Family Practice: A medical specialty concerned with the provision of continuing, comprehensive primary health care for the entire family.Physician's Practice Patterns: Patterns of practice related to diagnosis and treatment as especially influenced by cost of the service requested and provided.Psychological Theory: Principles applied to the analysis and explanation of psychological or behavioral phenomena.Practice Guidelines as Topic: Directions or principles presenting current or future rules of policy for assisting health care practitioners in patient care decisions regarding diagnosis, therapy, or related clinical circumstances. The guidelines may be developed by government agencies at any level, institutions, professional societies, governing boards, or by the convening of expert panels. The guidelines form a basis for the evaluation of all aspects of health care and delivery.General Practice: Patient-based medical care provided across age and gender or specialty boundaries.Professional Practice: The use of one's knowledge in a particular profession. It includes, in the case of the field of biomedicine, professional activities related to health care and the actual performance of the duties related to the provision of health care.Practice Management, Medical: The organization and operation of the business aspects of a physician's practice.Nursing Theory: Concepts, definitions, and propositions applied to the study of various phenomena which pertain to nursing and nursing research.Theory of Mind: The ability to attribute mental states (e.g., beliefs, desires, feelings, intentions, thoughts, etc.) to self and to others, allowing an individual to understand and infer behavior on the basis of the mental states. Difference or deficit in theory of mind is associated with ASPERGER SYNDROME; AUTISTIC DISORDER; and SCHIZOPHRENIA, etc.Private Practice: Practice of a health profession by an individual, offering services on a person-to-person basis, as opposed to group or partnership practice.Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).Practice (Psychology): Performance of an act one or more times, with a view to its fixation or improvement; any performance of an act or behavior that leads to learning.Information Theory: An interdisciplinary study dealing with the transmission of messages or signals, or the communication of information. Information theory does not directly deal with meaning or content, but with physical representations that have meaning or content. It overlaps considerably with communication theory and CYBERNETICS.Evidence-Based Practice: A way of providing health care that is guided by a thoughtful integration of the best available scientific knowledge with clinical expertise. This approach allows the practitioner to critically assess research data, clinical guidelines, and other information resources in order to correctly identify the clinical problem, apply the most high-quality intervention, and re-evaluate the outcome for future improvement.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Attitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.Systems Theory: Principles, models, and laws that apply to complex interrelationships and interdependencies of sets of linked components which form a functioning whole, a system. Any system may be composed of components which are systems in their own right (sub-systems), such as several organs within an individual organism.Professional Practice Location: Geographic area in which a professional person practices; includes primarily physicians and dentists.Quantum Theory: The theory that the radiation and absorption of energy take place in definite quantities called quanta (E) which vary in size and are defined by the equation E=hv in which h is Planck's constant and v is the frequency of the radiation.Primary Health Care: Care which provides integrated, accessible health care services by clinicians who are accountable for addressing a large majority of personal health care needs, developing a sustained partnership with patients, and practicing in the context of family and community. (JAMA 1995;273(3):192)Partnership Practice: A voluntary contract between two or more doctors who may or may not share responsibility for the care of patients, with proportional sharing of profits and losses.Practice Management: Business management of medical, dental and veterinary practices that may include capital financing, utilization management, and arrangement of capitation agreements with other parties.Models, Theoretical: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of systems, processes, or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.United StatesEnglandDecision Theory: A theoretical technique utilizing a group of related constructs to describe or prescribe how individuals or groups of people choose a course of action when faced with several alternatives and a variable amount of knowledge about the determinants of the outcomes of those alternatives.Great BritainEvidence-Based Medicine: An approach of practicing medicine with the goal to improve and evaluate patient care. It requires the judicious integration of best research evidence with the patient's values to make decisions about medical care. This method is to help physicians make proper diagnosis, devise best testing plan, choose best treatment and methods of disease prevention, as well as develop guidelines for large groups of patients with the same disease. (from JAMA 296 (9), 2006)Clinical Competence: The capability to perform acceptably those duties directly related to patient care.Guideline Adherence: Conformity in fulfilling or following official, recognized, or institutional requirements, guidelines, recommendations, protocols, pathways, or other standards.Game Theory: Theoretical construct used in applied mathematics to analyze certain situations in which there is an interplay between parties that may have similar, opposed, or mixed interests. In a typical game, decision-making "players," who each have their own goals, try to gain advantage over the other parties by anticipating each other's decisions; the game is finally resolved as a consequence of the players' decisions.Physicians, Family: Those physicians who have completed the education requirements specified by the American Academy of Family Physicians.Ethical Theory: A philosophically coherent set of propositions (for example, utilitarianism) which attempts to provide general norms for the guidance and evaluation of moral conduct. (from Beauchamp and Childress, Principles of Biomedical Ethics, 4th ed)Referral and Consultation: The practice of sending a patient to another program or practitioner for services or advice which the referring source is not prepared to provide.Dentist's Practice Patterns: Patterns of practice in dentistry related to diagnosis and treatment.Health Care Surveys: Statistical measures of utilization and other aspects of the provision of health care services including hospitalization and ambulatory care.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.General Practice, Dental: Nonspecialized dental practice which is concerned with providing primary and continuing dental care.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Physician-Patient Relations: The interactions between physician and patient.Physicians: Individuals licensed to practice medicine.Education, Medical, Continuing: Educational programs designed to inform physicians of recent advances in their field.Qualitative Research: Any type of research that employs nonnumeric information to explore individual or group characteristics, producing findings not arrived at by statistical procedures or other quantitative means. (Qualitative Inquiry: A Dictionary of Terms Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 1997)Quality Assurance, Health Care: Activities and programs intended to assure or improve the quality of care in either a defined medical setting or a program. The concept includes the assessment or evaluation of the quality of care; identification of problems or shortcomings in the delivery of care; designing activities to overcome these deficiencies; and follow-up monitoring to ensure effectiveness of corrective steps.Practice Management, Dental: The organization and operation of the business aspects of a dental practice.Decision Making: The process of making a selective intellectual judgment when presented with several complex alternatives consisting of several variables, and usually defining a course of action or an idea.Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Australia: The smallest continent and an independent country, comprising six states and two territories. Its capital is Canberra.Nurse's Practice Patterns: Patterns of practice in nursing related to provision of services including diagnosis and treatment.Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Quality of Health Care: The levels of excellence which characterize the health service or health care provided based on accepted standards of quality.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Diffusion of Innovation: The broad dissemination of new ideas, procedures, techniques, materials, and devices and the degree to which these are accepted and used.Interprofessional Relations: The reciprocal interaction of two or more professional individuals.Organizational Innovation: Introduction of changes which are new to the organization and are created by management.Models, Psychological: Theoretical representations that simulate psychological processes and/or social processes. These include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Cooperative Behavior: The interaction of two or more persons or organizations directed toward a common goal which is mutually beneficial. An act or instance of working or acting together for a common purpose or benefit, i.e., joint action. (From Random House Dictionary Unabridged, 2d ed)Computer Simulation: Computer-based representation of physical systems and phenomena such as chemical processes.Models, Organizational: Theoretical representations and constructs that describe or explain the structure and hierarchy of relationships and interactions within or between formal organizational entities or informal social groups.Netherlands: Country located in EUROPE. It is bordered by the NORTH SEA, BELGIUM, and GERMANY. Constituent areas are Aruba, Curacao, Sint Maarten, formerly included in the NETHERLANDS ANTILLES.Program Evaluation: Studies designed to assess the efficacy of programs. They may include the evaluation of cost-effectiveness, the extent to which objectives are met, or impact.Drug Prescriptions: Directions written for the obtaining and use of DRUGS.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Focus Groups: A method of data collection and a QUALITATIVE RESEARCH tool in which a small group of individuals are brought together and allowed to interact in a discussion of their opinions about topics, issues, or questions.Nurse's Role: The expected function of a member of the nursing profession.Communication: The exchange or transmission of ideas, attitudes, or beliefs between individuals or groups.Pediatrics: A medical specialty concerned with maintaining health and providing medical care to children from birth to adolescence.Physician's Role: The expected function of a member of the medical profession.Patient Care Team: Care of patients by a multidisciplinary team usually organized under the leadership of a physician; each member of the team has specific responsibilities and the whole team contributes to the care of the patient.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.State Medicine: A system of medical care regulated, controlled and financed by the government, in which the government assumes responsibility for the health needs of the population.Health Promotion: Encouraging consumer behaviors most likely to optimize health potentials (physical and psychosocial) through health information, preventive programs, and access to medical care.Research Design: A plan for collecting and utilizing data so that desired information can be obtained with sufficient precision or so that an hypothesis can be tested properly.Biological Evolution: The process of cumulative change over successive generations through which organisms acquire their distinguishing morphological and physiological characteristics.Rural Health Services: Health services, public or private, in rural areas. The services include the promotion of health and the delivery of health care.Curriculum: A course of study offered by an educational institution.Patient Satisfaction: The degree to which the individual regards the health care service or product or the manner in which it is delivered by the provider as useful, effective, or beneficial.Algorithms: A procedure consisting of a sequence of algebraic formulas and/or logical steps to calculate or determine a given task.Public Health Practice: The activities and endeavors of the public health services in a community on any level.General Practitioners: Physicians whose practice is not restricted to a specific field of MEDICINE.ScotlandCanada: The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.Mass Screening: Organized periodic procedures performed on large groups of people for the purpose of detecting disease.Patient-Centered Care: Design of patient care wherein institutional resources and personnel are organized around patients rather than around specialized departments. (From Hospitals 1993 Feb 5;67(3):14)Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Ontario: A province of Canada lying between the provinces of Manitoba and Quebec. Its capital is Toronto. It takes its name from Lake Ontario which is said to represent the Iroquois oniatariio, beautiful lake. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p892 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p391)Professional Competence: The capability to perform the duties of one's profession generally, or to perform a particular professional task, with skill of an acceptable quality.Program Development: The process of formulating, improving, and expanding educational, managerial, or service-oriented work plans (excluding computer program development).Patient Education as Topic: The teaching or training of patients concerning their own health needs.Outcome Assessment (Health Care): Research aimed at assessing the quality and effectiveness of health care as measured by the attainment of a specified end result or outcome. Measures include parameters such as improved health, lowered morbidity or mortality, and improvement of abnormal states (such as elevated blood pressure).Mathematics: The deductive study of shape, quantity, and dependence. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Teaching: The educational process of instructing.Learning: Relatively permanent change in behavior that is the result of past experience or practice. The concept includes the acquisition of knowledge.Guidelines as Topic: A systematic statement of policy rules or principles. Guidelines may be developed by government agencies at any level, institutions, professional societies, governing boards, or by convening expert panels. The text may be cursive or in outline form but is generally a comprehensive guide to problems and approaches in any field of activity. For guidelines in the field of health care and clinical medicine, PRACTICE GUIDELINES AS TOPIC is available.Specialization: An occupation limited in scope to a subsection of a broader field.LondonPatient Acceptance of Health Care: The seeking and acceptance by patients of health service.Health Personnel: Men and women working in the provision of health services, whether as individual practitioners or employees of health institutions and programs, whether or not professionally trained, and whether or not subject to public regulation. (From A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, 1976)History, 19th Century: Time period from 1801 through 1900 of the common era.Attitude to Health: Public attitudes toward health, disease, and the medical care system.Group Practice, Prepaid: An organized group of three or more full-time physicians rendering services for a fixed prepayment.Evidence-Based Nursing: A way of providing nursing care that is guided by the integration of the best available scientific knowledge with nursing expertise. This approach requires nurses to critically assess relevant scientific data or research evidence, and to implement high-quality interventions for their nursing practice.Pilot Projects: Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.Internship and Residency: Programs of training in medicine and medical specialties offered by hospitals for graduates of medicine to meet the requirements established by accrediting authorities.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Education, Medical, Graduate: Educational programs for medical graduates entering a specialty. They include formal specialty training as well as academic work in the clinical and basic medical sciences, and may lead to board certification or an advanced medical degree.Societies, Medical: Societies whose membership is limited to physicians.Quality Improvement: The attainment or process of attaining a new level of performance or quality.