Blood Circulation: The movement of the BLOOD as it is pumped through the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM.Extracorporeal Circulation: Diversion of blood flow through a circuit located outside the body but continuous with the bodily circulation.Pulmonary Circulation: The circulation of the BLOOD through the LUNGS.Collateral Circulation: Maintenance of blood flow to an organ despite obstruction of a principal vessel. Blood flow is maintained through small vessels.Enterohepatic Circulation: Recycling through liver by excretion in bile, reabsorption from intestines (INTESTINAL REABSORPTION) into portal circulation, passage back into liver, and re-excretion in bile.Coronary Circulation: The circulation of blood through the CORONARY VESSELS of the HEART.Cerebrovascular Circulation: The circulation of blood through the BLOOD VESSELS of the BRAIN.Placental Circulation: The circulation of BLOOD, of both the mother and the FETUS, through the PLACENTA.Splanchnic Circulation: The circulation of blood through the BLOOD VESSELS supplying the abdominal VISCERA.Blood Circulation Time: Determination of the shortest time interval between the injection of a substance in the vein and its arrival at some distant site in sufficient concentration to produce a recognizable end result. It represents approximately the inverse of the average velocity of blood flow between two points.Liver Circulation: The circulation of BLOOD through the LIVER.Regional Blood Flow: The flow of BLOOD through or around an organ or region of the body.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Blood Flow Velocity: A value equal to the total volume flow divided by the cross-sectional area of the vascular bed.Vascular Resistance: The force that opposes the flow of BLOOD through a vascular bed. It is equal to the difference in BLOOD PRESSURE across the vascular bed divided by the CARDIAC OUTPUT.Hemodynamics: The movement and the forces involved in the movement of the blood through the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM.Blood Pressure: PRESSURE of the BLOOD on the ARTERIES and other BLOOD VESSELS.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Cross Circulation: The circulation in a portion of the body of one individual of blood supplied from another individual.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Assisted Circulation: Pumping that aids the natural activity of the heart. (Dorland, 27th ed)Dogs: The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)Heart Arrest: Cessation of heart beat or MYOCARDIAL CONTRACTION. If it is treated within a few minutes, heart arrest can be reversed in most cases to normal cardiac rhythm and effective circulation.Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation: The artificial substitution of heart and lung action as indicated for HEART ARREST resulting from electric shock, DROWNING, respiratory arrest, or other causes. The two major components of cardiopulmonary resuscitation are artificial ventilation (RESPIRATION, ARTIFICIAL) and closed-chest CARDIAC MASSAGE.Renal Circulation: The circulation of the BLOOD through the vessels of the KIDNEY.Pulmonary Artery: The short wide vessel arising from the conus arteriosus of the right ventricle and conveying unaerated blood to the lungs.Liver: A large lobed glandular organ in the abdomen of vertebrates that is responsible for detoxification, metabolism, synthesis and storage of various substances.Placenta: A highly vascularized mammalian fetal-maternal organ and major site of transport of oxygen, nutrients, and fetal waste products. It includes a fetal portion (CHORIONIC VILLI) derived from TROPHOBLASTS and a maternal portion (DECIDUA) derived from the uterine ENDOMETRIUM. The placenta produces an array of steroid, protein and peptide hormones (PLACENTAL HORMONES).Metabolic Clearance Rate: Volume of biological fluid completely cleared of drug metabolites as measured in unit time. Elimination occurs as a result of metabolic processes in the kidney, liver, saliva, sweat, intestine, heart, brain, or other site.Maternal-Fetal Exchange: Exchange of substances between the maternal blood and the fetal blood at the PLACENTA via PLACENTAL CIRCULATION. The placental barrier excludes microbial or viral transmission.Tissue Distribution: Accumulation of a drug or chemical substance in various organs (including those not relevant to its pharmacologic or therapeutic action). This distribution depends on the blood flow or perfusion rate of the organ, the ability of the drug to penetrate organ membranes, tissue specificity, protein binding. The distribution is usually expressed as tissue to plasma ratios.Injections, Intravenous: Injections made into a vein for therapeutic or experimental purposes.Veins: The vessels carrying blood away from the capillary beds.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Vasodilation: The physiological widening of BLOOD VESSELS by relaxing the underlying VASCULAR SMOOTH MUSCLE.Vertebrobasilar Insufficiency: Localized or diffuse reduction in blood flow through the vertebrobasilar arterial system, which supplies the BRAIN STEM; CEREBELLUM; OCCIPITAL LOBE; medial TEMPORAL LOBE; and THALAMUS. Characteristic clinical features include SYNCOPE; lightheadedness; visual disturbances; and VERTIGO. BRAIN STEM INFARCTIONS or other BRAIN INFARCTION may be associated.Laser-Doppler Flowmetry: A method of non-invasive, continuous measurement of MICROCIRCULATION. The technique is based on the values of the DOPPLER EFFECT of low-power laser light scattered randomly by static structures and moving tissue particulates.Microcirculation: The circulation of the BLOOD through the MICROVASCULAR NETWORK.Vasoconstriction: The physiological narrowing of BLOOD VESSELS by contraction of the VASCULAR SMOOTH MUSCLE.Half-Life: The time it takes for a substance (drug, radioactive nuclide, or other) to lose half of its pharmacologic, physiologic, or radiologic activity.Lung: Either of the pair of organs occupying the cavity of the thorax that effect the aeration of the blood.Fetus: The unborn young of a viviparous mammal, in the postembryonic period, after the major structures have been outlined. In humans, the unborn young from the end of the eighth week after CONCEPTION until BIRTH, as distinguished from the earlier EMBRYO, MAMMALIAN.Arteries: The vessels carrying blood away from the heart.Cerebral Arteries: The arterial blood vessels supplying the CEREBRUM.Fontan Procedure: A procedure in which total right atrial or total caval blood flow is channeled directly into the pulmonary artery or into a small right ventricle that serves only as a conduit. The principal congenital malformations for which this operation is useful are TRICUSPID ATRESIA and single ventricle with pulmonary stenosis.Oxygen: An element with atomic symbol O, atomic number 8, and atomic weight [15.99903; 15.99977]. It is the most abundant element on earth and essential for respiration.Cardiac Output: The volume of BLOOD passing through the HEART per unit of time. It is usually expressed as liters (volume) per minute so as not to be confused with STROKE VOLUME (volume per beat).Vasodilator Agents: Drugs used to cause dilation of the blood vessels.Perfusion: Treatment process involving the injection of fluid into an organ or tissue.