Dental Articulators: Mechanical devices that simulate the temporomandibular joints and jaws to which maxillary and mandibular casts are attached. The entire assembly attempts to reproduce the movements of the mandible and the various tooth-to-tooth relationships that accompany those movements.Maxillary Sinus: The air space located in the body of the MAXILLARY BONE near each cheek. Each maxillary sinus communicates with the middle passage (meatus) of the NASAL CAVITY on the same side.Maxillary Sinus Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the MAXILLARY SINUS. They represent the majority of paranasal neoplasms.Maxilla: One of a pair of irregularly shaped bones that form the upper jaw. A maxillary bone provides tooth sockets for the superior teeth, forms part of the ORBIT, and contains the MAXILLARY SINUS.Paranasal Sinus Diseases: Diseases affecting or involving the PARANASAL SINUSES and generally manifesting as inflammation, abscesses, cysts, or tumors.Maxillary Sinusitis: Inflammation of the NASAL MUCOSA in the MAXILLARY SINUS. In many cases, it is caused by an infection of the bacteria HAEMOPHILUS INFLUENZAE; STREPTOCOCCUS PNEUMONIAE; or STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS.Maxillary Neoplasms: Cancer or tumors of the MAXILLA or upper jaw.Maxillary Artery: A branch of the external carotid artery which distributes to the deep structures of the face (internal maxillary) and to the side of the face and nose (external maxillary).Maxillary DiseasesParanasal Sinuses: Air-filled spaces located within the bones around the NASAL CAVITY. They are extensions of the nasal cavity and lined by the ciliated NASAL MUCOSA. Each sinus is named for the cranial bone in which it is located, such as the ETHMOID SINUS; the FRONTAL SINUS; the MAXILLARY SINUS; and the SPHENOID SINUS.Paranasal Sinus Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the PARANASAL SINUSES.Jaw, Edentulous: The total absence of teeth from either the mandible or the maxilla, but not both. Total absence of teeth from both is MOUTH, EDENTULOUS. Partial absence of teeth in either is JAW, EDENTULOUS, PARTIALLY.Sinus Floor Augmentation: Guided BONE TRANSPLANTATION of the MAXILLARY SINUS surface with a BONE SUBSTITUTE grafting. It increases the bone volume at the site of the DENTAL IMPLANT and helps stabilize it.Dental Implantation, Endosseous: Insertion of an implant into the bone of the mandible or maxilla. The implant has an exposed head which protrudes through the mucosa and is a prosthodontic abutment.Dentigerous Cyst: Most common follicular odontogenic cyst. Occurs in relation to a partially erupted or unerupted tooth with at least the crown of the tooth to which the cyst is attached protruding into the cystic cavity. May give rise to an ameloblastoma and, in rare instances, undergo malignant transformation.Dental Implants: Biocompatible materials placed into (endosseous) or onto (subperiosteal) the jawbone to support a crown, bridge, or artificial tooth, or to stabilize a diseased tooth.Maxillary Nerve: The intermediate sensory division of the trigeminal (5th cranial) nerve. The maxillary nerve carries general afferents from the intermediate region of the face including the lower eyelid, nose and upper lip, the maxillary teeth, and parts of the dura.Frontal Sinus: One of the paired, but seldom symmetrical, air spaces located between the inner and outer compact layers of the FRONTAL BONE in the forehead.Zygoma: Either of a pair of bones that form the prominent part of the CHEEK and contribute to the ORBIT on each side of the SKULL.Oral Surgical Procedures, Preprosthetic: Surgery necessary for a denture to rest on a firm base, free from marked osseous protuberances or undercuts, and devoid of interfering muscle attachments, excess mucoperiosteum, hyperplasias, and fibrous or papillary growths.Incisor: Any of the eight frontal teeth (four maxillary and four mandibular) having a sharp incisal edge for cutting food and a single root, which occurs in man both as a deciduous and a permanent tooth. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p820)Molar: The most posterior teeth on either side of the jaw, totaling eight in the deciduous dentition (2 on each side, upper and lower), and usually 12 in the permanent dentition (three on each side, upper and lower). They are grinding teeth, having large crowns and broad chewing surfaces. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p821)Alveolar Process: The thickest and spongiest part of the maxilla and mandible hollowed out into deep cavities for the teeth.Alveolar Ridge Augmentation: Preprosthetic surgery involving rib, cartilage, or iliac crest bone grafts, usually autologous, or synthetic implants for rebuilding the alveolar ridge.Nasal Cavity: The proximal portion of the respiratory passages on either side of the NASAL SEPTUM. Nasal cavities, extending from the nares to the NASOPHARYNX, are lined with ciliated NASAL MUCOSA.Tooth Eruption, Ectopic: An abnormality in the direction of a TOOTH ERUPTION.Otorhinolaryngologic Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the ear and its parts, the nose and nasal cavity, or the throat, including surgery of the adenoids, tonsils, pharynx, and trachea.Cranial Sinuses: Large endothelium-lined venous channels situated between the two layers of DURA MATER, the endosteal and the meningeal layers. They are devoid of valves and are parts of the venous system of dura mater. Major cranial sinuses include a postero-superior group (such as superior sagittal, inferior sagittal, straight, transverse, and occipital) and an antero-inferior group (such as cavernous, petrosal, and basilar plexus).Endoscopy: Procedures of applying ENDOSCOPES for disease diagnosis and treatment. Endoscopy involves passing an optical instrument through a small incision in the skin i.e., percutaneous; or through a natural orifice and along natural body pathways such as the digestive tract; and/or through an incision in the wall of a tubular structure or organ, i.e. transluminal, to examine or perform surgery on the interior parts of the body.Oroantral Fistula: A fistula between the maxillary sinus and the oral cavity.Sinusitis: Inflammation of the NASAL MUCOSA in one or more of the PARANASAL SINUSES.Palatal Expansion Technique: An orthodontic method used for correcting narrow or collapsed maxillary arches and functional cross-bite. (From