing with the establishment and maintenance of health in the individual and the group. It includes the conditions and practices conducive to health. (Webster, 3d ed)Medicine: The art and science of studying, performing research on, preventing, diagnosing, and treating disease, as well as the maintenance of health.Health Promotion: Encouraging consumer behaviors most likely to optimize health potentials (physical and psychosocial) through health information, preventive programs, and access to medical care.Filaricides: Pharmacological agents destructive to nematodes in the superfamily Filarioidea.Drug Utilization: The utilization of drugs as reported in individual hospital studies, FDA studies, marketing, or consumption, etc. This includes drug stockpiling, and patient drug profiles.Neoplasms: New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.Medical Records: Recording of pertinent information concerning patient's illness or illnesses.Quality Improvement: The attainment or process of attaining a new level of performance or quality.Teaching: The educational process of instructing.Obstetrics: A medical-surgical specialty concerned with management and care of women during pregnancy, parturition, and the puerperium.Professional Autonomy: The quality or state of being independent and self-directing, especially in making decisions, enabling professionals to exercise judgment as they see fit during the performance of their jobs.Counseling: The giving of advice and assistance to individuals with educational or personal problems.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Malaria: A protozoan disease caused in humans by four species of the PLASMODIUM genus: PLASMODIUM FALCIPARUM; PLASMODIUM VIVAX; PLASMODIUM OVALE; and PLASMODIUM MALARIAE; and transmitted by the bite of an infected female mosquito of the genus ANOPHELES. Malaria is endemic in parts of Asia, Africa, Central and South America, Oceania, and certain Caribbean islands. It is characterized by extreme exhaustion associated with paroxysms of high FEVER; SWEATING; shaking CHILLS; and ANEMIA. Malaria in ANIMALS is caused by other species of plasmodia.Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid: Liquid chromatographic techniques which feature high inlet pressures, high sensitivity, and high speed.Anti-Bacterial Agents: Substances that reduce the growth or reproduction of BACTERIA.Research: Critical and exhaustive investigation or experimentation, having for its aim the discovery of new facts and their correct interpretation, the revision of accepted conclusions, theories, or laws in the light of newly discovered facts, or the practical application of such new or revised conclusions, theories, or laws. (Webster, 3d ed)Medical Records Systems, Computerized: Computer-based systems for input, storage, display, retrieval, and printing of information contained in a patient's medical record.Cost-Benefit Analysis: A method of comparing the cost of a program with its expected benefits in dollars (or other currency). The benefit-to-cost ratio is a measure of total return expected per unit of money spent. This analysis generally excludes consideration of factors that are not measured ultimately in economic terms. Cost effectiveness compares alternative ways to achieve a specific set of results.Health Services Accessibility: The degree to which individuals are inhibited or facilitated in their ability to gain entry to and to receive care and services from the health care system. Factors influencing this ability include geographic, architectural, transportational, and financial considerations, among others.Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care): Evaluation procedures that focus on both the outcome or status (OUTCOMES ASSESSMENT) of the patient at the end of an episode of care - presence of symptoms, level of activity, and mortality; and the process (ASSESSMENT, PROCESS) - what is done for the patient diagnostically and therapeutically.Population Surveillance: Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.Attitude to Health: Public attitudes toward health, disease, and the medical care system.Organizational Policy: A course or method of action selected, usually by an organization, institution, university, society, etc., from among alternatives to guide and determine present and future decisions and positions on matters of public interest or social concern. It does not include internal policy relating to organization and administration within the corporate body, for which ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION is available.Appointments and Schedules: The different methods of scheduling patient visits, appointment systems, individual or group appointments, waiting times, waiting lists for hospitals, walk-in clinics, etc.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Certification: Compliance with a set of standards defined by non-governmental organizations. Certification is applied for by individuals on a voluntary basis and represents a professional status when achieved, e.g., certification for a medical specialty.Kinetics: The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.Quality Indicators, Health Care: Norms, criteria, standards, and other direct qualitative and quantitative measures used in determining the quality of health care.Diethylcarbamazine: An anthelmintic used primarily as the citrate in the treatment of filariasis, particularly infestations with Wucheria bancrofti or Loa loa.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Interdisciplinary Communication: Communication, in the sense of cross-fertilization of ideas, involving two or more academic disciplines (such as the disciplines that comprise the cross-disciplinary field of bioethics, including the health and biological sciences, the humanities, and the social sciences and law). Also includes problems in communication stemming from differences in patterns of language usage in different academic or medical disciplines.EuropeRural Population: The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Ivermectin: A mixture of mostly avermectin H2B1a (RN 71827-03-7) with some avermectin H2B1b (RN 70209-81-3), which are macrolides from STREPTOMYCES avermitilis. It binds glutamate-gated chloride channel to cause increased permeability and hyperpolarization of nerve and muscle cells. It also interacts with other CHLORIDE CHANNELS. It is a broad spectrum antiparasitic that is active against microfilariae of ONCHOCERCA VOLVULUS but not the adult form.Medical Staff, Hospital: Professional medical personnel approved to provide care to patients in a hospital.Urban Health Services: Health services, public or private, in urban areas. The services include the promotion of health and the delivery of health care.Professional Role: The expected function of a member of a particular profession.Ethics, Medical: The principles of professional conduct concerning the rights and duties of the physician, relations with patients and fellow practitioners, as well as actions of the physician in patient care and interpersonal relations with patient families.Education, Medical: Use for general articles concerning medical education.Medical Receptionists: Individuals who receive patients in a medical office.