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Portal System: A system of vessels in which blood, after passing through one capillary bed, is conveyed through a second set of capillaries before it returns to the systemic circulation. It pertains especially to the hepatic portal system.Sheep: Any of the ruminant mammals with curved horns in the genus Ovis, family Bovidae. They possess lachrymal grooves and interdigital glands, which are absent in GOATS.Rabbits: The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.Swine: Any of various animals that constitute the family Suidae and comprise stout-bodied, short-legged omnivorous mammals with thick skin, usually covered with coarse bristles, a rather long mobile snout, and small tail. Included are the genera Babyrousa, Phacochoerus (wart hogs), and Sus, the latter containing the domestic pig (see SUS SCROFA).Nitric Oxide: A free radical gas produced endogenously by a variety of mammalian cells, synthesized from ARGININE by NITRIC OXIDE SYNTHASE. Nitric oxide is one of the ENDOTHELIUM-DEPENDENT RELAXING FACTORS released by the vascular endothelium and mediates VASODILATION. It also inhibits platelet aggregation, induces disaggregation of aggregated platelets, and inhibits platelet adhesion to the vascular endothelium. Nitric oxide activates cytosolic GUANYLATE CYCLASE and thus elevates intracellular levels of CYCLIC GMP.Cerebral Angiography: Radiography of the vascular system of the brain after injection of a contrast medium.Bronchial Arteries: Left bronchial arteries arise from the thoracic aorta, the right from the first aortic intercostal or the upper left bronchial artery; they supply the bronchi and the lower trachea.Rats, Sprague-Dawley: A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.Polyethylene Glycols: Polymers of ETHYLENE OXIDE and water, and their ethers. They vary in consistency from liquid to solid depending on the molecular weight indicated by a number following the name. They are used as SURFACTANTS, dispersing agents, solvents, ointment and suppository bases, vehicles, and tablet excipients. Some specific groups are NONOXYNOLS, OCTOXYNOLS, and POLOXAMERS.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Blood Vessels: Any of the tubular vessels conveying the blood (arteries, arterioles, capillaries, venules, and veins).Coronary Vessels: The veins and arteries of the HEART.Endothelium, Vascular: Single pavement layer of cells which line the luminal surface of the entire vascular system and regulate the transport of macromolecules and blood components.Erythrocytes: Red blood cells. Mature erythrocytes are non-nucleated, biconcave disks containing HEMOGLOBIN whose function is to transport OXYGEN.Pulsatile Flow: Rhythmic, intermittent propagation of a fluid through a BLOOD VESSEL or piping system, in contrast to constant, smooth propagation, which produces laminar flow.Heart Rate: The number of times the HEART VENTRICLES contract per unit of time, usually per minute.Anoxia: Relatively complete absence of oxygen in one or more tissues.Mice, Inbred C57BLDose-Response Relationship, Drug: The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.Drug Carriers: Forms to which substances are incorporated to improve the delivery and the effectiveness of drugs. Drug carriers are used in drug-delivery systems such as the controlled-release technology to prolong in vivo drug actions, decrease drug metabolism, and reduce drug toxicity. Carriers are also used in designs to increase the effectiveness of drug delivery to the target sites of pharmacological actions. Liposomes, albumin microspheres, soluble synthetic polymers, DNA complexes, protein-drug conjugates, and carrier erythrocytes among others have been employed as biodegradable drug carriers.Carbon Dioxide: A colorless, odorless gas that can be formed by the body and is necessary for the respiration cycle of plants and animals.Basilar Artery: The artery formed by the union of the right and left vertebral arteries; it runs from the lower to the upper border of the pons, where it bifurcates into the two posterior cerebral arteries.Bile: An emulsifying agent produced in the LIVER and secreted into the DUODENUM. Its composition includes BILE ACIDS AND SALTS; CHOLESTEROL; and ELECTROLYTES. It aids DIGESTION of fats in the duodenum.Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.Retinal Artery: Central retinal artery and its branches. It arises from the ophthalmic artery, pierces the optic nerve and runs through its center, enters the eye through the porus opticus and branches to supply the retina.Vertebral Artery: The first branch of the SUBCLAVIAN ARTERY with distribution to muscles of the NECK; VERTEBRAE; SPINAL CORD; CEREBELLUM; and interior of the CEREBRUM.Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Blood Volume: Volume of circulating BLOOD. It is the sum of the PLASMA VOLUME and ERYTHROCYTE VOLUME.Models, Cardiovascular: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of the cardiovascular system, processes, or phenomena; includes the use of mathematical equations, computers and other electronic equipment.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Hypertension, Pulmonary: Increased VASCULAR RESISTANCE in the PULMONARY CIRCULATION, usually secondary to HEART DISEASES or LUNG DISEASES.Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.Liposomes: Artificial, single or multilaminar vesicles (made from lecithins or other lipids) that are used for the delivery of a variety of biological molecules or molecular complexes to cells, for example, drug delivery and gene transfer. They are also used to study membranes and membrane proteins.Kidney: Body organ that filters blood for the secretion of URINE and that regulates ion concentrations.Rats, Wistar: A strain of albino rat developed at the Wistar Institute that has spread widely at other institutions. This has markedly diluted the original strain.Oxygen Consumption: The rate at which oxygen is used by a tissue; microliters of oxygen STPD used per milligram of tissue per hour; the rate at which oxygen enters the blood from alveolar gas, equal in the steady state to the consumption of oxygen by tissue metabolism throughout the body. (Stedman, 25th ed, p346)Retinal Vessels: The blood vessels which supply and drain the RETINA.Kinetics: The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.Bile Acids and Salts: Steroid acids and salts. The primary bile acids are derived from cholesterol in the liver and usually conjugated with glycine or taurine. The secondary bile acids are further modified by bacteria in the intestine. They play an important role in the digestion and absorption of fat. They have also been used pharmacologically, especially in the treatment of gallstones.Parabiosis: The experimental joining of two individuals for the purpose of studying the effects of one on the other.