Jablonski's Dictionary of Dentistry),Palate: The structure that forms the roof of the mouth. It consists of the anterior hard palate (PALATE, HARD) and the posterior soft palate (PALATE, SOFT).Mandible: The largest and strongest bone of the FACE constituting the lower jaw. It supports the lower teeth.Tooth, Impacted: A tooth that is prevented from erupting by a physical barrier, usually other teeth. Impaction may also result from orientation of the tooth in an other than vertical position in the periodontal structures.Radiography, Panoramic: Extraoral body-section radiography depicting an entire maxilla, or both maxilla and mandible, on a single film.Cephalometry: The measurement of the dimensions of the HEAD.Cone-Beam Computed Tomography: Computed tomography modalities which use a cone or pyramid-shaped beam of radiation.Cuspid: The third tooth to the left and to the right of the midline of either jaw, situated between the second INCISOR and the premolar teeth (BICUSPID). (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p817)Mucocele: A retention cyst of the salivary gland, lacrimal sac, paranasal sinuses, appendix, or gallbladder. (Stedman, 26th ed)Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Dental Arch: The curve formed by the row of TEETH in their normal position in the JAW. The inferior dental arch is formed by the mandibular teeth, and the superior dental arch by the maxillary teeth.Ethmoid Sinus: The numerous (6-12) small thin-walled spaces or air cells in the ETHMOID BONE located between the eyes. These air cells form an ethmoidal labyrinth.Cavernous Sinus: An irregularly shaped venous space in the dura mater at either side of the sphenoid bone.Sinus of Valsalva: The dilatation of the aortic wall behind each of the cusps of the aortic valve.Bicuspid: One of the eight permanent teeth, two on either side in each jaw, between the canines (CUSPID) and the molars (MOLAR), serving for grinding and crushing food. The upper have two cusps (bicuspid) but the lower have one to three. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p822)Periapical Diseases: Diseases of the PERIAPICAL TISSUE surrounding the root of the tooth, which is distinguished from DENTAL PULP DISEASES inside the TOOTH ROOT.Orbit: Bony cavity that holds the eyeball and its associated tissues and appendages.Oral Surgical Procedures: Surgical procedures used to treat disease, injuries, and defects of the oral and maxillofacial region.Nose Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the NOSE.Carotid Sinus: The dilated portion of the common carotid artery at its bifurcation into external and internal carotids. It contains baroreceptors which, when stimulated, cause slowing of the heart, vasodilatation, and a fall in blood pressure.Sphenoid Sinus: One of the paired air spaces located in the body of the SPHENOID BONE behind the ETHMOID BONE in the middle of the skull. Sphenoid sinus communicates with the posterosuperior part of NASAL CAVITY on the same side.Osteoma: A benign tumor composed of bone tissue or a hard tumor of bonelike structure developing on a bone (homoplastic osteoma) or on other structures (heteroplastic osteoma). (From Dorland, 27th ed)Skull: The SKELETON of the HEAD including the FACIAL BONES and the bones enclosing the BRAIN.Facial Bones: The facial skeleton, consisting of bones situated between the cranial base and the mandibular region. While some consider the facial bones to comprise the hyoid (HYOID BONE), palatine (HARD PALATE), and zygomatic (ZYGOMA) bones, MANDIBLE, and MAXILLA, others include also the lacrimal and nasal bones, inferior nasal concha, and vomer but exclude the hyoid bone. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p113)Dental Prosthesis Design: The plan and delineation of dental prostheses in general or a specific dental prosthesis. It does not include DENTURE DESIGN. The framework usually consists of metal.Dimensional Measurement Accuracy: The closeness of a determined value of a physical dimension to the actual value.Extraoral Traction Appliances: Extraoral devices for applying force to the dentition in order to avoid some of the problems in anchorage control met with in intermaxillary traction and to apply force in directions not otherwise possible.Odontogenic Tumors: Neoplasms produced from tooth-forming tissues.Bone Transplantation: The grafting of bone from a donor site to a recipient site.Anatomic Variation: Peculiarities associated with the internal structure, form, topology, or architecture of organisms that distinguishes them from others of the same species or group.Facial Asymmetry: Congenital or acquired asymmetry of the face.Coronary Sinus: A short vein that collects about two thirds of the venous blood from the MYOCARDIUM and drains into the RIGHT ATRIUM. Coronary sinus, normally located between the LEFT ATRIUM and LEFT VENTRICLE on the posterior surface of the heart, can serve as an anatomical reference for cardiac procedures.Maxillofacial Development: The process of growth and differentiation of the jaws and face.Tooth Movement: Orthodontic techniques used to correct the malposition of a single tooth.Bone Substitutes: Synthetic or natural materials for the replacement of bones or bone tissue. They include hard tissue replacement polymers, natural coral, hydroxyapatite, beta-tricalcium phosphate, and various other biomaterials. The bone substitutes as inert materials can be incorporated into surrounding tissue or gradually replaced by original tissue.Vertical Dimension: The length of the face determined by the distance of separation of jaws. Occlusal vertical dimension (OVD or VDO) or contact vertical dimension is the lower face height with the teeth in centric occlusion. Rest vertical dimension (VDR) is the lower face height measured from a chin point to a point just below the nose, with the mandible in rest position. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p250)Molar, Third: The aftermost permanent tooth on each side in the maxilla and mandible.Cadaver: A dead body, usually a human body.Maxillary Fractures: Fractures of the upper jaw.Osteotomy, Le Fort: Transverse sectioning and repositioning of the maxilla. There are three types: Le Fort I osteotomy for maxillary advancement or the treatment of maxillary fractures; Le Fort II osteotomy for the treatment of maxillary fractures; Le Fort III osteotomy for the treatment of maxillary fractures with fracture of one or more facial bones. Le Fort III is often used also to correct craniofacial dysostosis and related facial abnormalities. (From Dorland, 28th ed, p1203 & p662)Enophthalmos: Recession of the eyeball into the orbit.Rhinitis: Inflammation of the NASAL MUCOSA, the mucous membrane lining the NASAL CAVITIES.Nasal Polyps: Focal accumulations of EDEMA fluid in the NASAL MUCOSA accompanied by HYPERPLASIA of the associated submucosal connective tissue. Polyps may be NEOPLASMS, foci of INFLAMMATION, degenerative lesions, or malformations.Skull Base: The inferior region of the skull consisting of an internal (cerebral), and an external (basilar) surface.Models, Anatomic: Three-dimensional representation to show anatomic structures. Models may be used in place of intact animals or organisms for teaching, practice, and study.Dental Models: Presentation devices used for patient education and technique training in dentistry.Palate, Hard: The anteriorly located rigid section of the PALATE.Malocclusion: Such malposition and contact of the maxillary and mandibular teeth as to interfere with the highest efficiency during the excursive movements of the jaw that are essential for mastication. (Jablonski, Illustrated Dictionary of Dentistry, 1982)Orthodontic Appliance Design: The planning, calculation, and creation of an apparatus for the purpose of correcting the placement or straightening of teeth.Foreign Bodies: Inanimate objects that become enclosed in the body.Sinus Thrombosis, Intracranial: Formation or presence of a blood clot (THROMBUS) in the CRANIAL SINUSES, large endothelium-lined venous channels situated within the SKULL. Intracranial sinuses, also called cranial venous sinuses, include the superior sagittal, cavernous, lateral, petrous sinuses, and many others. Cranial sinus thrombosis can lead to severe HEADACHE; SEIZURE; and other neurological defects.Nose Diseases: Disorders of the nose, general or unspecified.Dental Implantation: The grafting or inserting of a prosthetic device of alloplastic material into the oral tissue beneath the mucosal or periosteal layer or within the bone. Its purpose is to provide support and retention to a partial or complete denture.Malocclusion, Angle Class II: Malocclusion in which the mandible is posterior to the maxilla as reflected by the relationship of the first permanent molar (distoclusion).Tooth Crown: The upper part of the tooth, which joins the lower part of the tooth (TOOTH ROOT) at the cervix (TOOTH CERVIX) at a line called the cementoenamel junction. The entire surface of the crown is covered with enamel which is thicker at the extremity and becomes progressively thinner toward the cervix. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p216)Papilloma, Inverted: A mucosal tumor of the urinary bladder or nasal cavity in which proliferating epithelium is invaginated beneath the surface and is more smoothly rounded than in other papillomas. (Stedman, 25th ed)Orthodontic Appliances: Devices used for influencing tooth position. Orthodontic appliances may be classified as fixed or removable, active or retaining, and intraoral or extraoral. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p19)Leontopithecus: The genus of lion tamarins in the subfamily CALLITRICHINAE. The common name refers to the mane on the shoulders.Sick Sinus Syndrome: A condition caused by dysfunctions related to the SINOATRIAL NODE including impulse generation (CARDIAC SINUS ARREST) and impulse conduction (SINOATRIAL EXIT BLOCK). It is characterized by persistent BRADYCARDIA, chronic ATRIAL FIBRILLATION, and failure to resume sinus rhythm following CARDIOVERSION. This syndrome can be congenital or acquired, particularly after surgical correction for heart defects.Peplomycin: An antineoplastic agent derived from BLEOMYCIN.Tooth, Unerupted: A normal developing tooth which has not yet perforated the oral mucosa or one that fails to erupt in the normal sequence or time interval expected for the type of tooth in a given gender, age, or population group.Age Determination by Teeth: A means of identifying the age of an animal or human through tooth examination.Anatomic Landmarks: Reference points located by visual inspection, palpation, or computer assistance, that are useful in localizing structures on or within the human body.Nasal Sprays: Pharmacologic agents delivered into the nostrils in the form of a mist or spray.Nasal Obstruction: Any hindrance to the passage of air into and out of the nose. The obstruction may be unilateral or bilateral, and may involve any part of the NASAL CAVITY.Cranial Fossa, Posterior: The infratentorial compartment that contains the CEREBELLUM and BRAIN STEM. It is formed by the posterior third of the superior surface of the body of the sphenoid (SPHENOID BONE), by the occipital, the petrous, and mastoid portions of the TEMPORAL BONE, and the posterior inferior angle of the PARIETAL BONE.Osseointegration: The growth action of bone tissue as it assimilates surgically implanted devices or prostheses to be used as either replacement parts (e.g., hip) or as anchors (e.g., endosseous dental implants).Facial Injuries: General or unspecified injuries to the soft tissue or bony portions of the face.Tooth Root: The part of a tooth from the neck to the apex, embedded in the alveolar process and covered with cementum. A root may be single or divided into several branches, usually identified by their relative position, e.g., lingual root or buccal root. Single-rooted teeth include mandibular first and second premolars and the maxillary second premolar teeth. The maxillary first premolar has two roots in most cases. Maxillary molars have three roots. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p690)Tooth Extraction: The surgical removal of a tooth. (Dorland, 28th ed)Dentition, Mixed: The complement of teeth in the jaws after the eruption of some of the permanent teeth but before all the deciduous teeth are absent. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)Retrognathia: A physical misalignment of the upper (maxilla) and lower (mandibular) jaw bones in which either or both recede relative to the frontal plane of the forehead.Malocclusion, Angle Class III: Malocclusion in which the mandible is anterior to the maxilla as reflected by the first relationship of the first permanent molar (mesioclusion).
