Ethics Committees, Clinical: Hospital or other institutional ethics committees established to consider the ethical dimensions of patient care. Distinguish from ETHICS COMMITTEES, RESEARCH, which are established to monitor the welfare of patients or healthy volunteers participating in research studies.Ethics, Clinical: The identification, analysis, and resolution of moral problems that arise in the care of patients. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Ethics Consultation: Services provided by an individual ethicist (ETHICISTS) or an ethics team or committee (ETHICS COMMITTEES, CLINICAL) to address the ethical issues involved in a specific clinical case. The central purpose is to improve the process and outcomes of patients' care by helping to identify, analyze, and resolve ethical problems.Ethicists: Persons trained in philosophical or theological ethics who work in clinical, research, public policy, or other settings where they bring their expertise to bear on the analysis of ethical dilemmas in policies or cases. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Ethics, Institutional: The moral and ethical obligations or responsibilities of institutions.Ethics Committees: Committees established by professional societies, health facilities, or other institutions to consider decisions that have bioethical implications. The role of these committees may include consultation, education, mediation, and/or review of policies and practices. Committees that consider the ethical dimensions of patient care are ETHICS COMMITTEES, CLINICAL; committees established to protect the welfare of research subjects are ETHICS COMMITTEES, RESEARCH.Ethics, Medical: The principles of professional conduct concerning the rights and duties of the physician, relations with patients and fellow practitioners, as well as actions of the physician in patient care and interpersonal relations with patient families.Committee Membership: The composition of a committee; the state or status of being a member of a committee.Bioethics: A branch of applied ethics that studies the value implications of practices and developments in life sciences, medicine, and health care.Dissent and Disputes: Differences of opinion or disagreements that may arise, for example, between health professionals and patients or their families, or against a political regime.Ethics: The philosophy or code pertaining to what is ideal in human character and conduct. Also, the field of study dealing with the principles of morality.Ethics, Research: The moral obligations governing the conduct of research. Used for discussions of research ethics as a general topic.Ethics, Nursing: The principles of proper professional conduct concerning the rights and duties of nurses themselves, their patients, and their fellow practitioners, as well as their actions in the care of patients and in relations with their families.Lawyers: Persons whose profession is to give legal advice and assistance to clients and represent them in legal matters. (American Heritage Dictionary, 3d ed)Ethics Committees, Research: Hospital or other institutional committees established to protect the welfare of research subjects. Federal regulations (the "Common Rule" (45 CFR 46)) mandate the use of these committees to monitor federally-funded biomedical and behavioral research involving human subjects.Ethics, Professional: The principles of proper conduct concerning the rights and duties of the professional, relations with patients or consumers and fellow practitioners, as well as actions of the professional and interpersonal relations with patient or consumer families. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Social Responsibility: The obligations and accountability assumed in carrying out actions or ideas on behalf of others.Principle-Based Ethics: An approach to ethics that focuses on theories of the importance of general principles such as respect for autonomy, beneficence/nonmaleficence, and justice.Ethical Theory: A philosophically coherent set of propositions (for example, utilitarianism) which attempts to provide general norms for the guidance and evaluation of moral conduct. (from Beauchamp and Childress, Principles of Biomedical Ethics, 4th ed)Ethics, Dental: The principles of proper professional conduct concerning the rights and duties of the dentist, relations with patients and fellow practitioners, as well as actions of the dentist in patient care and interpersonal relations with patient families. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Bioethical Issues: Clusters of topics that fall within the domain of BIOETHICS, the field of study concerned with value questions that arise in biomedicine and health care delivery.Interdisciplinary Communication: Communication, in the sense of cross-fertilization of ideas, involving two or more academic disciplines (such as the disciplines that comprise the cross-disciplinary field of bioethics, including the health and biological sciences, the humanities, and the social sciences and law). Also includes problems in communication stemming from differences in patterns of language usage in different academic or medical disciplines.Ethical Analysis: The use of systematic methods of ethical examination, such as CASUISTRY or ETHICAL THEORY, in reasoning about moral problems.Ethical Review: A formal process of examination of patient care or research proposals for conformity with ethical standards. The review is usually conducted by an organized clinical