Preoperative Care: Care given during the period prior to undergoing surgery when psychological and physical preparations are made according to the special needs of the individual patient. This period spans the time between admission to the hospital to the time the surgery begins. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Pain, Postoperative: Pain during the period after surgery.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Postoperative Period: The period following a surgical operation.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Preoperative Period: The period before a surgical operation.Post and Core Technique: Use of a metal casting, usually with a post in the pulp or root canal, designed to support and retain an artificial crown.Operative Time: The duration of a surgical procedure in hours and minutes.Surgical Procedures, Operative: Operations carried out for the correction of deformities and defects, repair of injuries, and diagnosis and cure of certain diseases. (Taber, 18th ed.)Laparoscopy: A procedure in which a laparoscope (LAPAROSCOPES) is inserted through a small incision near the navel to examine the abdominal and pelvic organs in the PERITONEAL CAVITY. If appropriate, biopsy or surgery can be performed during laparoscopy.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Rectal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the RECTUM.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Postoperative Care: The period of care beginning when the patient is removed from surgery and aimed at meeting the patient's psychological and physical needs directly after surgery. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Intraoperative Care: Patient care procedures performed during the operation that are ancillary to the actual surgery. It includes monitoring, fluid therapy, medication, transfusion, anesthesia, radiography, and laboratory tests.Intraoperative Complications: Complications that affect patients during surgery. They may or may not be associated with the disease for which the surgery is done, or within the same surgical procedure.Reoperation: A repeat operation for the same condition in the same patient due to disease progression or recurrence, or as followup to failed previous surgery.Surgical Procedures, Elective: Surgery which could be postponed or not done at all without danger to the patient. Elective surgery includes procedures to correct non-life-threatening medical problems as well as to alleviate conditions causing psychological stress or other potential risk to patients, e.g., cosmetic or contraceptive surgery.Blood Loss, Surgical: Loss of blood during a surgical procedure.Intraoperative Period: The period during a surgical operation.Length of Stay: The period of confinement of a patient to a hospital or other health facility.Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.Vascular Surgical Procedures: Operative procedures for the treatment of vascular disorders.Cardiac Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the heart.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Neoadjuvant Therapy: Preliminary cancer therapy (chemotherapy, radiation therapy, hormone/endocrine therapy, immunotherapy, hyperthermia, etc.) that precedes a necessary second modality of treatment.Neoplasm Staging: Methods which attempt to express in replicable terms the extent of the neoplasm in the patient.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Dentistry, Operative: That phase of clinical dentistry concerned with the restoration of parts of existing teeth that are defective through disease, trauma, or abnormal development, to the state of normal function, health, and esthetics, including preventive, diagnostic, biological, mechanical, and therapeutic techniques, as well as material and instrument science and application. (Jablonski's Dictionary of Dentistry, 2d ed, p237)Hepatectomy: Excision of all or part of the liver. (Dorland, 28th ed)Coronary Artery Bypass: Surgical therapy of ischemic coronary artery disease achieved by grafting a section of saphenous vein, internal mammary artery, or other substitute between the aorta and the obstructed coronary artery distal to the obstructive lesion.Combined Modality Therapy: The treatment of a disease or condition by several different means simultaneously or sequentially. Chemoimmunotherapy, RADIOIMMUNOTHERAPY, chemoradiotherapy, cryochemotherapy, and SALVAGE THERAPY are seen most frequently, but their combinations with each other and surgery are also used.Survival Rate: The proportion of survivors in a group, e.g., of patients, studied and followed over a period, or the proportion of persons in a specified group alive at the beginning of a time interval who survive to the end of the interval. It is often studied using life table methods.Digestive System Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the digestive system or its parts.Surgical Procedures, Minimally Invasive: Procedures that avoid use of open, invasive surgery in favor of closed or local surgery. These generally involve use of laparoscopic devices and remote-control manipulation of instruments with indirect observation of the surgical field through an endoscope or similar device.Surgical Wound Infection: Infection occurring at the site of a surgical incision.Pancreaticoduodenectomy: The excision of the head of the pancreas and the encircling loop of the duodenum to which it is connected.Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal: An abnormal balloon- or sac-like dilatation in the wall of the ABDOMINAL AORTA which gives rise to the visceral, the parietal, and the terminal (iliac) branches below the aortic hiatus at the diaphragm.Neurosurgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the nervous system or its parts.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Chi-Square Distribution: A distribution in which a variable is distributed like the sum of the squares of any given independent random variable, each of which has a normal distribution with mean of zero and variance of one. The chi-square test is a statistical test based on comparison of a test statistic to a chi-square distribution. The oldest of these tests are used to detect whether two or more population distributions differ from one another.Surgery, Computer-Assisted: Surgical procedures conducted with the aid of computers. This is most frequently used in orthopedic and laparoscopic surgery for implant placement and instrument guidance. Image-guided surgery interactively combines prior CT scans or MRI images with real-time video.Anastomosis, Surgical: Surgical union or shunt between ducts, tubes or vessels. It may be end-to-end, end-to-side, side-to-end, or side-to-side.Perioperative Care: Interventions to provide care prior to, during, and immediately after surgery.Spinal Fusion: Operative immobilization or ankylosis of two or more vertebrae by fusion of the vertebral bodies with a short bone graft or often with diskectomy or laminectomy. (From Blauvelt & Nelson, A Manual of Orthopaedic Terminology, 5th ed, p236; Dorland, 28th ed)Cholecystectomy, Laparoscopic: Excision of the gallbladder through an abdominal incision using a laparoscope.Orthopedic Procedures: Procedures used to treat and correct deformities, diseases, and injuries to the MUSCULOSKELETAL SYSTEM, its articulations, and associated structures.Adenocarcinoma: A malignant epithelial tumor with a glandular organization.Cholecystectomy: Surgical removal of the GALLBLADDER.Patient Selection: Criteria and standards used for the determination of the appropriateness of the inclusion of patients with specific conditions in proposed treatment plans and the criteria used for the inclusion of subjects in various clinical trials and other research protocols.Recovery of Function: A partial or complete return to the normal or proper physiologic activity of an organ or part following disease or trauma.Esophagectomy: Excision of part (partial) or all (total) of the esophagus. (Dorland, 28th ed)Suture Techniques: Techniques for securing together the edges of a wound, with loops of thread or similar materials (SUTURES).Blood Vessel Prosthesis Implantation: Surgical insertion of BLOOD VESSEL PROSTHESES to repair injured or diseased blood vessels.Survival Analysis: A class of statistical procedures for estimating the survival function (function of time, starting with a population 100% well at a given time and providing the percentage of the population still well at later times). The survival analysis is then used for making inferences about the effects of treatments, prognostic factors, exposures, and other covariates on the function.