... it articulates with the maxilla and forms a part of the medial wall of the maxillary sinus. The inferior border is free, thick ... It may be divided into three portions: of these, the anterior articulates with the conchal crest of the maxilla; the posterior ... Nasal conchae Left maxilla. Nasal surface. Right inferior nasal concha. Medial surface. Right inferior nasal concha. Lateral ... Both extremities are more or less pointed, the posterior being the more tapering. The inferior nasal concha is ossified from a ...
... where it forms the posterior part of the medial wall of the maxillary sinus. On the posterior part of this surface is a deep ... for articulation with the nasal surface of the maxilla; its upper and back part is smooth where it enters into the formation of ... and closes in the lower and back part of the opening of the maxillary sinus. The posterior border presents a deep groove, the ... In the articulated skull this foramen leads from the pterygopalatine fossa into the posterior part of the superior meatus of ...
Inadequate maxillary bone volume may be due to bone resorption as well as to pneumatization of the maxillary sinus or to a ... "Use of zygomatic implants to deal with resorbed posterior maxillae". Periodontology 2000. 33 (1): 82-89. doi:10.1046/j.0906- ... ten Bruggenkate, Chris M.; van den Bergh, Johan P. A. (1998-06-01). "Maxillary sinus floor elevation: a valuable pre-prosthetic ... rather than the maxilla (upper jaw). They may be used when maxillary bone quality or quantity is inadequate for the placement ...
The implant is placed in front of the maxillary sinus in the upper jaw (maxilla) and in front of the mental nerve in the lower ... dense bone that remains in the front part of the jaws and by placing the two posterior implants on an angle to avoid the sinus ... This will allow a molar tooth to be cantilevered posterior resulting in a denture or bridge with approximately 12 teeth. The ... It consists of the rehabilitation of either edentulous or dentate maxilla and/or mandible with fixed prosthesis by placing four ...
Below the bulla ethmoidalis and hidden by the uncinate process of the ethmoid is the opening of the maxillary sinus (ostium ... Left maxilla. Nasal surface. Left palatine bone. Nasal aspect. Enlarged. Left orbicularis oculi, seen from behind. Coronal ... the sphenopalatine foramen opens into the cavity of the superior meatus and the meatus communicates with the posterior ... Above and at the back of the superior concha is the sphenoethmoidal recess which the sphenoidal sinus opens into. The superior ...
The maxillary sinus presents the appearance of a furrow on the lateral wall of the nose. In the adult the vertical diameter is ... At birth the transverse and antero-posterior diameters of the bone are each greater than the vertical. The frontal process is ... Maxilla shown in green. Skull from side. Maxilla shown in green. Skull. Maxilla shown in green. Skull from below. Maxilla shown ... The maxilla (plural: maxillae /mækˈsɪliː/) in animals is the upper jawbone formed from the fusion of two maxillary bones. The ...
Lost more than one tooth in the posterior maxilla. Lost a significant amount of bone in the posterior maxilla. Missing teeth ... Maxillary sinus floor augmentation (also termed sinus lift, sinus graft, sinus augmentation or sinus procedure) is a surgical ... Zitzmann NU, Scharer P (1998). "Sinus elevation procedures in the resorbed posterior maxilla. Comparison of the crestal and ... The first maxillary sinus floor augmentation procedure was performed by Oscar Hilt Tatum, Jr. in 1974. A sinus-lift procedure ...
Maxilla shown in semi-transparent. Maxillary sinus shown in red. Right maxilla. Medial view. Right maxilla. Posterior view. ... If the maxillary posterior teeth are lost, the maxillary sinus may expand even more, thinning the bony floor of the alveolar ... Maxillary sinus cancer that has spread to the brain Maxillary sinus cancer that has spread to the lymph nodes With age, the ... and so the maxillary sinus does not drain well, and infection develops more easily. The maxillary sinus may drain into the ...
