Popliteal Vein: The vein formed by the union of the anterior and posterior tibial veins; it courses through the popliteal space and becomes the femoral vein.Aneurysm: Pathological outpouching or sac-like dilatation in the wall of any blood vessel (ARTERIES or VEINS) or the heart (HEART ANEURYSM). It indicates a thin and weakened area in the wall which may later rupture. Aneurysms are classified by location, etiology, or other characteristics.Intracranial Aneurysm: Abnormal outpouching in the wall of intracranial blood vessels. Most common are the saccular (berry) aneurysms located at branch points in CIRCLE OF WILLIS at the base of the brain. Vessel rupture results in SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE or INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES. Giant aneurysms (>2.5 cm in diameter) may compress adjacent structures, including the OCULOMOTOR NERVE. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p841)Veins: The vessels carrying blood away from the capillary beds.Femoral Vein: The vein accompanying the femoral artery in the same sheath; it is a continuation of the popliteal vein and becomes the external iliac vein.Aneurysm, Infected: Aneurysm due to growth of microorganisms in the arterial wall, or infection arising within preexisting arteriosclerotic aneurysms.Venous Insufficiency: Impaired venous blood flow or venous return (venous stasis), usually caused by inadequate venous valves. Venous insufficiency often occurs in the legs, and is associated with EDEMA and sometimes with VENOUS STASIS ULCERS at the ankle.Ultrasonography, Doppler, Duplex: Ultrasonography applying the Doppler effect combined with real-time imaging. The real-time image is created by rapid movement of the ultrasound beam. A powerful advantage of this technique is the ability to estimate the velocity of flow from the Doppler shift frequency.Saphenous Vein: The vein which drains the foot and leg.Aortic Aneurysm: An abnormal balloon- or sac-like dilatation in the wall of AORTA.Phlebography: Radiographic visualization or recording of a vein after the injection of contrast medium.Skin Diseases, Vascular: Skin diseases affecting or involving the cutaneous blood vessels and generally manifested as inflammation, swelling, erythema, or necrosis in the affected area.Varicose Veins: Enlarged and tortuous VEINS.Heart Aneurysm: A localized bulging or dilatation in the muscle wall of a heart (MYOCARDIUM), usually in the LEFT VENTRICLE. Blood-filled aneurysms are dangerous because they may burst. Fibrous aneurysms interfere with the heart function through the loss of contractility. True aneurysm is bound by the vessel wall or cardiac wall. False aneurysms are HEMATOMA caused by myocardial rupture.Aortic Aneurysm, Thoracic: An abnormal balloon- or sac-like dilatation in the wall of the THORACIC AORTA. This proximal descending portion of aorta gives rise to the visceral and the parietal branches above the aortic hiatus at the diaphragm.Transducers, Pressure: Transducers that are activated by pressure changes, e.g., blood pressure.Venous Pressure: The blood pressure in the VEINS. It is usually measured to assess the filling PRESSURE to the HEART VENTRICLE.Leg: The inferior part of the lower extremity between the KNEE and the ANKLE.Aneurysm, Dissecting: Aneurysm caused by a tear in the TUNICA INTIMA of a blood vessel leading to interstitial HEMORRHAGE, and splitting (dissecting) of the vessel wall, often involving the AORTA. Dissection between the intima and media causes luminal occlusion. Dissection at the media, or between the media and the outer adventitia causes aneurismal dilation.Venous Valves: Flaps within the VEINS that allow the blood to flow only in one direction. They are usually in the medium size veins that carry blood to the heart against gravity.Vascular Surgical Procedures: Operative procedures for the treatment of vascular disorders.Venous Thrombosis: The formation or presence of a blood clot (THROMBUS) within a vein.Embolization, Therapeutic: A method of hemostasis utilizing various agents such as Gelfoam, silastic, metal, glass, or plastic pellets, autologous clot, fat, and muscle as emboli. It has been used in the treatment of spinal cord and INTRACRANIAL ARTERIOVENOUS MALFORMATIONS, renal arteriovenous fistulas, gastrointestinal bleeding, epistaxis, hypersplenism, certain highly vascular tumors, traumatic rupture of blood vessels, and control of operative hemorrhage.Iliac Aneurysm: Abnormal balloon- or sac-like dilatation in the wall of any one of the iliac arteries including the common, the internal, or the external ILIAC ARTERY.Catheterization, Peripheral: Insertion of a catheter into a peripheral artery, vein, or airway for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes.Intermittent Pneumatic Compression Devices: Instruments that generate intermittent forces, uniformed or graduated, to facilitate