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Biological Markers: Measurable and quantifiable biological parameters (e.g., specific enzyme concentration, specific hormone concentration, specific gene phenotype distribution in a population, presence of biological substances) which serve as indices for health- and physiology-related assessments, such as disease risk, psychiatric disorders, environmental exposure and its effects, disease diagnosis, metabolic processes, substance abuse, pregnancy, cell line development, epidemiologic studies, etc.Poliomyelitis: An acute infectious disease of humans, particularly children, caused by any of three serotypes of human poliovirus (POLIOVIRUS). Usually the infection is limited to the gastrointestinal tract and nasopharynx, and is often asymptomatic. The central nervous system, primarily the spinal cord, may be affected, leading to rapidly progressive paralysis, coarse FASCICULATION and hyporeflexia. Motor neurons are primarily affected. Encephalitis may also occur. The virus replicates in the nervous system, and may cause significant neuronal loss, most notably in the spinal cord. A rare related condition, nonpoliovirus poliomyelitis, may result from infections with nonpoliovirus enteroviruses. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp764-5)Injections, Intra-Arterial: Delivery of drugs into an artery.Cardiopulmonary Bypass: Diversion of the flow of blood from the entrance of the right atrium directly to the aorta (or femoral artery) via an oxygenator thus bypassing both the heart and lungs.Choroid: The thin, highly vascular membrane covering most of the posterior of the eye between the RETINA and SCLERA.Partial Pressure: The pressure that would be exerted by one component of a mixture of gases if it were present alone in a container. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Survival Analysis: A class of statistical procedures for estimating the survival function (function of time, starting with a population 100% well at a given time and providing the percentage of the population still well at later times). The survival analysis is then used for making inferences about the effects of treatments, prognostic factors, exposures, and other covariates on the function.Angiography: Radiography of blood vessels after injection of a contrast medium.Ischemia: A hypoperfusion of the BLOOD through an organ or tissue caused by a PATHOLOGIC CONSTRICTION or obstruction of its BLOOD VESSELS, or an absence of BLOOD CIRCULATION.Acute Disease: Disease having a short and relatively severe course.Serum Albumin, Radio-Iodinated: Normal human serum albumin mildly iodinated with radioactive iodine (131-I) which has a half-life of 8 days, and emits beta and gamma rays. It is used as a diagnostic aid in blood volume determination. (from Merck Index, 11th ed)Hypothermia, Induced: Abnormally low BODY TEMPERATURE that is intentionally induced in warm-blooded animals by artificial means. In humans, mild or moderate hypothermia has been used to reduce tissue damages, particularly after cardiac or spinal cord injuries and during subsequent surgeries.Persistent Fetal Circulation Syndrome: A syndrome of persistent PULMONARY HYPERTENSION in the newborn infant (INFANT, NEWBORN) without demonstrable HEART DISEASES. This neonatal condition can be caused by severe pulmonary vasoconstriction (reactive type), hypertrophy of pulmonary arterial muscle (hypertrophic type), or abnormally developed pulmonary arterioles (hypoplastic type). The newborn patient exhibits CYANOSIS and ACIDOSIS due to the persistence of fetal circulatory pattern of right-to-left shunting of blood through a patent ductus arteriosus (DUCTUS ARTERIOSUS, PATENT) and at times a patent foramen ovale (FORAMEN OVALE, PATENT).Magnetic Resonance Angiography: Non-invasive method of vascular imaging and determination of internal anatomy without injection of contrast media or radiation exposure. The technique is used especially in CEREBRAL ANGIOGRAPHY as well as for studies of other vascular structures.Brain Ischemia: Localized reduction of blood flow to brain tissue due to arterial obstruction or systemic hypoperfusion. This frequently occurs in conjunction with brain hypoxia (HYPOXIA, BRAIN). Prolonged ischemia is associated with BRAIN INFARCTION.Intracranial Aneurysm: Abnormal outpouching in the wall of intracranial blood vessels. Most common are the saccular (berry) aneurysms located at branch points in CIRCLE OF WILLIS at the base of the brain. Vessel rupture results in SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE or INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES. Giant aneurysms (>2.5 cm in diameter) may compress adjacent structures, including the OCULOMOTOR NERVE. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p841)Portal Vein: A short thick vein formed by union of the superior mesenteric vein and the splenic vein.Papio: A genus of the subfamily CERCOPITHECINAE, family CERCOPITHECIDAE, consisting of five named species: PAPIO URSINUS (chacma baboon), PAPIO CYNOCEPHALUS (yellow baboon), PAPIO PAPIO (western baboon), PAPIO ANUBIS (or olive baboon), and PAPIO HAMADRYAS (hamadryas baboon). Members of the Papio genus inhabit open woodland, savannahs, grassland, and rocky hill country. Some authors consider MANDRILLUS a subgenus of Papio.Umbilical Arteries: Specialized arterial vessels in the umbilical cord. They carry waste and deoxygenated blood from the FETUS to the mother via the PLACENTA. In humans, there are usually two umbilical arteries but sometimes one.Heart: The hollow, muscular organ that maintains the circulation of the blood.Venous Pressure: The blood pressure in the VEINS. It is usually measured to assess the filling PRESSURE to the HEART VENTRICLE.Survival Rate: The proportion of survivors in a group, e.g., of patients, studied and followed over a period, or the proportion of persons in a specified group alive at the beginning of a time interval who survive to the end of the interval. It is often studied using life table methods.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Drug Delivery Systems: Systems for the delivery of drugs to target sites of pharmacological actions. Technologies employed include those concerning drug preparation, route of administration, site targeting, metabolism, and toxicity.Stroke: A group of pathological conditions characterized by sudden, non-convulsive loss of neurological function due to BRAIN ISCHEMIA or INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES. Stroke is classified by the type of tissue NECROSIS, such as the anatomic location, vasculature involved, etiology, age of the affected individual, and hemorrhagic vs. non-hemorrhagic nature. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp777-810)Ductus Arteriosus: A fetal blood vessel connecting the pulmonary artery with the descending aorta.Erythrocyte Aging: The senescence of RED BLOOD CELLS. Lacking the organelles that make protein synthesis possible, the mature erythrocyte is incapable of self-repair, reproduction, and carrying out certain functions performed by other cells. This limits the average life span of an erythrocyte to 120 days.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Ultrasonography, Doppler: Ultrasonography applying the Doppler effect, with frequency-shifted ultrasound reflections produced by moving targets (usually red blood cells) in the bloodstream along the ultrasound axis in direct proportion to the velocity of movement of the targets, to determine both direction and velocity of blood flow. (Stedman, 25th ed)Capillaries: The minute vessels that connect the arterioles and venules.Infarction, Posterior Cerebral Artery: NECROSIS induced by ISCHEMIA in the POSTERIOR CEREBRAL ARTERY distribution system which supplies portions of the BRAIN STEM; the THALAMUS; TEMPORAL LOBE, and OCCIPITAL LOBE. Depending on the size and location of infarction, clinical features include OLFACTION DISORDERS and visual problems (AGNOSIA; ALEXIA; HEMIANOPSIA).Hypertension, Portal: Abnormal increase of resistance to blood flow within the hepatic PORTAL SYSTEM, frequently seen in LIVER CIRRHOSIS and conditions with obstruction of the PORTAL VEIN.Reference Values: The range or frequency distribution of a measurement in a population (of organisms, organs or things) that has not been selected for the presence of disease or abnormality.Middle Cerebral Artery: The largest of the cerebral arteries. It trifurcates into temporal, frontal, and parietal branches supplying blood to most of the parenchyma of these lobes in the CEREBRAL CORTEX. These are the areas involved in motor, sensory, and speech activities.