... horseshoe shaped bony protuberances which extend from the inferior margin of the maxilla, and the maxillary sinuses. Continuity ... The pterygoid plates lie posterior to the upper dental row, or alveolar ridge, when viewing the face from an anterior view. The ... They also involve the medial and lateral buttresses, or walls, of the maxillary sinus, traveling through the face just above ... As with the other fractures, it also involves the junction of the pterygoids with the maxillary sinuses. CSF rhinorrhea, or ...
Below the bulla ethmoidalis and hidden by the uncinate process of the ethmoid is the opening of the maxillary sinus (ostium ... the sphenopalatine foramen opens into the cavity of the superior meatus and the meatus communicates with the posterior ... Above and at the back of the superior concha is the sphenoethmoidal recess which the sphenoidal sinus opens into. The superior ... cells and in rather more than fifty percent of skulls is continued upward as the frontonasal duct into the frontal air-sinus; ...
... to supply the molar and premolar teeth and the lining of the maxillary sinus, while others are continued forward on the ... Anterior superior alveolar arteries Posterior superior alveolar nerve Left maxilla. Outer surface. This article incorporates ... The posterior superior alveolar artery (posterior dental artery) is given off from the maxillary, frequently in conjunction ... Descending upon the tuberosity of the maxilla, it divides into numerous branches, some of which enter the alveolar canals, ...
... and give off branches to the lining membrane of the maxillary sinus and gingival and dental branches to each molar tooth from a ... They descend on the tuberosity of the maxilla and give off several twigs to the gums and neighboring parts of the mucous ... The posterior superior alveolar branches (posterior superior dental branches) arise from the trunk of the maxillary nerve just ... The posterior superior alveolar nerve innervates the second and third maxillary molars, and two of the three roots of the ...
... it forms a small part of the medial wall of the maxillary sinus, and articulates with the ethmoidal process of the inferior ... they are the anterior and posterior ethmoidal canals, and open on the inner wall of the orbit. The posterior surface presents ... below with the maxilla and orbital process of the palatine, in front with the lacrimal, and behind with the sphenoid. In front ... the posterior ethmoidal cells open into this meatus. Below, and in front of the superior meatus, is the convex surface of the ...
In the maxilla it can extend into the maxillary sinus and floor of the nose. The lesion has a tendency to expand the bony ... The disease is most often found in the posterior body and angle of the mandible, but can occur anywhere in either the maxilla ... and acanthomatous type in the maxillary sinus: a case report". Quintessence International. 34 (4): 311-4. PMID 12731620. ... Lesions will occur in the mandible and maxilla, although 75% occur in the ascending ramus area and will result in extensive and ...
The posterior maxillary molars and maxillary sinus are innervated by the same branch of nerves which is the maxillary division ... Osteomyelitis of the maxilla, injudicious use of instruments during oral procedures, malignancy of the maxillary sinus, ... The maxillary sinus is known for its thin floor walls and close proximity to the posterior maxillary teeth. Dental procedures ... This innervation complicates the situation as the pain from maxillary sinus might be indistinguishable from a posterior ...
The Long Term Evaluation of Short Threaded Implants in the Posterior Mandible and Maxilla. Delayed versus Immediate Loading. ... "The Use of Recombinant Human Platelet-Derived Growth Factor for Maxillary Sinus Augmentation". www.quintpub.com. Retrieved 23 ... The use of recombinant human Platelet-Derived Growth Factor for maxillary sinus augmentation. Int J Periodontics Restorative ... Management of A Sinus Augmentation Complication. A Palatal Approach. Case Report. Int J Periodontics Restorative Dent. 2016 Jan ...
It is located posterior to the maxilla, between the lateral pterygoid plate of the sphenoid bone medially and by the base of ... The most likely causative tooth is the maxillary third molar (upper wisdom tooth). Topazian RG, Goldberg MH, Hupp JR (2002). ... to the cavernous sinus via the pterygoid plexus of veins. The contents of the infratemporal space are: branches of the ... as it is possible for infection to spread via emissary veins from the pterygoid plexus to the cavernous sinus, which may result ...
The wall of the maxillary sinus may be hard, rendering the procedure difficult. Touching the posterior wall of the sinus by the ... Fracture of maxilla: Antral Lavage may result in escape of the fluid through fracture lines. Febrile stage of acute maxillary ... Age: Below the age of 3 years, as the size of the sinus is small due to underdeveloped Maxillary Sinus. Bleeding disorders: May ... Infection in the maxillary sinus is common. Anaesthetic complications may occur. Air embolism. If the returning fluid is ...
The inferior orbital fissure lies inferior and lateral to the ocular globe at the lateral wall of the maxillary sinus. It is ... and sits at the junction of the sphenoid sinus with the ethmoid air cells, superomedial and posterior to structures at the ... The floor (inferior wall) is formed by the orbital surface of maxilla, the orbital surface of zygomatic bone and the minute ... and sits on the anterior wall of the maxillary sinus. Both foramina are crucial as potential pathways for cancer and infections ...
... secondary septa form as a result of irregular pneumatization of the sinus following loss of maxillary posterior teeth. Sinus ... The incidence, location, and height of maxillary sinus septa in the edentulous and dentate maxilla. J Oral Maxillofac Surg 1999 ... or maxillary sinus septa, singular septum) are fin-shaped projections of bone that may exist in the maxillary sinus, first ... Posterior: Underwood Recent studies have classified two types of maxillary sinus septa: primary and secondary. Primary septa ...