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Range of Motion, Articular: The distance and direction to which a bone joint can be extended. Range of motion is a function of the condition of the joints, muscles, and connective tissues involved. Joint flexibility can be improved through appropriate MUSCLE STRETCHING EXERCISES.Premedication: Preliminary administration of a drug preceding a diagnostic, therapeutic, or surgical procedure. The commonest types of premedication are antibiotics (ANTIBIOTIC PROPHYLAXIS) and anti-anxiety agents. It does not include PREANESTHETIC MEDICATION.Drainage: The removal of fluids or discharges from the body, such as from a wound, sore, or cavity.Neoplasm Recurrence, Local: The local recurrence of a neoplasm following treatment. It arises from microscopic cells of the original neoplasm that have escaped therapeutic intervention and later become clinically visible at the original site.Pneumonectomy: The excision of lung tissue including partial or total lung lobectomy.Endoscopy: Procedures of applying ENDOSCOPES for disease diagnosis and treatment. Endoscopy involves passing an optical instrument through a small incision in the skin i.e., percutaneous; or through a natural orifice and along natural body pathways such as the digestive tract; and/or through an incision in the wall of a tubular structure or organ, i.e. transluminal, to examine or perform surgery on the interior parts of the body.Colectomy: Excision of a portion of the colon or of the whole colon. (Dorland, 28th ed)Laparotomy: Incision into the side of the abdomen between the ribs and pelvis.Decompression, Surgical: A surgical operation for the relief of pressure in a body compartment or on a body part. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Cardiopulmonary Bypass: Diversion of the flow of blood from the entrance of the right atrium directly to the aorta (or femoral artery) via an oxygenator thus bypassing both the heart and lungs.Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee: Replacement of the knee joint.Prostatectomy: Complete or partial surgical removal of the prostate. Three primary approaches are commonly employed: suprapubic - removal through an incision above the pubis and through the urinary bladder; retropubic - as for suprapubic but without entering the urinary bladder; and transurethral (TRANSURETHRAL RESECTION OF PROSTATE).Osteotomy: The surgical cutting of a bone. (Dorland, 28th ed)Angiography: Radiography of blood vessels after injection of a contrast medium.Reconstructive Surgical Procedures: Procedures used to reconstruct, restore, or improve defective, damaged, or missing structures.Pancreatectomy: Surgical removal of the pancreas. (Dorland, 28th ed)Gastrectomy: Excision of the whole (total gastrectomy) or part (subtotal gastrectomy, partial gastrectomy, gastric resection) of the stomach. (Dorland, 28th ed)Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Monitoring, Intraoperative: The constant checking on the state or condition of a patient during the course of a surgical operation (e.g., checking of vital signs).Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Postoperative Hemorrhage: Hemorrhage following any surgical procedure. It may be immediate or delayed and is not restricted to the surgical wound.Hospital Mortality: A vital statistic measuring or recording the rate of death from any cause in hospitalized populations.Kaplan-Meier Estimate: A nonparametric method of compiling LIFE TABLES or survival tables. It combines calculated probabilities of survival and estimates to allow for observations occurring beyond a measurement threshold, which are assumed to occur randomly. Time intervals are defined as ending each time an event occurs and are therefore unequal. (From Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1995)Recurrence: The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.Heart Valve Prosthesis Implantation: Surgical insertion of synthetic material to repair injured or diseased heart valves.Multivariate Analysis: A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.Thoracic Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the thoracic organs, most commonly the lungs and the heart.Lumbar Vertebrae: VERTEBRAE in the region of the lower BACK below the THORACIC VERTEBRAE and above the SACRAL VERTEBRAE.Thoracotomy: Surgical incision into the chest wall.Robotics: The application of electronic, computerized control systems to mechanical devices designed to perform human functions. Formerly restricted to industry, but nowadays applied to artificial organs controlled by bionic (bioelectronic) devices, like automated insulin pumps and other prostheses.Thoracic Vertebrae: A group of twelve VERTEBRAE connected to the ribs that support the upper trunk region.Feasibility Studies: Studies to determine the advantages or disadvantages, practicability, or capability of accomplishing a projected plan, study, or project.Perioperative Period: The time periods immediately before, during and following a surgical operation.Liver Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the LIVER.Ambulatory Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on an outpatient basis. It may be hospital-based or performed in an office or surgicenter.Aortic Aneurysm: An abnormal balloon- or sac-like dilatation in the wall of AORTA.Endarterectomy, Carotid: The excision of the thickened, atheromatous tunica intima of a carotid artery.Scoliosis: An appreciable lateral deviation in the normally straight vertical line of the spine. (Dorland, 27th ed)Esophageal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the ESOPHAGUS.Lymphatic Metastasis: Transfer of a neoplasm from its primary site to lymph nodes or to distant parts of the body by way of the lymphatic system.Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip: Replacement of the hip joint.Gynecologic Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the female genitalia.Microsurgery: The performance of surgical procedures with the aid of a microscope.Prosthesis Design: The plan and delineation of prostheses in general or a specific prosthesis.Laminectomy: A surgical procedure that entails removing all (laminectomy) or part (laminotomy) of selected vertebral lamina to relieve pressure on the SPINAL CORD and/or SPINAL NERVE ROOTS. Vertebral lamina is the thin flattened posterior wall of vertebral arch that forms the vertebral foramen through which pass the spinal cord and nerve roots.Nephrectomy: Excision of kidney.Pain Measurement: Scales, questionnaires, tests, and other methods used to assess pain severity and duration in patients or experimental animals to aid in diagnosis, therapy, and physiological studies.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Cholangiography: An imaging test of the BILIARY TRACT in which a contrast dye (RADIOPAQUE MEDIA) is injected into the BILE DUCT and x-ray pictures are taken.Radiotherapy, Adjuvant: Radiotherapy given to augment some other form of treatment such as surgery or chemotherapy. Adjuvant radiotherapy is commonly used in the therapy of cancer and can be administered before or after the primary treatment.Blood Vessel Prosthesis: Device constructed of either synthetic or biological material that is used for the repair of injured or diseased blood vessels.Endosonography: Ultrasonography of internal organs using an ultrasound transducer sometimes mounted on a fiberoptic endoscope. In endosonography the transducer converts electronic signals into acoustic pulses or continuous waves and acts also as a receiver to detect reflected pulses from within the organ. An audiovisual-electronic interface converts the detected or processed echo signals, which pass through the electronics of the instrument, into a form that the technologist can evaluate. The procedure should not be confused with ENDOSCOPY which employs a special instrument called an endoscope. The "endo-" of endosonography refers to the examination of tissue within hollow organs, with reference to the usual ultrasonography procedure which is performed externally or transcutaneously.Pancreatic Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the PANCREAS. Depending on the types of ISLET CELLS present in the tumors, various hormones can be secreted: GLUCAGON from PANCREATIC ALPHA CELLS; INSULIN from PANCREATIC BETA CELLS; and SOMATOSTATIN from the SOMATOSTATIN-SECRETING CELLS. Most are malignant except the insulin-producing tumors (INSULINOMA).Hysterectomy: Excision of the uterus.Bone Screws: Specialized devices used in ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY to repair bone fractures.Craniotomy: Any operation on the cranium or incision into the cranium. (Dorland, 28th ed)Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Blood Transfusion: The introduction of whole blood or blood component directly into the blood stream. (Dorland, 27th ed)Fracture Fixation, Internal: The use of internal devices (metal plates, nails, rods, etc.) to hold the position of a fracture in proper alignment.Internal Fixators: Internal devices used in osteosynthesis to hold the position of the fracture in proper alignment. By applying the principles of biomedical engineering, the surgeon uses metal plates, nails, rods, etc., for the correction of skeletal defects.General Surgery: A specialty in which manual or operative procedures are used in the treatment of disease, injuries, or deformities.Endarterectomy: Surgical excision, performed under general anesthesia, of the atheromatous tunica intima of an artery. When reconstruction of an artery is performed as an endovascular procedure through a catheter, it is called ATHERECTOMY.Parathyroidectomy: Excision of one or more of the parathyroid glands.Vascular Patency: The degree to which BLOOD VESSELS are not blocked or obstructed.Ultrasonography: The visualization of deep structures of the body by recording the reflections or echoes of ultrasonic pulses directed into the tissues. Use of ultrasound for imaging or diagnostic purposes employs frequencies ranging from 1.6 to 10 megahertz.Rectum: The distal segment of the LARGE INTESTINE, between the SIGMOID COLON and the ANAL CANAL.Aorta, Abdominal: The aorta from the DIAPHRAGM to the bifurcation into the right and left common iliac arteries.Extraction, Obstetrical: Extraction of the fetus by means of obstetrical instruments.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Aortic Rupture: The tearing or bursting of the wall along any portion of the AORTA, such as thoracic or abdominal. It may result from the rupture of an aneurysm or it may be due to TRAUMA.Aortic Valve: The valve between the left ventricle and the ascending aorta which prevents backflow into the left ventricle.Statistics, Nonparametric: A class of statistical methods applicable to a large set of probability distributions used to test for correlation, location, independence, etc. In most nonparametric statistical tests, the original scores or observations are replaced by another variable containing less information. An important class of nonparametric tests employs the ordinal properties of the data. Another class of tests uses information about whether an observation is above or below some fixed value such as the median, and a third class is based on the frequency of the occurrence of runs in the data. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed, p1284; Corsini, Concise Encyclopedia of Psychology, 1987, p764-5)Anesthesia: A state characterized by loss of feeling or sensation. This depression of nerve function is usually the result of pharmacologic action and is induced to allow performance of surgery or other painful procedures.Methods: A series of steps taken in order to conduct research.Chemotherapy, Adjuvant: Drug therapy given to augment or stimulate some other form of treatment such as surgery or radiation therapy. Adjuvant chemotherapy is commonly used in the therapy of cancer and can be administered before or after the primary treatment.Tooth, Nonvital: A tooth from which the dental pulp has been removed or is necrotic. (Boucher, Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)Biopsy, Needle: Removal and examination of tissue obtained through a transdermal needle inserted into the specific region, organ, or tissue being analyzed.Cervical Vertebrae: The first seven VERTEBRAE of the SPINAL COLUMN, which correspond to the VERTEBRAE of the NECK.Visual Acuity: Clarity or sharpness of OCULAR VISION or the ability of the eye to see fine details. Visual acuity depends on the functions of RETINA, neuronal transmission, and the interpretative ability of the brain. Normal visual acuity is expressed as 20/20 indicating that one can see at 20 feet what should normally be seen at that distance. Visual acuity can also be influenced by brightness, color, and contrast.Disease-Free Survival: Period after successful treatment in which there is no appearance of the symptoms or effects of the disease.Lymph Node Excision: Surgical excision of one or more lymph nodes. Its most common use is in cancer surgery. (From Dorland, 28th ed, p966)Cataract Extraction: The removal of a cataractous CRYSTALLINE LENS from the eye.Surgical Instruments: Hand-held tools or implements used by health professionals for the performance of surgical tasks.Heart Valve Diseases: Pathological conditions involving any of the various HEART VALVES and the associated structures (PAPILLARY MUSCLES and CHORDAE TENDINEAE).Gallstones: Solid crystalline precipitates in the BILIARY TRACT, usually formed in the GALLBLADDER, resulting in the condition of CHOLELITHIASIS. Gallstones, derived from the BILE, consist mainly of calcium, cholesterol, or bilirubin.Aortography: Radiographic visualization of the aorta and its branches by injection of contrast media, using percutaneous puncture or catheterization procedures.Liver Transplantation: The transference of a part of or an entire liver from one human or animal to another.Intestinal Obstruction: Any impairment, arrest, or reversal of the normal flow of INTESTINAL CONTENTS toward the ANAL CANAL.Urologic Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the urinary tract or its parts in the male or female. For surgery of the male genitalia, UROLOGIC SURGICAL PROCEDURES, MALE is available.Surgical Stapling: A technique of closing incisions and wounds, or of joining and connecting tissues, in which staples are used as sutures.Thoracic Surgery, Video-Assisted: Endoscopic surgery of the pleural cavity performed with visualization via video transmission.Obesity, Morbid: The condition of weighing two, three, or more times the ideal weight, so called because it is associated with many serious and life-threatening disorders. In the BODY MASS INDEX, morbid obesity is defined as having a BMI greater than 40.0 kg/m2.Diagnostic Techniques, Surgical: Methods and procedures for the diagnosis of disease or dysfunction by examination of the pathological site or operative field during surgical intervention.Hysteroscopy: Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the interior of the uterus.Thyroidectomy: Surgical removal of the thyroid gland. (Dorland, 28th ed)Anesthesia, General: Procedure in which patients are induced into an unconscious state through use of various medications so that they do not feel pain during surgery.Arthroscopy: Endoscopic examination, therapy and surgery of the joint.Laparoscopes: ENDOSCOPES for examining the abdominal and pelvic organs in the peritoneal cavity.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Thoracic Surgery: A surgical specialty concerned with diagnosis and treatment of disorders of the heart, lungs, and esophagus. Two major types of thoracic surgery are classified as pulmonary and cardiovascular.Embolization, Therapeutic: A method of hemostasis utilizing various agents such as Gelfoam, silastic, metal, glass, or plastic pellets, autologous clot, fat, and muscle as emboli. It has been used in the treatment of spinal cord and INTRACRANIAL ARTERIOVENOUS MALFORMATIONS, renal arteriovenous fistulas, gastrointestinal bleeding, epistaxis, hypersplenism, certain highly vascular tumors, traumatic rupture of blood vessels, and control of operative hemorrhage.Neuronavigation: Intraoperative computer-assisted 3D navigation and guidance system generally used in neurosurgery for tracking surgical tools and localize them with respect to the patient's 3D anatomy. The pre-operative diagnostic scan is used as a reference and is transferred onto the operative field during surgery.Imaging, Three-Dimensional: The process of generating three-dimensional images by electronic, photographic, or other methods. For example, three-dimensional images can be generated by assembling multiple tomographic images with the aid of a computer, while photographic 3-D images (HOLOGRAPHY) can be made by exposing film to the interference pattern created when two laser light sources shine on an object.Heart Valve Prosthesis: A device that substitutes for a heart valve. It may be composed of biological