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Drug Interactions: The action of a drug that may affect the activity, metabolism, or toxicity of another drug.Personnel Selection: The process of choosing employees for specific types of employment. The concept includes recruitment.Models, Theoretical: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of systems, processes, or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Dentists: Individuals licensed to practice DENTISTRY.Community Health Services: Diagnostic, therapeutic and preventive health services provided for individuals in the community.Nurses: Professionals qualified by graduation from an accredited school of nursing and by passage of a national licensing examination to practice nursing. They provide services to patients requiring assistance in recovering or maintaining their physical or mental health.Continuity of Patient Care: Health care provided on a continuing basis from the initial contact, following the patient through all phases of medical care.Educational Measurement: The assessing of academic or educational achievement. It includes all aspects of testing and test construction.Dose-Response Relationship, Drug: The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.Feasibility Studies: Studies to determine the advantages or disadvantages, practicability, or capability of accomplishing a projected plan, study, or project.Breast Feeding: The nursing of an infant at the breast.IndiaRandomized Controlled Trials as Topic: Works about clinical trials that involve at least one test treatment and one control treatment, concurrent enrollment and follow-up of the test- and control-treated groups, and in which the treatments to be administered are selected by a random process, such as the use of a random-numbers table.Office Visits: Visits made by patients to health service providers' offices for diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up.Immunization Programs: Organized services to administer immunization procedures in the prevention of various diseases. The programs are made available over a wide range of sites: schools, hospitals, public health agencies, voluntary health agencies, etc. They are administered to an equally wide range of population groups or on various administrative levels: community, municipal, state, national, international.Biomedical Research: Research that involves the application of the natural sciences, especially biology and physiology, to medicine.WalesJob Satisfaction: Personal satisfaction relative to the work situation.Organizational Culture: Beliefs and values shared by all members of the organization. These shared values, which are subject to change, are reflected in the day to day management of the organization.History, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.Algorithms: A procedure consisting of a sequence of algebraic formulas and/or logical steps to calculate or determine a given task.Clinical Protocols: Precise and detailed plans for the study of a medical or biomedical problem and/or plans for a regimen of therapy.Nursing Process: The sum total of nursing activities which includes assessment (identifying needs), intervention (ministering to needs), and evaluation (validating the effectiveness of the help given).Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Clinical Trials as Topic: Works about pre-planned studies of the safety, efficacy, or optimum dosage schedule (if appropriate) of one or more diagnostic, therapeutic, or prophylactic drugs, devices, or techniques selected according to predetermined criteria of eligibility and observed for predefined evidence of favorable and unfavorable effects. This concept includes clinical trials conducted both in the U.S. and in other countries.Rural Health: The status of health in rural populations.World Health: The concept pertaining to the health status of inhabitants of the world.Clinical Medicine: The study and practice of medicine by direct examination of the patient.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Group Practice, Dental: Any group of three or more full-time dentists, organized in a legally recognized entity for the provision of dental care, sharing space, equipment, personnel and records for both patient care and business management, and who have a predetermined arrangement for the distribution of income.Preventive Health Services: Services designed for HEALTH PROMOTION and prevention of disease.Total Quality Management: The application of industrial management practice to systematically maintain and improve organization-wide performance. Effectiveness and success are determined and assessed by quantitative quality measures.Information Dissemination: The circulation or wide dispersal of information.Patient Compliance: Voluntary cooperation of the patient in following a prescribed regimen.Education, Pharmacy: Formal instruction, learning, or training in the preparation, dispensing, and proper utilization of drugs in the field of medicine.Physicians, Primary Care: Providers of initial care for patients. These PHYSICIANS refer patients when appropriate for secondary or specialist care.Public Health: Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.Drug Therapy: The use of DRUGS to treat a DISEASE or its symptoms. One example is the use of ANTINEOPLASTIC AGENTS to treat CANCER.Patient Selection: Criteria and standards used for the determination of the appropriateness of the inclusion of patients with specific conditions in proposed treatment plans and the criteria used for the inclusion of subjects in various clinical trials and other research protocols.Infection Control: Programs of disease surveillance, generally within health care facilities, designed to investigate, prevent, and control the spread of infections and their causative microorganisms.Liver: A large lobed glandular organ in the abdomen of vertebrates that is responsible for detoxification, metabolism, synthesis and storage of various substances.Office Management: Planning, organizing, and administering activities in an office.Physical Therapy Specialty: The auxiliary health profession which makes use of PHYSICAL THERAPY MODALITIES to prevent, correct, and alleviate movement dysfunction of anatomic or physiological origin.Inservice Training: On the job training programs for personnel carried out within an institution or agency. It includes orientation programs.Safety: Freedom from exposure to danger and protection from the occurrence or risk of injury or loss. It suggests optimal precautions in the workplace, on the street, in the home, etc., and includes personal safety as well as the safety of property.Biotransformation: The chemical alteration of an exogenous substance by or in a biological system. The alteration may inactivate the compound or it may result in the production of an active metabolite of an inactive parent compound. The alterations may be divided into METABOLIC DETOXICATION, PHASE I and METABOLIC DETOXICATION, PHASE II.Insect Control: The reduction or regulation of the population of noxious, destructive, or dangerous insects through chemical, biological, or other means.Health Education: Education that increases the awareness and favorably influences the attitudes and knowledge relating to the improvement of health on a personal or community basis.