the emptying of VEINS. These devices are used to reduce limb EDEMA and prevent venous THROMBOEMBOLISM, such as deep vein thrombosis in the legs.Thrombophlebitis: Inflammation of a vein associated with a blood clot (THROMBUS).Coronary Aneurysm: Abnormal balloon- or sac-like dilatation in the wall of CORONARY VESSELS. Most coronary aneurysms are due to CORONARY ATHEROSCLEROSIS, and the rest are due to inflammatory diseases, such as KAWASAKI DISEASE.Popliteal Cyst: A SYNOVIAL CYST located in the back of the knee, in the popliteal space arising from the semimembranous bursa or the knee joint.Postphlebitic Syndrome: A condition characterized by a chronically swollen limb, often a leg with stasis dermatitis and ulcerations. This syndrome can appear soon after phlebitis or years later. Postphlebitic syndrome is the result of damaged or incompetent venous valves in the limbs. Distended, tortuous VARICOSE VEINS are usually present. Leg pain may occur after long period of standing.Portal Vein: A short thick vein formed by union of the superior mesenteric vein and the splenic vein.Blood Vessel Prosthesis Implantation: Surgical insertion of BLOOD VESSEL PROSTHESES to repair injured or diseased blood vessels.Cerebral Angiography: Radiography of the vascular system of the brain after injection of a contrast medium.Aneurysm, False: Not an aneurysm but a well-defined collection of blood and CONNECTIVE TISSUE outside the wall of a blood vessel or the heart. It is the containment of a ruptured blood vessel or heart, such as sealing a rupture of the left ventricle. False aneurysm is formed by organized THROMBUS and HEMATOMA in surrounding tissue.Aortic Rupture: The tearing or bursting of the wall along any portion of the AORTA, such as thoracic or abdominal. It may result from the rupture of an aneurysm or it may be due to TRAUMA.Constriction, Pathologic: The condition of an anatomical structure's being constricted beyond normal dimensions.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Blood Vessel Prosthesis: Device constructed of either synthetic or biological material that is used for the repair of injured or diseased blood vessels.Ultrasonography, Doppler, Color: Ultrasonography applying the Doppler effect, with the superposition of flow information as colors on a gray scale in a real-time image. This type of ultrasonography is well-suited to identifying the location of high-velocity flow (such as in a stenosis) or of mapping the extent of flow in a certain region.Jugular Veins: Veins in the neck which drain the brain, face, and neck into the brachiocephalic or subclavian veins.Pulmonary Veins: The veins that return the oxygenated blood from the lungs to the left atrium of the heart.Plethysmography: Recording of change in the size of a part as modified by the circulation in it.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Aorta, Abdominal: The aorta from the DIAPHRAGM to the bifurcation into the right and left common iliac arteries.Pulmonary Embolism: Blocking of the PULMONARY ARTERY or one of its branches by an EMBOLUS.Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Bleeding into the intracranial or spinal SUBARACHNOID SPACE, most resulting from INTRACRANIAL ANEURYSM rupture. It can occur after traumatic injuries (SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE, TRAUMATIC). Clinical features include HEADACHE; NAUSEA; VOMITING, nuchal rigidity, variable neurological deficits and reduced mental status.Endovascular Procedures: Minimally invasive procedures, diagnostic or therapeutic, performed within the BLOOD VESSELS. They may be perfomed via ANGIOSCOPY; INTERVENTIONAL MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING; INTERVENTIONAL RADIOGRAPHY; or INTERVENTIONAL ULTRASONOGRAPHY.Angiography, Digital Subtraction: A method of delineating blood vessels by subtracting a tissue background image from an image of tissue plus intravascular contrast material that attenuates the X-ray photons. The background image is determined from a digitized image taken a few moments before injection of the contrast material. The resulting angiogram is a high-contrast image of the vessel. This subtraction technique allows extraction of a high-intensity signal from the superimposed background information. The image is thus the result of the differential absorption of X-rays by different tissues.Aortography: Radiographic visualization of the aorta and its branches by injection of contrast media, using percutaneous puncture or catheterization procedures.Supine Position: The posture of an individual lying face up.Dermatitis: Any inflammation of the skin.