material (BIOPROSTHESIS) and/or synthetic material.Surgical Flaps: Tongues of skin and subcutaneous tissue, sometimes including muscle, cut away from the underlying parts but often still attached at one end. They retain their own microvasculature which is also transferred to the new site. They are often used in plastic surgery for filling a defect in a neighboring region.Ophthalmologic Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the eye or any of its parts.Cardiovascular Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the heart or blood vessels.Ampulla of Vater: A dilation of the duodenal papilla that is the opening of the juncture of the COMMON BILE DUCT and the MAIN PANCREATIC DUCT, also known as the hepatopancreatic ampulla.Blood Transfusion, Autologous: Reinfusion of blood or blood products derived from the patient's own circulation. (Dorland, 27th ed)Aortic Diseases: Pathological processes involving any part of the AORTA.Operating Room Information Systems: Information systems, usually computer-assisted, designed to store, manipulate, and retrieve information for planning, organizing, directing, and controlling administrative activities associated with the provision and utilization of operating room services and facilities.Appendectomy: Surgical removal of the vermiform appendix. (Dorland, 28th ed)Common Bile Duct Neoplasms: Tumor or cancer of the COMMON BILE DUCT including the AMPULLA OF VATER and the SPHINCTER OF ODDI.Carcinoembryonic Antigen: A glycoprotein that is secreted into the luminal surface of the epithelia in the gastrointestinal tract. It is found in the feces and pancreaticobiliary secretions and is used to monitor the response to colon cancer treatment.Biopsy: Removal and pathologic examination of specimens in the form of small pieces of tissue from the living body.Abdomen: That portion of the body that lies between the THORAX and the PELVIS.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Hip Joint: The joint that is formed by the articulation of the head of FEMUR and the ACETABULUM of the PELVIS.Joint Instability: Lack of stability of a joint or joint prosthesis. Factors involved are intra-articular disease and integrity of extra-articular structures such as joint capsule, ligaments, and muscles.Keratomileusis, Laser In Situ: A surgical procedure to correct MYOPIA by CORNEAL STROMA subtraction. It involves the use of a microkeratome to make a lamellar dissection of the CORNEA creating a flap with intact CORNEAL EPITHELIUM. After the flap is lifted, the underlying midstroma is reshaped with an EXCIMER LASER and the flap is returned to its original position.Stomach Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the STOMACH.Arterial Occlusive Diseases: Pathological processes which result in the partial or complete obstruction of ARTERIES. They are characterized by greatly reduced or absence of blood flow through these vessels. They are also known as arterial insufficiency.Operating Rooms: Facilities equipped for performing surgery.Common Bile Duct: The largest bile duct. It is formed by the junction of the CYSTIC DUCT and the COMMON HEPATIC DUCT.Ultrasonography, Doppler, Duplex: Ultrasonography applying the Doppler effect combined with real-time imaging. The real-time image is created by rapid movement of the ultrasound beam. A powerful advantage of this technique is the ability to estimate the velocity of flow from the Doppler shift frequency.Fluorouracil: A pyrimidine analog that is an antineoplastic antimetabolite. It interferes with DNA synthesis by blocking the THYMIDYLATE SYNTHETASE conversion of deoxyuridylic acid to thymidylic acid.Meningioma: A relatively common neoplasm of the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that arises from arachnoidal cells. The majority are well differentiated vascular tumors which grow slowly and have a low potential to be invasive, although malignant subtypes occur. Meningiomas have a predilection to arise from the parasagittal region, cerebral convexity, sphenoidal ridge, olfactory groove, and SPINAL CANAL. (From DeVita et al., Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, pp2056-7)Cholelithiasis: Presence or formation of GALLSTONES in the BILIARY TRACT, usually in the gallbladder (CHOLECYSTOLITHIASIS) or the common bile duct (CHOLEDOCHOLITHIASIS).Bile Duct Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the BILE DUCTS.Rupture: Forcible or traumatic tear or break of an organ or other soft part of the body.ROC Curve: A graphic means for assessing the ability of a screening test to discriminate between healthy and diseased persons; may also be used in other studies, e.g., distinguishing stimuli responses as to a faint stimuli or nonstimuli.Iliac Artery: Either of two large arteries originating from the abdominal aorta; they supply blood to the pelvis, abdominal wall and legs.Patient Satisfaction: The degree to which the individual regards the health care service or product or the manner in which it is delivered by the provider as useful, effective, or beneficial.Fracture Fixation: The use of metallic devices inserted into or through bone to hold a fracture in a set position and alignment while it heals.Colorectal Surgery: A surgical specialty concerned with the diagnosis and treatment of disorders and abnormalities of the COLON; RECTUM; and ANAL CANAL.Hemostasis, Surgical: Control of bleeding during or after surgery.Gallbladder Diseases: Diseases of the GALLBLADDER. They generally involve the impairment of BILE flow, GALLSTONES in the BILIARY TRACT, infections, neoplasms, or other diseases.Video-Assisted Surgery: Endoscopic surgical procedures performed with visualization via video transmission. When real-time video is combined interactively with prior CT scans or MRI images, this is called image-guided surgery (see SURGERY, COMPUTER-ASSISTED).Learning Curve: The course of learning of an individual or a group. It is a measure of performance plotted over time.Mitral Valve: The valve between the left atrium and left ventricle of the heart.Hyperparathyroidism: A condition of abnormally elevated output of PARATHYROID HORMONE (or PTH) triggering responses that increase blood CALCIUM. It is characterized by HYPERCALCEMIA and BONE RESORPTION, eventually leading to bone diseases. PRIMARY HYPERPARATHYROIDISM is caused by parathyroid HYPERPLASIA or PARATHYROID NEOPLASMS. SECONDARY HYPERPARATHYROIDISM is increased PTH secretion in response to HYPOCALCEMIA, usually caused by chronic KIDNEY DISEASES.
The last phase is post-operative, enduring that the patients are provided with suitable care and treatments. People who want to ... Preoperative teaching if delivered competently is an important aspect of patient care. Positive effects of preoperative ... A surgical nurse, also referred to as a theatre nurse or scrub nurse, specializes in preoperative care, providing care to ... Pre-operative, the nurse must help to prepare the patient and operating room for the surgery. During the surgery, they assist ...
They perform preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative care primarily in the operating theatre. Perioperative nurses in ... Perioperative nursing is a nursing specialty that works with patients who are having operative or other invasive procedures. ... The role also includes preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative care of the patient. The perianaesthesia nurse (recovery ... Post Anaesthetic Care Unit or recovery nurse, registered nurse first assistant (RNFA), and patient educator The circulating ...
Information obtained during preoperative assessment is used as a basis for the care plan for the patient. The preoperative ... The postoperative period begins after the transfer to the PACU (Post Anesthesia Care Unit) and terminates with the resolution ... The intra-operative period begins when the patient is transferred to the operating room table and ends with the transfer of a ... Perioperative care is the care that is given before, during and after surgery. It takes place in hospitals, in surgical centers ...
Postoperative pneumonia. An operating room manager must consider the preoperative, intraoperative and postoperative factors ... The three checkpoints are (1) preoperative verification of procedure and background information, (2) marking of the operative ... Surgical Care Improvement Project (SCIP) SCIP is a national partnership of organizations [www.medqic.org/scip] that are ... Management criteria must therefore include preoperative, intraoperative, and immediate postoperative system analysis. Waiting ...