It comprises the principal functions of sensation from the maxillary, nasal cavity, sinuses, the palate and subsequently that ... It then crosses the pterygopalatine fossa, inclines lateralward on the back of the maxilla, and enters the orbit through the ... through the sphenopalatine foramen Posterior superior alveolar nerve Greater and lesser palatine nerves Pharyngeal nerve Middle ... The maxillary nerve (CN V2) is one of the three branches or divisions of the trigeminal nerve, the fifth (V) cranial nerve. ...
... mastoid air cells mastoid process matrix maxilla maxillae maxillary antrum maxillary artery maxillary nerve maxillary sinus ... posterior inferior cerebellar artery posterior lobe of the cerebellum posterior nasal artery posterior septal artery posterior ... membrane posterior auricular artery posterior cerebral artery Posterior chamber of eyeball posterior clinoid posterior column- ... tract posterior commissure posterior communicating artery posterior cranial fossa posterior cricoarytenoid muscle posterior ...
... the middle meatus provides drainage for the anterior ethmoid sinuses and for the maxillary and frontal sinuses; and the ... The superior meatus is the drainage area for the posterior ethmoid bone cells and the sphenoid sinus; ... The supply of parasympathetic nerves to the face and the upper jaw (maxilla) derives from the greater superficial petrosal (GSP ... Lateral to the turbinates is the medial wall of the maxillary sinus. Inferior to the nasal conchae (turbinates) is the meatus ...
Body of maxilla Orbital surface Infra-orbital canal Infra-orbital groove Anterior surface Infra-orbital foramen Maxillary sinus ... Oval window Sinus tympani Round window Mastoid wall (posterior wall) Aditus to mastoid antrum Pyramidal eminence Mastoid antrum ... Dural venous sinuses Transverse sinus Confluence of sinuses Marginal sinus Occipital sinus Petrosquamous sinus Sigmoid sinus ... Superior sagittal sinus Inferior sagittal sinus Straight sinus Inferior petrosal sinus Superior petrosal sinus Cavernous sinus ...
... approach enters through the posterior edge of the maxillary sinus ostium and posterior wall of the maxillary sinus. This ... Surgery includes a uninectomy (removal of the osteomeatal complex), a medial maxillectomy (removal of maxilla), a ethmoidectomy ... the ethmoid sinus, the sphenoidal sinus, and the maxillary sinus. Surgeons use this method to reach the cavernous sinus, ... and removal of the maxillary sinus and the palatine bone. The posterior septum is also removed at the beginning to allow use of ...
Body of maxilla. *Maxillary sinus. Zygomatic. *Orbital process (Zygomatico-orbital). *Temporal process (Zygomaticotemporal) ... Horizontal plate (Posterior nasal spine). *Perpendicular plate (Greater palatine canal, Sphenopalatine foramen, Pyramidal ...
... unilateral maxillary sinus tenderness, and worsening symptoms after initial improvement. Sinus radiography and ultrasonography ... the anterior ethmoid and maxillary sinuses, the posterior ethmoid and maxillary sinuses, and the sphenoid sinus. Limited-sinus ... The examiner observes the light transmitted through the maxilla with the patients mouth open. Transillumination may be more ... maxillary tooth or facial pain (especially unilateral), unilateral maxillary sinus tenderness, and worsening symptoms after ...
Odontogenic keratocyst associated with an ectopic tooth in the maxillary sinus: a report of two cases and a review of the ... CEOT is usually encountered in the posterior mandible, and is most common in patients between 30 and 50 years of age, with no ... Kamath G, Abraham R. Recurrent CEOT of the maxilla. Dent Res J (Isfahan) 2012; 9: 233-236. PMID: 22623944. ... Peripheral calcifying cystic odontogenic tumour of the maxillary gingiva. BMC Res Notes 2012; 5: 455PMID: 22917449. ...
Maxilla shown in semi-transparent. Maxillary sinus shown in red. Right maxilla. Medial view. Right maxilla. Posterior view. ... If the maxillary posterior teeth are lost, the maxillary sinus may expand even more, thinning the bony floor of the alveolar ... Maxillary sinus cancer that has spread to the brain Maxillary sinus cancer that has spread to the lymph nodes With age, the ... and so the maxillary sinus does not drain well, and infection develops more easily. The maxillary sinus may drain into the ...
Soft tissue of nose maxilla anterior Radiopaque 60 Maxillary sinus maxilla posterior ...
Pneumatization of the maxillary sinus secondary to posterior maxillary tooth loss is an extremely common finding. Significant ... atrophy of the maxilla prevents dental implant placement in this region. Grafting the floor of the maxillary sinus has emerged ... The aim of this article is to review the essentials of maxillary sinus augmentation, clarify this procedure for ... Maxillary Sinus Augmentation for Dental Implants. By Gökhan Göçmen and Yasar Özkan ...
Maxillary sinus augmentation is frequently necessary before placement of dental implants in the posterior maxilla. Besides ... Ewers R. Maxilla sinus grafting with marine algae derived bone forming material: a clinical report of long-term results. J Oral ... Autogenous iliac crest bone graft has been the "gold standard" for spinal fusion and maxillary sinus augmentation. However, ... Although autogenous bone grafting continues to be considered the gold standard for sinus grafting and spinal fusion, 10 it is ...