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Motivation: Those factors which cause an organism to behave or act in either a goal-seeking or satisfying manner. They may be influenced by physiological drives or by external stimuli.Medicine: The art and science of studying, performing research on, preventing, diagnosing, and treating disease, as well as the maintenance of health.Career Choice: Selection of a type of occupation or profession.Research: Critical and exhaustive investigation or experimentation, having for its aim the discovery of new facts and their correct interpretation, the revision of accepted conclusions, theories, or laws in the light of newly discovered facts, or the practical application of such new or revised conclusions, theories, or laws. (Webster, 3d ed)Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Benchmarking: Method of measuring performance against established standards of best practice.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Obstetrics: A medical-surgical specialty concerned with management and care of women during pregnancy, parturition, and the puerperium.Culture: A collective expression for all behavior patterns acquired and socially transmitted through symbols. Culture includes customs, traditions, and language.Philosophy: A love or pursuit of wisdom. A search for the underlying causes and principles of reality. (Webster, 3d ed)Ethics, Medical: The principles of professional conduct concerning the rights and duties of the physician, relations with patients and fellow practitioners, as well as actions of the physician in patient care and interpersonal relations with patient families.Professional Role: The expected function of a member of a particular profession.Professional Autonomy: The quality or state of being independent and self-directing, especially in making decisions, enabling professionals to exercise judgment as they see fit during the performance of their jobs.Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care): Evaluation procedures that focus on both the outcome or status (OUTCOMES ASSESSMENT) of the patient at the end of an episode of care - presence of symptoms, level of activity, and mortality; and the process (ASSESSMENT, PROCESS) - what is done for the patient diagnostically and therapeutically.Organizational Culture: Beliefs and values shared by all members of the organization. These shared values, which are subject to change, are reflected in the day to day management of the organization.Organizational Policy: A course or method of action selected, usually by an organization, institution, university, society, etc., from among alternatives to guide and determine present and future decisions and positions on matters of public interest or social concern. It does not include internal policy relating to organization and administration within the corporate body, for which ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION is available.Models, Chemical: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of chemical processes or phenomena; includes the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Drug Utilization: The utilization of drugs as reported in individual hospital studies, FDA studies, marketing, or consumption, etc. This includes drug stockpiling, and patient drug profiles.Counseling: The giving of advice and assistance to individuals with educational or personal problems.Medical Records Systems, Computerized: Computer-based systems for input, storage, display, retrieval, and printing of information contained in a patient's medical record.Interdisciplinary Communication: Communication, in the sense of cross-fertilization of ideas, involving two or more academic disciplines (such as the disciplines that comprise the cross-disciplinary field of bioethics, including the health and biological sciences, the humanities, and the social sciences and law). Also includes problems in communication stemming from differences in patterns of language usage in different academic or medical disciplines.Medical Records: Recording of pertinent information concerning patient's illness or illnesses.Health Policy: Decisions, usually developed by government policymakers, for determining present and future objectives pertaining to the health care system.Models, Statistical: Statistical formulations or analyses which, when applied to data and found to fit the data, are then used to verify the assumptions and parameters used in the analysis. Examples of statistical models are the linear model, binomial model, polynomial model, two-parameter model, etc.Educational Measurement: The assessing of academic or educational achievement. It includes all aspects of testing and test construction.Health Services Accessibility: The degree to which individuals are inhibited or facilitated in their ability to gain entry to and to receive care and services from the health care system. Factors influencing this ability include geographic, architectural, transportational, and financial considerations, among others.Education, Medical: Use for general articles concerning medical education.Models, Educational: Theoretical models which propose methods of learning or teaching as a basis or adjunct to changes in attitude or behavior. These educational interventions are usually applied in the fields of health and patient education but are not restricted to patient care.Hygiene: The science dealing with the establishment and maintenance of health in the individual and the group. It includes the conditions and practices conducive to health. (Webster, 3d ed)Clinical Medicine: The study and practice of medicine by direct examination of the patient.Probability Theory: The branch of mathematics dealing with the purely logical properties of probability. Its theorems underlie most statistical methods. (Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Appointments and Schedules: The different methods of scheduling patient visits, appointment systems, individual or group appointments, waiting times, waiting lists for hospitals, walk-in clinics, etc.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Certification: Compliance with a set of standards defined by non-governmental organizations. Certification is applied for by individuals on a voluntary basis and represents a professional status when achieved, e.g., certification for a medical specialty.Nurses: Professionals qualified by graduation from an accredited school of nursing and by passage of a national licensing examination to practice nursing. They provide services to patients requiring assistance in recovering or maintaining their physical or mental health.Medical Staff, Hospital: Professional medical personnel approved to provide care to patients in a hospital.Quality Indicators, Health Care: Norms, criteria, standards, and other direct qualitative and quantitative measures used in determining the quality of health care.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Health Behavior: Behaviors expressed by individuals to protect, maintain or promote their health status. For example, proper diet, and appropriate exercise are activities perceived to influence health status. Life style is closely associated with health behavior and factors influencing life style are socioeconomic, educational, and cultural.Biomedical Research: Research that involves the application of the natural sciences, especially biology and physiology, to medicine.Continuity of Patient Care: Health care provided on a continuing basis from the initial contact, following the patient through all phases of medical care.Cost-Benefit Analysis: A method of comparing the cost of a program with its expected benefits in dollars (or other currency). The benefit-to-cost ratio is a measure of total return expected per unit of money spent. This analysis generally excludes consideration of factors that are not measured ultimately in economic terms. Cost effectiveness compares alternative ways to achieve a specific set of results.Personal Construct Theory: A psychological theory based on dimensions or categories used by a given person in describing or explaining the personality and behavior of others or of himself. The basic idea is that different people will use consistently different categories. The theory was formulated in the fifties by George Kelly. Two tests devised by him are the role construct repertory test and the repertory grid test. (From Stuart Sutherland, The International Dictionary of Psychology, 1989)Nursing Process: The sum total of nursing activities which includes assessment (identifying needs), intervention (ministering to needs), and evaluation (validating the effectiveness of the help given).Information Dissemination: The circulation or wide dispersal of information.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Anthropology, Cultural: It is the study of social phenomena which characterize the learned, shared, and transmitted social activities of particular ethnic groups with focus on the causes, consequences, and complexities of human social and cultural variability.Nurse-Patient Relations: Interaction between the patient and nurse.Dentists: Individuals licensed to practice DENTISTRY.Thermodynamics: A rigorously mathematical analysis of energy relationships (heat, work, temperature, and equilibrium). It describes systems whose states are determined by thermal parameters, such as temperature, in addition to mechanical and electromagnetic parameters. (From Hawley's Condensed Chemical Dictionary, 12th ed)Personnel Selection: The process of choosing employees for specific types of employment. The concept includes recruitment.