Pediatric operating suites and pre- and post-recovery areas, as well as a pre-operative learning program. A Family Resource ... The only Pediatric Intensive Care Unit in the Hudson Valley region and only pediatric burn care center. The only Level IV (most ... The only Level 1 (highest level) Trauma Center in the Hudson Valley region with Medevac Helicopter and Mobile Intensive Care ... Maria Fareri Children's Hospital, a member of the Westchester Medical Center Health Network (WMCHealth), is the advanced care ...
Responsible for all aspects of pre-operative, operative, and post-operative care of abdominal organ transplant patients. ... They are also called upon to staff surgical intensive care units or trauma intensive care units.[citation needed] All general ... Some general surgeons obtain advanced training in this field (most commonly surgical critical care) and specialty certification ... that outcomes in surgical cancer care are positively associated to surgeon volume-i.e., the more cancer cases a surgeon treats ...
ODPs provide care for patients during the anaesthesia (pre-operative), surgical (intra-operative), and recovery (post-operative ... are a type of health care provider involved with the overall planning and delivery of perioperative care. They are mainly ... In 2004 the regulation of ODPs was taken over by the UK's Health and Care Professions Council, which changed its name in 2012 ... ODPs may sometimes work in a circulating role during the surgical stage of a patient's care. In this role, they give extra ...
The pre-operative and post-operative care, facility fees, anesthesia, and medications must be taken into consideration when ... Scars may appear red and prominent at first, but with proper care, they heal into a thin, silvery line. Abdominoplasty carries ...
... such as post-operative care or follow-up visits. Because the patients can be instructed by their dentists to view the ... Thus, DPES may contribute to reducing the patients' pre-operative anxiety levels and to expediting the informed consent process ... Finally, depending on the procedure involved, a patient may review online the dentist's post-operative recommendations included ... The article is posted internally to the online repository. Once the article is drafted, it is submitted to two other faculty ...
Nurses provide extensive care to patients in the early stages of emergence from anesthetic and in the immediate post-operative ... Preoperative assessment[edit]. Nurses are responsible for a large amount of the assessment done in pre-operative clinics, where ... Ambulatory care[edit]. A large number procedures are performed on an outpatient basis where the patient is not expected to ... Perianesthesia nursing is a nursing specialty practice area concerned with providing nursing care to patients undergoing or ...
The Wikstrom Surgical Center opened in 1993, providing 16 operating rooms, pre-operative and post-anesthesia areas, and a ... An additional urgent care treatment facility is located offsite at the Waltham Urgent Care Center at 9 Hope Avenue in Waltham, ... Patients were cared for in windowed ward rooms, one story high. A School of Nursing was established at the hospital in 1888. ... Only 26 patients were cared for in 1886 - the first year the Hospital was opened. Chickens and cows grazed at the Hospital, ...
Khuri SF, Daley J, Henderson WG (2002). "The Comparative Assessment and Improvement of Quality Surgical Care in the Department ... The ACS NSQIP collects data on 135 variables, including preoperative risk factors, intraoperative variables, and 30-day ... In the mid-1980s the VHA was criticized for their high operative mortality. To that end, Congress passed Public Law 99-166 in ... postoperative mortality and morbidity outcomes for patients undergoing major surgical procedures in both the inpatient and ...
... pre-operative and post-operative preparatory and recovery rooms and eight operating rooms. The building is attached to the ... University of Kentucky Critical Care Unit and is across from the Charles T. Wethington Jr. Building. The goals of the center ...
... monitored anesthesia care, general anesthesia); typically both intraoperative and postoperative As a part of a pre-operative ...
... and post operative time frame of patient care. After successful completion of the fellowship with subspecialty training in TEE ... Cardiothoracic anesthesiology is a subspeciality of the medical practice of anesthesiology devoted to the preoperative, ... post-operative ICU care, blood transfusion medicine, electrophysiology, and transthoracic echocardiography. [4] Many ... and postoperative care of adult and pediatric patients undergoing cardiothoracic surgery and related invasive procedures. It ...
... hospital costs not covered by statutory insurance additional charges for private hospital room pre-operative and post-operative ... "Health Care Systems in Transition- Luxembourg" (PDF). www.euro.who.int/_data/assets. Retrieved December 4, 2017. "Organisation ... The state role at most consists of working with care providers for accreditation, and management of contracts. Citizens pay at ... Boslaugh, Sarah (2013). Health Care Systems Around the World: A Comparative Guide. Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE. p. 271. ISBN ...
... preoperative notes, operative notes, postoperative notes, procedure notes, delivery notes, postpartum notes, and discharge ... and the initial instructions for that patient's care. Health care professionals use them to record a patient's baseline status ... Admission notes document the reasons why a patient is being admitted for inpatient care to a hospital or other facility, the ... reasons why the patient is being admitted for inpatient care to a hospital or other facility, and the initial instructions for ...
... will advise you about the pre-operative and post-operative care that they will need to undergo and how to best take care of ...
... pre-operative care, post-operative care, intensive care units, and pain medicine. After passing the examination, the college of ... These are Intensive care, Pediatric anesthesiology and intensive care, Advanced pain medicine, Critical care medicine, and ... post-operative recovery, intensive care medicine, and chronic and acute pain management. After residency, many ... Anesthesiologists provide medical care to patients in many different ways. During preoperative evaluation, in consultation with ...
The information in the operative report includes preoperative and postoperative diagnosis and the condition of the patient ... Standards for operative reports are set by the Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care (AAAHC) and the Joint ... An Operative report is a report written in a patient's medical record to document the details of a surgery. The operative ... Dictionary definition of operative report Sample operative reports. ...
Most practices do not include within their quoted fees the cost of pre-operative care and testing or any potential ... This is why a proper post-op diet and a good after-care plan are essential to success. A recent study found that patients who ... It is important to note that, in order to maintain their weight reduction, patients must carefully follow post-operative ... Some practices also bundle a set duration of post-operative follow-up visits for filling and unfilling the gastric band as ...
Gibbison, B; Spencer, R (December 2009). "Post-operative nausea and vomiting". Anesthesia & Intensive Care Medicine. 10 (12): ... high levels of pre-operative anxiety and patients with history of PONV in the past. ... Expectant use of post-operative Opioid medications Management[edit]. Because there is currently no single antiemetic available ... Postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) is the phenomenon of nausea, vomiting or retching experienced by a patient in the Post ...
The woman also is instructed about post-operative matters such as convalescence and the proper care of the surgical wounds to ... The medical treatment records for the reduction mammoplasty are established with pre-operative, multi-perspective photographs ... post-operative, on the day of the breast reduction surgery; to resume washing in a shower at 1-day post-operative; to avoid ... The post-operative convalescence is weeks long, depending upon the corrections performed; and some women might experience ...
Preoperative education is currently an important part of patient care. There is some evidence that it may slightly reduce ... Post-operative femoral fractures are graded by the Vancouver classification. Many long-term problems with hip replacements are ... Post operative sciatic nerve palsy is another possible complication. The incidence of this complication is low. Femoral nerve ... Post-operative projectional radiography is routinely performed to ensure proper configuration of hip prostheses. The direction ...