Figure 3-9. \Posterior view of facial skeleton. floor of the orbits are the maxillary sinuses; the largest of the sinuses. ... Maxillae Bones The maxillae bones are the largest bones of the face and together form the upper jaw. The maxilla (singular) ... The palatine bones are located behind the maxillae (fig. 3-10). The bones are somewhat L-shaped and form the posterior portion ... The maxilla forms the hard palate, floor of the nose, part of the orbits (eye sockets), and the tooth sockets of the upper ...
Lost more than one tooth in the posterior maxilla. Lost a significant amount of bone in the posterior maxilla. Missing teeth ... Maxillary sinus floor augmentation (also termed sinus lift, sinus graft, sinus augmentation or sinus procedure) is a surgical ... Zitzmann NU, Scharer P (1998). "Sinus elevation procedures in the resorbed posterior maxilla. Comparison of the crestal and ... The first maxillary sinus floor augmentation procedure was performed by Oscar Hilt Tatum, Jr. in 1974. A sinus-lift procedure ...
The maxillary sinus has multiple functions, which include serving as a resonance body for the voice, contributing to the ... Micro-CT evaluation of the cortical bone micro-architecture in the anterior and posterior maxilla and the maxillary sinus floor ... A cadaveric study of maxillary sinus size and aid in bone grafting of the maxillary sinus floor. J Oral Maxillofacial Surg 56: ... A cadaveric study of maxillary sinus size and aid in bone grafting of the maxillary sinus floor. J Oral Maxillofacial Surg 56: ...
Cementoblastoma of posterior maxilla involving the maxillary sinus. Dadhich AS, Nilesh K - Ann Maxillofac Surg (2015 Jan-Jun) ... premolar.This paper presents a rare case of cementoblastoma in the maxillary posterior region involving the maxillary sinus, in ... premolar.This paper presents a rare case of cementoblastoma in the maxillary posterior region involving the maxillary sinus, in ... Bottom Line: It usually occurs in the posterior mandible and is associated with roots of a mandibular first molar or second ...
W. P. Maher, "Artery distribution in the prenatal human maxilla," The Cleft Palate Journal, vol. 18, no. 1, pp. 51-58, 1981. ... maxillary sinus augmentation, removal of pathologic lesions and infections in the maxillary sinus, orthognathic surgery, and ... including maxillary sinus augmentation, removal of pathologic lesions and infections in the maxillary sinus, orthognathic ... Identification of the Bony Canal of the Posterior Superior Alveolar Nerve and Artery in the Maxillary Sinus: Tomographic, ...
Zygomatic Implant Options for the Atrophic Maxilla: Case Report (#186). $40.00 Add to cart ... Sinus Tenting for Posterior Maxillary Implant Placement. Home AGD PACE Sinus Tenting for Posterior Maxillary Implant Placement ... Sinus Tenting for Posterior Maxillary Implant Placement. $20.00. Author: Timothy F. Kosinski, DDS. Credit Hours: 1. Sinus ... Timothy F. Kosinski, DDS, outlines a predictable clinical protocol for sinus tenting for placement of maxillary implants. ...
placement? How can these problems be overcome? In the posterior maxilla, a pneumatization of the maxillary sinus can result in ... the maxilla is usually more rapid and severe. This may be due to the lack of muscle attachments to the maxilla and therefore ... What procedures can be done to augment a severely atrophic maxilla with a good palatal vault? In the severely resorbed maxilla ... alveolar nerve injury insulin intravenous joint laser lateral lesions lidocaine liver mandible mandibular maxilla maxillary ...
Augmentation of the Maxillary Sinus with Calcium Sulfate: One-Year Clinical Report from a Prospective, Longitudinal Study. De ... Endosteal Implants in the Edentulous Posterior Maxilla: Rationale and Clinical Report. Misch CE, Poitras Y, Dietsh-Misch F. ... Posterior Implant Single-tooth Replacement and Status of Adjacent Teeth during a 10-year Period: A Retrospective Report. Misch ... Short Dental Implants in Posterior Partial Edentulism: A Multicenter Retrospective 6-year Case Series Study. Misch CE, Steignga ...
... is a paired pyramid-shaped paranasal sinus within the maxillary bone which drains via the maxillary ostium into the ... The floor is formed by the alveolar process of the maxilla. The roof is the orbital floor. The posterior wall forms the ... The maxillary sinus (or antrum of Highmore) is a paired pyramid-shaped paranasal sinus within the maxillary bone which drains ... Large maxillary sinuses can extend to the alveolar process of the maxilla to the point where the roots of the molar teeth can ...
Six months after sinus lifting, 60 implants were placed in the posterior maxilla. The ISQ was recorded on the day of surgery ... Bilateral maxillary sinus augmentation was performed in 10 patients in a split-mouth design using a bobine HA (BBM) as a ... The aim of the present study was to monitor implant stability after sinus floor elevation with two biomaterials during the ... Six months after sinus lifting, 60 implants were placed in the posterior maxilla. The ISQ was recorded on the day of surgery ...
