Nurse Practitioners: Nurses who are specially trained to assume an expanded role in providing medical care under the supervision of a physician.Nurses: Professionals qualified by graduation from an accredited school of nursing and by passage of a national licensing examination to practice nursing. They provide services to patients requiring assistance in recovering or maintaining their physical or mental health.Advanced Practice Nursing: Evidence-based nursing, midwifery and healthcare grounded in research and scholarship. Practitioners include nurse practitioners, clinical nurse specialists, nurse anesthetists, and nurse midwives.Nursing, Practical: The practice of nursing by licensed, non-registered persons qualified to provide routine care to the sick.Nurse-Patient Relations: Interaction between the patient and nurse.Family Practice: A medical specialty concerned with the provision of continuing, comprehensive primary health care for the entire family.Nurse's Role: The expected function of a member of the nursing profession.Nurse Clinicians: Registered nurses who hold Master's degrees in nursing with an emphasis in clinical nursing and who function independently in coordinating plans for patient care.Office Nursing: Nursing practice limited to an office setting.Nurse's Practice Patterns: Patterns of practice in nursing related to provision of services including diagnosis and treatment.Education, Nursing, Continuing: Educational programs designed to inform nurses of recent advances in their fields.Primary Health Care: Care which provides integrated, accessible health care services by clinicians who are accountable for addressing a large majority of personal health care needs, developing a sustained partnership with patients, and practicing in the context of family and community. (JAMA 1995;273(3):192)Attitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.Primary Nursing: The primary responsibility of one nurse for the planning, evaluation, and care of a patient throughout the course of illness, convalescence, and recovery.Health Status: The level of health of the individual, group, or population as subjectively assessed by the individual or by more objective measures.General Practice: Patient-based medical care provided across age and gender or specialty boundaries.Delivery of Health Care: The concept concerned with all aspects of providing and distributing health services to a patient population.Public Health: Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.Health Promotion: Encouraging consumer behaviors most likely to optimize health potentials (physical and psychosocial) through health information, preventive programs, and access to medical care.EnglandPrimary Care Nursing: Techniques or methods of patient care used by nurses as primary careproviders.Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).Models, Nursing: Theoretical models simulating behavior or activities in nursing, including nursing care, management and economics, theory, assessment, research, and education. Some examples of these models include Orem Self-Care Model, Roy Adaptation Model, and Rogers Life Process Model.Nursing Staff: Personnel who provide nursing service to patients in an organized facility, institution, or agency.Nursing Care: Care given to patients by nursing service personnel.Physician's Practice Patterns: Patterns of practice related to diagnosis and treatment as especially influenced by cost of the service requested and provided.Health Care Surveys: Statistical measures of utilization and other aspects of the provision of health care services including hospitalization and ambulatory care.Physician-Nurse Relations: The reciprocal interaction of physicians and nurses.Great BritainProfessional Practice: The use of one's knowledge in a particular profession. It includes, in the case of the field of biomedicine, professional activities related to health care and the actual performance of the duties related to the provision of health care.Attitude to Health: Public attitudes toward health, disease, and the medical care system.Health Policy: Decisions, usually developed by government policymakers, for determining present and future objectives pertaining to the health care system.Quality of Health Care: The levels of excellence which characterize the health service or health care provided based on accepted standards of quality.Physicians, Family: Those physicians who have completed the education requirements specified by the American Academy of Family Physicians.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Health Care Reform: Innovation and improvement of the health care system by reappraisal, amendment of services, and removal of faults and abuses in providing and distributing health services to patients. It includes a re-alignment of health services and health insurance to maximum demographic elements (the unemployed, indigent, uninsured, elderly, inner cities, rural areas) with reference to coverage, hospitalization, pricing and cost containment, insurers' and employers' costs, pre-existing medical conditions, prescribed drugs, equipment, and services.Practice Guidelines as Topic: Directions or principles presenting current or future rules of policy for assisting health care practitioners in patient care decisions regarding diagnosis, therapy, or related clinical circumstances. The guidelines may be developed by government agencies at any level, institutions, professional societies, governing boards, or by the convening of expert panels. The guidelines form a basis for the evaluation of all aspects of health care and delivery.Health Services Accessibility: The degree to which individuals are inhibited or facilitated in their ability to gain entry to and to receive care and services from the health care system. Factors influencing this ability include geographic, architectural, transportational, and financial considerations, among others.Community Health Nursing: General and comprehensive nursing practice directed to individuals, families, or groups as it relates to and contributes to the health of a population or community. This is not an official program of a Public Health Department.Mental Health: The state wherein the person is well adjusted.Education, Nursing: Use for general articles concerning nursing education.Nursing Evaluation Research: Research carried out by nurses that uses interviews, data collection, observation, surveys, etc., to evaluate nursing, health, clinical, and nursing education programs and curricula, and which also demonstrates the value of such evaluation.Health Behavior: Behaviors expressed by individuals to protect, maintain or promote their health status. For example, proper diet, and appropriate exercise are activities perceived to influence health status. Life style is closely associated with health behavior and factors influencing life style are socioeconomic, educational, and cultural.Nursing Staff, Hospital: Personnel who provide nursing service to patients in a hospital.Patient Care Team: Care of patients by a multidisciplinary team usually organized under the leadership of a physician; each member of the team has specific responsibilities and the whole team contributes to the care of the patient.Health: The state of the organism when it functions optimally without evidence of disease.Clinical Competence: The capability to perform acceptably those duties directly related to patient care.Health Personnel: Men and women working in the provision of health services, whether as individual practitioners or employees of health institutions and programs, whether or not professionally trained, and whether or not subject to public regulation. (From A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, 1976)Patient Acceptance of Health Care: The seeking and acceptance by patients of health service.Outcome Assessment (Health Care): Research aimed at assessing the quality and effectiveness of health care as measured by the attainment of a specified end result or outcome. Measures include parameters such as improved health, lowered morbidity or mortality, and improvement of abnormal states (such as elevated blood pressure).Health Planning: Planning for needed health and/or welfare services and facilities.Health Services Research: The integration of epidemiologic, sociological, economic, and other analytic sciences in the study of health services. Health services research is usually concerned with relationships between need, demand, supply, use, and outcome of health services. The aim of the research is evaluation, particularly in terms of structure, process, output, and outcome. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Qualitative Research: Any type of research that employs nonnumeric information to explore individual or group characteristics, producing findings not arrived at by statistical procedures or other quantitative means. (Qualitative Inquiry: A Dictionary of Terms Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 1997)Referral and Consultation: The practice of sending a patient to another program or practitioner for services or advice which the referring source is not prepared to provide.Health Services Needs and Demand: Health services required by a population or community as well as the health services that the population or community is able and willing to pay for.Health Services: Services for the diagnosis and treatment of disease and the maintenance of health.Health Education: Education that increases the awareness and favorably influences the attitudes and knowledge relating to the improvement of health on a personal or community basis.World Health: The concept pertaining to the health status of inhabitants of the world.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Insurance, Health: Insurance providing coverage of medical, surgical, or hospital care in general or for which there is no specific heading.Nurse Administrators: Nurses professionally qualified in administration.Clinical Nursing Research: Research carried out by nurses in the clinical setting and designed to provide information that will help improve patient care. Other professional staff may also participate in the research.Counseling: The giving of advice and assistance to individuals with educational or personal problems.Nursing Process: The sum total of nursing activities which includes assessment (identifying needs), intervention (ministering to needs), and evaluation (validating the effectiveness of the help given).Workload: The total amount of work to be performed by an individual, a department, or other group of workers in a period of time.Public Health Nursing: A nursing specialty concerned with promoting and protecting the health of populations, using knowledge from nursing, social, and public health sciences to develop local, regional, state, and national health policy and research. It is population-focused and community-oriented, aimed at health promotion and disease prevention through educational, diagnostic, and preventive programs.State Medicine: A system of medical care regulated, controlled and financed by the government, in which the government assumes responsibility for the health needs of the population.Oral Health: The optimal state of the mouth and normal functioning of the organs of the mouth without evidence of disease.Occupational Health: The promotion and maintenance of physical and mental health in the work environment.Australia: The smallest continent and an independent country, comprising six states and two territories. Its capital is Canberra.Public Health Practice: The activities and endeavors of the public health services in a community on any level.Patient Education as Topic: The teaching or training of patients concerning their own health needs.Public Health Administration: Management of public health organizations or agencies.Health Expenditures: The amounts spent by individuals, groups, nations, or private or public organizations for total health care and/or its various components. These amounts may or may not be equivalent to the actual costs (HEALTH CARE COSTS) and may or may not be shared among the patient, insurers, and/or employers.Patient Satisfaction: The degree to which the individual regards the health care service or product or the manner in which it is delivered by the provider as useful, effective, or beneficial.General Practitioners: Physicians whose practice is not restricted to a specific field of MEDICINE.Rural Health Services: Health services, public or private, in rural areas. The services include the promotion of health and the delivery of health care.WalesOncology Nursing: A nursing specialty concerned with the care provided to cancer patients. It includes aspects of family functioning through education of both patient and family.Practice Management, Medical: The organization and operation of the business aspects of a physician's practice.Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care): Evaluation procedures that focus on both the outcome or status (OUTCOMES ASSESSMENT) of the patient at the end of an episode of care - presence of symptoms, level of activity, and mortality; and the process (ASSESSMENT, PROCESS) - what is done for the patient diagnostically and therapeutically.Netherlands: Country located in EUROPE. It is bordered by the NORTH SEA, BELGIUM, and GERMANY. Constituent areas are Aruba, Curacao, Sint Maarten, formerly included in the NETHERLANDS ANTILLES.Environmental Health: The science of controlling or modifying those conditions, influences, or forces surrounding man which relate to promoting, establishing, and maintaining health.Self Care: Performance of activities or tasks traditionally performed by professional health care providers. The concept includes care of oneself or one's family and friends.National Health Programs: Components of a national health care system which administer specific services, e.g., national health insurance.Interprofessional Relations: The reciprocal interaction of two or more professional individuals.Health Status Disparities: Variation in rates of disease occurrence and disabilities between population groups defined by socioeconomic characteristics such as age, ethnicity, economic resources, or gender and populations identified geographically or similar measures.Program Evaluation: Studies designed to assess the efficacy of programs. They may include the evaluation of cost-effectiveness, the extent to which objectives are met, or impact.Community Health Services: Diagnostic, therapeutic and preventive health services provided for individuals in the community.Rural Health: The status of health in rural populations.Health Care Rationing: Planning for the equitable allocation, apportionment, or distribution of available health resources.Cerumen: The yellow or brown waxy secretions produced by vestigial apocrine sweat glands in the external ear canal.Private Practice: Practice of a health profession by an individual, offering services on a person-to-person basis, as opposed to group or partnership practice.Mental Health Services: Organized services to provide mental health care.Quality Assurance, Health Care: Activities and programs intended to assure or improve the quality of care in either a defined medical setting or a program. The concept includes the assessment or evaluation of the quality of care; identification of problems or shortcomings in the delivery of care; designing activities to overcome these deficiencies; and follow-up monitoring to ensure effectiveness of corrective steps.Communication: The exchange or transmission of ideas, attitudes, or beliefs between individuals or groups.Health Priorities: Preferentially rated health-related activities or functions to be used in establishing health planning goals. This may refer specifically to PL93-641.Delivery of Health Care, Integrated: A health care system which combines physicians, hospitals, and other medical services with a health plan to provide the complete spectrum of medical care for its customers. In a fully integrated system, the three key elements - physicians, hospital, and health plan membership - are in balance in terms of matching medical resources with the needs of purchasers and patients. (Coddington et al., Integrated Health Care: Reorganizing the Physician, Hospital and Health Plan Relationship, 1994, p7)Women's Health: The concept covering the physical and mental conditions of women.Pilot Projects: Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.Guideline Adherence: Conformity in fulfilling or following official, recognized, or institutional requirements, guidelines, recommendations, protocols, pathways, or other standards.Health Care Sector: Economic sector concerned with the provision, distribution, and consumption of health care services and related products.Child Health Services: Organized services to provide health care for children.Urban Health: The status of health in urban populations.Case Management: A traditional term for all the activities which a physician or other health care professional normally performs to insure the coordination of the medical services required by a patient. It also, when used in connection with managed