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Portal Pressure: The venous pressure measured in the PORTAL VEIN.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Gestational Age: The age of the conceptus, beginning from the time of FERTILIZATION. In clinical obstetrics, the gestational age is often estimated as the time from the last day of the last MENSTRUATION which is about 2 weeks before OVULATION and fertilization.Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest: Occurrence of heart arrest in an individual when there is no immediate access to medical personnel or equipment.Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction: A variation of the PCR technique in which cDNA is made from RNA via reverse transcription. The resultant cDNA is then amplified using standard PCR protocols.RNA, Messenger: RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.Cells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.Hematocrit: The volume of packed RED BLOOD CELLS in a blood specimen. The volume is measured by centrifugation in a tube with graduated markings, or with automated blood cell counters. It is an indicator of erythrocyte status in disease. For example, ANEMIA shows a low value; POLYCYTHEMIA, a high value.Vasoconstrictor Agents: Drugs used to cause constriction of the blood vessels.Cell Line, Tumor: A cell line derived from cultured tumor cells.Vasomotor System: The neural systems which act on VASCULAR SMOOTH MUSCLE to control blood vessel diameter. The major neural control is through the sympathetic nervous system.Blood Gas Analysis: Measurement of oxygen and carbon dioxide in the blood.Antigen-Antibody Complex: The complex formed by the binding of antigen and antibody molecules. The deposition of large antigen-antibody complexes leading to tissue damage causes IMMUNE COMPLEX DISEASES.Pre-Eclampsia: A complication of PREGNANCY, characterized by a complex of symptoms including maternal HYPERTENSION and PROTEINURIA with or without pathological EDEMA. Symptoms may range between mild and severe. Pre-eclampsia usually occurs after the 20th week of gestation, but may develop before this time in the presence of trophoblastic disease.Lymphatic System: A system of organs and tissues that process and transport immune cells and LYMPH.Rats, Inbred Strains: Genetically identical individuals developed from brother and sister matings which have been carried out for twenty or more generations or by parent x offspring matings carried out with certain restrictions. This also includes animals with a long history of closed colony breeding.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Ultrasonography, Doppler, Transcranial: A non-invasive technique using ultrasound for the measurement of cerebrovascular hemodynamics, particularly cerebral blood flow velocity and cerebral collateral flow. With a high-intensity, low-frequency pulse probe, the intracranial arteries may be studied transtemporally, transorbitally, or from below the foramen magnum.Lymph: The interstitial fluid that is in the LYMPHATIC SYSTEM.Cardiovascular System: The HEART and the BLOOD VESSELS by which BLOOD is pumped and circulated through the body.Posterior Cerebral Artery: Artery formed by the bifurcation of the BASILAR ARTERY. Branches of the posterior cerebral artery supply portions of the OCCIPITAL LOBE; PARIETAL LOBE; inferior temporal gyrus, brainstem, and CHOROID PLEXUS.Tumor Markers, Biological: Molecular products metabolized and secreted by neoplastic tissue and characterized biochemically in cells or body fluids. They are indicators of tumor stage and grade as well as useful for monitoring responses to treatment and predicting recurrence. Many chemical groups are represented including hormones, antigens, amino and nucleic acids, enzymes, polyamines, and specific cell membrane proteins and lipids.Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Bleeding into the intracranial or spinal SUBARACHNOID SPACE, most resulting from INTRACRANIAL ANEURYSM rupture. It can occur after traumatic injuries (SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE, TRAUMATIC). Clinical features include HEADACHE; NAUSEA; VOMITING, nuchal rigidity, variable neurological deficits and reduced mental status.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Intestines: The section of the alimentary canal from the STOMACH to the ANAL CANAL. It includes the LARGE INTESTINE and SMALL INTESTINE.Jugular Veins: Veins in the neck which drain the brain, face, and neck into the brachiocephalic or subclavian veins.Flow Cytometry: Technique using an instrument system for making, processing, and displaying one or more measurements on individual cells obtained from a cell suspension. Cells are usually stained with one or more fluorescent dyes specific to cell components of interest, e.g., DNA, and fluorescence of each cell is measured as it rapidly transverses the excitation beam (laser or mercury arc lamp). Fluorescence provides a quantitative measure of various biochemical and biophysical properties of the cell, as well as a basis for cell sorting. Other measurable optical parameters include light absorption and light scattering, the latter being applicable to the measurement of cell size, shape, density, granularity, and stain uptake.Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay: An immunoassay utilizing an antibody labeled with an enzyme marker such as horseradish peroxidase. While either the enzyme or the antibody is bound to an immunosorbent substrate, they both retain their biologic activity; the change in enzyme activity as a result of the enzyme-antibody-antigen reaction is proportional to the concentration of the antigen and can be measured spectrophotometrically or with the naked eye. Many variations of the method have been developed.Mice, Inbred BALB CArterial Occlusive Diseases: Pathological processes which result in the partial or complete obstruction of ARTERIES. They are characterized by greatly reduced or absence of blood flow through these vessels. They are also known as arterial insufficiency.Cell Movement: The movement of cells from one location to another. Distinguish from CYTOKINESIS which is the process of dividing the CYTOPLASM of a cell.Spleen: An encapsulated lymphatic organ through which venous blood filters.Heart Defects, Congenital: Developmental abnormalities involving structures of the heart. These defects are present at birth but may be discovered later in life.Iodine Radioisotopes: Unstable isotopes of iodine that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. I atoms with atomic weights 117-139, except I 127, are radioactive iodine isotopes.Pia