or research ethics committee (CLINICAL ETHICS COMMITTEES or RESEARCH ETHICS COMMITTEES), sometimes by a subset of such a committee, an ad hoc group, or an individual ethicist (ETHICISTS).State Medicine: A system of medical care regulated, controlled and financed by the government, in which the government assumes responsibility for the health needs of the population.Family Practice: A medical specialty concerned with the provision of continuing, comprehensive primary health care for the entire family.Morals: Standards of conduct that distinguish right from wrong.Moral Obligations: Duties that are based in ETHICS, rather than in law.Beneficence: The state or quality of being kind, charitable, or beneficial. (from American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 4th ed). The ethical principle of BENEFICENCE requires producing net benefit over harm. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Great BritainHuman Experimentation: The use of humans as investigational subjects.Personal Autonomy: Self-directing freedom and especially moral independence. An ethical principle holds that the autonomy of persons ought to be respected. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Virtues: Character traits that are considered to be morally praiseworthy. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Moral Development: The process by which individuals internalize standards of right and wrong conduct.Theology: The study of religion and religious belief, or a particular system or school of religious beliefs and teachings (from online Cambridge Dictionary of American English, 2000 and WordNet: An Electronic Lexical Database, 1997)Informed Consent: Voluntary authorization, by a patient or research subject, with full comprehension of the risks involved, for diagnostic or investigative procedures, and for medical and surgical treatment.Social Values: Abstract standards or empirical variables in social life which are believed to be important and/or desirable.Physician's Practice Patterns: Patterns of practice related to diagnosis and treatment as especially influenced by cost of the service requested and provided.Paternalism: Interference with the FREEDOM or PERSONAL AUTONOMY of another person, with justifications referring to the promotion of the person's good or the prevention of harm to the person. (from Cambridge Dictionary of Philosophy, 1995); more generally, not allowing a person to make decisions on his or her own behalf.Practice Guidelines as Topic: Directions or principles presenting current or future rules of policy for assisting health care practitioners in patient care decisions regarding diagnosis, therapy, or related clinical circumstances. The guidelines may be developed by government agencies at any level, institutions, professional societies, governing boards, or by the convening of expert panels. The guidelines form a basis for the evaluation of all aspects of health care and delivery.Patient Rights: Fundamental claims of patients, as expressed in statutes, declarations, or generally accepted moral principles. (Bioethics Thesaurus) The term is used for discussions of patient rights as a group of many rights, as in a hospital's posting of a list of patient rights.Personhood: The state or condition of being a human individual accorded moral and/or legal rights. Criteria to be used to determine this status are subject to debate, and range from the requirement of simply being a human organism to such requirements as that the individual be self-aware and capable of rational thought and moral agency.Philosophy, MedicalPhilosophy: A love or pursuit of wisdom. A search for the underlying causes and principles of reality. (Webster, 3d ed)Professional Practice: The use of one's knowledge in a particular profession. It includes, in the case of the field of biomedicine, professional activities related to health care and the actual performance of the duties related to the provision of health care.Social Justice: An interactive process whereby members of a community are concerned for the equality and rights of all.Confidentiality: The privacy of information and its protection against unauthorized disclosure.Ethical Relativism: The philosophical view that conceptions of truth and moral values are not absolute but are relative to the persons or groups holding them. (from American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 4th ed)Jurisprudence: The science or philosophy of law. Also, the application of the principles of law and justice to health and medicine.Research Subjects: Persons who are enrolled in research studies or who are otherwise the subjects of research.Human Rights: The rights of the individual to cultural, social, economic, and educational opportunities as provided by society, e.g., right to work, right to education, and right to social security.General Practice: Patient-based medical care provided across age and gender or specialty boundaries.Value of Life: The intrinsic moral worth ascribed to a living being. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Ethics, Pharmacy: The principles of proper professional conduct concerning the rights and duties of the pharmacist, relations with patients and fellow practitioners, as well as actions of the pharmacist in health care and interpersonal relations with patient families. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Resource Allocation: Societal or individual decisions about the equitable distribution of available resources.