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic: Works about clinical trials that involve at least one test treatment and one control treatment, concurrent enrollment and follow-up of the test- and control-treated groups, and in which the treatments to be administered are selected by a random process, such as the use of a random-numbers table.Urban Health Services: Health services, public or private, in urban areas. The services include the promotion of health and the delivery of health care.History, 17th Century: Time period from 1601 through 1700 of the common era.Total Quality Management: The application of industrial management practice to systematically maintain and improve organization-wide performance. Effectiveness and success are determined and assessed by quantitative quality measures.Models, Nursing: Theoretical models simulating behavior or activities in nursing, including nursing care, management and economics, theory, assessment, research, and education. Some examples of these models include Orem Self-Care Model, Roy Adaptation Model, and Rogers Life Process Model.Morals: Standards of conduct that distinguish right from wrong.Nursing Research: Research carried out by nurses, generally in clinical settings, in the areas of clinical practice, evaluation, nursing education, nursing administration, and methodology.Physicians, Primary Care: Providers of initial care for patients. These PHYSICIANS refer patients when appropriate for secondary or specialist care.Job Satisfaction: Personal satisfaction relative to the work situation.Medical Receptionists: Individuals who receive patients in a medical office.EuropeClinical Protocols: Precise and detailed plans for the study of a medical or biomedical problem and/or plans for a regimen of therapy.Personal Autonomy: Self-directing freedom and especially moral independence. An ethical principle holds that the autonomy of persons ought to be respected. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.WalesInservice Training: On the job training programs for personnel carried out within an institution or agency. It includes orientation programs.Leadership: The function of directing or controlling the actions or attitudes of an individual or group with more or less willing acquiescence of the followers.Rural Population: The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.Physical Therapy Specialty: The auxiliary health profession which makes use of PHYSICAL THERAPY MODALITIES to prevent, correct, and alleviate movement dysfunction of anatomic or physiological origin.Internet: A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.Knowledge: The body of truths or facts accumulated in the course of time, the cumulated sum of information, its volume and nature, in any civilization, period, or country.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Professional-Patient Relations: Interactions between health personnel and patients.Psychometrics: Assessment of psychological variables by the application of mathematical procedures.Health Education: Education that increases the awareness and favorably influences the attitudes and knowledge relating to the improvement of health on a personal or community basis.Nursing: The field of nursing care concerned with the promotion, maintenance, and restoration of health.Office Visits: Visits made by patients to health service providers' offices for diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up.Community Health Services: Diagnostic, therapeutic and preventive health services provided for individuals in the community.Feasibility Studies: Studies to determine the advantages or disadvantages, practicability, or capability of accomplishing a projected plan, study, or project.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Safety Management: The development of systems to prevent accidents, injuries, and other adverse occurrences in an institutional setting. The concept includes prevention or reduction of adverse events or incidents involving employees, patients, or facilities. Examples include plans to reduce injuries from falls or plans for fire safety to promote a safe institutional environment.Patient Participation: Patient involvement in the decision-making process in matters pertaining to health.Psychiatry: The medical science that deals with the origin, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of mental disorders.Health Plan Implementation: Those actions designed to carry out recommendations pertaining to health plans or programs.Education, Pharmacy: Formal instruction, learning, or training in the preparation, dispensing, and proper utilization of drugs in the field of medicine.Translational Medical Research: The application of discoveries generated by laboratory research and preclinical studies to the development of clinical trials and studies in humans. A second area of translational research concerns enhancing the adoption of best practices.Choice Behavior: The act of making a selection among two or more alternatives, usually after a period of deliberation.Students, Medical: Individuals enrolled in a school of medicine or a formal educational program in medicine.Intention: What a person has in mind to do or bring about.
Theory. Practice. Criticism. Memoir.'). Moscow, 1999. Petrova, E. (2000) Russkiy futurizm ('Russian Futurism'). SPb., 2000. ...
Coleman, E. Gabriella; Golub, Alex (2008-09-01). "Hacker practice". Anthropological Theory. 8 (3): 255-277. doi:10.1177/ ... This second generation practice of sharing contributed to the battles of free and open software. In fact, when Bill Gates' ... The value of community is still in high practice and use today. [citation needed] Levy identifies several "true hackers" who ...
Theory and practice. Warszawa, Kluwer Dordrecht: PWN. Elżbieta Pleszczyńska has cofounded Foundation Supporting Physically ... In practice, the underlying assumptions are often not checked, moreover they are always violated - there is no normal ... in practice multivariate normal distribution is being assumed). Parametric statistical tests are derived from distribution ... Lecture Notes of the ICB Seminars Statistics and Clinical Practice. Warszawa: International Center of Biocybernetics, 64-69. ...
Theory and Practice. IFTR/FIRT Political Performances Working Group. Haedicke, Susan C., Deirdre Heddon, Avraham Oz and E.J. ...
Johnson, R.T.; Johnson, D.W. (1999). "Making Cooperative Learning Work". Theory into Practice. 38 (2: Building Community ... The social dominance theory is considered to be the opposite of social interdependence theory. David Johnson, Deutsch's student ... Derived from the constructivist learning theory and social psychology's social interdependence theory, positive interdependence ... theory is the foundation of modern collaborative and cooperative practice in business, science, and education. Kurt Koffka, one ...
Theory and Practice. Addison Wesley Panofsky E (1991) Perspective as a Symbolic Form 1991. Zone Books, New York Veltman K (1997 ...
... theory in practice. New York: New York University Press. ISBN 9780814727058. Scheman, Naomi; O'Connor, Peg (2002). Feminist ... Scheman is especially interested in the ways in which transgressive practices shine light on the actions of normal people, and ... toward responsible knowing and practice, Cambridge New York: Cambridge University Press, pp. 106-124, ISBN 9780521719407. " ...
Covin, Jeffrey; Wales, William (2012). "The Measurement of Entrepreneurial Orientation". Entrepreneurship: Theory & Practice. ... Theory & Practice. 33 (3): 761-787. doi:10.1111/j.1540-6520.2009.00308.x. Retrieved 2015-02-05. Wales, William; Gupta, Vishal; ... Theory & Practice. 35 (5): 925-946. doi:10.1111/j.1540-6520.2011.00454.x. Retrieved 2015-02-05. Wales, William; Patel, Pankaj; ... Theory & Practice. 35 (5): 855-872. doi:10.1111/j.1540-6520.2011.00482.x. Retrieved 2015-02-05. Wales, William (2013). " ...
This approach to reading and learning looks to some of the best practices and theory from collaborative learning and ... Webb, N.M (1997). "Assessing students in small collaborative groups". Theory into Practice. 36 (4): 205-213. doi:10.1080/ ... The true intent of literature circles is "to allow students to practice and develop the skills and strategies of good readers ... Literature circles combine the best practices of collaborative learning and student-directed learning. They are not to be ...
Bies, David (2003). Engineering Noise Control; Theory and Practice. London: Spon Press. p. 235. ISBN 0-415-26713-7. As wind ...