"National Conservation Practice Standards." National Handbook of Conservation Practices. Accessed 2015-10-02. ... "National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System. EPA. September 20, 2018.. *^ Iowa Department of Natural Resources. Des Moines ... Schueler, Thomas R. "Cars Are Leading Source of Metal Loads in California." Reprinted in The Practice of Watershed Protection. ... "National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System. EPA. 2014. Archived from the original on February 19, 2015.. ...
... system to discourage unfair trade practices; elimination and harmonization of tariff restrictions; nonmember country safeguard ...
To be a professional occupational hygienist, experience in as wide a practice as possible is required to demonstrate knowledge ... Hazard Controls (elimination, substitution, engineering, administrative, PPE and Air Conditioning and Extraction Ventilation); ... This is difficult for "specialists" or those who practice in narrow subject areas. Limiting experience to individual subject ... These methods include elimination, substitution, engineering controls (isolation or ventilation), administrative controls and ...
CSW (2013). Agreed conclusions: The elimination and prevention of all forms of violence against women and girls (PDF). ECOSOC ... In practice this ban was often applied very widely to exclude all women.[152][153] Women, at least those in the child-bearing ... UN (20 December 1993). Declaration on the Elimination of Violence against Women. 48/104. United Nations General Assembly.. ... The practice is concentrated in some 30 countries in Africa, the Middle East and Asia.[77] FGC affects many religious faiths, ...
Training National Menu of Stormwater Best Management Practices - Information on good stormwater management practices. ... "Fiber Rolls". National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES). Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Archived from the ... "National Menu of Stormwater Best Management Practices: Fiber Rolls." Archived 2007-09-05 at the Wayback Machine. June 1, 2006 ...
Other management practices include elimination of all-terrain vehicles. United States Fish and Wildlife Service. "Species ... The direct cause of the reduced habitat is partly due to improvement of land management practices and control of fire in the ... The improvement of land management practices and control of fire is a direct human influence on the habitat conditions needed ... The more current management practices often follow a more concise grazing scheme that promotes the improvement of range ...
Wang, Dongming (2001). Elimination Methods. Wien New York: Springer-Verlag. Wang, Dongming (2004). Elimination Practice: ... In 1993 he proposed an elimination method for triangular decomposition of polynomial systems, which has been referred to as ... Wang, Dongming (1993). "An elimination method for polynomial systems". Journal of Symbolic Computation. 16 (2): 83-114. doi: ... Wang worked on algorithmic elimination theory, geometric reasoning and knowledge management, and applications of symbolic ...
O'Leary, Cornelius (1962). The Elimination of Corrupt Practices in British Elections 1868-1911. Oxford: Oxford University Press ... Erskine May: Parliamentary Practice Hardcastle, Henry (1874). The Law and Practice of Election Petitions. London: Stevens and ... Corrupt practices Election court Election fraud Parliamentary Elections Corrupt Practices Act 1885 Craig, F.W.S. (1974). ... The Law relating to Corrupt Practices at Elections and the practice on election petitions, etc. London: Waterlow and Sons. ...
ISBN 978-1-7822-5258-0. O'Leary, Cornelius (1962). The Elimination of Corrupt Practices in British Elections 1868-1911. Oxford ... c. 125), sometimes known as the Election Petitions and Corrupt Practices at Elections Act or simply the Corrupt Practices Act ... In four cases a Royal Commission had to be appointed because of widespread corrupt practices in the constituency. When he came ...
ISBN 978-1-7822-5258-0. O'Leary, Cornelius (1962). The Elimination of Corrupt Practices in British Elections 1868-1911. Oxford ... In four cases a Royal Commission had to be appointed because of widespread corrupt practices in the constituency. As a result, ...
Their focus includes preserving traditional religious practices and sacred sites; elimination of barriers to full political ...
"National Conservation Practice Standards." National Handbook of Conservation Practices. Accessed 2015-10-02. National ... "Low Impact Development and Other Green Design Strategies". National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System. EPA. 2014. Archived ... These techniques, called best management practices (BMPs) in the U.S., may focus on water quantity control, while others focus ... Pollution prevention practices include low-impact development techniques, installation of green roofs and improved chemical ...
It is commonly believed that in infants, voiding occurs involuntarily (as a reflex). However, the practice of elimination ... Babies have little socialized control over urination within traditions or families that do not practice elimination ... Since elimination of bodily wastes is, of necessity, a subject talked about with toddlers during toilet training, other ... The white-headed capuchin sometimes engages in a practice known as "urine washing", in which the monkey rubs urine on its feet ...