  • Each of these papers can be taken individually as a stand-alone Certificate of Proficiency, or towards the Postgraduate Certificate and/or Postgraduate Diploma in General Practice. (otago.ac.nz)
  • If you have already completed a Postgraduate Diploma in General Practice, you can study for a Master of General Practice. (otago.ac.nz)
  • For those who already have completed a Master's level qualification, we also offer PhD supervision on a wide range of topics relating to General Practice and Rural Health. (otago.ac.nz)
  • Patellofemoral pain (PFP) has a high prevalence in general practice, 1 orthopaedic 2 , 3 and sports settings. (bmj.com)
  • Toon, by contrast argues such re-interpretations are not exclusive to general practice and primary care. (wikipedia.org)
  • Previous empirical work among physicians has led us to propose that clinical practice is experienced by clinicians as an engagement-in-the-clinical-situation. (biomedcentral.com)
  • If you will be in or near Grand Rapids, Michigan on Friday, September 5, 2014, come to Spectrum Health's 2014 ethics conference for clinicians: "Ethics, Law and Clinical Practice" at the Calvin College Prince Conference Center. (wordpress.com)
  • Practice and Intellectual Disabilities will be highly relevant to a wide audience, including professionals working in community services, clinicians working in special education schools, residential facilities, and psychiatric hospitals, and parents and organizations involved in the care of individuals with intellectual disabilities"-- Read more. (worldcat.org)
  • All I ask is that we avoid personal questions from patients (we can't do clinical work or second-guess therapists here, but we can have professional discussions among clinicians about ethics or forensic scenarios). (behavior.net)
  • Informed by the latest developments in the neuroscience field, contemporary psychodynamic thinking and the historical contributions of seminal clinical social work scholars, Dr. Freedberg has made clear what relational theory means for social work clinicians. (routledge.com)
  • Useful, too, is a chapter that describes and critically evaluates some of the common distinctions that clinicians make in practice, such as those between "ordinary" and "extraordinary" care. (aafp.org)
  • As with any text comprising cases, Ethics in Clinical Practice may be somewhat difficult to use as a reference because clinicians may not readily perceive connections between the cases at hand and the cases in the text. (aafp.org)
  • Primary care ethics is the study of the everyday decisions that primary care clinicians make, such as: how long to spend with a particular patient, how to reconcile their own values and those of their patients, when and where to refer or investigate, how to respect confidentiality when dealing with patients, relatives and third parties. (wikipedia.org)
  • The extension of this argument is that it is not just good primary care physicians who are aware of the ethics of the everyday, but good clinicians (15). (wikipedia.org)
  • Susan Brannen, ASHA vice president for professional practices in audiology (2001-2003), served as monitoring vice president. (asha.org)
  • Specifically designed for those studying to become and those who are ethics consultants, this book, with its innovative and multi-layered approach, allows readers to share a peer-review-like experience that shows accountability to be what it is, an ethical, not merely procedural or administrative, undertaking. (springer.com)
  • That may result in an underappreciation of the physician's biopsychosocial situation, namely the context of clinical practice. (biomedcentral.com)
  • This book is invaluable for all social workers, no matter their practice context, to more fully understand human behavior and appreciate our profession's relationship focus. (routledge.com)
  • Washington, DC, December 17, 2014 - In the wake of media focus on the bravery of nurses in the context of the Ebola crisis, the National League for Nursing was among the lead organizations in nursing, nursing education, and clinical ethics to come together to explore the ethical dimensions facing the profession. (nln.org)
  • This statement supersedes the Scope of Practice in Audiology statement (LC 08-95), ( ASHA, 1996 ). (asha.org)
  • This open access book about the Zadeh Project demonstrates and explores a core question in clinical ethics: how can ethics consultants be accountable in the face of a robust plurality of ethical standpoints, especially those that underwrite practices and methods for doing ethics consultation as well as those viewpoints and values encountered in daily clinical ethics practice? (springer.com)
  • With built-in opportunities to constantly stretch yourself, learn and grow, the Dental Hygiene Degree Program at Oregon Tech has a strong history of service learning and innovative educational methods that prepare students as dental hygienists, or as a stepping stone for advanced dental practice. (oit.edu)