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Mesenteric Veins: Veins which return blood from the intestines; the inferior mesenteric vein empties into the splenic vein, the superior mesenteric vein joins the splenic vein to form the portal vein.Renal Veins: Short thick veins which return blood from the kidneys to the vena cava.Iliac Vein: A vein on either side of the body which is formed by the union of the external and internal iliac veins and passes upward to join with its fellow of the opposite side to form the inferior vena cava.Stents: Devices that provide support for tubular structures that are being anastomosed or for body cavities during skin grafting.Blood Flow Velocity: A value equal to the total volume flow divided by the cross-sectional area of the vascular bed.Surgical Instruments: Hand-held tools or implements used by health professionals for the performance of surgical tasks.Regional Blood Flow: The flow of BLOOD through or around an organ or region of the body.Umbilical Veins: Venous vessels in the umbilical cord. They carry oxygenated, nutrient-rich blood from the mother to the FETUS via the PLACENTA. In humans, there is normally one umbilical vein.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Hepatic Veins: Veins which drain the liver.Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Angiography: Radiography of blood vessels after injection of a contrast medium.Hemodynamics: The movement and the forces involved in the movement of the blood through the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM.Cerebral Veins: Veins draining the cerebrum.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Prosthesis Design: The plan and delineation of prostheses in general or a specific prosthesis.Subclavian Vein: The continuation of the axillary vein which follows the subclavian artery and then joins the internal jugular vein to form the brachiocephalic vein.Splenic Vein: Vein formed by the union (at the hilus of the spleen) of several small veins from the stomach, pancreas, spleen and mesentery.
He did this using a saphenous vein graft to restore continuity after excision of a syphilitic aneurysm of the popliteal artery ... Pringle, J. H. (1913). "Two Cases of Vein-Grafting for the Maintenance of a Direct Arterial Circulation". The Lancet. 181 (4687 ... "An assistant," he wrote, "held the portal vein and the hepatic artery between a finger and thumb and completely arrested all ... Pringle was the first surgeon in Britain to carry out a free vein graft. ...
Popliteal aneurysm and hemorrhage: A popliteal aneurysm (abnormal dilation of all or part of the popliteal artery) usually ... Anteriorly: The popliteal surface of the femur, the knee joint, and the popliteus muscle. Posteriorly: The popliteal vein and ... Popliteal pulse: Because the popliteal artery is deep, it may be difficult to feel the popliteal pulse. Palpation of this pulse ... Popliteal artery entrapment syndrome Popliteal artery The popliteal, posterior tibial, and peroneal arteries. Muscles of thigh ...
Rich and Hughes described popliteal vein compression,[citation needed] thus adding a fifth type into the former classification ... This repetitive trauma may result in stenotic artery degeneration, complete artery occlusion or even formation of an aneurysm. ... according to the various relationships between the popliteal artery and the muscles of the popliteal space. ... The popliteal artery may be compressed behind the knee, due to congenital deformity of the muscles or tendon insertions of the ...
... including the femoral vein, the popliteal vein, and the iliofemoral vein (as with May-Thurner syndrome). Extensive lower- ... Other differential diagnoses include hematoma, tumors, venous or arterial aneurysms, and connective tissue disorders. ... DVT below the popliteal vein, a proximal vein behind the knee, is classified as distal and has limited clinical significance ... Deep vein thrombosis (DVT), is the formation of a blood clot in a deep vein, most commonly the legs. Symptoms may include pain ...
Diagnosis is confirmed by ultrasonography, although if needed and there is no suspicion of a popliteal artery aneurysm then ... is a deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Quick assessment of the possibility of DVT may be required where a Baker's cyst has compressed ... popliteal cyst) is located behind the knee and is a swelling of the popliteal bursa. In this image, the Baker's cyst is the ... A Baker's cyst, also known as a popliteal cyst, is a benign swelling of the semimembranosus or more rarely some other synovial ...
Pompe's disease Poncet-Spiegler's cylindroma Pontoneocerebellar Hypoplasia Popliteal pterygium syndrome lethal type Popliteal ... Pulmonar arterioveinous aneurysm Pulmonary agenesis Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, congenital Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis ... deficiency of Pulmonary valve stenosis Pulmonary valves agenesis Pulmonary veins stenosis Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease ... hereditary coproporphyria Portal hypertension due to infrahepatic block Portal hypertension Portal thrombosis Portal vein ...