"Whole-School Detracking: A Strategy for Equity and Excellence". Theory into Practice. Archived from the original on 2007-08-13 ... Alvarez, Doris; Mehan, Bud (2006). "Whole School Detracking: A Strategy for Equity and Excellence" (PDF). Theory Into Practice ... which focuses on practicing for Quiz Bowl-like events. Other science-related clubs include a medical engineering club, the ...
Service-Learning in Theory and Practice: The Future of Community Engagement in Higher Education. NY: Palgrave. (Read chapter 1 ... Theory into Practice. Butin, D. W. (Forthcoming). "Democracy in Doubt: A Critical Examination of K-12 Service-Learning" in ... Teaching Social Foundations of Education: Contexts, Theories, and Issues. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Publishers. BOOK ... Theories, and Issues. Mahwah: NJ. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. Butin, D. W. (2004). "The Foundations of Preparing Teachers: Are ...
"A rational organisation of agriculture? Theory and practice". Belgian State Archives. Retrieved 2011-10-10. Corley, R. H. V.; ...
Bempechat, Janine (2004). "The Motivational Benefits of Homework: A Social-Cognitive Perspective". Theory In Practice. 43 (3): ... Epstein, Joyce L. (1988), "Homework practices, achievements, and behaviors of elementary school students", Center for Research ... Teachers have many purposes for assigning homework including: practice, preparation, participation personal development, parent ... or other skills to be practiced. The effect of homework is debated. Generally speaking, homework does not improve academic ...
Payne, Charles (1984). "Theory into Practice". Theory into Practice. JSTOR 1476441. "BROWN V. BOARD: Timeline of School ... Legal scholar John Tehranian argues that in reality this was a "performance-based" standard, relating to religious practices, ... The reasons for this were the arguments and theories about the Finns originally being of Mongolian instead of native European ... in American society they were unperturbed with the fact that the United States still continued its discriminatory practices ...
Hyland, N. (2006). "Detracking in the Social Studies: A Path to a More Democratic Education?". Theory into Practice. 45 (1): 64 ... Hallinan, Maureen (1994). "Tracking: From Theory to Practice". Sociology of Education. Sociology of Education, Vol. 67, No. 2. ... In practice, tracks are generally not as homogeneous as they could be (although they are more homogenous than a non-tracking ... While most schools practice similar tracking methods, the way in which they organize their tracks may create profound ...
"The Ethics of Government Whistleblowing". Social Theory & Practice. Jan2015, Vol. 41 Issue 1, p77-105. 29p. Alford, C. Fred. " ... Delmas, Candice (January 2015). "The Ethics of Government Whisltleblowing". Social Theory and Practice. ,access-date= requires ... Developments in Theory, Research, and Practice (2012) Drew D (29 January 2015) Francis NHS whistleblower report: a new ... Deeper questions and theories of whistleblowing and why people choose to do so can be studied through an ethical approach. ...
Theory into Practice. Taylor &. 23 (2): 124-131. doi:10.1080/00405848409543102. JSTOR 1476441. Water Tossing Boulders- how a ...
Theory into Practice. Taylor &. 23 (2): 124-131. doi:10.1080/00405848409543102. JSTOR 1476441. ...
CICO can take regulatory strategies from this learning theory that is practiced in the general classroom. In the general ... Hughes, Charles A., and Douglas D. Dexter (2011). "Response To Intervention: A Research-Based Summary". Theory Into Practice. 4 ... Jimerson, S. R., Burns, M. K., & VanDerHeyden, A. M. (2007). "Response to Intervention at School: The Science and Practice of ... Marzano, R (1998). "A theory-based meta-analysis of research on instruction. Aurora, CO: Mid-continent Research for Education ...
Kohlberg, Lawrence; Richard Hersh (1977). "Moral Development: A Review of the Theory". Theory Into Practice. 16 (2): 53-58. doi ... The five foundations theory are both a nativist and cultural-psychologica theory. Modern moral psychology concedes that " ... Another theory that this can be equated to is Jonathan Haidt's "Social Intuition Theory" where individuals justify their ... who introduced the moral development theory in 1969. This theory was built on Piaget's observation that children develop ...
Theory and practice. by Tatyana Tishko, Tishko Dmitry, Titar Vladimir, World Scientific (2010).ISBN 978-981-4289-54-2 Tishko,T ... Vestnik., 2 (1):107-111(in Russian). Theory and practice of erythrocyte microscopy by Novitsky, V.V., Ryazantzeva, N.V., ... "3D Imaging: Theory, Technology and Application", New York, NY: Nova Publishers (2010):51-92.ISBN 978-1-60876-885-1. Safronov, G ...
Reese, Frederick D. (February 1968). "School Age Suicide and the Educational Environment". Theory Into Practice. Vol. 7 (1): 10 ... Students with ADHD tend to have trouble mastering behaviors and practices demanded of them by the public education system in ...
Rubin, Andee; Bruce, Bertram C. (1990). "Alternate realizations of purpose in computer-supported writing". Theory into Practice ... A Collection of Proven Exemplary Educational Programs and Practices (16th ed.). Longmont, CO: Sopris West. p. 352. Tonfoni, ...
Grant, Jill (2008). A Reader in Canadian Planning: Linking Theory and Practice. Toronto: Thomson Nelson. ISBN 978-0-17-610357-6 ... Its cultural practice is defined by the sets of traditional knowledges, customs, practices, and cultural identities that are ... and not as a normative paradigm in theory and practice)." Planning is embedded and operates in specific cultural contexts, ... Sandercock, Leonie (2004-03-01). "Commentary: indigenous planning and the burden of colonialism". Planning Theory & Practice. 5 ...
Michael A. Arbib; Shun-ichi Amari; Prudence H. Arbib (2002). The Handbook of Brain Theory and Neural Networks. Cambridge, ... and clinical practice. Integrative neuroscience attempts to consolidate these observations through unified descriptive models ... In some cases the complex interactions between inhibitory and excitatory neurons can be simplified using mean field theory, ... In theory, computational neuroscience would be a sub-field of theoretical neuroscience which employs computational simulations ...
... article on Practice Theory Pascalian Meditations, Polity, 2000. see chapter 4 especially Outline of a Theory of Practice. ... Practice theory is a theory of how social beings, with their diverse motives and their diverse intentions, make and transform ... Theodore Schatzki developed an alternative theory of practice, primarily in his books Social Practices (1996) and The Site of ... johnpostill.com/2008/10/30/what-is-practice-theory/ Social Practices (1996) The Site of the Social (2002) (Nicolini, 2014, p. ...
Theory in Practice is a Swedish technical death metal band founded in 1995, which borrows heavily from progressive metal. The ... Submissive (demo, 1996) Third Eye Function (CD, 1997) The Armageddon Theories (CD, 1999) Colonizing the Sun (CD, 2002) Evolving ...