The elimination half life of phenylephrine is about 2.5 to 3.0 hours. The clinical effects of a single intravenous bolus dose ... Such use is common in anesthesia or critical-care practices; it is especially useful in counteracting the hypotensive effect of ...
No practice sessions were held for the preliminary and team challenges. The trainer for the elimination challenge was Bill ... The trainer for the elimination challenge was Cory Kruse, shotgun world champion. No practice sessions were held in this ... did not win the individual challenge but was not nominated for elimination The player was nominated for elimination, but won an ... The top two vote-getters then competed in an elimination challenge as in earlier episodes. The trainer for both challenges was ...
The elimination of age-discriminatory practices in remuneration schedules and medical services. The expansion of assistance for ... Hatoyama practices the Transcendental Meditation technique and will deliver the Maharishi University of Management commencement ...
"Second Practice Results". MRN.com. Motor Racing Network. October 21, 2017. Retrieved October 21, 2017. "Final Practice Results ... Skretta, Dave (October 20, 2017). "Truex fastest for playoff elimination race at Kansas". Associated Press. Kansas City, Kansas ... Kyle Larson was the fastest in the first practice session with a time of 28.563 seconds and a speed of 189.056 mph (304.256 km/ ... Kyle Larson was the fastest in the second practice session with a time of 29.724 seconds and a speed of 181.671 mph (292.371 km ...
By 1927 all madrasahs were shut down, and 1928 saw the elimination of waqfs. A 1929 law against religious practices effectively ...
... all such practices must be condemned and efforts must be deployed for their elimination. Following criticisms about this ...
"Second Practice Results". MRN.com. Motor Racing Network. October 29, 2016. Retrieved October 29, 2016. "Final Practice Results ... Fryer, Jenna (October 28, 2016). "Truex bounces back from Chase elimination to win pole". Associated Press. Martinsville, ... We'll get this Fastenal back-up out and get to work on it tonight and make sure that we have it ready to go for practice ... Kyle Larson was the fastest in the first practice session with a time of 19.289 and a speed of 98.170 mph (157.989 km/h). ...
This type of practise is concerned with the elimination of symptoms. However, according to Makinde: The treatment of a disease ... The last 400 years saw individuals in the Caribbean and South America practice the Yorubic healing system as a token of their ... and other self-regulatory practices. It addresses not only symptoms, but the entire person, and his or her current life ... balance/imbalance.Yorubic medicine has come to be widely known in Nigeria as the ultimate traditional medical practice due to ...
AIDA tools or apps most frequently used in the practice include: Brainstorming 40x40: Generate 40 ideas with 40 TRIZ Inventive ... Root-conflict analysis and anticipatory failure identification: tool for elimination harmful effects. Systematic and creative ... Database of 200+ best practice measures for enhancement of innovation capability. The new Advanced Innovation Methods are the ...
... the practice of democratic shared governance by faculty and students; (4) the value of social and cultural endeavors outside ... the classroom; and (5) elimination of oversight from outside trustees. He also enjoyed bringing in diverse visitors. His ...
To encourage best practice in the treatment of older people. To promote positive attitudes towards older people and encourage ... To promote the provision of opportunities for and the elimination of discrimination against older people. ... Issue guidance on best practice in relation to any matter concerning the interests of older people. Conduct investigations for ...
EU project report summary "Pharmaceutical Input and Elimination from Local Sources", 2012 Buxton, H.T.; Kolpin, D.W. (June 2002 ... Tong, A.Y.; Peake, B.; Braund, R. (2011). "Disposal practices for unused medications around the world". Environment ... It deals specifically with those pharmacological agents that have impact on the environment via elimination through living ... It deals specifically with those pharmacological agents that affect the environment via elimination through living organisms ...
Example: In practice, since the brain is normally a rapid user of glucose, and since brain pathologies such as Alzheimer's ... The uptake of the drug, the tissues in which it concentrates, and its eventual elimination, can be monitored far more quickly ... In practice, considerable pre-processing of the data is required-correction for random coincidences, estimation and subtraction ... In practice, the LOR has a non-zero width as the emitted photons are not exactly 180 degrees apart. If the resolving time of ...
OHCHR , English , Your Human Rights , Women , WGDiscriminationAgainstWomen , Good practices in the elimination of ... To inform its thematic report, the Working Group on the issue of discrimination against women in law and in practice circulated ... Discrimination against Women in Law and Practice in Family and Cultural Life ...
The elimination of indigenous measles, mumps, and rubella from Finland by a 12-year, two-dose vaccination program. N Engl J Med ... Notice to Readers: Updated Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) for the Control and ... On May 17, 2006, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) updated criteria for mumps immunity and mumps ... Measles, mumps, and rubella---vaccine use and strategies for elimination of measles, rubella, and congenital rubella syndrome ...
... preventive measures and practices in order to inform the countrys proposed malaria elimination programme in Swaziland. A ... Most people (78%) perceived clinics and vector control practices as central to treating and preventing malaria disease. Indoor ... its potential fatal consequences and correct treatment practices. Almost 90% (n = 320) of the respondents stated that they ... attitudes and practices (KAP) studies to malaria research and control has not received much attention in most southern African ...