If the femoral artery has to be ligated surgically to treat a popliteal aneurysm, blood can still reach the popliteal artery ... The femoral vein intervenes between the artery and the adductor longus. Medially: It is related to the femoral vein in the ... It enters and passes through the adductor canal, and becomes the popliteal artery as it passes through an opening in adductor ... Its first three or four centimetres are enclosed, with the femoral vein, in the femoral sheath. The relations of the femoral ...
This reduces the risk of stroke or a rupture of an aneurysm. The ELANA technique is a subtle modification of other methods to ... For example, a femoral-popliteal bypass ("fem-pop") might be used if the femoral artery is occluded. A fem-pop bypass may refer ... Such a bypass is referred to as an arteriovenous fistula if it directly connects a vein to an artery without using synthetic ... In general, someone's own vein (autograft) is the preferred graft material (or conduit) for a vascular bypass, but other types ...
The brain, including cerebral aneurysms, berry aneurysms, and Charcot-Bouchard aneurysms. The legs, including the popliteal ... This test combines a regular CT scan with a contrast dye injected into a vein. Once the dye is injected into a vein, it travels ... including coronary artery aneurysms, ventricular aneurysms, aneurysm of sinus of Valsalva, and aneurysms following cardiac ... Without treatment, these aneurysms will ultimately progress and rupture. Infection. A mycotic aneurysm is an aneurysm that ...
The brain, including cerebral aneurysms, berry aneurysms, and Charcot-Bouchard aneurysms.. *The legs, including the popliteal ... A false aneurysm, or pseudoaneurysm, is a collection of blood leaking completely out of an artery or vein, but confined next to ... The heart, including coronary artery aneurysms, ventricular aneurysms, aneurysm of sinus of Valsalva, and aneurysms following ... Most aneurysms develop after the age of 40.[citation needed]. Pediatric aneurysmsEdit. Pediatric aneurysms have different ...
Gordon, S (7 April 1883). "Aneurysm of both Popliteal Arteries: Cure by Ligature of the Femoral Arteries: At Three Years' ... These large vessel are the: Femoral artery (also known in this location as the common femoral artery) and Femoral vein ...
Thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair. Thoracic outlet syndrome. Surgical decompression. Varicose veins. Vein stripping ... Popliteal artery entrapment syndrome. Portal hypertension. Portosystemic shunt. Pseudoaneurysm. Covered stent Surgical ligation ... Vascular surgery also involves surgery of veins, for conditions such as May-Thurner syndrome and for varicose veins. In some ... The UK Small Aneurysm Trial Participants". Lancet. 352 (9141): 1649-55. November 1998. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(98)10137-X. PMID ...
Varicose veins - Veins that have become enlarged and tortuous with failed valves, commonly in the legs. Vericose veins have ... Aortic aneurysm - Aneurysm of the aorta, typically of the abdominal aorta (abdominal aortic aneurysm or AAA). They are ... popliteal, posterior tibial, radial, temporal, ulnar Heart rate Pulse quality: pulsus paradoxus, pulsus parvus et tardus ... Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) - Formation of a thrombus in a deep vein, commonly in the legs that may ...
SLC6A4 Aortic aneurysm, familial thoracic 4; 132900; MYH11 Aortic aneurysm, familial thoracic 6; 611788; ACTA2 Aortic valve ... RARS2 Popliteal pterygium syndrome; 119500; IRF6 POR deficiency; 201750; POR Porencephaly; 175780; COL4A1 Porokeratosis, ... ATP1A2 Alveolar capillary dysplasia with misalignment of pulmonary veins; 265380; FOXF1 Alveolar soft part sarcoma; 606243; ... aneurysms, and muscle cramps; 611773; COL4A1 Aniridia; 106210; PAX6 Anonychia congenita; 206800; RSPO4 Anterior segment ...
If the femoral artery has to be ligated surgically to treat a popliteal aneurysm, blood can still reach the popliteal artery ... The femoral vein intervenes between the artery and the adductor longus.. *Medially: It is related to the femoral vein in the ... Its first three or four centimetres are enclosed, with the femoral vein, in the femoral sheath. The relations of the femoral ... It enters and passes through the adductor canal, and becomes the popliteal artery as it passes through an opening in adductor ...