Mater: The innermost layer of the three meninges covering the brain and spinal cord. It is the fine vascular membrane that lies under the ARACHNOID and the DURA MATER.Poverty: A situation in which the level of living of an individual, family, or group is below the standard of the community. It is often related to a specific income level.Endothelial Cells: Highly specialized EPITHELIAL CELLS that line the HEART; BLOOD VESSELS; and lymph vessels, forming the ENDOTHELIUM. They are polygonal in shape and joined together by TIGHT JUNCTIONS. The tight junctions allow for variable permeability to specific macromolecules that are transported across the endothelial layer.Ophthalmic Artery: Artery originating from the internal carotid artery and distributing to the eye, orbit and adjacent facial structures.Hemoglobins: The oxygen-carrying proteins of ERYTHROCYTES. They are found in all vertebrates and some invertebrates. The number of globin subunits in the hemoglobin quaternary structure differs between species. Structures range from monomeric to a variety of multimeric arrangements.Leukocyte Count: The number of WHITE BLOOD CELLS per unit volume in venous BLOOD. A differential leukocyte count measures the relative numbers of the different types of white cells.Arterioles: The smallest divisions of the arteries located between the muscular arteries and the capillaries.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Microspheres: Small uniformly-sized spherical particles, of micrometer dimensions, frequently labeled with radioisotopes or various reagents acting as tags or markers.Homeostasis: The processes whereby the internal environment of an organism tends to remain balanced and stable.Femoral Artery: The main artery of the thigh, a continuation of the external iliac artery.Neoplastic Cells, Circulating: Exfoliate neoplastic cells circulating in the blood and associated with metastasizing tumors.Immunoglobulin G: The major immunoglobulin isotype class in normal human serum. There are several isotype subclasses of IgG, for example, IgG1, IgG2A, and IgG2B.Multivariate Analysis: A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.Antibodies, Monoclonal: Antibodies produced by a single clone of cells.Biological Transport: The movement of materials (including biochemical substances and drugs) through a biological system at the cellular level. The transport can be across cell membranes and epithelial layers. It also can occur within intracellular compartments and extracellular compartments.Angiography, Digital Subtraction: A method of delineating blood vessels by subtracting a tissue background image from an image of tissue plus intravascular contrast material that attenuates the X-ray photons. The background image is determined from a digitized image taken a few moments before injection of the contrast material. The resulting angiogram is a high-contrast image of the vessel. This subtraction technique allows extraction of a high-intensity signal from the superimposed background information. The image is thus the result of the differential absorption of X-rays by different tissues.Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Nanoparticles: Nanometer-sized particles that are nanoscale in three dimensions. They include nanocrystaline materials; NANOCAPSULES; METAL NANOPARTICLES; DENDRIMERS, and QUANTUM DOTS. The uses of nanoparticles include DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEMS and cancer targeting and imaging.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Yolk Sac: The first of four extra-embryonic membranes to form during EMBRYOGENESIS. In REPTILES and BIRDS, it arises from endoderm and mesoderm to incorporate the EGG YOLK into the DIGESTIVE TRACT for nourishing the embryo. In placental MAMMALS, its nutritional function is vestigial; however, it is the source of INTESTINAL MUCOSA; BLOOD CELLS; and GERM CELLS. It is sometimes called the vitelline sac, which should not be confused with the VITELLINE MEMBRANE of the egg.Mononuclear Phagocyte System: Mononuclear cells with pronounced phagocytic ability that are distributed extensively in lymphoid and other organs. It includes MACROPHAGES and their precursors; PHAGOCYTES; KUPFFER CELLS; HISTIOCYTES; DENDRITIC CELLS; LANGERHANS CELLS; and MICROGLIA. The term mononuclear phagocyte system has replaced the former reticuloendothelial system, which also included less active phagocytic cells such as fibroblasts and endothelial cells. (From Illustrated Dictionary of Immunology, 2d ed.)Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Resuscitation: The restoration to life or consciousness of one apparently dead. (Dorland, 27th ed)Water Movements: The flow of water in enviromental bodies of water such as rivers, oceans, water supplies, aquariums, etc. It includes currents, tides, and waves.Intestinal Absorption: Uptake of substances through the lining of the INTESTINES.Seasons: Divisions of the year according to some regularly recurrent phenomena usually astronomical or climatic. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Heart, Artificial: A pumping mechanism that duplicates the output, rate, and blood pressure of the natural heart. It may replace the function of the entire heart or a portion of it, and may be an intracorporeal, extracorporeal, or paracorporeal heart. (Dorland, 28th ed)Forearm: Part of the arm in humans and primates extending from the ELBOW to the WRIST.Catheterization: Use or insertion of a tubular device into a duct, blood vessel, hollow organ, or body cavity for injecting or withdrawing fluids for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes. It differs from INTUBATION in that the tube here is used to restore or maintain patency in obstructions.Carotid Artery, Internal: Branch of the common carotid artery which supplies the anterior part of the brain, the eye and its appendages, the forehead and nose.Heart-Lung Machine: Apparatus that provides mechanical circulatory support during open-heart surgery, by passing the heart to facilitate surgery on the organ. The basic function of the machine is to oxygenate the body's venous supply of blood and then pump it back into the arterial system. The machine also provides intracardiac suction, filtration, and temperature control. Some of the more important components of these machines include pumps, oxygenators, temperature regulators, and filters. (UMDNS, 1999)Recombinant Proteins: Proteins prepared by recombinant DNA technology.Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Cerebral Infarction: The formation of an area of NECROSIS in the CEREBRUM caused by an insufficiency of arterial or venous blood flow. Infarcts of the cerebrum are generally classified by hemisphere (i.e., left vs. right), lobe (e.g., frontal lobe infarction), arterial distribution (e.g., INFARCTION, ANTERIOR CEREBRAL ARTERY), and etiology (e.g., embolic infarction).Hypotension: Abnormally low BLOOD PRESSURE that can result in inadequate blood flow to the brain and other vital organs. Common symptom is DIZZINESS but greater negative impacts on the body occur when there is prolonged depravation of oxygen and nutrients.Fetal Blood: Blood of the fetus. Exchange of nutrients and waste between the fetal and maternal blood occurs via the PLACENTA. The cord blood is blood contained in the umbilical vessels (UMBILICAL CORD) at the time of delivery.