care, covers all the activities of evaluating the patient, planning treatment, referral, and follow-up so that care is continuous and comprehensive and payment for the care is obtained. (From Slee & Slee, Health Care Terms, 2nd ed)Mass Screening: Organized periodic procedures performed on large groups of people for the purpose of detecting disease.Physician-Patient Relations: The interactions between physician and patient.Risk Management: The process of minimizing risk to an organization by developing systems to identify and analyze potential hazards to prevent accidents, injuries, and other adverse occurrences, and by attempting to handle events and incidents which do occur in such a manner that their effect and cost are minimized. Effective risk management has its greatest benefits in application to insurance in order to avert or minimize financial liability. (From Slee & Slee: Health care terms, 2d ed)LondonPhysician's Role: The expected function of a member of the medical profession.World Health Organization: A specialized agency of the United Nations designed as a coordinating authority on international health work; its aim is to promote the attainment of the highest possible level of health by all peoples.Continuity of Patient Care: Health care provided on a continuing basis from the initial contact, following the patient through all phases of medical care.Health Facilities: Institutions which provide medical or health-related services.Nursing Assessment: Evaluation of the nature and extent of nursing problems presented by a patient for the purpose of patient care planning.Health Literacy: Degree to which individuals have the capacity to obtain, process, and understand basic health information and services needed to make appropriate health decisions.IrelandSocioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Health Manpower: The availability of HEALTH PERSONNEL. It includes the demand and recruitment of both professional and allied health personnel, their present and future supply and distribution, and their assignment and utilization.Professional-Patient Relations: Interactions between health personnel and patients.Community Health Planning: Planning that has the goals of improving health, improving accessibility to health services, and promoting efficiency in the provision of services and resources on a comprehensive basis for a whole community. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988, p299)Community Health Centers: Facilities which administer the delivery of health care services to people living in a community or neighborhood.Quality of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.Cost-Benefit Analysis: A method of comparing the cost of a program with its expected benefits in dollars (or other currency). The benefit-to-cost ratio is a measure of total return expected per unit of money spent. This analysis generally excludes consideration of factors that are not measured ultimately in economic terms. Cost effectiveness compares alternative ways to achieve a specific set of results.Evidence-Based Practice: A way of providing health care that is guided by a thoughtful integration of the best available scientific knowledge with clinical expertise. This approach allows the practitioner to critically assess research data, clinical guidelines, and other information resources in order to correctly identify the clinical problem, apply the most high-quality intervention, and re-evaluate the outcome for future improvement.Professional Competence: The capability to perform the duties of one's profession generally, or to perform a particular professional task, with skill of an acceptable quality.Regional Health Planning: Planning for health resources at a regional or multi-state level.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Physicians: Individuals licensed to practice medicine.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Preventive Health Services: Services designed for HEALTH PROMOTION and prevention of disease.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Feasibility Studies: Studies to determine the advantages or disadvantages, practicability, or capability of accomplishing a projected plan, study, or project.Health Resources: Available manpower, facilities, revenue, equipment, and supplies to produce requisite health care and services.ScotlandTelephone: An instrument for reproducing sounds especially articulate speech at a distance. (Webster, 3rd ed)Electronic Health Records: Media that facilitate transportability of pertinent information concerning patient's illness across varied providers and geographic locations. Some versions include direct linkages to online consumer health information that is relevant to the health conditions and treatments related to a specific patient.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Specialties, Nursing: Various branches of nursing practice limited to specialized areas.Time and Motion Studies: The observation and analysis of movements in a task with an emphasis on the amount of time required to perform the task.Evidence-Based Medicine: An approach of practicing medicine with the goal to improve and evaluate patient care. It requires the judicious integration of best research evidence with the patient's values to make decisions about medical care. This method is to help physicians make proper diagnosis, devise best testing plan, choose best treatment and methods of disease prevention, as well as develop guidelines for large groups of patients with the same disease. (from JAMA 296 (9), 2006)Quality Indicators, Health Care: Norms, criteria, standards, and other direct qualitative and quantitative measures used in determining the quality of health care.Practice (Psychology): Performance of an act one or more times, with a view to its fixation or improvement; any performance of an act or behavior that leads to learning.Maternal Health Services: Organized services to provide health care to expectant and nursing mothers.Personnel Staffing and Scheduling: The selection, appointing, and scheduling of personnel.Life Style: Typical way of life or manner of living characteristic of an individual or group. (From APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)Smoking Cessation: Discontinuation of the habit of smoking, the inhaling and exhaling of tobacco smoke.Health Occupations: Professions or other business activities directed to the cure and prevention of disease. For occupations of medical personnel who are not physicians but who are working in the fields of medical technology, physical therapy, etc., ALLIED HEALTH OCCUPATIONS is available.Allied Health Personnel: Health care workers specially trained and licensed to assist and support the work of health professionals. Often used synonymously with paramedical personnel, the term generally refers to all health care workers who perform tasks which must otherwise be performed by a physician or other health professional.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Health Plan Implementation: Those actions designed to carry out recommendations pertaining to health plans or programs.Medical History Taking: Acquiring information from a patient on past medical conditions and treatments.Urban Health Services: Health services, public or private, in urban areas. The services include the promotion of health and the delivery of health care.Cooperative Behavior: The interaction of two or more persons or organizations directed toward a common goal which is mutually beneficial. An act or instance of working or acting together for a common purpose or benefit, i.e., joint action. (From Random House Dictionary Unabridged, 2d ed)Emergency Nursing: The specialty or practice of nursing in the care of patients admitted to the emergency department.Diabetes Mellitus: A heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by HYPERGLYCEMIA and GLUCOSE INTOLERANCE.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Focus Groups: A method of data collection and a QUALITATIVE RESEARCH tool in which a small group of individuals are brought together and allowed to interact in a discussion of their opinions about topics, issues, or questions.Health Services for the Aged: Services for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases in the aged and the maintenance of health in the elderly.United StatesOccupational Health Services: Health services for employees, usually provided by the employer at the place of work.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Reproductive Health: The physical condition of human reproductive systems.Job Satisfaction: Personal satisfaction relative to the work situation.