Popliteal Vein. Iliac Aneurysm. Abstract. A 77 year old man with known ischaemic heart disease and p paroxysmal a trial ... A, P., S, C., Ahmed, M., A, K., & Lagattolla, N. (2016). Popliteal artery aneurysms masquerading as deep vein thrombosis. ... Parvaiz A, Chandran S, Muhammad Ahmed, Karim A, Nrf Lagattolla, Popliteal artery aneurysms masquerading as deep vein thrombosis ... He was taken to theatre, and a reversed long saphenous vein femoro-popliteal bypass graft was performed with the graft ...
... popliteal artery; pa: pseudoaneursym of the popliteal artery; v: popliteal vein; av: aneurysm of the popliteal vein. ... aneurysm of the popliteal vein; v: popliteal vein; (B) Medial surgical access; the arrow indicates the proximal anastomosis of ... Keywords: arteriovenous fistula; wounds and injuries; popliteal artery; popliteal vein; aneurysm, false; surgery ... a left popliteal artery pseudoaneurysm with a 2.6 cm diameter and an aneurysm of the popliteal vein with a 5 cm diameter ( ...
The junction of the anterior tibial vein and posterior tibial vein, near the knee, defines where the popliteal originates. ... Near the popliteal artery the popliteal vein follows and carries blood from the knee (as well as the thigh and calf muscles) ... Surgery is usually used to treat these aneurysms. Aneurysm in the popliteal vein may or may not cause symptoms, but will be ... The popliteal artery, located behind the knee, is where the popliteal vein begins to extend. The popliteal vein drains the ...
... of a Long-Segment Aneurysm from the Iliac to Popliteal Artery Associated with Arteriovenous Malformation and Varicose Veins ... A 58-year-old male patient with severe claudication due to thrombosis of the left ilio-femoro-popliteal artery aneurysm. He ... Long-term follow-up is needed to define the fate of aneurysms and varicose vein graft. ... Thrombosis of a Long-Segment Aneurysm from the Iliac to Popliteal Artery Associated with A ...
Popliteal Vein Aneurysm Associated with Varicose Veins, Hydrocele, and Multiple Congenital Popliteal Vein Aneurysm Associated ... Popliteal vein aneurysms (PVAs) represent a rare form of venous aneurysms and necessitate prompt management because of their ... Adult , Aneurysm , Chronic Pain , Humans , Lower Extremity , Osteoma , Physical Examination , Popliteal Vein , Pulmonary ... Popliteal Vein / Pulmonary Embolism / Varicose Veins / Humans / Ultrasonography / Adult / Lower Extremity / Chronic Pain ...
Osteochondroma Complicated by a Popliteal Vein Aneurysm- A Rare Case Report.. Sethi S, Prakash M, Dhal A, Puri SK. ...
A Case Series of Plication for Popliteal Vein Aneurysms March 2020. Robert Beaulieu , Anna Boniakowski , Chandu Vemuri , Dawn ... Deep Vein Stenting Is the Only Therapy to Improve Healing of Venous Leg Ulcerations in Patients With Deep Venous Stenosis March ... Quality and Readability of Online Patient Resources for Varicose Veins-Do We Know What Is Out There? March 2020 ... Twelve-Month Results of a Clinical Feasibility Study for Endovenous Valve Formation to Treat Deep Vein Reflux March 2020 ...
A new technique is described involving percutaneous catheterisation of the innominate vein via a right second intercostal space ... 20806145 - [a rare aneurysm of the popliteal vein].. 3105275 - The role of dural anomalies in vein of galen aneurysms: report ... the middle thyroid vein in infants; and on the inferior epigastric vein, the azygos vein, the iliac vein, and even the inferior ... central vein catheterisation by the subclavian or internal jugular vein, or by a cutdown. There remains, however, a small ...
Aneurysm of the interventricular septum without a shunt was found by means of transthoracic echocardiography in a 6-year-old ... 16878638 - Popliteal vein aneurysm presenting as a popliteal mass.. 17576738 - Hepatic artery aneurysm rupture in a woman with ... Heart Aneurysm / complications*, ultrasonography. Heart Septum. Heart Ventricles. Hemiplegia / etiology. Humans. Male. ... Aneurysm of the interventricular septum without a shunt was found by means of transthoracic echocardiography in a 6-year-old ...