Like one who kills a son before his father's eyes is the man who offers sacrifice from the property of the poor. The bread of ... "Bills and Currency in Current Circulation". Banco de Guatemala. Archived from the original on September 23, 2013. Retrieved 12 ... Michael Tangeman, Mexico at the Crossroads: Politics, the Church, and the Poor. Maryknoll NY: Orbis Books 1995, p. 72. " ... the needy is the life of the poor; whoever deprives them of it is a man of blood." quoted from Brading (1997:119-20). Las ...
The increase in its circulation continued until 1980. El Alcázar closed in 1988 as a result of poor sales. Antonio Izquierdo ... The circulation of El Alcázar declined between 1970 and 1975. Its circulation was 13,119 copies in 1975, 26,724 copies in 1976 ... By the end of the paper's run, circulation was primarily among Francoist veterans. In November 1994 the Audiencia Nacional ...
As the simple cross-tube boiler has near-horizontal tubes, circulation is poor. To improve this, designs such as the Clarke ... Circulation in boilers is largely due to the thermosyphon effect, which is encouraged by the vertical rise of the water-tubes. ... This improved circulation, although it made washout difficult. Large diameter gives a low ratio of heating surface to water ... These tubes are horizontal, or slightly inclined so as to encourage circulation in a single direction without turbulence. As ...
At the time, the center of circulation remained poor; however, it became better defined later that day, with a stable amount of ...
It has a circulation of 10,000 copies. It also has a quarterly YMA News published in English. Indira Priyadarshini Vrikshamitra ... And the black bottom symbolizes a concern for the poor, the despair and the hapless. Young Mizo Association publishes a monthly ...
Poor circulation may also be a cause of hot aches. Circulation is highly affected by the reaction of sympathetic nervous system ... Accordingly, peripheral circulation is withdrawn to protect the organs at the sacrifice of the limbs. By using cognition ... techniques and aromatherapy oils rubbed into the affected area, the sympathetic nervous system and peripheral circulation can ...
Less than 5% of the original dosage reaches the circulation. The relatively long half-life and lack of dietary influence of ... The strong first-pass hepatic metabolism results in poor bioavailability. ...
Circulation. 96 (10): 3466-3476. doi:10.1161/01.cir.96.10.3466. PMID 9396443. Moyano JV, Evans JR, Chen F, Lu M, Werner ME, ... "B-Crystallin is a novel oncoprotein that predicts poor clinical outcome in breast cancer". Journal of Clinical Investigation. ...
In congenital cases, it is associated with poor prognosis and high mortality rate. In some people, pulmonary vein stenosis ... "Congenital and Acquired Pulmonary Vein Stenosis". Circulation. American Heart Association. Retrieved 3 November 2014. Chen, ...
Poor blood circulation leads to a weak pulse, pale skin and fainting. A severe case of an allergic reaction, caused by symptoms ... Serious danger regarding allergies can begin when the respiratory tract or blood circulation is affected. The former can be ... Epinephrine relieves airway swelling and obstruction, and improves blood circulation; blood vessels are tightened and heart ... affecting the respiratory tract and blood circulation, is called anaphylaxis. When symptoms are related to a drop in blood ...
Poor feeding, failure to thrive, and rapid shallow breathing may also be observed due to poor circulation. Upon examination, ... Poor systemic circulation also results due to improper positioning of the aorta. Left atrial appendage isomerism, also called ... Poor positioning of the intestine also makes it more prone to blockage, which can result in numerous chronic health issues. ... The Fontan procedure routes blood through the patient's single ventricle, to the lungs, and into systemic circulation. This ...
They have poor circulation, evidenced by a greenish tint to the skin. They also have relatively the smallest hearts and lungs ... Much of this land is poor in nutrients, so is abandoned after a few years for newly cleared land. Forest species are ... Due to their near lack of a tail to serve as rudder or counterweight, tinamous are notoriously poor at steering. They regularly ... Despite their poor flying ability, the percentage of their body mass that is muscle is 28.6-40%, which is similar to that of ...
John II built the monastery of the Pantocrator (Almighty) with a hospital for the poor of 50 beds. With the restoration of firm ... Meanwhile, the volume of money in circulation dramatically increased. This was reflected in Constantinople by the construction ...
There is an almost perpetual circulation of it in Circassia; and when unhappily the small-pox has quite left the country, the ... The Circassians are poor, and their daughters are beautiful, and indeed, it is in them they chiefly trade. They furnish with ...
These problems are much more likely to occur if air circulation is poor. Most seeds need only be planted at a depth equal to ... Most seedlings, whether grown in pots or beds, benefit from good air circulation which discourages fungus growth and promotes ...
... circulation had reached 75,000 and covered every state and territory. Shattuck stepped down as editor 1871 due to poor health. ...
She retired in 2005 after having a leg amputated due to poor circulation. Gray's Inn Hall installed "the Curnow Rail" to allow ...
... it is threatened by brown tides caused by poor circulation and dredging. An influx of seawater can sometimes replace the vital ...
Problems occur if a thick filter cake is formed; tight hole conditions, poor log quality, stuck pipe, lost circulation and ... poor hole cleaning, solids loading and poor formation evaluation In sand and sandstones formations, hole enlargement can be ... Poor lubrication causes high torque and drag, heat checking of the drill string, but these problems are also caused by key ... This helical flow around the drill-string causes drill cuttings near the wall, where poor hole cleaning conditions occur, to ...
An important factor is the poor uptake of tomatine into general blood circulation. When tomatine is orally ingested, much ...