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Evidence-Based Nursing: A way of providing nursing care that is guided by the integration of the best available scientific knowledge with nursing expertise. This approach requires nurses to critically assess relevant scientific data or research evidence, and to implement high-quality interventions for their nursing practice.Patient Compliance: Voluntary cooperation of the patient in following a prescribed regimen.Professional Practice Location: Geographic area in which a professional person practices; includes primarily physicians and dentists.Catchment Area (Health): A geographic area defined and served by a health program or institution.Health Benefit Plans, Employee: Health insurance plans for employees, and generally including their dependents, usually on a cost-sharing basis with the employer paying a percentage of the premium.Psychiatric Nursing: A specialty concerned with the application of psychiatric principles in caring for the mentally ill. It also includes the nursing care provided the mentally ill patient.Needs Assessment: Systematic identification of a population's needs or the assessment of individuals to determine the proper level of services needed.Mental Disorders: Psychiatric illness or diseases manifested by breakdowns in the adaptational process expressed primarily as abnormalities of thought, feeling, and behavior producing either distress or impairment of function.Rural Population: The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Comprehensive Health Care: Providing for the full range of personal health services for diagnosis, treatment, follow-up and rehabilitation of patients.Ontario: A province of Canada lying between the provinces of Manitoba and Quebec. Its capital is Toronto. It takes its name from Lake Ontario which is said to represent the Iroquois oniatariio, beautiful lake. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p892 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p391)Health Services Administration: The organization and administration of health services dedicated to the delivery of health care.Occupational Health Nursing: The practice of nursing in the work environment.Nursing Methodology Research: Research carried out by nurses concerning techniques and methods to implement projects and to document information, including methods of interviewing patients, collecting data, and forming inferences. The concept includes exploration of methodological issues such as human subjectivity and human experience.Cardiovascular Diseases: Pathological conditions involving the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM including the HEART; the BLOOD VESSELS; or the PERICARDIUM.Health Maintenance Organizations: Organized systems for providing comprehensive prepaid health care that have five basic attributes: (1) provide care in a defined geographic area; (2) provide or ensure delivery of an agreed-upon set of basic and supplemental health maintenance and treatment services; (3) provide care to a voluntarily enrolled group of persons; (4) require their enrollees to use the services of designated providers; and (5) receive reimbursement through a predetermined, fixed, periodic prepayment made by the enrollee without regard to the degree of services provided. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988)Practice Management: Business management of medical, dental and veterinary practices that may include capital financing, utilization management, and arrangement of capitation agreements with other parties.Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2: A subclass of DIABETES MELLITUS that is not INSULIN-responsive or dependent (NIDDM). It is characterized initially by INSULIN RESISTANCE and HYPERINSULINEMIA; and eventually by GLUCOSE INTOLERANCE; HYPERGLYCEMIA; and overt diabetes. Type II diabetes mellitus is no longer considered a disease exclusively found in adults. Patients seldom develop KETOSIS but often exhibit OBESITY.Community Mental Health Services: Diagnostic, therapeutic and preventive mental health services provided for individuals in the community.Students, Nursing: Individuals enrolled in a school of nursing or a formal educational program leading to a degree in nursing.Public Health Informatics: The systematic application of information and computer sciences to public health practice, research, and learning.Professional Autonomy: The quality or state of being independent and self-directing, especially in making decisions, enabling professionals to exercise judgment as they see fit during the performance of their jobs.Diffusion of Innovation: The broad dissemination of new ideas, procedures, techniques, materials, and devices and the degree to which these are accepted and used.Asthma: A form of bronchial disorder with three distinct components: airway hyper-responsiveness (RESPIRATORY HYPERSENSITIVITY), airway INFLAMMATION, and intermittent AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION. It is characterized by spasmodic contraction of airway smooth muscle, WHEEZING, and dyspnea (DYSPNEA, PAROXYSMAL).Women's Health Services: Organized services to provide health care to women. It excludes maternal care services for which MATERNAL HEALTH SERVICES is available.Poverty: A situation in which the level of living of an individual, family, or group is below the standard of the community. It is often related to a specific income level.Health Planning Guidelines: Recommendations for directing health planning functions and policies. These may be mandated by PL93-641 and issued by the Department of Health and Human Services for use by state and local planning agencies.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Nursing Audit: A detailed review and evaluation of selected clinical records by qualified professional personnel for evaluating quality of nursing care.Decision Making: The process of making a selective intellectual judgment when presented with several complex alternatives consisting of several variables, and usually defining a course of action or an idea.Politics: Activities concerned with governmental policies, functions, etc.Population Surveillance: Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.State Health Plans: State plans prepared by the State Health Planning and Development Agencies which are made up from plans submitted by the Health Systems Agencies and subject to review and revision by the Statewide Health Coordinating Council.
A Model for Transforming Practice.' Journal: Critical Care Nurse http://ccn.aacnjournals.org/content/27/1/66.full 2016 Nursing ... But our primary relationship has been and must always be with the patient." The Practice of Primary Nursing was first published ... Clinical Nursing Practices E-Book: Guidelines for Evidence-Based Practice.' "Creative Health Care Management". "Creative Health ... Minneapolis, MN: Creative Health Care Management. 'Relationship Based Care: A Model for Transforming Practice.' Nursing ...
... expand nursing practice to improve access to primary health care in medically underserved communities, and support efforts to ... nurse midwives, nurse anesthetists, nurse educators, nurse administrators or public health nurses. To increase nursing ... of the United States Department of Health and Human Services. HRSA programs train health care professionals and place them ... and other negative actions taken against health care practitioners and entities. The Healthcare Integrity and Protection Data ...
... thus reducing their overall health care costs. In Guided Care, a registered nurse based in a primary care office works closely ... Guided Care is provided by physician-nurse teams in primary care practices to the physicians' most complex patients, mainly ... Geriatric Nursing, 2009 Gerard Anderson, "Chronic Conditions," Expert Voices, National Institute for Health Care Management ... for high-risk patients with complex health care needs; a health care practice that provides comprehensive, coordinated and ...
Primary care is obtained from the health care centers employing general practitioners and nurses that provide most day-to-day ... This can partly be explained by the importance placed on the use of nurses, who greatly reduce the need for practicing ... He has also contributed to the development of nursing education, pharmacy industry and public awareness over health issues. ... Primary health services provided by municipalities are defined in the Primary Health Care Act. Secondary care is provided by ...