Saphenous mononeuropathy after popliteal vein aneurysm repair [Case Report]. Shenoy, Anant M; Wiesman, Janice ...
Three groups of leg veins that are affected by different clinical conditions can be distinguished: Epifascial (superficial) ... McDevitt DT, Lohr JM, Martin KD, Welling RE, Sampson MG (1993) Bilateral popliteal vein aneurysms. Ann Vasc Surg 7:282-286 ... Rubin BG, Beak BI, Reilly JM (1995) Fusiform aneurysms of the popliteal vein. In: The American venous forum 7th annual meeting ... Gabrielli R, Vitale S, Constanzo A, Carra A (2010) Our experience of popliteal vein aneurysm. Interact Cardiovasc Thorac Surg ...
Shenoy AM, Wiesman J. Saphenous mononeuropathy after popliteal vein aneurysm repair. Neurologist. 2010 Jan; 16(1):47-9. PMID: ...
All popliteal artery injuries were treated by femoropopliteal bypass graft with autogenous saphenous vein. The external iliac ... Arterial injuries consisted of 8 axillary or subclavian branch artery aneurysms with embolization, 6 popliteal artery injuries ... Although the number of open aneurysm repairs has remained the same, the complexity of the open aneurysm experience has ... In our experience, endovascular aneurysm repair reduced the overall aneurysm-related death rate when compared to open repair. ...
Patients with aneurysms of the ulnar artery underwent excision and reversed autogenous vein grafting (n = 11) from the distal ... All popliteal artery injuries were treated by femoropopliteal bypass graft with autogenous saphenous vein. The external iliac ... Distal saphenous vein from the ankle or foot was the graft source in 16 procedures and basilic vein the source in one procedure ... Human saphenous veins were obtained at surgery and assayed immediately (n = 10). The veins were cut into rings, suspended in ...
Risse M , Reuhl J, Ogbuihi S, et al. Traumatic venous aneurysm of the popliteal vein with outcome: a case report and review of ... Traumatic false aneurysm of the femoral vein has never been reported in the English literature. Patients with venous aneurysm ... A false aneurysm 1 × 2 cm in size was detected on the common femoral vein. This was assumed to be responsible for the symptoms ... Sigg P , Koella C h, Stobe C h, et al. Popliteal venous aneurysm, a cause of pulmonary embolism. Vasa 2003;32:221-4. ...
Popliteal artery aneurysms masquerading as deep vein thrombosis. Ann King Edward Med Uni Apr - Jun 2004;10(2):205-207. ...
... including popliteal artery aneurysm or venous aneurysm, popliteal deep vein thrombosis, or soft-tissue masses [16-18], were not ... Popliteal cysts or Baker cysts represent a distended gastrocnemio-semimembranosus bursa. First description of popliteal cysts ... There was no correlation between patient age and the size of the popliteal cyst (Pearsons , ). All cysts showed the ... or aneurysms of the large popliteal vessels were not seen in our study group. ...
The venous aneurysm involved the medial gastrocnemius vein near its confluence in the popliteal vein and was surgically ... A large venous aneurysm in the left popliteal fossa was detected by chance in a 44-year-old woman one month after a compressive ... Venous aneurysms are uncommon. They can involve both superficial and deep venous systems. We hereby present a unique case of ... Histopathology evidenced a true venous aneurysm. The patient was discharged under oral anticoagulation for three months. At one ...
8. Bohra AK, Doyle T, Harvey C. True aneurysm of a femoro-popliteal vein graft. Int J Clin Pract 2001;55:725–726. 9. Chalmers ... Biederer et al reported a case of late false aneurysm formation in the body of a PTFE femoro-popliteal bypass graft 7 years ... Miller G, Elliott G. False aneurysm in a Teflon femoro-popliteal bypass graft. Can Med J 1961;84:1200–1201. 19. Samson RH, ... Histopathological analysis of vein graft aneurysms demonstrates endothelial disruption, medial necrosis, loss of elastic ...