The Hub Labeling algorithm (HL) is an exact shortest path algorithm with excellent query performance on some classes of problems. It precomputes some auxiliary information (stored as a label) for each vertex, and its query performance depends only on the label size. While there are polynomial-time approximation algorithms to find labels of approximately optimal size, practical solutions use hierarchical hub labels (HHL), which are faster to compute but offer no guarantee on the label size. We improve the theoretical and practical performance of the HL approximation algorithms, enabling us to compute such labels for moderately large problems. Our comparison shows that HHL algorithms scale much better and find labels that usually are not much bigger than the theoretically justified HL labels.. ...
... chemistry Polymer theory Polymerchemie Polymertheorie experiments macromolecular chemistry morphology polymer practice theory ...
Mathematical Theory and Computational Practice. 5th Conference on Computability in Europe, CiE 2009, Heidelberg, Germany, July ... algebras algorithms combinatorial optimization complexity computability computable model theory computational complexity ...
Statistical Matching: Theory and Practice introduces the basics of statistical matching, before going on to offer a detailed, ... Statistical Matching: Theory and Practice presents a comprehensive exploration of an increasingly important area. Ideal for ... Statistical Matching: Theory and Practice introduces the basics of statistical matching, before going on to offer a detailed, ... Statistical Matching: Theory and Practice presents a comprehensive exploration of an increasingly important area. Ideal for ...
... One afternoon in the fall of 1995, John McDonough tells us in his new book, "Experiencing Politics ... No theory is perfect, McDonough says, but a little knowledge of Kuhn helps in situations like this--to shed light on those ... No one will agree with all the theories McDonough tries out in Experiencing Politics--indeed, as he admits, some of the ideas ... A practical politician comfortable in the realm of theory and ideas is an accident worth celebrating. ...
The theorists are now demonstrating that the dislocation of the worlds currency systems impedes international trading. But Federal Reserve Governor HARDING, speaking at Boston, called the attention of the theorists ...
... Many students at Warwick will go on to work in fields where they make complex, high-stakes ... Is an understanding of ethical theory necessary for, or even conducive to, good decision making? ...
Theory begets practice So I told him -- are you ready for this? -- I told him . . . hello? HELLO??? ... Yet another Stanford-alumni-rich team, she continued, was able to apply its comfort level with deep theory to a quite different ...
Genetic Programming Theory and Practice explores the emerging interaction between theory and practice in the cutting-edge, ... Genetic Programming Theory and Practice explores the emerging interaction between theory and practice in the cutting-edge, ... programming theorists and practitioners met to examine how GP theory informs practice and how GP practice impacts GP theory. ... Theory and Practice. … The balanced combination of theoretical issues and application issues, along with the many new and ...
Adult Learning Theory and Practice EDUC 768 The purpose of this course is to enable participants to develop and deepen their ... understanding of adult learning theories and how they are practiced in social contexts. ...
... Every chapter in the widely distributed first edition has been updated, and four new ...
The European Joint Conferences on Theory and Practice of Software (ETAPS) is a confederation of four computer science ... European Joint Conferences on Theory and Practice of Software. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia ... Retrieved from "https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=European_Joint_Conferences_on_Theory_and_Practice_of_Software&oldid= ... especially theories and methods for the analysis, integration, synthesis, transformation, and verification of programs and ...
Theory and Practice of Finite Elements. Authors: Ern, Alexandre, Guermond, Jean-Luc ... This book presents the mathematical theory of finite elements, starting from basic results on approximation theory and finite ... "A relative complete coverage of issues concerning finite element methodology based soundly on theory. … this is a self- ...
We have learnt that part of the reason the heart pumps blood around is to make sure that the body gets a fresh supply of oxygen. So in the same way that our hearts need to keep beating, we need to keep breathing oxygen into our lungs to survive. But what is the function of oxygen? Why does our body need oxygen, and what does it do with it once we have breathed it in? These are some of the questions that we will examine in first part of this section.. In the second part of this section, w ...
Graph Theory Lessons. The applets contain topics typically found in undergraduate graph theory and discrete structures classes ... Deleuzes Postscript on the Societies of Control - Liquid Theory TV - Episode 2. The second episode in the Liquid Theory TV ... Quotation Practice Using Quoteland.com as a Resource for Quotes. This exercise exposes the student to various ways of employing ... Basic of theory make decision in Air Traffic Control. in Ukrainian languege. Author(s): No creator set. ...
Theory and Practice. [Werner Mendling] -- Fungal infections in the female play an increasingly large role in everyday ... gynecological practice. This is the first book to deal comprehensively with vulvovaginal candidosis. Following an ... ... Vulvovaginal Candidosis : Theory and Practice. Author:. Werner Mendling. Publisher:. Berlin, Heidelberg : Springer Berlin ... Vulvovaginal Candidosis : Theory and Practice/Werner Mendling; Berlin, Heidelberg : Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 1988. ...
Home Programs & Courses Full-Time Massage Therapy - Compressed Massage Theory and Practice 1 ... It is developed to assist the student to acquire a conceptual framework for practice based upon a critical thinking model. ...
Theory and Practice, Volume 5 - 1st Edition. Print Book & E-Book. ISBN 9780444816238, 9780080539096 ...
To reinforce the theory underlying the concepts and techniques of sequence analysis and post-genomic bioinformatics. An ... The practical component will assess the students ability to apply theory in the a practical setting and will be assessed as an ... The examination will assess the students knowledge of the fundamental theories of genome and post genomic. analysis and is an ... This module provides an understanding of the basic theory behind bioinformatics analyses and experience in practically applying ...
Downloadable (with restrictions)! On the basis of the environmental tax literature, this article recommends a system of upstream taxes on fossil fuels, combined with refunds for downstream emissions capture, to reduce carbon and local pollution emissions. Motor fuel taxes should also account for congestion and other externalities associated with vehicle use, at least until mileage-based taxes are widely introduced. An examination of existing energy/environmental tax systems in Germany, Sweden, Turkey, and Vietnam suggests that there is substantial scope for policy reform. Policy options include harmonizing taxes for pollution content across different fuels and end users, better aligning tax rates with (albeit crude) values for externalities, and scaling back excise taxes on vehicle ownership and electricity use that are redundant (on environmental grounds) in the presence of more targeted taxes.