... the primary goal of the CNS is continuous improvement of patient outcomes and nursing care. Key elements of CNS practice are to ... CNSs practice in a variety of non-acute care settings. In the Australian Health System, however, a clinical nurse specialist ... For the journal, see Clinical Nurse Specialist (journal).. A clinical nurse specialist (CNS) is an advanced practice nurse who ... According to the International Council of Nurses (ICN), an Advanced Practice Nurse is a registered nurse who has acquired the ...
... is not certified to practice medicine or nursing, but has the primary task of gathering information on the health status of a ... Community health agent (agente comunitário de saúde or ACS, in Portuguese language) is the title of a specific lay health care ... Every agent is supervised by a doctor or nurse of the health clinic, and home visits are conducted in the coverage area of a ... Programa de Saúde da Família-health community workers can be found in two different situations in relation to the health care ...
"Nurse Practitioners," "independently licensed providers," "primary-care providers," "health-care professionals," and " ... in reference to the legal and professional paradigm that nursing practice is considered separate and independent of other ... Advanced Practice Provider (APP) is the term for Nurse Practitioners, Nurse Anesthetists, Physician Assistants, Clinical Nurse ... Mid-level practitioners, also called assistant practice clinicians, are health care providers who have received different ...
The chief nurse is a registered nurse who supervises the care of all the patients at a health care facility. The chief nurse is ... common for registered nurses to seek additional education to earn a Master of Science in Nursing or Doctor of Nursing Practice ... They have primary responsibilities for staffing, budgeting, and day-to-day operations of the unit. The charge nurse is the ... critical care services, etc.). The nurse manager is the nurse with management responsibilities of a nursing unit. They ...
The Nurse Practitioner: The American Journal of Primary Health Care AANP Standards for NP practice in retail based clinics CNS ... of Nurse Practitioners List of nursing credentials Clinical nurse specialist Nurse anesthetist Nurse midwife Nursing portal " ... "collaborative practice" agreements and providing for the independent practice of nurse practitioners in areas of primary care. ... The advanced practice nursing role began to take shape in the mid-20th century United States. Nurse anesthetists and nurse ...
... expand nursing practice to improve access to primary health care in medically underserved communities, and support efforts to ... nurse midwives, nurse anesthetists, nurse educators, nurse administrators or public health nurses. To increase nursing ... for primary care medical, dental, and mental and behavioral health clinicians; for primary care medical and dental providers-in ... pediatricians and primary care providers. Main article: Area Health Education Centers Program HRSA supports a network of more ...
... nursing Manthey, Marie (2002). The Practice of Primary Nursing. Minneapolis, MN: Creative Health Care Management. p. 1. ISBN ... Originated in 1969 by staff nurses at the University of Minnesota, Primary Nursing is a system of nursing care delivery which ... This is distinguished from the practice of team nursing, functional nursing, or total patient care, in that primary nursing ... From The Practice of Primary Nursing, "Primary Nursing is a delivery system for nursing at the station level that facilitates ...
Geriatric Emergency Nursing Education (GENE) Mobile Intensive Care Nurse (MICN) National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale ... Their primary function is to assess, diagnose and treat a patient in the home in an emergency setting. An advanced practice ... emergency nurses increasingly care for people who are unwilling or unable to get primary medical care elsewhere and come to ... to Advanced Practice Nursing: A Glimpse Into the History of Emergency Nursing". Advanced emergency nursing journal. 28 (3): 198 ...
These advance practice nurses are active in a variety of settings across the continuum including primary, acute, post-acute and ... and they provide care services depending on health conditions. Skilled nursing, otherwise known as a nursing home, is a place ... A generalist is a registered nurse or Licensed Practical Nurse. A gerontological nurse specialist is an advanced practice nurse ... "Post-basic nursing practice". Retrieved 8 July 2014. Conestoga College. "Enhance nursing practice - gerontology and chronic ...
Kenya Registered Community Health Nurse [Post Basic] Kenya Registered Anaesthetic Nurse Kenya Registered Critical Care Nurse ... care learning institutions continue to recognise the need to build capacity to facilitate health care management and practice ... The first nurses were primarily male and were known as "dressers." Their primary responsibilities included dressing wounds, ... Kenya Registered Nurse Kenya Registered Nurse Midwife Bachelor of Science in Nursing Kenya Enrolled Community Health Nurse [ ...
The magazine is published by Cogora, previously Campden Health, and is available to all primary care nurses on request. The ... Nursing in Practice is a bimonthly British print magazine and website aimed at nurses working in primary care. It provides news ... Cogora publishes Nursing in Practice Cogora is the new name for Campden Health Press Association - Nurse negligence claims more ... In December 2011, Nursing in Practice broke the story that legal costs for negligence cases against nurses have trebled in the ...
Emergency Nursing Intensive Care Nursing Mental Health Nursing Nurse Practitioner Primary Health Care Nursing The School has ... Critical and Trauma Care Mental Health Health Care Practice "QS World Rankings 2016". Retrieved 22 March 2016. "Become a nurse ... Sydney Nursing School offer three entry-to-practice pathways to becoming a registered nurse in Australia: Bachelor of Nursing ( ... Advanced Nursing Practice Cancer and Haematology Nursing Clinical Trials Practice (Graduate Certificate only) ...
... to nurses who have given exceptional service to patients through nursing practice in any aspect of primary health care. The QNI ... Wales and Northern Ireland on health care policy including primary care, public health, nursing education, regulation and skill ... The number of health care assistants - trained to do specific tasks - had more than doubled As a result, The Queen's Nursing ... Subject guide for Nursing, Midwifery and Health Visiting from the Wellcome Library Nurse First official website National ...
Advanced practice registered nurse Pediatrician "Nurse Practitioner Primary Care Competencies in Specialty Areas" (PDF). US ... the care of children from birth through young adult with an in-depth knowledge and experience in pediatric primary health care ... To align with the Consensus Model for APRN Regulation developed by the National Council of State Boards of Nursing, PNPs are ... A pediatric nurse practitioner (PNP) is a nurse practitioner that specializes in care to newborns, infants, toddlers, pre- ...