Which artery descends on the posterior surface of the maxilla and supplies the maxillary sinus and the maxillary molar and ... posterior surface of the maxillary tuberosity of the maxilla. • anterior to the infraorbital foramen of the maxilla. • the apex ... the maxillary first molar. • the maxillary second molar. • the maxillary third molar. • all of the above ... The maxillary sinus opens into the middle meatus of the nose through the:. • frontonasal duct. • bulla ethmoidalis. • hiatus ...
... and terminating at the posterior edge of the maxillary sinus. The infraorbital groove, canal, and foramen are contiguous, ... tunneling through the maxilla, and entombing the maxillary branch of the trigeminal nerve. The maxillary branch of cranial ... The most anterior bone, the lacrimal bone, forms the posterior one half of the lacrimal sac fossa. The anterior and posterior ... If one identifies the posterior foramen, keep in mind that the optic canal is not much farther posterior and that the ...
... it articulates with the maxilla and forms a part of the medial wall of the maxillary sinus. The inferior border is free, thick ... It may be divided into three portions: of these, the anterior articulates with the conchal crest of the maxilla; the posterior ... Both extremities are more or less pointed, the posterior being the more tapering. In mathematics, an object is convex if for ... The inferior nasal concha articulates with four bones: the ethmoid, maxilla, lacrimal, and palatine. ...
The maxillary sinuses are contained in the body. The relevant openings in the maxilla where the blood vessels and nerves travel ... Along its course, three alveolar branches emerge to supply the sinus and the upper teeth. The posterior superior alveolar ... The maxillary sinus has a base at the lateral wall of the nose and an apex pointing at the zygomatic bone. The roof is formed ... Maxillary sinus is an air-filled space in the face that is covered with a respiratory mucosa. It is pyramidal in shape with a ...
The location of the nasal cavity and the paranasal sinuses make them extremely close to vital structures. Sinonasal ... The posterior aspect of the maxillary sinus is where the converging walls of the lateral, inferior, medial, and superior walls ... The anterior aspect is the anterior wall of the maxilla is simply the thin bony plate running from the root of the canine to ... This opening drains the frontal sinus and the maxillary sinus. The sphenoid sinus lies posteriorly over the middle aspect of ...
Maxillary sinus floor elevation has opened up a new way of increasing alveolar bone height in the posterior edentulous maxilla ... Abnormal conditions of the maxillary sinus were found in 30 sinuses; absence or severe deformity of the maxillary sinus caused ... Most of the maxillary posterior regions did not provide sufficient bone height for implant placement without maxillary sinus ... It is very important to obtain detailed knowledge of maxillary sinus anatomy to avoid complications during the sinus ...
The lifting of the maxillary sinus floor is currently a widely used procedure for bone augmentation of the posterior maxilla in ... Grafting of the maxillary sinus is a method for reaching sufficient bone height for posterior maxillary implant placement and ... The tissue was placed and the maxillary sinus was filled by grafting material selected (Figure 3(a)). The posterior part of the ... The present study showed that the bone graft survival in the maxillary sinus after sinus membrane perforation can be obtained ...
Bone volume is limited by the presence of the maxillary sinus together with loss of alveolar bone height ... Insufficient bone volume is a common problem encountered in the rehabilitation of the edentulous posterior maxillae with ... Interventions for replacing missing teeth: augmentation procedures of the maxillary sinus Cochrane Systematic Reviews, 12-Aug- ...
... calcium sulfate hemihydrate was placed as a grafting material for sinus floor elevation in the left posterior maxilla. After 8 ... In both the grafted area and the previously existing area of sinus floor, the histology showed complete calcium sulfate ... when used as a grafting material for augmentation of the sinus floor, may lead to proper osseointegration of dental implants. ( ...
  • Following provision of informed consent, eligible participants are allocated into one (or more) of three study groups depending on the levels of osseous-regeneration needed in Superior Posterior (SP) area of the maxilla. (isrctn.com)
  • What procedures can be done to augment a severely atrophic maxilla with a good palatal vault? (google.nl)
  • Immediate fixed full-arch implant-supported prosthetic rehabilitation of the severely atrophic maxilla is a challenging treatment modality with favourable patient interest. (qxmd.com)
  • Radiographic exams showed an extensive bone reabsorption and maxillary sinus filled with homogeneous tissue, which sometimes showed polypoid formation. (bvsalud.org)
  • Once the incision is made, the surgeon then pulls back the gum tissue, exposing the lateral boney wall of the sinus. (wikipedia.org)
  • Gerec ve yontem: Bu calismada 52 kisiden cesitli dental nedenlerle elde edilmis panoramik radyografi ve KIBT goruntusundeki 104 maksiller sinus, dort agiz, dis ve cene radyolojisi uzmaninin fikir birligi ile incelendi. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • Insufficient bone volume in the posterior portions of the maxilla can create problems for dental implant installation, and the reduced bone quantity and quality may affect the outcome of implant treatment in this area. (allenpress.com)
  • BACKGROUND: An observational case-control study was designed to retrospectively assess the association among sex, skeletal and dental variables and the and the palatal maxillary canine impaction. (bvsalud.org)
  • With these sinus lifts being performed in the same patient at the exact same time, a unique opportunity presented itself for direct observation and comparison of healing results for a repaired versus a non-perforated sinus lift and the dental implant survival that followed. (jiacd.com)