... and estimation theory. Scientists and engineers in a variety of fields will find The Art of Measurement: Theory and Practice an ... What we really need is an approach that places one foot in the theory and the other foot in the practice. There are abundant ... The Art of Measurement: Theory and Practice is the first book to bring together the practical tools of standard measurement ... In keeping with its practical approach, The Art of Measurement: Theory and Practice uses numerous case studies to give concrete ...
15 credits, Level 7 (Masters). Autumn teaching. In this module you will learn prototyping techinques incorporating traditional techniques, computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacture. It explores idea feasibility through drawing and paper prototyping, to 3D prototyping.. The module teaches how to carry feasible ideas forward into digital prototyping that may incorporate physical computing (Microcontrollers), software and/or 3D modelling in Solidworks, 3D construction (3D printing, CNC, laser cutting, etc.), emphasising the unique characteristics offered by each prototyping method.. It will develop an understanding of appropriate usage of prototypes of robots and mechatronic devices, and how to utillise prototypes to achieve goals from functionality to usability. ...
"U.S. Financial Transmission Rights: Theory and Practice," Staff General Research Papers Archive 12266, Iowa State University, ...
  • In keeping with its practical approach, The Art of Measurement: Theory and Practice uses numerous case studies to give concrete illustrations of theoretical concepts. (informit.com)
  • Rheology has long been treated as the theoretical foundation of polymer processing, and from this standpoint it is difficult to overesti- mate its importance in practice. (waterstones.com)
  • Although the book has been primarily designed to provide the theoretical background necessary for the optimal practice of open heart surgery, it also contains basic information on most surgical procedures for ischemic heart disease, acquired valvular disease, congenital heart disease, and various aspects of pre- and post-operative management. (powells.com)
  • Written by leading experts in the field, Understanding Medical Education provides a comprehensive resource of the theoretical and academic bases to modern medical education practice. (barnesandnoble.com)
  • Traditional approaches in philosophy of biology focus attention on biological concepts, explanations, and theories, on evidential support and inter-theoretical relations. (pitt.edu)
  • Newer approaches shift attention from concepts to conceptual practices, from theories to practices of theorizing, and from theoretical reduction to reductive retooling. (pitt.edu)
  • The second illustration suggests that analyzing how a multiplicity of alternative models function in practice provides an illuminating approach for understanding the nature of theoretical knowledge in evolutionary biology. (pitt.edu)
  • With Academician Kapitza, there are reasoned arguments, plausible alter- natives, humor and humane discipline, energy and patience, a skill for the practical, and transcendent clarity about what is at issue in theoretical practice as in engineering necessities. (booktopia.com.au)
  • In addition, clinical issues--both theoretical and applied--are highlighted throughout the book, making this an excellent choice for anyone working with neurogenic language disorders.Clark, Heather M. is the author of 'Neurogenic Disorders of Language Theory Driven Clinical Practice', published 2005 under ISBN 9781565937031 and ISBN 1565937031. (valorebooks.com)
  • His concept of habitus represents an important formulation of the principles of practice theory. (wikipedia.org)
  • Giddens developed the theory of structuration an analysis of agency and structure, in which primacy is granted to neither, to demonstrate 'how principles of order could both produce and be reproduced at the level of practice itself' and not through some 'ordering' society impinging upon individual actors from above. (wikipedia.org)
  • The programme secured its legacy with launch of its final report ' From Principles to Practice' and accompanying animation. (thersa.org)
  • It is for this reason that the general theory of first contact -- contact principles applicable to any interaction between any two extraterrestrial civilizations -- is of such monumental importance to xenologists. (bibliotecapleyades.net)
  • The book is organised into three sections - The first section presents the theory of health promotion including principles and models, factors influencing health as well as ill health and behavioural change. (platekompaniet.no)
  • When Johnson begins the assignment with helping students to remember the principals of physics and the principles of design, he is using the Structure of the Disciplines learning theory. (learner.org)
  • A continuation of the principles and practice of Iyengar Yoga, Part I. Practice and refinement of techniques of the four basic groups of postures (standing, forward bends, back bends and inverted poses). (ucr.edu)
  • In Green Chemistry: Theory and Practice , Paul T. Anastas and John C. Warner provide a concise and comprehensive answer: 'Green chemistry is the utilization of a set of principles that reduces or eliminates the use or generation of hazardous substances in the design, manufacture and application of chemical products. (abebooks.com)
  • The material contained in this contributed volume was developed from a workshop at the University of Michigan's Center for the Study of Complex Systems where an international group of genetic programming theorists and practitioners met to examine how GP theory informs practice and how GP practice impacts GP theory. (springer.com)
  • Theory guides and informs practice, and is most prevalent and influential in decision-making that's the result of critical thinking in care delivery. (lww.com)
  • The purpose of this course is to enable participants to develop and deepen their understanding of adult learning theories and how they are practiced in social contexts. (umass.edu)
  • In his polemic against the so-called True Socialists, he pointed out that theory, as an activity of particular people carried out in particular social contexts, does not develop by a process of 11 pure thought' but springs 'from the practical needs, the whole conditions of life of a particular class in particular countries. (libcom.org)
  • The discussion has been taking place mainly in Francophone, German, Scandinavian, and Anglophone theory and concerning case studies from these contexts. (uni-giessen.de)
  • In this article, I describe the shift from theory-focused to practice-centered philosophy of science and explain how it is leading philosophers to abandon fundamentalist assumptions associated with traditional approaches in philosophy of science and to embrace scientific pluralism. (pitt.edu)
  • Each illustration begins by describing how traditional theory-focused philosophical approaches are laden with fundamentalist assumptions and then proceeds to show that shifting attention to practice undermines these assumptions and motivates a philosophy of scientific pluralism. (pitt.edu)
  • His book, Outline of a Theory of Practice, which is based on his work in Algeria during the Algerian War of Independence is an example of Bourdieu's formulation of practice theory applied to empirical data gathered through ethnography. (wikipedia.org)
  • The book will no doubt inspire new and old researchers and practitioners to push further the frontiers of GP theory and practice for the benefit of the international society. (springer.com)
  • This book presents the mathematical theory of finite elements, starting from basic results on approximation theory and finite element interpolation and building up to more recent research topics, such as and Discontinuous Galerkin, subgrid viscosity stabilization, and a posteriori error estimation. (springer.com)
  • The Art of Measurement: Theory and Practice is the first book to bring together the practical tools of standard measurement with the philosophy and theory behind probability and statistical estimation. (informit.com)
  • The book's appendices offer a review of basic mathematical terminology and tools, but to get the most out of this book some higher-level math is required, in particular a familiarity with Fourier and Laplace transforms, matrix algebra, multi-dimensional vector spaces, probability theory, statistics, and estimation theory. (informit.com)