Advanced practice registered nurse Family medicine "Nurse Practitioner Primary Care Competencies in Specialty Areas" (PDF). US ... Primary care emphasises the holistic nature of health and it is based on knowledge of the patient in the context of the family ... Board certification must be maintained by obtaining continuing nursing education credits. In the US, board certification is ... A family nurse practitioner (FNP) provides continuing and comprehensive healthcare for the individual and family across all ...
All registered nurses and health care professionals should be taught to read and critically interpret research and know where ... Nursing portal Evidence-based practice Melnyk, B.M. (2011). Evidence-based practice in nursing & healthcare: A guide to best ... Many responded, "lack of time during their shift is the primary challenge to researching and applying EBP." There is always and ... Evidence-based practice in nursing & healthcare: A guide to best practice (3rd ed.). Philadelphia, PA: Wolters Kluwer Health. p ...
Adult Nurse Practitioner, Adult-gerontology nurse practitioner (acute or primary care), Adult Psychiatric- Mental Health Nurse ... acute or primary care), and School Nurse Practitioner. Specific practice guidelines can vary by state and area of practice. In ... In addition, nurses can be found in the military, in industry, nursing education, and do health care research. Nurses in these ... and lead health care organizations. "Nursing Fact Sheet," 2014 "Registered Nurses", 2014 "Nursing Fact Sheet," 2014 Ebel, n.d. ...
... in 2003 Clark was responsible for the development of a program of research in community health nursing and primary health care ... project to develop an International Classification of Nursing Practice (ICNP). She is deputy president of the Welsh Nursing ... in particular in primary health care. In 1990, she left the NHS and went into higher education as Professor of Nursing to start ... She worked as a health visitor, and remained in community nursing as a manager, professor, and political advocate for nearly 40 ...
Nurse Practitioner Women's Health Care Nurse Practitioner ADN to MSN Bridge Post Masters Certificate Doctor of Nursing Practice ... ethical and compassionate nurse-midwives and nurse practitioners who will provide primary care for women and families residing ... In 2005, the Community-Based Women's Health Care Nurse Practitioner option was added. In 2011, Frontier School of Midwifery and ... Frontier Nursing University academic offerings include: Master of Science in Nursing Nurse-Midwifery Family ...
... patient education has been shown to be effective when approached from all angles by the healthcare team (nurse, primary care ... Provide accurate, competent, and evidence-based care. Practice preventative health care. Focus on relationship-centered care ... Compliance (medicine) Green prescription Managed care Medical writing Orem model of nursing "iv. Patient Education and ... Health education is also a tool used by managed care plans, and may include both general preventive education or health ...
This accreditation contributes to health care quality and professional nursing practice by defining standards for the ... Primary Accreditation Established in 1974, Primary Accreditation recognizes organizations (or components of organizations) that ... Ambulatory care nursing Cardiac vascular nursing Gerontological nursing Informatics nursing Medical-surgical nursing Nurse ... Nurse Specialist Pediatric Clinical Nurse Specialist Advanced Practice Adult Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing Nurse ...
PubMed Health. Cologne: Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care. July 2016. Archived from the original on 6 ... Morelli V, Calmet E, Jhingade V (June 2010). "Alternative therapies for common dermatologic disorders, part 2". Primary Care ( ... White DS (1917). A Text-book of the Principles and Practice of Veterinary Medicine. Lea & Febiger. p. 258.. ... Well D (October 2013). "Acne vulgaris: A review of causes and treatment options". The Nurse Practitioner (Review). 38 (10): 22- ...
The Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner program is designed with a simple 2-day schedule to lead to an advanced ... primary care, community and home health nursing, hospital nursing, long-term care nursing and new independent roles in managed ... Designed for the graduate nursing student preparing for family nurse practitioner practice, or the community health nursing ... Designed for the graduate nursing student preparing for family nurse practitioner practice, or the community health nursing ...
The American Journal of Primary Healthcare. Dr. Newland maintains a practice as a certified Family Nurse Practitioner. ... Child and Adolescent Behavioral Health: A Resource for Advanced Practice Psychiatric and Primary Care Practitioners in Nursing ... Child and Adolescent Behavioral Health: A Resource for Advanced Practice Psychiatric and Primary Care Practitioners in Nursing ... Yearwood is ANCC certified as a Clinical Nurse Specialist in Child/Adolescent Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing and is a member ...
... chair of Hampshire Primary Care Trust.. When it opens next year, the £30m Aldershot Centre for Health will provide primary ... Nurse training places in Wales will increase by 10% in 2018. 08 Dec 2017 ... recovering personnel and a multidoctor primary healthcare practice of its own. Malcolm Young, chief executive of Wilky, the ... The largest primary healthcare centre in Britain - and probably Europe - took another step towards completion when it was ...
23 National Rural Health Alliance Inc. Advanced nursing practice in rural and remotes areas. Position paper. 2005. [acesso 24 ... Skill mix and professional roles in primary care. In: What is the future for a primary care-led NHS? National Primary Care ... Key words Primary healthcare; Human Resource in Health; Professional practice; Health workforce ... as nurses performing certain medical procedures; the expansion of primary care health professionals scope of practice, as ...
Nurse, this course will equip you with all the core skills required for the role. It is aligned to the HEE Career Framework for ... If you are new in post as a General Practice (GP) ... Fundamentals of Primary Care Nursing (General Practice Nursing ... This module builds on the foundation provided by the Primary Care Nursing Core and Professional Practice modules. The module is ... alongside online activities and supervised practice with a General Practice Nurse mentor. All General Practice Nurse skills are ...
Foundations of General Practice Nursing Workshops. This workshop provides practical, comprehensive CPD for new and ... 2016 Nurses , the heart of primary health care. Melbourne played host to Nurses , the heart of primary health care APNAs 2016 ... Copyright 2017 Australian Primary Health Care Nurses Association (APNA). All rights reserved. MRM by AMS. ... and what a special time it was for nurses working in primary health care to connect with each other and learn about the issues ...
... is the peak professional body for nurses working in primary health care. ... Foundations of General Practice Nursing Workshops. This workshop provides practical, comprehensive CPD for new and ... The Australian Primary Health Care Nurses Association (APNA) is the peak professional body for nurses working in primary health ... The Australian Primary Health Care Nurses Association (APNA) is the peak professional body for nurses working in primary health ...