A stationary front in the Gulf of Mexico developed an upper-level circulation. By July 28, the system organized enough to be ... Despite favorable conditions, the depression tracked westward without significantly intensifying, due to the poor organization ... Later that day, the low level circulation became indiscernible on infrared imagery. By 12:00 UTC on October 8, Pablo weakened ... It rapidly developed a closed circulation, though convection diminished a few days after the wave entered the Atlantic. However ...
But due to poor literacy and less culture of reading in Afghanistan, print-media is limited to urban areas. Radio is the only ... It covers national and international news with circulation of 4800. It is published by Afghanistan Group of Newspapers, an ... Due to its large national circulation, the Daily Afghanistan receives extensive business advertisements. The Daily Outlook ...
The lack of water circulation through the system left the waters turbid and malodorous. The bulk of the canals were paved over ... The remaining canal district stayed in poor condition until extensively renovated in 1992. The canals have since become an ...
The poorer qualities ended up in circulation while the finer qualities were inevitably exported. This commodity system became ... Because more paper money was issued than what was taxed out of circulation, the currency depreciated in relation to the British ... the first settlers strained to keep money in circulation. They could not find a suitable medium of exchange in which the value ... The paper currency depreciated quickly because the colonies printed more than what was taxed out of circulation. By 1740, Rhode ...
... was poor as multiple vortices were present within the circulation. One of these vortices split from the main circulation and ... A circulation was first reported from a ship 300 miles west of Guam on September 26. The system then quickly intensified into a ... The circulation was pulled north by the influence of Typhoon Billie. The storm had organized enough that by October 25 it was ... The size of Billie's eye was comparable to the extensive radius of the circulation. At times the eye measured over 180 miles in ...
... poor diet, stress, and urbanization.[10][32] Excess body fat is associated with 30% of cases in those of Chinese and Japanese ... "Circulation. 121 (11): 1356-64. doi:10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.109.876185. PMC 2862465. PMID 20308626.. ... and poor blood flow in the limbs which may lead to amputations.[1] The sudden onset of hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state may ... "Circulation. 135 (2): 180-195. doi:10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.116.022622. PMC 5502688. PMID 28069712.. ...
Circulation, 2001 Oct 9;104(15):1761-6.. 2. Puskas JD et al. Clinical outcomes, angiographic patency, and resource utilization ... Now individuals who have medical conditions such as diabetes, history of stroke, or poor physical health, can undergo cardiac ...
Learn more about poor circulation and how to improve it here. ... Poor circulation has a range of potential causes, including ... The symptoms of poor circulation may not be apparent.. However, whether symptoms are obvious or not, poor circulation can be ... Symptoms of poor circulation. Tingling in the extremities and joint pain are symptoms of poor circulation. ... Poor blood flow affects energy levels and can cause fatigue.. Also, the heart must pump harder when circulation is poor, which ...
... There are plenty of other treatments for high blood pressure that do not have these side ... My doctor thinks its okay, but I have very poor circulation especially to hand and feet, and feel cold all the time. ...
Poor circulation means that blood flow is compromised in various parts of the body, such as the arms or legs. If you suffer ... from poor circulation, have tests done to determine the cause and start the cycle of treatment immediately. ... or poor circulation, is caused by a number of disorders. ... or poor circulation, is caused by a number of disorders. Poor ... A diagnosis of poor circulation can be made by administering an ankle brachial index test. This test consists of a cuff being ...
Poor foot circulation is a problem faced by a growing number of people especially the elderly. The initial signs of circulation ... If the poor circulation to your feet is making your feet swell then try altering the position of your feet at regular intervals ... Poor foot circulation should not be ignored as it is a sign of underlying problems with the circulatory system as a whole. Such ... 3 thoughts on "7 Tips for Improving Poor Foot Circulation" * MIMI says: ...
Poor blood circulation is the impaired flow of blood to certain parts of the body. It is mostly noticed at body extremities ... What is Poor Circulation of Blood?. Poor blood circulation is the impaired flow of blood to certain parts of the body. It is ... What are the Warning Signs of Poor Blood Circulation?. Warning signs of poor blood circulation can be both physical and mental ... How do you Improve Poor Blood Circulation?. Poor blood circulation can be caused by various factors. Tackling those factors can ...
One of the causes of poor circulation in the legs is the inappropriate function of the valves in the veins. All veins have ... of the causes of poor circulation in the legs is the inappropriate function of the valves in the veins. All veins have valves ... How to Aleviate Poor Circulation in Legs. By besesitos Jun 23, 2010 ... Compression hose may also be helpful to assist with circulation.. I have experienced vein stripping, and I have had lasor ...
As with most blood circulation problems, the most common cause of poor knee circulation is the build-up of fatty deposits that ... Poor blood circulation, especially in the knees, is a common problem with older people, mostly because it takes a long time to ... As with most blood circulation problems, the most common cause of poor knee circulation is the build-up of fatty deposits that ... Poor blood circulation in any part of the body can be a symptom of a much more serious health problem. In the knees, legs and ...
... experiencing numbness or poor blood circulation in your legs should never be left untreated. Poor leg circulation has various ... GodsWayNutrition: Do You Suffer from Poor Circulation. *UAB Health System: Is Poor Circulation Giving You a Case of Cold Feet? ... experiencing numbness or poor blood circulation in your legs should never be left untreated. Poor leg circulation has various ... When left untreated, poor blood circulation can result in diabetes, arthritis, high LDL cholesterol and heart disease. Consult ...
Poor circulation is a common problem that is experienced in extremities such as your feet. Because your feet are so far away ... One symptom of poor circulation in your feet is numbness, according to Mayo Clinic. Very poor circulation affects your nerves, ... they are a common place to experience poor circulation. If you have poor circulation, not enough oxygen- and nutrient-rich ... Another sign of poor circulation is that your toenails will not grow at their normal rate, and you might notice you have to ...
Our podiatry specialists use the latest treatment options to help people with poor circulation, whether its caused by diabetes ... Poor circulation. Poor circulation reduces the ability of feet to heal from injury or trauma and can cause symptoms like cold ... What you should know about poor circulation *Poor circulation, especially in people with diabetes, can make injuries slow to ... Poor circulation can put people at higher risk for infection and slow the healing process for wounds and injuries. We use the ...