Surgical treatment of popliteal venous aneurysms. Ann Vasc Surg. 2015 Aug; 29: (6)1084-9. View PubMed ... Relief of iliofemoral vein occlusion with the Palma bypass in a patient with Klippel Trenaunay syndrome. Ann Vasc Surg. 2003 ... Outcomes of endovascular and contemporary open surgical repairs of popliteal artery aneurysm. J Vasc Surg. 2014 Sep; 60(3):631- ... Results of elective and emergency endovascular repairs of popliteal artery aneurysms. J Vasc Surg. 2013 May; 57(5):1299-305. ...
Popliteal aneurysm, Venous insufficiency, Aneurysm, Aortic aneurysm, Arterial aneurysm, Thoracic aortic aneurysm, Vascular ... Thoracic aortic aneurysm, Varicose vein, Popliteal artery entrapment syndrome, Renal artery aneurysm, Critical limb ischemia, ... Venous aneurysm, Deep vein thrombosis, Venous insufficiency, Renal artery aneurysm, Popliteal artery entrapment syndrome, ... Aortic aneurysm, Aortic disorder, Varicose vein, Lymphedema, Popliteal aneurysm, Vascular graft infection, Cerebrovascular ...
Find out information about popliteal vein. A vein passing through the popliteal space, formed by merging of the tibial veins ... and continuing to become the femoral vein Explanation of popliteal vein ... We present a case of an asymptomatic popliteal vein aneurysm detected on routine investigation of varicose veins.. Popliteal ... popliteal vein. Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia. popliteal vein. [päp′lid·ē·əl ′vān] (anatomy) A vein ...
Osteochondroma Complicated by a Popliteal Vein Aneurysm- A Rare Case Report TD05-TD06 ... Adult Idiopathic Renal Vein Thrombosis Mimicking Acute Pyelonephritis PD18-PD19 Arpan Choudhary, Prasenjit Majee, Rupesh Gupta ... Portal Vein Thrombosis and Arterioportal Fistula in Post Liver Transplant Recipient: A Case Report TD13-TD15 ...
Other vascular applications include coronary arteries, carotid arteries, vascular aneurysms, and peripheral arteries and veins ... e.g., renal, iliac, femoral, popliteal, subclavian, aorta, intracranial, etc.). Other nonvascular applications include ... Non-limiting examples of such conditions include aneurysms, such as abdominal aorta aneurysms, and surgery for tumor removal. ... Exclusion of ascending/descending aorta and/or aortic arch aneurysm US5713917A (en) 1998-02-03. Apparatus and method for ...
Synonyms for popliteal at Thesaurus.com with free online thesaurus, antonyms, and definitions. Find descriptive alternatives ... The aneurism was cured by ligation of the vein above and below the communication and proximal ligature of the popliteal artery. ... popliteal. At the back of the knee the popliteal artery can be felt beating. ... The popliteal area is a depression on the posterior surface of the distal part of the femur immediately proximal to the ...
  • Isolated iliac vascular injuries and outcome of repair versus ligation of isolated iliac vein injury J Vasc Surg. (usc.edu)
  • The popliteal artery is the primary vascular supply in the region of the knee and lower leg. (statpearls.com)
  • DALLAS Dec. 30, 2009 A vascular surgical technique pioneered at UT Southwestern Medical Center and designed to replace infected aortic grafts with the body's own veins has proved more durable and less prone to new infection than similar procedures using synthetic and cadaver grafts. (bio-medicine.org)
  • Brewster DC, Cronenwett JL, Hallett HJW, Johnston KW, Krupsk WC, Matsumura JS (2003) Guidelines for the treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms: Report of a subcommittee of the Joint Council of the American Association for Vascular Surgery and Society for Vascular Surgery. (springer.com)
  • He previously underwent excision of the vascular tissues in the left popliteal area and multiple embolosclerotherapy sessions to treat AVM of the lower left leg at another hospital. (vsijournal.org)
  • Such venous anomalies are a result of the defective development of embryonic veins during the vascular trunk formation period in the later stage of embryonic development. (phlebolymphology.org)
  • A basic knowledge of vascular embryology and in particular, the evolutional and involutional development of the venous system involved in the maturation of the truncal vein, is essential for the recognition and interpretation of a number of venous anomalies. (phlebolymphology.org)
  • A defect at any point in the complex development stages of evolution and involution of multiple paired embryonic veins can result in congenital vascular malformations (CVM). (phlebolymphology.org)
  • As CVMs are birth defects that arise during the various stages of development of the vascular system, 11,12 they can involve one or more components: artery, vein, lymphatics, and/or capillary vessels. (phlebolymphology.org)