During the post-operative recovery period for a tonsillectomy or adenoidectomy, it is common for adult patients to experience a ... Care must be taken under such circumstances to avoid potentially fatal complications of refeeding syndrome. Psyhogeos, Matina ( ... Other drugs may be used to intentionally cause anorexia in order to help a patient preoperative fasting prior to general ... Home Care After Tonsillectomy and Adenoidectomy Jáuregui-Garrido, B; Jáuregui-Lobera, I (2012). "Sudden death in eating ...
... (PVE) is a preoperative procedure performed in interventional radiology to initiate hypertrophy of the anticipated future liver remnant a couple weeks prior to a major liver resection procedure. The procedure involves injecting the right or left portal vein with embolic material to occlude portal blood flow. By occluding the blood flow to areas of the liver that will be resected away, the blood is diverted to healthy parts of the liver and induces hyperplasia. This may allow for a more extensive resection or stage bilateral resections that would otherwise be contraindicated resulting in better oncological treatment outcomes. Indications for PVE depend on the ratio of future liver remnant (FLR) to total estimated liver volume (TELV) and liver condition. Although there is no consensus to the absolute minimum liver volume required for adequate post-resection liver function, a FLR/TELV ratio of at least 25% in recommended in patients with otherwise normal livers. The ...
... (desmethylalprazolam, marketed under the brand names ProSom, Eurodin) is a benzodiazepine derivative drug developed by Upjohn in the 1970s. It possesses anxiolytic, anticonvulsant, hypnotic, sedative and skeletal muscle relaxant properties. Estazolam is an intermediate-acting oral benzodiazepine. It is commonly prescribed for short-term treatment of insomnia. Estazolam is prescribed for the short-term treatment of certain sleep disorders. It is an effective hypnotic drug showing efficacy in increasing the time spent asleep as well as reducing awakenings during the night. Combination with non-pharmacological options for sleep management results in long-term improvements in sleep quality after discontinuation of short-term estazolam therapy. Estazolam is also sometimes used as a preoperative sleep aid. It was found to be superior to triazolam in side effect profile in preoperative patients in a trial. Estazolam also has anxiolytic properties and due to its long half life ...
... techniques include coronary catheterization, echocardiogram, Intravascular ultrasound, Cardiac PET scan, Cardiac CT scan and Cardiac MRI. A physician may recommend cardiac imaging to support a diagnosis of a heart condition. Medical specialty professional organizations discourage the use of routine cardiac imaging during pre-operative assessment for patients about to undergo low or mid-risk non-cardiac surgery because the procedure carries risks and is unlikely to result in the change of a patient's management. Stress cardiac imaging is discouraged in the evaluation of patients without cardiac symptoms or in routine follow-ups. Coronary catheterization uses pressure monitoring and blood sampling through a catheter inserted into the heart through blood vessels in the leg to determine the functioning of the heart, and, following injections of radiocontrast dye, uses X-ray fluoroscopy, typically at 30 frames per second, to visualize the position and volume of blood within the heart ...
The perioperative period (not to be confused with peroperative period - during the course of the operation) is the time period of a patient's surgical procedure. It commonly includes ward admission, anesthesia, surgery, and recovery. Perioperative may refer to the three phases of surgery: preoperative, peroperative, and postoperative, though it is a term most often used for the first and third of these only - a term which is often specifically utilized to imply 'around' the time of the surgery. The primary concern of perioperative care is to provide better conditions for patients before operation (sometimes construed as during operation) and after operation.[1] ...
... (POCD) is a decline in cognitive function (especially in memory and executive functions) that may last from a few days to a few weeks after surgery. In rare cases, this disorder may persist for several months after major surgery. POCD is distinct from emergence delirium. It occurs most commonly in older patients and those with pre-existing cognitive impairment. The causes of POCD are not understood. It does not appear to be caused by lack of oxygen or impaired blood flow to the brain and is equally likely under regional and general anesthesia. It may be mediated by the body's inflammatory response to surgery. POCD is common after cardiac surgery, and recent studies have now verified that POCD also exists after major non-cardiac surgery, although at a lower incidence. The risk of POCD increases with age, and the type of surgery is also important because there is a very low incidence associated with minor surgery. POCD is common in adult patients of all ages at ...
Coronary artery bypass surgery is a type of surgery that relieves chest pain, caused by lack of blood flow, and reduces the risk of death from heart disease. It is also known as coronary artery bypass graft (CABG, pronounced "cabbage") surgery, and known by doctors as heart bypass or bypass surgery. In this surgery, blood vessels from elsewhere in the patient's body are added to the heart vessels to go around blood vessels blocked by fat and get more blood into the heart so it can keep running. This surgery usually happens with the heart stopped, which makes machines that act as lungs and heart needed. However, it is possible to have the surgery with the heart still pumping, called "off-pump" surgery. ...
Complication, in medicine, is an unfavorable evolution or consequence of a disease, a health condition or a therapy. The disease can become worse in its severity or show a higher number of signs, symptoms or new pathological changes, become widespread throughout the body or affect other organ systems. A new disease may also appear as a complication to a previous existing disease. A medical treatment, such as drugs or surgery may produce adverse effects or produce new health problem(s) by itself. Therefore, a complication may be iatrogenic (i.e. literally brought forth by the physician).. Medical knowledge about a disease, procedure or treatment usually entails a list of the most common complications, so that they can be foreseen, prevented or recognized more easily and speedily.. Depending on the degree of vulnerability, susceptibility, age, health status, immune system condition, etc. complications may arise more easily. Complications affect adversely the prognosis of a disease. Non-invasive ...
After completion of surgery, the patient is transferred to the post anesthesia care unit and closely monitored. When the patient is judged to have recovered from the anesthesia, he/she is either transferred to a surgical ward elsewhere in the hospital or discharged home. During the post-operative period, the patient's general function is assessed, the outcome of the procedure is assessed, and the surgical site is checked for signs of infection. There are several risk factors associated with postoperative complications, such as immune deficiency and obesity. Obesity has long been considered a risk factor for adverse post-surgical outcomes. It has been linked to many disorders such as obesity hypoventilation syndrome, atelectasis and pulmonary embolism, adverse cardiovascular effects, and wound healing complications.[11] If removable skin closures are used, they are removed ...
The long-term complications of standing are the conditions that may arise after prolonged time in a standing or upright position including standing, walking or running. Many of the complications come from prolonged standing (more the 60% of a work day) that is repeated several times a week. There are many different jobs that require prolonged standing. These included: "retail staff, Baristas, bartenders, assembly line workers, security staff, engineers, catering staff, library assistants, hair stylists and laboratory technicians." Cornell university has calculated that "Standing requires ~20% more energy than sitting". There are no exact measures of how prevalent the complications are. However, European studies report that between one third and one half of all workers spend at least four hours per Working time (for an average workday of eight hours) standing or walking. One estimate from the United Kingdom stated that over 11 million people stand for long periods of time without rest. Proper ...