... complicates a lot of problems of the foot and lower limb and can cause its own symptoms. The ... The reason that this is so important to the foot is that those with poor circulation need to take special care not to get any ... Those with poor circulation do need to discuss with their doctor about a supervised exercise program to help improve the ... main cause of poor circulation is atherosclerosis, which is generally underpinned by lifestyle and sedentary activity. As a ...
Find out how your circulatory system works, what problems you can have with it, and how to improve your circulation. ... Having poor circulation can lead to a range of health problems. ... Effects of poor arterial circulation. Poor arterial circulation ... Effects of poor venous circulation. If you have poor venous circulation, your veins will struggle to return blood from your ... home > health > circulation. A.Vogel Talks Circulation. Find out all you need to know about circulation and how to combat those ...
Stroke, one of the leading causes of death worldwide, is normally caused by poor blood flow to the brain, or cerebral ischemia ...
But you should also be on the lookout for these six warning signs of poor circulation. ... But when your circulation is impeded, its a different story.. Circulation issues-in this case, were talking specifically ... 6 Signs You Have Poor Circulation. By Barbara Brody , February 4, 2019 ... "The same type of plaque that can build up in the vessels to your heart can impair circulation to the brain and cause a stroke, ...
... a condition that causes extremely poor circulation and leads to an estimated 230,000 amputations yearly in North America and ... New therapy could treat poor blood circulation caused by peripheral artery disease An injectable gel was tested in a rat model ... Peripheral arterial disease patients suffer from poor circulation in their limbs, which can lead to critical tissue damage. The ... New therapy could treat poor blood circulation caused by peripheral artery disease. University of California - San Diego ...
Polestriding Versus Walking for Subjects With Poor Leg Circulation. The safety and scientific validity of this study is the ... Polestriding Versus Walking for Subjects With Poor Leg Circulation. Official Title ICMJE Polestriding Versus Walking for PAD ... and traditional walking on physical endurance in subjects with poor circulation in their legs. Another goal is to evaluate the ...
Complete information about Poor Circulation, including signs and symptoms; conditions that suggest it; contributing risk ... Poor Circulation can lead to:. Circulation. Cold Hands and Feet In cases of peripheral vascular disease, the arteries narrow ... Risk factors for Poor Circulation:. Addictions. Cigarette Smoke Damage Circulation. Coronary Disease / Heart Attack Not ... Poor Circulation: Overview. Good health and an active lifestyle depend on good circulation. That means a good flow of life- ...
Arthritis, Poor Circulation, just an off night? Discussion in Miscellaneous [BG] started by Lipis Roman, Sep 15, 2002. ...
toc]One of the many issues due to which a person undergoes a lot of diseases and infections is that of poor blood circulation ... 6 Home Remedies For Poor Circulation. Keep Yourself Hydrated. One of the best ways in which you can improve on the poor ... 6 Home Remedies For Poor Circulation. By rashmig Featured, Health Care, Home Remedies, Other 0 Comments ... Another easy and effective home remedy that can be followed in the case of poor circulation of the blood in the body is to use ...
Poor circulation is the consequence of inactive, unhealthy lifestyles and lack of exercise. Fortunately, herbal remedies are ... Poor circulation of blood causes a lot of problems in the body and there can be a lot of health ailments that you can get prone ... Poor circulation in organs such as the heart caused due to plaque formation can have serious consequences so it is important to ... Poor circulation is easily rectified through the use of herbs like Ginger, Cinnamon, Garlic, Ginseng, Garlic, Gingko Biloba, ...
Get cures for cold feet & poor circulation symptoms! ... Poor leg circulation (peripheral artery disease) occurs as ... What Causes Poor Circulation?. Poor leg circulation, or peripheral artery disease (PAD), occurs as arteries narrow and reduce ... and lack of exercise are common causes of poor circulation.. Poor circulation symptoms include leg pain while walking, cramping ... I too have poor circulation in my legs & am considering apple cider vinegar. As I am diabetic on oral meds I must be careful ...
Poor Circulation / Leg Health. Healthy Legs. Many factors contribute to the overall health of our legs: heredity, weight, age, ... Your Circulation. The flow of blood in the veins is assisted by a series of one-way valves. The valves remain open when the ...
Symptoms progressively feeling worse - lightheaded and dizzy at times and I feel like circulation to my feet/lower legs is poor ... Poor you. Cant believe your GP is dismissing you with those symptoms. Good luck with the scan. ... Also ask for magnesium to be checked as a deficiency in that can cause leg tingling and circulation issues etc ... Your leg and circulation issues could be caused by inflammation to the sciatic nerve. Ive had sciatica before without any back ...
... poor,circulation,and,heal,wounds,medicine,medical news today,latest medical news,medical newsletters,current medical news, ... 15 in the journal Circulation Research. The study mechanism suggests new ways to treat conditions that involve poor circulation ... Researchers discover new way to reverse poor circulation and heal wounds. ...Researchers have solved a longstanding mystery ... Furthermore, the same signals that influence circulation in some tissues drive cell growth elsewhere. That could lead to an ...
  • Some people with poor circulation may be suffering from venous thrombosis or deep vein thrombosis. (md-health.com)
  • Other factors that contribute to circulatory system problems are tobacco smoking, alcohol consumption, caffeine, poor eating habits, insufficient exercise and sitting in a cramped position or no movement for long periods (also known as economy class syndrome/DVT - deep vein thrombosis). (ethnichealthcourt.com)
  • Venous hypertension aka venous circulation problems can cause both hyperpigmentation [ brown spots ] and hypopigmentation [ atrophic or whitish spots} proper treatment of the underlying venous issue is essential however many of the skin changes can not be reversed.The reddish spot respond the best but not always. (healthtap.com)
  • Bioengineers and physicians at the University of California, San Diego have developed a potential new therapy for critical limb ischemia, a condition that causes extremely poor circulation in the limbs and leads to an estimated 230,000 amputations every year in North America and Europe alone to prevent the spread of infection and tissue death. (eurekalert.org)
  • The lower limbs of the body are especially prone to poor circulation of blood. (blogspot.com)
  • Could poor circulation be the cause of my spider veins? (healthtap.com)
  • Please be careful - people with poor circulation may want to avoid rubbing lotions or moisturizers in between toes. (pioneerthinking.com)