  • When defective development occurs in the vascular trunk formation period in the 'later stage' of embryonic development, the defects involve 'named' vessels (eg, iliac, femoral, and popliteal vessels) and are limited to the vessel trunk itself. (phlebolymphology.org)
  • Therapeutic procedures performed for complex hemodialysis vascular access in patients with inadequate access at more conventional sites (eg, femoral vein transposition). (mhmedical.com)
  • Jugular vein aneurysms are rare vascular abnormalities that are most commonly encountered in the pediatric population. (imagegentlyproviders.org)
  • Arterial aneurysms are commonly encountered in adult clinical practice, arising from multifactorial vascular degeneration and typically presenting in sixth to eighth decades of life. (imagegentlyproviders.org)
  • With extensive knowledge in the behavior of peripheral aneurysms and a particular specialty in limb salvage bypass surgery, Dr. Alan I. Benvenisty, MD is a highly respected and trusted vascular specialist in New York City. (drbenvenisty.com)
  • Prospective, randomized study of external jugular vein patch versus polytetrafluoroethylene patch during carotid endarterectomy: perioperative and long-term results. (naver.com)
  • Popliteal cysts, or Baker cysts, are considered rare in children and may exhibit particular features, as compared with adults. (hindawi.com)
  • Prevalence of popliteal cysts was 57% in arthritic knees, 58% with hypermobility syndrome, and 28% without risk factors. (hindawi.com)
  • Popliteal cysts or Baker cysts represent a distended gastrocnemio-semimembranosus bursa. (hindawi.com)
  • First description of popliteal cysts is attributed to Adams in 1840, while Baker studied these cysts in the context of intra-articular pathologies and effusion of the knee joint [ 1 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • Baker cysts appear to be common in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis [ 5 ], where studies found popliteal cysts in up to 61% and demonstrated an association with joint effusion [ 6 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • We reviewed data from a paediatric population with clinically suspected Baker cysts in order to evaluate the prevalence and the characteristics of popliteal cysts in clinically defined subgroups on ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging. (hindawi.com)
  • Our study is based on the retrospective data analysis of 80 consecutive patients, who were examined for clinically suspected popliteal cysts at our department between May 2003 and September 2010. (hindawi.com)
  • Popliteal cysts were defined as a well-delineated lesions extending from the space between the tendons of the medial head of the gastrocnemius muscle and the semimembranosus tendon [ 10 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • The cystic nature of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease and its renal and extrarenal complications (kidney stones, cyst hemorrhage, intracerebral aneurysm, liver cysts, cardiac valve abnormalities, etc. ) give radiologic imaging studies a central role in the management of these patients. (asnjournals.org)
  • There are primary and secondary Baker's (popliteal) cysts. (physiobook.com)
  • Primary Baker's (popliteal) cysts develop near normal, healthy knee joint. (physiobook.com)
  • Secondary Baker's (popliteal) cysts develop in adult life, always along pathological knee joint changes like knee injuries, rheumatoid arthritis, gonoarthrosis, patellofemoral syndrome erc. (physiobook.com)
  • CT revealed the abnormal relation between the Popliteal artery and the medial head Gastrocnemius on both sides where the arteries are seen deviated medially wrapping around the muscle rather than following the usual lateral course. (eurorad.org)
  • Medially: The semimembranosus and the medial condyle of femur in upper part, and tibial nerve, popliteal vein, medial head of gastrocnemius in lower part. (wikipedia.org)
  • Adventitial cystic disease of the popliteal artery constitutes an infrequent cause of claudication in non-atherosclerotic young or middle-aged population. (minervamedica.it)
  • Here, we report the case of a 43-year-old female with adventitial cystic disease of the popliteal artery causing left lower leg claudication, detected by dupplex scanning. (minervamedica.it)
  • Ascer E, Pollina RM, Gennaro M, Lorensen E (1995b) Noninvasive predictors of patency for infrapopliteal PTFE bypasses with combined arteriovenous fistula and vein interposition technique. (springer.com)
  • Multiplanar reconstructions (Fig. 2f-h) confirmed the lesion to be consistent with aneurysmal dilatation of the right hypogastric vein, measuring 5.5x3x3 cm, probably secondary to recurrent thrombophlebitis. (eurorad.org)