The perioperative period (not to be confused with peroperative period - during the course of the operation) is the time period of a patient's surgical procedure. It commonly includes ward admission, anesthesia, surgery, and recovery. Perioperative may refer to the three phases of surgery: preoperative, peroperative, and postoperative, though it is a term most often used for the first and third of these only - a term which is often specifically utilized to imply 'around' the time of the surgery. The primary concern of perioperative care is to provide better conditions for patients before operation (sometimes construed as during operation) and after operation.[1] ...
In the United States, as of 2006[citation needed], the Federal Reserve sets an interest rate target for the federal funds (overnight bank reserves) market. When the actual federal funds rate is higher than the target, the Federal Reserve Bank of New York will usually increase the money supply via a repurchase agreement (or repo), in which the Fed "lends" money to commercial banks. When the actual federal funds rate is less than the target, the Fed will usually decrease the money supply via a reverse repo, in which the banks purchase securities from the Fed. The Federal Reserve conducts open market operations with the objective of controlling short-term interest rates and the money supply. These operations fall into 2 categories: Dynamic open market operations are intended to change the level of reserves and the monetary base, and defensive open market operations are intended to offset movements in other factors that affect reserves and the monetary base, such as changes in Treasury deposits with ...
For each mission, one or more operational cells are created[clarify]. If al-Qaeda uses its typical modus operandi of multiple concurrent attacks, there may be an operational cell for each target location. Some operations may need support cells in the operational area. For example, it may be more secure to have a local cell build bombs, which will be delivered by cells coming from outside the area. "Operational cells are not created, but instead 'seeded' utilizing individuals spotted or that request assistance (both groups are 'vetted' by being trained under the observation of the core group, which dramatically restricts the opportunity for passing off walk-ins under false flag). Categorization of operational cells appears to be by capabilities, region, and then task/operation. Operational cells are composed of members whose worldview has been firmly tested-necessary to front-load, because such cells are dispersed back to their own local control (or negative control-proscribed behavior-with ...
To find the essential prime implicants, we run along the top row. We have to look for columns with only 1 "✓". If a column has only 1 "✓", this means that the minterm can only be covered by 1 prime implicant. This prime implicant is essential. For example: in the first column, with minterm 4, there is only 1 "✓". This means that m(4,12) is essential. So we place a star next to it. Minterm 15 also has only 1 "✓", so m(10,11,14,15) is also essential. Now all columns with 1 "✓" are covered. The second prime implicant can be 'covered' by the third and fourth, and the third prime implicant can be 'covered' by the second and first, and neither is thus essential. If a prime implicant is essential then, as would be expected, it is necessary to include it in the minimized boolean equation. In some cases, the essential prime implicants do not cover all minterms, in which case additional procedures for chart reduction can be employed. The simplest "additional procedure" is trial and error, but a ...
Preoperative and postoperative care ebooks from our Academic section for your eReader at great prices. ... It is aimed at all members of the operative team - anesthesiologists, technologists, neurophysiologists, surgeons, and nurses. ... Monitoring the Nervous System for Anesthesiologists and Other Health Care Professionalsby Antoun Koht; Tod B. Sloan; J. Richard ... Veel patiënten in een intensive care unit (ICU) worden behandeld vanwege meervoudig orgaanfalen. Zij ontwikkelen dit syndroom ...
The efficacy of a nurse-led preoperative cataract assessment and postoperative care clinic. ...
The pre-operative assessment and post-operative is critical for successful surgical procedures which will in turn lead to high ... The pre-operative assessment and post-operative is critical for successful surgical procedures which will in turn lead to high ... Third, I will present surgical techniques and discuss post-operative care. My objective for this presentation is to facilitate ... a better understanding of the importance of pre-operative assessment, post-operative care, and surgical techniques. Having a ...
Pre operative and Post Surgical care Instructions - Read about the instructions and know more about precautionary measures ... Home / For Patients / Pre and Post-Surgical Instructions Pre and Post-Surgical Instructions. Pre-Operative Instructions. At ... Post-Surgical Care. Following any surgical procedure some care is required for the wound or affected area to minimize the risk ... Post-Surgery Care involves appropriate pain relief medication, changing of dressings and wound care protocols as well as rest ...
Visit our site to learn more about preoperative and postoperative care tips! ... Pre-Operative Care. If you are undergoing a surgical procedure, its important to take care of your eyes before and after the ... Post-Operative Care. After the surgery, you will receive detailed instructions as to what activities you are allowed or not ... Our offices will communicate with your surgeon and assist in your post-operative care.. You will need to treat your eyes and ...
Preoperative smoking cessation: the role of the primary care provider. Mayo Clin Proc2005;80:252-8. ... Higham H, Sear JW, Neill F, et al. Peri-operative silent myocardial ischaemia and long-term adverse outcomes in non-cardiac ... Bluman LG, Mosca L, Newman N, et al. Preoperative smoking habits and postoperative pulmonary complications. Chest1998;113:883-9 ... Effects of preoperative smoking cessation on the incidence and risk of intraoperative and postoperative complications in adult ...
We cover: • Pre-operative care • Exercise demonstration • Injury prevention • Post-operative precautions • Family education • ... Post-Operative • Spinal Rehabilitation • Balance Disorders • Post-Fracture • CVA (Stroke) • Scoliosis • Tendonitis • Joint ... Want to make a change in your life? Interested in health care? We offer hands-on-training in a variety of health care fields. ... Learn to Manage the Business side of Health Care by studying in Health Care Administration. Call now to find out more ...
They are at your side at every step of the way through the procedure providing expert care and advice. ... Pre-Operative Care. A stoma nurse will meet with patients and their families prior to the operation to explain the procedure, ... Post-Operative Care. After the surgery, the stoma nurse will carry out the surgeons orders and work with other hospital staff ... They will show you how to care for your stoma and how to empty and change out the bags or pouches. The stoma nurse will prepare ...
Readmission to hospital for wound care;. *Invasive procedures required for wound care (drainage of hematoma, seroma or infected ... some studies suggest it may be possible to reduce the incidence of acute wound healing complications associated with pre-operative ... Preoperative vs Postoperative IMRT for Extremity/Truncal STS. The safety and scientific validity of this study is the ... Radiation: Preoperative intensity modulated radiation therapy Radiation: Postoperative intensity modulated radiation therapy ...
Pre-operative care. Take your rabbit to the vet well before the operation date for a health check and to discuss the procedure ... Post-operative care. Your rabbit should be awake, alert and preferably eating when you collect it after surgery. Remember to ... Ask whether any pre-operative blood tests are advised. Dont change the diet in the week or so before surgery. Rabbits cannot ... By Post. Rabbit Welfare Association and Fund. Enigma House. Culmhead Business Park. Taunton. Somerset. TA3 7DY ...
... there is very little information available about how best to care for a Caesarean ... Pre-operative preparation:. Whether your Caesarean is planned or not, it is advisable to manage your expectations of your scar ... 0 to 6 weeks post Caesarean:. During the first 6 weeks post-surgery, the focus naturally moves to your new baby. However, it is ... How have you cared for your Caesarean section scar? Share your tips and tricks by emailing [email protected] ...
Preoperative Care Recommendations. If you are planning to have a breast augmentation with silicone implants, you should find a ... Postsurgery Care Tips. First of all, it is important to note that, if you have breast implants, it is safe to surf and catch ... Thus, extra care should be taken, and bra compression will be needed when practicing sports. You should discuss with your ...