Therefore, at the eve of elimination of malaria from Sri Lanka, it is likely that the infection is mostly encountered among ... Sri Lanka entered the pre-elimination stage of malaria in 2008. One case of indigenous malaria and four other cases of imported ... are among the other responsibilities expected of all clinicians who manage patients in countries reaching malaria elimination. ... What clinicians who practice in countries reaching malaria elimination should be aware of: lessons learnt from recent ...
In this months Java theory and practice, columnist Brian Goetz explores why it is so much harder to measure the performance of ... Dead code elimination. In Decembers article, I discussed the problem of dead-code elimination in benchmarks -- that because ... This content is part of the series:Java theory and practice. Stay tuned for additional content in this series. ... Read the complete Java theory and practice series by Brian Goetz. Decembers column, Dynamic compilation and performance ...
Disulfiram absorption and elimination. About 80 to 95 percent of ingested disulfiram is absorbed from the gastrointestinal ... The practice of deliberately inducing a reaction by giving large doses of disulfiram in conjunction with "alcohol challenges" ... Decreases total body clearance and increases elimination half-life and peak plasma levels of desipramine or imipramine. Monitor ... Incorporating Alcohol Pharmacotherapies Into Medical Practice.. Show details. Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) Series, No. ...
... a practice that can pollute the environment and spread disease, warned ... A total of 15.5 million people are forced to practice open defecation in Latin America and the Caribbean, ... Recommendations for achieving elimination. To end open defecation, PAHO urges countries to ensure that sanitation is a ... Haiti is the country in the Region with the highest percentage of the population that practices open defecation (20%) and the ...
... practices often need help deciding what data to collect, which measures to report ... ... Obamacare cuts costs of sexual healthcare with co-pay elimination. Low-cost preventive services and more insurance coverage ... practices often need help deciding what data to collect, which measures to report ... ...
Re: Call for papers on harmful practices The Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women and the ... The harmful practices covered by this General Recommendation/Comment include traditional or emerging practices, prescribed by ... and of States Parties to CEDAW with respect to the elimination of harmful practices (as defined in the General Recommendation/ ... Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women. Jean Zermatten. Chairperson. Committee on the Rights of the Child ...
Do Your Practice and all is Coming , Motivation from Zen Buddhist Master Vashistha Yoga ... Yoga way to sit on Toilet for easy Bowel Clean Elimination , Yoga for Constipation , Vashistha Yoga Vashistha Yoga ... A strong and healthy core is essential to a strong and healthy practice. Practice and all is coming. Subscribe us: http://www. ... Hatha Vinyasa Yoga for daily Practice , Beginner and Intermediate Yoga Vashistha Yoga ...
Flow Practice to Prepare for Meditation with Baron Baptiste: Yoga Journals Home Practice - Duration: 25:18. Yoga Journal ... Yoga way to sit on Toilet for easy Bowel Clean Elimination , Yoga for Constipation , Vashistha Yoga Vashistha Yoga ... Do Your Practice and all is Coming , Motivation from Zen Buddhist Master Vashistha Yoga ... Cleanse Your Chakras: Kundalini Pranayama Practice - Duration: 23:11. Allie - The Journey Junkie 33,915 views ...
Type: 1= seperate hard lumps, hard to pass; 2= sausage-shaped but lumpy; 3= like a sausage but with cracks on its surface; 4= like a sausage or snake, smooth and soft; 5= soft blobs with clear-cut edges; 6= fluffy pieces with ragged edges, passed easily, a mushy stool; 7= watery, no solid pieces, entirely liquid. ...
CONCLUSIONS: Although knowledge and practices regarding malaria amongst resettled populations in Mannar District were high, ... living in Manthai West and Madhu DSDs who were displaced to refugee camps had better malaria-related knowledge and practices, ... Knowledge, attitudes and practices relevant to malaria elimination amongst resettled populations in a post-conflict district of ... Knowledge, attitudes and practices relevant to malaria elimination amongst resettled populations in a post-conflict district of ...
Elimination of .... Page 91. As with any disease whose course is prolonged and capricious, the importance of emotional factors ... books.google.comhttps://books.google.com/books/about/The_practice_of_dermatology.html?id=NclsAAAAMAAJ&utm_source=gb-gplus-share ... 0 Reviewshttps://books.google.com/books/about/The_practice_of_dermatology.html?id=NclsAAAAMAAJ ...
Enhance elimination and treat acidosis *Correction of metabolic acidosis is critical to limit CNS penetration ... and the early enhancement of elimination (urinary alkalisation with or without haemodialysis). ...
Elimination by aspects. While pilot knowledge elicitation tools (KnETs) attempt to classify important knowledge attributes of ...
Elimination. • Nutrition. • Hydration. • Hygiene. • Skin integrity • Safety. • Assistance with mobility. • Sepsis • Basic life ... Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned ... Students are to ensure they are familiar with the contents of the 2014 Master of Clinical Practice Handbook. A PDF of this ... The exam will be based on the acute and chronic health problems explored this semester and the practice expectations around the ...
"National Menu of Best Management Practices (BMPs) for Stormwater". National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System. EPA. 2016. ... Storage practices: ponds; recovery; green infrastructure design.. *Vegetative practices: buffers; channels; green roofs; ... 3. Industry-Specific Best Management Practices". Guidance Manual for Developing Best Management Practices (BMP) (PDF) (Report ... schedules of activities, prohibitions of practices, maintenance procedures, and other management practices to prevent or reduce ...