If you would like to obtain more information about these advertising practices and to make choices about online behavioral ... Primary Care Nurse Practitioner. Salem, Massachusetts. Full Time. Lahey Health Behavioral Services is searching for a Primary ... Health Callings, Health eCareers and Health eCareers Networks are among the federally registered trademarks of Everyday Health ... primary care providers, specialist physicians, behavioral health and senior care resources and services throughout northeastern ...
Practice implications: To make patients more active, the nurses need more education and continuous training in motivational ... Nursing Identifiers. URN: urn:nbn:se:shh:diva-1985DOI: 10.3402/ecrj.v2.27915PubMedID: 26672958OAI: oai:DiVA.org:shh-1985DiVA: ... Nurses and patients communication in smoking cessation at nurse-led COPD clinics in primary health care. Österlund Efraimsson ... communication between patients and registered nurses trained in MI in COPD nurse-led clinics in Swedish primary health care. ...
Journal of Nursing & Care. *Advanced Practices in Nursing. *Health Care : Current Reviews ... Midwifery and Women Health Nursing. *Neonatal Nursing and Maternal Healthcare. *Nurse Practitioner ... 51st International Conference on Nursing and Health Care. September 17-18,2020 Kyoto, Japan ... 26th World Nursing Healthcare Conference May 18-19, 2020 Berlin, Germany. Organizing Committee Submit Abstract Register Now ...
... community nursing, sexual health or walk-in centre. ... has been designed for nurses with interest in practice nursing ... to work within a variety of primary care settings.. Why study the PGDip Primary Care Nursing at Middlesex University?. This ... She was the primary care development lead for Camden CCG, a nurse specialist in community palliative care and a community ... Nursing Studies MSc / Nursing Studies (Advanced Nursing Practice) MSc. Start: October 2019 ...
... nurses need to make use of the nursing care systematization as a way to ensure good practices of care to this population. By ... nurses, nursing technicians, and community health workers. Thus, nurses need to know and use the resources of the care network ... Perceptions and practices of professionals in primary health care in the approach of drug use]. Psic Teor Pesq Online [Internet ... To understand the experience of nurses in the approach to tobacco users in the context of primary health care. ...
This study provides support for the restructuring of work processes in the primary health care environment and for ... The tools used were the Nursing Work Index Revised, Maslach Burnout Inventory and a form to characterize the nurses. To analyze ... The environment of professional practice and Burnout in nurses in primary healthcare / O ambiente da prática profissional e ... The environment of professional practice and Burnout in nurses in primary healthcare ...
The home visit was identified as a nursing practice possible to be expanded in order to identify social determinants of health ... Objective Identify nurses emancipatory practices in primary care, to contribute to the improvement of health care. Method A ... Emancipatory practices of nurses in primary health care: the home visit as an instrument of health needs assessment / Prácticas ... Emancipatory practices of nurses in primary health care: the home visit as an instrument o ...
The need for nurses who practice on community-based primary care and public health teams is growing. As health care moves from ... Wayne State College of Nursing receives $2.6M HRSA grant to expand BSN training in Detroit ... Primary to yield record number of women on general election ballot More women are running for political office motivated by the ... Health and Environment Alliance (HEAL). Statement of APA President Regarding the Traumatic Effects of Separating Immigrant ...
However, this study suggests that, in primary health-care practices, if nurses take on more roles previously the preserve of ... How is Primary Health Care conceptualised in nursing in Australia? A review of the literature, Health & Social Care in the ... A program of nurse algorithm-guided care for adult patients with acute minor illnesses in primary care, BMC Family Practice, ... Background This study investigated patient opinion about the provision of nurse-led vs. doctor-led primary health care in the ...
... but to give knowledge and insight into to developing a professional practice model of care. ... This book needs to be read by as many nurses as possible not just if you are completing an assignment for a module, ... Scheme inspires primary school children to become nurses 19 December, 2018 0:57 am ... Evaluation of a primary care clinical research nursing service A recently created primary care clinical research nursing ...
Advanced practice registered nurse Womens health "Nurse Practitioner Primary Care Competencies in Specialty Areas" (PDF). US ... Board certification must be maintained by obtaining continuing nursing education credits. In the US, board certification is ... Collaborating with other health care providers for management or referral of high-risk pregnancies. Performing primary care ... A womens health nurse practitioner (WHNP) is a nurse practitioner that specializes in continuing and comprehensive healthcare ...
... clinical nursing practice, social justice, primary healthcare, health optimization and health challenges. A person with the ... Critical care nurses also administer medications and conduct pulmonary assessments. With the health care industry expanding all ... Acute care nursing, adult nursing, community nursing, family nursing, neonatal nursing, occupational health nursing, ... psychiatric health nursing, pediatric nursing, oncology nursing, geriatric nursing, parish nursing, and public health nursing. ...
Primary Healthcare Nurse Johannesburg *Clinical Risk Manager Johannesburg *National Nursing Manager Johannesburg ... South Africas clinic based health system was originally created to provide primary care services like maternal and child care ... Healthcare jobs. *Medical Practice Billing Officer Pretoria *Quality Advisor/Surveyor Cape Town ... Pilot programme to expand access to care for NCDs. A pilot programme that aims to increase access to care for non-communicable ...
Cost-Effective Health Care: The Future of Nurs... ... Federal Options for Maximizing the Value of Advanced Practice ... as primary care providers for various insurance programs-all on their own license as regulated by the Board of Nursing.10 In ... E Undergraduate Nursing Education 369-374 * F Health Care System Reform and the Nursing Workforce: Matching Nursing Practice ... Variations in nurse practitioner use in Veterans Affairs primary care practices. Health Services Research 39(4 Pt. 1):887. ...
Choose from 500 different sets of adult health nursing flashcards on Quizlet. ... Learn adult health nursing with free interactive flashcards. ... primary care. QSEN. QSEN competencies. specialty practice... ... quality... safety... education ... nurses. patient centered care... teamwork and collaboration... evidence base… ... defined nursing as both an art and a science, differentiated n…. volunteered to care for wounds and feed Union soldiers during… ...
The purpose of this research was to develop a conceptual nursing model for the implementation of spiritual care in adult ... primary care by nurse practitioners (NPs), with an emphasis on older adults.Data sources:The study was a descriptive, ... Implications for practice:The nursing model reflects a spiritual-relational view. As the NP and older adult grow in ... of a conceptual nursing model for the implementation of spiritual care in adult primary healthcare settings by nurse ...