Efficacy of Pre-operative Oral Pregabalin in Ambulatory Inguinal Hernia Repair for Post Operative Pain. The safety and ... Quadruple (Participant, Care Provider, Investigator, Outcomes Assessor). Primary Purpose:. Prevention. Official Title:. ... Efficacy of Pre-operative Oral Pregabalin in Ambulatory Inguinal Hernia Repair for Post Operative Pain. ... Severity of Post operative nausea and vomiting (PONV) graded with mild, moderare and severe(Vomiting) Side effect of medication ...
Provide pre and/or postoperative education*. Provide preoperative care*. Provide intraoperative care*. Manage client during and ... Evaluate client response to post-operative interventions to prevent complications (e.g., prevent. aspiration, promote venous ... Provide intrapartum care and education (e.g., care provided during labor and birth). Provide post-partum care and education*. ... Safe and Effective Care Environment. Management of Care. Management of Care - The nurse provides and directs nursing care that ...
Video Institution: Christiana Care Health System. Pre-operative planning & strategies for elective vs emergent paraesophageal ... Posted on. 09/18/2018. Learning Themes. Foregut, Hernia. Sources. 2018 Annual Meeting. Masters Level. 200. Video Authors. ...
PREOPERATIVE AND POSTOPERATIVE CARE. Before entering into a surgical procedure, the patient must be screened for complicating ... The preoperative counseling should outline the operative preparations and the general procedure in detail. A summary of the ... Finally, on the evening before surgery a vaginal cleansing douche should guarantee a clean operative field. Preoperative ... Preferably, no solid fecal evacuation should challenge the repair until late in the postoperative period. Postoperative sitz ...
Pre-operative assessment. * Post-operative management. * The acute abdomen. * Trauma. * Skin, soft tissue and hernias. ... Post-operative care. * Pain management. * Fluid balance. * Wounds and wound healing. * Fever. * Shock. * Discharge arrangements ... Develop a sense of perspective of surgery in the arena of health care. 6. By the end of Year IV a student should be able to ... Operative procedures. * Admission of elective and emergency cases. Students must realise that the amount of formal tuition ( ...
One-half month in a preoperative evaluation clinic. *One-half month in a post anesthesia care unit ... PGY-4 and PGY-5 years, residents may elect to participate in pediatric anesthesia pre-operative clinic to meet this requirement ... It is easy to imagine a dual-trained physician working one-on-one with a patient in the preoperative clinic one day, the ... Additionally, there is the possibility of mixing tracts in unique ways such as pediatric critical care and pain medicine or ...
Trauma Care - Traction Boot - Extension Boot. For perfect customising of the foot and fracture pain relief. for extension ... For post-operative use, the straps can be removed and the boot is convert to a Standard- or Smooth-Version. ... Postoperative Care. Overview Postoperative Care. Foot:. Relief Dual® Off-loading Shoe. OrthoWedge Off-loading Shoe. OrthoWedge ... Diabetic and Wound Care. Overview Diabetic and Wound Care. Acute Care:. Relief Dual® Off-loading Shoe. AllRound Shoe® Closed ...
Surgical neonates - pathway for provision and location of intensive care. *Surgery - pre-operative and post-operative care of ... Preoperative care. *Follow standard steps for preoperative care. Postoperative care. *Follow the standard steps for ...
Post-operative care. End-stage lung disease. Pediatric Thoracic Anesthesia. "Key Points" summarizing each chapters Highlights ... Preoperative evaluation of the patient. Airway procedures. Mediastinal procedures. The complicating factors of significant co- ...
Post-Laminectomy Syndrome. *Pre-Operative Care. *Primary Care for Adolescents. *Psoriasis. *Radiculopathy (Not Due to Disc ... Care Philosophy. A dual service facility dedicated to diagnosis and treatment of acute and chronic disease, chronic disease ... Review your doctorHelp Millions of people find the right doctor and care they need ... Check the quality of care at hospitals where Dr. Jones. treats patients. ...
Post-Operative Care. *Pre-Operative Care. *Presbyopia. *Primary Open Angle Glaucoma. *Prism Lenses ... Care PhilosophyBiography. "Vision is a huge part of how we live our daily lives. Improving quality of life by enhancing vision ... Review your doctorHelp Millions of people find the right doctor and care they need ...
Intensive Care & Post Operative Management. Complications of Transplantation. Pancreas Transplantation. Background & ... Preoperative Assessment & Preparation. Anaesthesia. Donor Hepatectomy & Retrieval. Orthotopic Liver Transplant. Reduced Lobe ... Adolescent Medicine and Transition Care post Transplantation. Physical and Psycho-social Development post Transplantation. ... "I have no doubt that this will prove to be a valuable reference text for all clinicians involved in the surgical care of ...
Anesthetic Management, Preoperative and Postoperative Care. Techniques of Biliary Tract Intervention: Radiologic, Endoscopic, ... Blumgarts own archives, as well as operative videos from the Memorial Sloan Kettering video library, showing you how to ...
  • The reasons for this are likely multifactorial, but are in part related to total dose delivered (50 Gray (GY) preoperatively and 60-66 Gy postoperatively) and, based on a previous National Cancer Institute (Canada) Phase III randomized controlled trial, the much larger volume treated in the postoperative setting compared to that in the preoperative setting. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Preoperative airway management includes consideration of need for intubation and mechanical ventilation and chest radiography to confirm endotracheal tube position, to assess lung volumes and to evaluate cardiomegaly. (intechopen.com)
  • The care of the animals going through surgical procedures for any study starts at the moment you order them. (labroots.com)
  • Currently the Principal at CP LegalMed Consulting and a Staff Nurse in ICE at UC San Diego Health System, Ms. Paine specializes in Critical Care, Interventional Radiology, Medical Surgical, and Discharge Planning . (experts.com)
  • A quasi-experimental differences-in-differences (DID) approach evaluated whether professional guidance in 2002 was associated with changes in pre-operative screening patterns while adjusting for temporal styles in routine screening as captured by screening patterns in general medical exams. (exposed-skin-care.net)
  • Also, our oncologists have expertise in palliative care to treat cancer-associated symptoms, providing for the best quality of life. (uhhospitals.org)
  • Identify scenarios when critical care coding is appropriate and when it is not. (facs.org)
  • Critical care is an audit target! (facs.org)
  • Community and professional educational seminars on critical care and transport topics available upon request. (childrensmercy.org)
  • After a mysterious illness ravages Zei's lungs and leaves her fighting for life, the critical care team re-invents its life support protocols to push the limits of medicine to give her a chance. (childrensmercy.org)
  • An overall decrease in opioid use was found in the postoperative follow-up phase after lumbar fusion in both the county and managed care hospitals. (jaoa.org)
  • Overall, the difference in decreased opioid use between county and managed care hospitals after lumbar fusion was not significant. (jaoa.org)
  • I have no doubt that this will prove to be a valuable reference text for all clinicians involved in the surgical care of children with disorders of the liver, biliary tract and pancreas, and for hepatobiliary specialists themselves. (routledge.com)