Critical Control Management: Good practice guide Offers practical guidance on preventing the most serious types of health and ...
... for the abrogation of laws that discriminate against women and the elimination of discriminatory practices; and for the ... A project on the integration of a gender perspective into technical cooperation practices and E/CN.4/1998/22 E/CN.6/1998/11 11 ... segregated employment practices; discriminatory traditional and cultural laws and practices; unequal representation by women in ... Although they have not addressed legislation aimed at the elimination of discrimination with the issue of women per se, they ...
Create flow in ALM processes with automation and elimination Matt Heusser provides tips on how to assess, streamline and ... Use tried-and-true DevOps practices to beat analysis paralysis. If your company feels stuck, the principles behind DevOps can ... Extending Agile ALM: Why Agile engineering practices matter so much Agile consultant Howard Deiner explains several Agile ... engineering practices that can be used regardless of which methodology your organization employs. Continue Reading ...
5.9 Comparison of Elimination Methods. 5.10 Quadratic Interpolation Method. 5.11 Cubic Interpolation Method ... Engineering Optimization: Theory and Practice, Fifth Edition enables readers to quickly master and apply all the important ...
ELIMINATION OF CERTAIN ABUSIVE PRACTICES. (a) PROHIBITION OF REFERRAL FEES. -- Section 15(c) of the Securities Exchange Act of ... Elimination of certain abusive practices. Section 101(a) amends the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (the `1934 Act) by adding ... Each of these practices contribute to the manufacture of lawsuits under the securities laws that are designed to coerce ... Prevention of Abusive Practices That Foment Litigation.* * * Section 203(b) amends Section 15(c) of the Exchange Act by adding ...
Acupuncturists seek practice expansion and competition elimination Acupuncturists want to expand their scope of practice far ... Legislative Alchemy 2019: Acupuncturists score Medicare coverage and scope of practice expansion Through the magic of ...
What does micro-elimination look like in practice?. Examples of research evidence on micro-elimination initiatives will be ... A micro-elimination approach. Building on the concept of micro-elimination, key criteria for a micro-elimination approach have ... Micro-elimination can also build support and generate momentum for national elimination by demonstrating early successes.1 ... Micro-elimination of hepatitis C: A pathway to achieve national elimination goals. By Rivka Kushner ...
  • This course uses a blend of lectures, tutorials and workshops to identify situations that impact the daily environment of nursing practice. (edu.au)
  • The tables below indicate the lecture, tutorial and I based workshop outlines for Fundamentals of Nursing Practice 1. (edu.au)
  • Doctor in Nursing Practice (D.N.P. (plu.edu)
  • The School of Nursing offers the Doctor of Nursing Practice with a Family Nurse Practitioner or Psychiatric Mental Health Practitioner specialty. (plu.edu)
  • Health Assessment and Clinical Nursing I provides the core skills for basic nursing practice. (edu.au)
  • The book uses person-centred nursing as its guiding principle (in-line with the new NMC standards) to encourage students to develop a more detailed understanding of specific disorders and learn how to apply the bioscience theory to nursing practice and patient care. (sagepub.com)
  • This book is an natural extension of Essentials of Anatomy and Physiology for Nursing Practice , allowing nursing students from all fields the opportunity to apply their fundamental knowledge to the management and treatment of commonly occurring conditions. (sagepub.com)
  • Four principles guide the elimination diet plans we assign to our patients. (precisionnutrition.com)
  • 2. In the same resolution, the General Assembly, inter alia , urged Member States to review and evaluate their legislation and legal principles, procedures, policies and practices relating to criminal matters to ensure that women were treated fairly by the criminal justice system, and to be guided by the Model Strategies and Practical Measures in developing and undertaking strategies and practical measures to eliminate violence against women. (un.org)
  • 5) The authority sought to be conferred by § 3 was not merely to deal with "unfair competitive practices" which offend against existing law, or to create administrative machinery for the application of established principles of law to particular instances of violation. (cornell.edu)
  • Attention to the Fundamentals of Care enables students to proceed on their first placement experience able to support patients in the activities of daily living, providing basic hygiene, apply principles of basic nutrition, employ safe manual handling practices and begin to measure vital signs. (edu.au)
  • Demonstrate self-awareness of personal and workplace actions based on the role of the nursing assistant, core nursing values, lifelong learning, standards of practice, and ethical-legal principles. (comfsm.fm)
  • Apply principles of effective communication, documentation, and technology in nursing assistant practice. (comfsm.fm)
  • Heather Skeens, MD, CFMP, cornea, cataract, and refractive fellowship trained integrative ophthalmologist and practice management expert, joins Integrative Practitioner editor, Katherine Rushlau, to discuss challenges facing integrative healthcare practices and paths forward following the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. (integrativepractitioner.com)
  • 1.1 Distinguish the nature and scope of practice of nursing assistants from registered nurses, practical nurses, EMTs, medical assistants, community health assistants/workers, and expanded roles based on state rules and regulations. (comfsm.fm)
  • This study investigated the local communities' understanding of malaria transmission, recognition of signs and symptoms, perceptions of cause, treatment-seeking patterns, preventive measures and practices in order to inform the country's proposed malaria elimination programme in Swaziland. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Chapter review questions include matching, short answer, multiple choice, and true/false questions provide students with evaluation and test-taking practice. (elsevier.com)