... through which boards of nursing act and counsel together on matters of common interest and concern affecting the public health ... safety and welfare, including the development of licensing examinations in nursing. ... The National Council of State Boards of Nursing (NCSBN) is a not-for-profit organization whose purpose is to provide an ... Full Scope-of-Practice Regulation is Associated With Higher Supply of Nurse Practitioners in Rural and Primary Care Health ...
Find the top Nursing Colleges in Missouri on our website. ... Search through information you need on Nursing Schools in ... Primary Healthcare. * Clinical Nursing Practice. * Health Optimization. * Physiology. * Anatomy. * Record keeping. * ... How much do nurses make in Missouri? Source: O*NET OnLine. Registered nurses in Missouri in 2014 earned a median annual salary ... The Missouri State Board of Education takes care of the states public education system. There are some nursing schools in ...
  • The aim of this study was to investigate the scope of practice of physicians and nurses who work in the Atenção Primária em Saúde (APS) (Primary Healthcare) and their main barriers. (scielo.br)
  • The term "scope of practice" refers to a comprehensive set of attributions, functions and activities of a certain occupation. (scielo.br)
  • 1 From this perspective, the scope of practice is determined from the processes of interaction between the agents and the institutions, which include from the professional regulation, in other words, those activities authorized by law, the activities that the professional performs in practice and has competence to perform, considering both the skills gained through study and practice as on the individual's qualities and attitudes. (scielo.br)
  • the expansion of primary care health professionals scope of practice, as physicinas performing tasks usually attributed to specialists. (scielo.br)
  • In Brazil, the APS is the preferential entrance to the Sistema Único de Saúde (SUS) (Public Health System) and the scope of practice for health professionals who work in this context influence directly the referrals rates and lines at secondary and tertiary care and, consequently, costs and access to health. (scielo.br)
  • Chief among these, as I have noted elsewhere, are "conflicting and restrictive state provisions governing [APNs'] scope of practice and prescriptive authority… as well as the fragmented and parsimonious state and federal standards for their reimbursement" (Safriet, 1992). (nap.edu)
  • defined scope of practice. (quizlet.com)
  • The ability of nurse practitioners (NPs) to provide full care is governed by state scope-of-practice (SOP) regulation, which is classified into three types: full SOP, reduced SOP, and restricted SOP. (ncsbn.org)
  • NPs are 'registered nurses with additional educational preparation and experience who possess and demonstrate the competencies to autonomously diagnose, order and interpret diagnostic tests, prescribe pharmaceuticals and perform specific procedures within their legislated scope of practice' (Canadian Nurses Association [CNA] 2008: 16). (longwoods.com)
  • The chapter begins by explaining the significance of title protection then presents role characteristics, scope of practice, and competencies for the advanced practice nurse. (springer.com)
  • This program prepares licensed Registered Nurses (RNs) with a bachelor's degree to expand their scope of practice. (gradschools.com)
  • Additionally, the median wage for registered nurses as of May 2018 was $71,730 per year and $34.48 per hour. (excite.com)
  • Revenue was estimated by analyzing Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) codes for BHNP visits from the Epic electronic health record and corresponding relative value units (RVUs), based on 135% of 2018 nationally unadjusted Medicare rates. (ajmc.com)
  • According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the 2018 median annual salary for advanced practice nurses in the U.S. was $113,930 per year. (csusm.edu)
  • The report argued there would be "substantial potential benefits" from a "range of new approaches to staffing", including greater use of new professions, such as physician associates and healthcare assistants, within GP practices. (hsj.co.uk)
  • Although chiropractors and medical doctors work concurrently in the Ontario healthcare system, there has yet to be a meaningful integration of these two professions. (chiro.org)
  • The full access of nurses to doctorate programs, the regulation of health professions and Nursing specialties, as well as the strong support from some institutions funding and promoting nurse-led research have been essential for the current development. (francoangeli.it)
  • Collaborate with multiple professions to provide care for individuals, families, and communities with complex health needs. (indwes.edu)
  • Registered nurses are expected to assess patient condition, record their observations, administer medicine and do much more to ensure the best possible patient care. (excite.com)
  • Aims of this study were to identify nurse workarounds during medication administration, to assess changes in the rates of medication events and workarounds after STEP, to assess changes in systems thinking and safety culture after STEP, and to correlate safety culture and systems thinking. (ncsbn.org)
  • To assess nurses' patient safety culture in primary health-care centres in Tunisia and to determine its associated factors. (who.int)
  • A mixed methods design with both quantitative and qualitative components was used to assess the healthcare teams. (chiro.org)
  • The largest primary healthcare centre in Britain - and probably Europe - took another step towards completion when it was topped out with a final trowel-full of concrete by Professor Jonathan Montgomery, chair of Hampshire Primary Care Trust. (nursinginpractice.com)
  • Uniquely, the facilities will be shared by the 5,000-strong Army garrison.At 138,500 sq ft/12,866 m², the building is many times bigger than a conventional health centre. (nursinginpractice.com)
  • Pictured from left: Professor Jonathan Montgomery, chair of Hampshire PCT, and local GPs Dr Peter Brigg and Dr Chris Pearson, whose practices will be moving into the centre. (nursinginpractice.com)
  • It is with great delight that APNA announces our 12th annual National Conference for nurses working in primary health care, to be held at the Sydney International Convention Centre from 21 to 23 May. (apna.asn.au)
  • Two factors were associated with patient safety culture: participation in risk management committees, and district of the primary care centre. (who.int)
  • He is currently researcher at the Prehospital Disaster and Medicine Center in Western Sweden and University of Gothenburg Centre for Person-centered Care. (gu.se)
  • We sought to investigate the effect of integrating chiropractic on the attitudes of providers on two healthcare teams. (chiro.org)
  • Given positive attitudes and similar knowledge across clinician types, we recommend that SDM is not confined to the patient-physician dyad but instead advocated among other health professionals. (bmj.com)
  • The Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) at CSUSM is a part-time program designed for working registered nurses who hold a baccalaureate degree in nursing. (csusm.edu)
  • A quantitative questionnaire assessed providers' opinions, experiences with collaboration, and perceptions of chiropractic care. (chiro.org)