  • and the necessity of practicing in a culturally sensitive way with diverse populations. (routledge.com)
  • The second section considers evidence, or lack thereof, for nutritional supplementation in special populations, such as those practicing veganism. (ama-assn.org)
  • The clinical mental health counseling program at Valparaiso University serves as an ethical and professional point of entry for individuals from diverse populations interested in acquiring the requisite skills associated with becoming a licensed professional counselor. (valpo.edu)
  • Developed from the authors' experiences as practitioners and clinical faculty, Clinical Social Work Practice, 5/e p rovides students with a method for integrating clinical theories and practice with diverse clients. (indigo.ca)
  • She is also Adjunct Associate Professor at Smith College School for Social Work where she was formerly on the full time faculty and chair of social work practice. (indigo.ca)
  • Develop recommendations for preparing faculty to teach ethics effectively. (nln.org)
  • It is the mission of the clinical mental health counseling program faculty to prepare counselors who will ethically promote the well-being of individuals, families, mental health organizations, and communities located in metropolitan, rural, and global settings. (valpo.edu)
  • Sufficient studies have not been performed describing routine clinical practice in this type of patients, and this limitation prevents adequate evaluation of the added value of new treatments and their impact on costs. (springer.com)
  • Dr. Sung: Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, 9/F Clinical Science Building, Prince of Wales Hospital, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Sha Tin NT, Hong Kong. (annals.org)
  • Offering some of the best facilities for health, social care and medicine students in the country, the outstanding teaching and learning resources include leading edge clinical skills facilities, an 860-seat lecture theatre, and a variety of teaching rooms and social learning spaces. (edgehill.ac.uk)
  • Moreover, if one defines clinical medicine as an applied science, the question arises as to how physicians should account for the humanity of their patients. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Reasons to doubt the validity of the dual discourse as an account of clinical practice can be found outside of medicine. (biomedcentral.com)
  • In 1994, the Nursing/Allied Health division of the American Society for Laser Medicine and Surgery adopted the "Standards of Perioperative Clinical Practice in Laser Medicine and Surgery" using these two publications as models. (aslms.org)
  • The CACM is a non-profit national academic organization in China that is an important social force in the development of Chinese medicine and acts as a link between the government and the professionals who practice Chinese medicine. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The aim of this study was to investigate autism spectrum disorder (ASD) clinical practice patterns of Korean medicine doctors (KMDs) through questionnaire survey. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Organizational Culture and Ethics in Modern Medicine. (igi-global.com)
  • Doctors in other specialities (such as psychiatry, rheumatology, HIV medicine, where specialists take primary responsibility for a patient's health care over a considerable period) may perform what he terms the interpretative function, but when then do so they are acting as generalists and practising generalism (14). (wikipedia.org)
  • Stretched between these institutional and practical initiatives resides a crucial set of of ethical considerations, chief among them the meaning and scope of responsibility for clinical ethics consultants. (springer.com)
  • This scope of practice in audiology statement is an official policy of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA). (asha.org)
  • Practice activities related to emerging clinical, technological, and scientific developments are not precluded from consideration as part of the scope of practice of an audiologist. (asha.org)
  • It is also recognized that specialty areas identified within the scope of practice will vary among the individual providers. (asha.org)
  • ASHA also recognizes that credentialed professionals in related fields may have knowledge, skills, and experience that could be applied to some areas within the scope of audiology practice. (asha.org)
  • Defining the scope of practice of audiologists is not meant to exclude other appropriately credentialed postgraduate professionals from rendering services in common practice areas. (asha.org)
  • ASHA members and ASHA-certified professionals are bound by the ASHA Code of Ethics to provide services that are consistent with the scope of their competence, education, and experience ( ASHA, 2003 ). (asha.org)