  • Substantial decreases in HIV diagnoses in key cities show the way to elimination of new HIV diagnoses in gay men, a workshop at the 22nd International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2018) in Amsterdam heard on Tuesday. (aidsmap.com)
  • The Global Vaccine Action Plan (GVAP), approved by the World Health Assembly in 2012, set targets for vaccination coverage and a goal to achieve measles and rubella elimination in 5 of the 6 World Health Organization (WHO) regions by 2020 ( 10 ). (cdc.gov)
  • The move towards elimination of waste and a greater emphasis on the use of the worlds scare resources which have necessitated a desire for improved methods of forecasting and control of costs. (scribd.com)
  • Washington, DC, 19 November 2019 (PAHO)- A total of 15.5 million people are forced to practice open defecation in Latin America and the Caribbean, a practice that can pollute the environment and spread disease, warned the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) today on the eve of World Toilet Day . (paho.org)
  • This means that 82.7 million people lack access to basic sanitation in the region and of these, 15.5 million (18.8%) continue to practice open defecation. (paho.org)
  • Open defecation is an unhealthy practice," said Marcos Espinal, Director of the Department of Communicable Diseases and Environmental Determinants of Health. (paho.org)
  • People with lower incomes, groups in situations of vulnerability, rural populations and indigenous peoples are the most affected by poor sanitation and are therefore among those that must practice open defecation the most. (paho.org)
  • Haiti is the country in the Region with the highest percentage of the population that practices open defecation (20%) and the lowest levels of access to basic water services and sanitation services (65.5% and 34.7% respectively). (paho.org)
  • Successful elimination requires an intact defecation reflex. (veterinarypracticenews.com)
  • In moderate to severe salicylate poisoning, consider decontamination (activated charcoal) and the early enhancement of elimination (urinary alkalisation with or without haemodialysis). (rch.org.au)
  • Data concerning conditions of storage, leech external decontamination, microbiological controls, mode of delivery and antibiotic prophylaxis were collected from all the French university hospitals in practicing leech therapy, on the basis of a standardized questionnaire. (springer.com)
  • There must be a plan as to how resources and services will be tailored to overcome known barriers to achieve micro-elimination goals. (catie.ca)
  • Segments of the population that can be targeted for micro-elimination can include people in certain settings, geographic areas, subpopulations and age cohorts, for example people in prisons, people in cities or people with co-infections. (catie.ca)
  • However, the General Recommendation/Comment will provide a conceptual framework and recommendations for State Party action that are applicable to all harmful practices that fall within its scope. (ohchr.org)
  • The investigators also reviewed available policy and strategy documents, standards of practice and surveys, and paid visits to pharmaceutical premises to check the availability of antiviral drugs. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Demonstrate the professional behavior, work and practice standards, and ethics expected of the nursing assistant role. (comfsm.fm)
  • Focusing on 'day one competencies', this book offers essential guidance to the most common problems encountered in small animal general practice. (wiley.com)
  • To measure the independent effect on length of general-practice consultations of a range of characteristics of the general practitioner (GP), practice, patient and consultation, as a basis for considering future GP workforce needs. (mja.com.au)
  • all consultations that were claimable from the Australian Government's Medicare system as General Practice Attendances and had recorded start and finish times were included. (mja.com.au)
  • These factors should be considered in modelling future general practice workforce needs. (mja.com.au)
  • This makes it difficult to consider their possible impact on future consultation length in light of the changes in Australian general practice. (mja.com.au)
  • Although NAA tests have been offered by individual laboratories, approval of commercial kits may result in increased use for clinical practice and TB control. (cdc.gov)
  • A comprehensive lifelong learning program for each family physician will support continuous personal, professional, and clinical practice assessment and improvement. (annfammed.org)
  • schedules of activities, prohibitions of practices, maintenance procedures, and other management practices to prevent or reduce the pollution of waters of the United States, BMPs also include treatment requirements, operating procedures, and practices to control plant site runoff, spillage or leaks, sludge or waste disposal, or drainage from raw material storage. (wikipedia.org)
  • Typical BMPs include operator training, maintenance practices, and spill control procedures for treatment chemicals. (wikipedia.org)
  • Stormwater BMPs can be classified as "structural" (i.e., devices installed or constructed on a site such as silt fences , rock filter dams, fiber rolls (also called erosion control logs or excelsior wattles), sediment traps and numerous other proprietary products) or "non-structural" (procedures, such as modified landscaping practices, soil disturbing activity scheduling, or street sweeping). (wikipedia.org)
  • Stormwater BMPs can be classified as "structural" (i.e., devices installed or constructed on a site) or "non-structural" (procedures, such as modified landcaping practices or street sweeping). (wikipedia.org)
  • Elimination will require the implementation of evidence-based practices, the alignment of financial incentives, the closing of knowledge gaps, and the acquisition of information to assess progress and to enable response to emerging threats. (cambridge.org)
  • We report the results of a national survey conducted in all the French university hospitals to assess the current extent of use of leech for medical practices in the hospital and to investigate maintenance, delivery practices and prevention of the risk of infection. (springer.com)