  • This book will be especially helpful to rehabilitation professionals and students who want to develop and improve their practice, or research, but might not know where to start. (routledge.com)
  • This book easily achieves its aim to encourage "rehabilitation practitioners to engage with theory and theorizing, to assist systematic reflection on what we do, to conceptualize, problematise and theorize as freely as possible, so that new thinking about rehabilitation emerges progressively and collectively" (p.10). (routledge.com)
  • But Eric, author of several previous books about the theory and practice of citizenship (including The Gardens of Democracy and A Chinaman's Chance ) and head of the Citizen University network, based in Seattle, has devoted his useful and enlightening new book to just this topic, in the age of Trump. (theatlantic.com)
  • The book will interest economists concerned with the likely impact of workers' participation as well as specialists in self-management theory and the operation of the Yugoslav economy. (cambridge.org)
  • Expertly balancing theory with practice, and complemented with an abundance of pedagogical tools, including test questions, examples, teaching suggestions, and chapter summaries, this book is a valuable, self-contained tool for professionals and an ideal introductory text for courses in software testing, quality assurance, and software engineering. (wiley.com)
  • Discussing how to put policy into practice, and with case studies throughout, this book combines research and practice in one broad-ranging volume. (cabi.org)
  • This book serves two purposes: first, it examines the theory behind "x-phi," including its underlying motivations and the objections that have been leveled against it. (broadviewpress.com)
  • This book is a one-stop shop to bring yourself up to speed on both the theory and practice of experimental philosophy. (broadviewpress.com)
  • Statistical Matching: Theory and Practice introduces the basics of statistical matching, before going on to offer a detailed, up-to-date overview of the methods used and an examination of their practical applications. (wiley.com)
  • FoSSaCS (International Conference on Foundations of Software Science and Computation Structures) is a conference that focuses on foundational research in software science, especially theories and methods for the analysis, integration, synthesis, transformation, and verification of programs and software systems. (wikipedia.org)
  • The practical component will assess the students ability to apply theory in the a practical setting and will be assessed as an essay and practical report, which are suitable methods for assessing the use of bioinformatics software. (ncl.ac.uk)
  • You'll establish good practice in design and illustration research methods. (ntu.ac.uk)
  • Advances in these areas have revolutionized design methods, codes of practice, and the teaching of structural engineers. (booktopia.com.au)
  • Classic parametric methods, like Pearson correlation coefficient, or least squares method produce comparable results only for comparable distribution types (in practice multivariate normal distribution is being assumed). (wikipedia.org)
  • Risk, Reliability and Safety contains papers describing innovations in theory and practice contributed to the scientific programme of the European Safety and Reliability conference (ESREL 2016), held at the University of Strathclyde in Glasgow, Scotland (25-29 September 2016). (routledge.com)
  • This important new work fills the pressing need for a user-friendly text that aims to provide software engineers, software quality professionals, software developers, and students with the fundamental developments in testing theory and common testing practices. (wiley.com)
  • It is developed to assist the student to acquire a conceptual framework for practice based upon a critical thinking model. (centennialcollege.ca)
  • The first illustration shows how shifting philosophical attention to conceptual practice reveals how molecular biologists succeed in identifying coherent causal strands within systems of bewildering complexity. (pitt.edu)
  • In practice, the underlying assumptions are often not checked, moreover they are always violated - there is no normal distribution in the real world, because every real variable is limited (for example people cannot be -170 cm or +2 km tall), and the normal distribution implies positive probability density for every real number. (wikipedia.org)
  • I thought you might be interested in this item at http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/851289361 Title: Vulvovaginal Candidosis : Theory and Practice Author: Werner Mendling Publisher: Berlin, Heidelberg : Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 1988. (worldcat.org)
  • The section on philosophy in action should be most useful as it is not easy to get such a clear exposition in relation to our practice. (routledge.com)
  • You learn that, regardless of differences in their theories, all other schools of philosophy reflect a definite relationship with Yoga. (ucr.edu)
  • The Theory and Practice of Experimental Philosophy represents a tremendously important accomplishment-the creation of a genuinely interdisciplinary "how to" manual, something of interest to philosophers and social scientists alike. (broadviewpress.com)
  • His works, Central Problems in Social Theory (1979) and The Constitution of Society (1984), brought him international fame on the sociological arena. (wikipedia.org)
  • Seen through the prism of 20th century literary theory, autofiction participates in the critical dialogue about authorship and identity and about the referentiality and truth value of autobiography. (uni-giessen.de)
  • Working alongside an extensive community of practice (including GP surgeries, schools, Foundation Trusts, care homes and numerous CCGs and local and combined authorities), the RSA's role has been to spread evidence of what works beyond the expert sphere of health professionals. (thersa.org)
  • Whether you are interested in personal health and well being or deepening your own practice, this program will give you a solid foundation on all aspects of yoga. (ucr.edu)
  • The science of aging and optimizing health continues to evolve as theories are revisited, challenged and reworked, or validated and expanded upon. (nutraceuticalsworld.com)
  • Their work paved the way for Denham Harman's free radical theory of aging, published in the Journal of Gerontology in 1956, which stated "aging and the degenerative diseases associated with it are attributed basically to the deleterious side attacks of free radicals on cell constituents and on the connected tissues. (nutraceuticalsworld.com)
  • The examination will assess the students knowledge of the fundamental theories of genome and post genomic analysis and is an appropriate technique for assessing this work. (ncl.ac.uk)
  • This project aims to design parallel algorithms for shared-memory machines that are efficient both in theory and also in practice. (mit.edu)
  • On the other hand, many parallel algorithms used in practice are not work-efficient and polylogarithmic-depth. (mit.edu)
  • The goal of this project is to bridge this gap by developing parallel algorithms for shared-memory machines that are efficient both in theory and also in practice, as this allows for good performance across all possible inputs, scalability across a wide range of core counts, and graceful scalability to larger data sets. (mit.edu)
  • This has created new possibilities and conditions in artistic practice: the author seems to navigate freely as an orchestrating authority, making at times conflicting claims to factuality and fictionality in the text itself, and in paratextual commentary or performance. (uni-giessen.de)
  • We then explained network theory, the basics of ethernet, looking at wireless and wired in separate modules, then network policies and procedures, safety practices, installing and configuring network equipment. (pluralsight.com)
  • Their interclade beginnings wanted from the delegates of the plans at the costs of the human and download anarchism from theory to serving few pages who demanded their benefits conserved with all plans of project. (polishnationalhome.com)