  • To enable you to develop and enhance your scope of clinical practice whilst also advancing your abilities to make effective clinical decisions. (southampton.ac.uk)
  • The document was developed by the Coordinating Committee for the ASHA vice president for professional practices in audiology and approved in 2003 by the Legislative Council (11-03). (asha.org)
  • A trial should be conducted in compliance with the protocol that has received prior institutional review board (IRB)/independent ethics committee (IEC) approval or favourable opinion. (marsdd.com)
  • The length of time practicing CM may influence the rate of adherence, since 709 doctors (51.90%) with less than 5 years of experience reported never having followed CPGs. (biomedcentral.com)
  • As the premier voice for nursing education, the NLN applauds this endeavor, which dovetails with the League's efforts to advance standards of care in all settings-nationally and internationally-through classroom and clinical instruction in evidence-based best practices," said NLN president Marsha Howell Adams, PhD, RN, CNE, FAAN, ANEF, who attended the conference. (nln.org)
  • Before responding to whether a patient with a disorder of consciousness-a condition subsuming coma, the vegetative state, and the minimally conscious state (MCS) -should be enrolled in a clinical trial or withdrawn from life support, we need to define relevant terms and be precise in our queries. (ama-assn.org)
  • The course consists of a wide range of highly flexible taught and work-based learning modules that will enable busy practitioners to access patient-care enhancing education and become a leader who can demonstrate a high level of autonomy in your specialist area of practice. (edgehill.ac.uk)
  • The physician's solicitude for the patient entrains engagement in the clinical situation. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Access helpful forms developed by a variety of sources for patient charts, logs, information sheets, office signs, and use by practice administration. (acponline.org)
  • A multitude of factors other than evidence drive clinical decision-making, including patient preferences and social circumstances, presence of disease-drug and drug-drug interactions, clinical experience, competing demands from more pressing clinical conditions, marketing and promotional activity, and system-level drug policies. (ices.on.ca)
  • Following a change to the ABPI Code of Practice in 2012, companies are obliged to publish all clinical trial results within one year of marketing authorisation and publically register new clinical trials within 21 days of the first patient being enrolled. (abpi.org.uk)
  • Pass the NCLEX exam, background check, and acquire an RN license to practice nursing. (excite.com)
  • The program will emphasize clinical skill development, clinical experience, and advanced nursing knowledge. (excite.com)
  • Therefore, standards reflect the values and priorities of the profession and provide direction for professional nursing practice and a framework for evaluation of this practice. (aslms.org)
  • The Master of Science (Applied) Nursing - Global Health Direct Entry concentration provides students with global health content throughout their program of study, and students spend one semester taking clinical- and project-based courses in their final year in a global health placement site. (mcgill.ca)
  • The summit has published A Blueprint for 21st-Century Nursing Ethics: Report of the National Nursing Summit . (nln.org)
  • During the 1983 Japanese encephalitis (JE) epidemic in northern Thailand, we systematically attempted to isolate JE virus (JEV) from clinical specimens collected from 49 consecutive JE patients at 1 provincial hospital. (ajtmh.org)
  • Module content will include both general decision making concepts and specialist components, which you will be able apply to your area of practice. (southampton.ac.uk)
  • Psychotherapy may address spirituality as a significant part of someone's mental / psychological life, and some forms are derived from spiritual philosophies, but practices based on treating the spiritual as a separate dimension are not necessarily considered as traditional or 'legitimate' forms of psychotherapy. (wikipedia.org)
  • The CACREP Accredited program in clinical mental health counseling is particularly appropriate for persons who plan to seek licensure in the state of Indiana (or states with similar statutes) as a clinical mental health counselor. (valpo.edu)
  • This is in line with the International Federation of Pharmaceutical Manufacturers and Associations Code of Practice . (abpi.org.uk)
  • In February 2013 the ABPI committed to providing a disclosure toolkit for companies to help them meet their requirement for trial transparency under the Code of Practice. (abpi.org.uk)
  • Underscoring this question is the recognition that the field of clinical ethics consultation has arrived at a crucial point in its maturation. (springer.com)