  • Measures to prevent infectious complications before application to patient have to be better applied and guidelines of good practices are necessary. (springer.com)
  • 1. The present report is submitted in accordance with General Assembly resolution 52/86 of 12 December 1997, entitled 'Crime prevention and criminal justice measures to eliminate violence against women', by which the Assembly adopted the Model Strategies and Practical Measures on the Elimination of Violence against Women in the Field of Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice, annexed to the resolution. (un.org)
  • Sustained elimination of HAIs can be based on this public health model of constant action and vigilance. (cambridge.org)
  • This investigation demonstrated the value of evaluating elements of the broader health system in investigating measles outbreaks and the need for using a diagonal approach to achieving sustainable measles elimination. (cdc.gov)
  • Measles elimination, therefore, becomes a useful vehicle to achieve broad strengthening of the overall health system ( 8 ). (cdc.gov)
  • The "canary in the coalmine" approach to measles elimination efforts takes advantage of vertical strategies that focus on using surveillance data for action and to identify areas missed by vaccination, and of horizontal strategies that build systems and health services to sustain the gains and achieve broader objectives. (cdc.gov)
  • Measles-driven policies and elimination strategies can provide opportunities for improving immunization service delivery performance, as well as strengthening health systems to help achieve the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals and Universal Health Coverage ( 8 , 9 , 12 ). (cdc.gov)
  • However, lack of regulation and consistent standards has led to confusion in terms of what different health coaches are qualified to do and how health coaches fit in to different models of practice. (integrativepractitioner.com)
  • RESULTS The project identified core values, a New Model of practice, and a process for development, research, education, partnership, and change with great potential to transform the ability of family medicine to improve the health and health care of the nation. (annfammed.org)
  • 2.2 Utilize technology such as e-mail and search engines to access current health and nursing assistant practice information. (comfsm.fm)
  • Physician job satisfaction and stress mediated the relationship between physician, practice, and patient characteristics as independent variables and physician physical and mental health as dependent variables. (nih.gov)
  • Poor practice conditions can result in poor outcomes, which can erode quality of care and prove costly to the physician and health care organization. (nih.gov)
  • CONCLUSIONS: Although knowledge and practices regarding malaria amongst resettled populations in Mannar District were high, continued malaria surveillance, case management, vector control including distribution of LLINs, education and information campaigns are important not only amongst the communities affected by the conflict but the entire district. (ox.ac.uk)
  • Stormwater management, as a specialized area within the field of environmental engineering , emerged later in the 20th century, and some practitioners have used the term BMP to describe both structural or engineered control devices and systems (e.g. retention ponds ) to treat polluted stormwater, as well as operational or procedural practices (e.g. minimizing use of chemical fertilizers and pesticides). (wikipedia.org)
  • In addition, no clear guideline of good practices for leech management before use exists in France. (springer.com)
  • Reduce stormwater runoff rates and volumes, soil erosion, and nonpoint source pollution, wherever possible, through SMPs, devices, and/or structures, and to ensure that these management practices, devices, and/or structures are properly maintained and eliminate threats to public safety. (ecode360.com)
  • 1.7.1 8 Best Practices in Business Management. (scribd.com)
  • Engineering Optimization: Theory and Practice, Fifth Edition enables readers to quickly master and apply all the important optimization methods in use today across a broad range of industries. (wiley.com)
  • Pre-mastication is a cultural practice ultimately designed for communities and cultures that didn't have knives, forks and machines to soften food,' she says. (latimes.com)
  • We discuss types of histamine receptors and their mechanism of action, absorption, onset and duration of action of first-generation and second-generation H(1)-antihistamines, as well as elimination of H(1)-antihistamines which has important implications for dosing in children. (bmj.com)
  • The importance regarding awareness of new malaria treatment regimens, treatment under direct observation, prompt notification of suspected or diagnosed cases of malaria and avoiding blind use of anti-malarials are among the other responsibilities expected of all clinicians who manage patients in countries reaching malaria elimination. (biomedcentral.com)
  • After reading this statistic, WLL began to ask patients about RLS and discovered that it was alive and well in his practice. (aafp.org)
  • 5. The Model Strategies and Practical Measures build on the measures included in the Platform for Action 1 adopted by the Fourth World Conference on Women and derives its definition from the Declaration on the Elimination of Violence against Women (General Assembly resolution 48/104). (un.org)
  • 6. The Model Strategies and Practical Measures specifically acknowledge the need for an active policy of mainstreaming a gender perspective in all policies and programmes related to violence against women and of achieving gender equality and equal and fair access to justice, as well as establishing the goal of gender balance in areas of decision-making related to the elimination of violence against women. (un.org)
  • As female genital mutilation, early marriage and forced marriage are practices that often come before the Committees, are well studied and have been gradually reduced with certain legislative and programmatic approaches, this General Recommendation/General Comment will use them as key illustrative examples. (ohchr.org)