Pinus ponderosa: A plant species of the genus PINUS that contains isocupressic acid.Plant Poisoning: Poisoning by the ingestion of plants or its leaves, berries, roots or stalks. The manifestations in both humans and animals vary in severity from mild to life threatening. In animals, especially domestic animals, it is usually the result of ingesting moldy or fermented forage.Abortifacient Agents: Chemical substances that interrupt pregnancy after implantation.Abortion, Veterinary: Premature expulsion of the FETUS in animals.Pinus: A plant genus in the family PINACEAE, order Pinales, class Pinopsida, division Coniferophyta. They are evergreen trees mainly in temperate climates.Pacific States: The geographic designation for states bordering on or located in the Pacific Ocean. The states so designated are Alaska, California, Hawaii, Oregon, and Washington. (U.S. Geologic Survey telephone communication)Pseudotsuga: A plant genus in the family PINACEAE, order Pinales, class Pinopsida, division Coniferophyta. They are coniferous evergreen trees with long, flat, spirally arranged needles that grow directly from the branch.Resins, Plant: Flammable, amorphous, vegetable products of secretion or disintegration, usually formed in special cavities of plants. They are generally insoluble in water and soluble in alcohol, carbon tetrachloride, ether, or volatile oils. They are fusible and have a conchoidal fracture. They are the oxidation or polymerization products of the terpenes, and are mixtures of aromatic acids and esters. Most are soft and sticky, but harden after exposure to cold. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed & Dorland, 28th ed)Pinus sylvestris: A plant species of the genus PINUS which is the source of pinosylvin. It is sometimes called Scotch pine or Scots pine, which is also a common name for other species of this genus.Needles: Sharp instruments used for puncturing or suturing.ArkansasTylenchida: An order of nematodes consisting of many species which are plant parasites. Female worms lay eggs that hatch either in soil or in the host plant.United States Department of Agriculture: A cabinet department in the Executive Branch of the United States Government concerned with improving and maintaining farm income and developing and expanding markets for agricultural products. Through inspection and grading services it safeguards and insures standards of quality in food supply and production.Trees: Woody, usually tall, perennial higher plants (Angiosperms, Gymnosperms, and some Pterophyta) having usually a main stem and numerous branches.Cupressaceae: A plant family of the order Pinales, class Pinopsida, division Coniferophyta (conifers). They are mainly resinous, aromatic evergreen trees.Balsams: Resinous substances which most commonly originate from trees. In addition to resins, they contain oils, cinnamic acid and BENZOIC ACID.Fraser Syndrome: Rare autosomal recessive congenital malformation syndrome characterized by cryptophthalmos, SYNDACTYLY and UROGENITAL ABNORMALITIES. Other anomalies of bone, ear, lung, and nose are common. Mutations on FRAS1 and FREM2 are associated with the syndrome.Douglas' Pouch: A sac or recess formed by a fold of the peritoneum.Weevils: BEETLES in the family Curculionidae and the largest family in the order COLEOPTERA. They have a markedly convex shape and many are considered pests.Holidays: Days commemorating events. Holidays also include vacation periods.ArizonaGeography: The science dealing with the earth and its life, especially the description of land, sea, and air and the distribution of plant and animal life, including humanity and human industries with reference to the mutual relations of these elements. (From Webster, 3d ed)Encyclopedias as Topic: Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)North AmericaPinus taeda: A plant species of the genus PINUS which is the subject of genetic study.Ericaceae: The heath plant family of the order Ericales, subclass Dilleniidae, class Magnoliopsida that are generally shrubs or small trees. Leaves are alternate, simple, and leathery; flowers are symmetrical with a 4- or 5-parted corolla of partly fused petals.Arecaceae: The palm family of order Arecales, subclass Arecidae, class Liliopsida.Juniperus: A plant genus of the family CUPRESSACEAE. The species are slow growing coniferous evergreen trees or shrubs.Computing Methodologies: Computer-assisted analysis and processing of problems in a particular area.SculptureVenous Cutdown: Creation of a small incised opening in a vein to permit the passage of a needle or cannula for withdrawal of blood, administration of medication, or in diagnostic or therapeutic catheterization. (Dorland, 28th ed.; Stedman, 26th ed.)Forestry: The science of developing, caring for, or cultivating forests.PennsylvaniaSnow: Frozen water crystals that fall from the ATMOSPHERE.Wood: A product of hard secondary xylem composed of CELLULOSE, hemicellulose, and LIGNANS, that is under the bark of trees and shrubs. It is used in construction and as a source of CHARCOAL and many other products.Renewable Energy: Forms of energy that are constantly and rapidly renewed by natural processes such as solar, ocean wave, and wind energy. (from McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Tupaiidae: The only family of the order SCANDENTIA, variously included in the order Insectivora or in the order Primates, and often in the order Microscelidea, consisting of five genera. They are TUPAIA, Ananthana (Indian tree shrew), Dendrogale (small smooth-tailed tree shrew), Urogale (Mindanao tree shrew), and Ptilocercus (pen-tailed tree shrew). The tree shrews inhabit the forest areas of eastern Asia from India and southwestern China to Borneo and the Philippines.Picea: A plant genus in the family PINACEAE, order Pinales, class Pinopsida, division Coniferophyta. They are evergreen, pyramidal trees with whorled branches and thin, scaly bark. Each of the linear, spirally arranged leaves is jointed near the stem on a separate woody base.WashingtonPlant Leaves: Expanded structures, usually green, of vascular plants, characteristically consisting of a bladelike expansion attached to a stem, and functioning as the principal organ of photosynthesis and transpiration. (American Heritage Dictionary, 2d ed)Plant Transpiration: The loss of water vapor by plants to the atmosphere. It occurs mainly from the leaves through pores (stomata) whose primary function is gas exchange. The water is replaced by a continuous column of water moving upwards from the roots within the xylem vessels. (Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990)Carbon: A nonmetallic element with atomic symbol C, atomic number 6, and atomic weight [12.0096; 12.0116]. It may occur as several different allotropes including DIAMOND; CHARCOAL; and GRAPHITE; and as SOOT from incompletely burned fuel.Plant Stomata: Closable openings in the epidermis of plants on the underside of leaves. They allow the exchange of gases between the internal tissues of the plant and the outside atmosphere.Water: A clear, odorless, tasteless liquid that is essential for most animal and plant life and is an excellent solvent for many substances. The chemical formula is hydrogen oxide (H2O). (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Photosynthesis: The synthesis by organisms of organic chemical compounds, especially carbohydrates, from carbon dioxide using energy obtained from light rather than from the oxidation of chemical compounds. Photosynthesis comprises two separate processes: the light reactions and the dark reactions. In higher plants; GREEN ALGAE; and CYANOBACTERIA; NADPH and ATP formed by the light reactions drive the dark reactions which result in the fixation of carbon dioxide. (from Oxford Dictionary of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 2001)Nanoparticles: Nanometer-sized particles that are nanoscale in three dimensions. They include nanocrystaline materials; NANOCAPSULES; METAL NANOPARTICLES; DENDRIMERS, and QUANTUM DOTS. The uses of nanoparticles include DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEMS and cancer targeting and imaging.Particle Size: Relating to the size of solids.Drug Carriers: Forms to which substances are incorporated to improve the delivery and the effectiveness of drugs. Drug carriers are used in drug-delivery systems such as the controlled-release technology to prolong in vivo drug actions, decrease drug metabolism, and reduce drug toxicity. Carriers are also used in designs to increase the effectiveness of drug delivery to the target sites of pharmacological actions. Liposomes, albumin microspheres, soluble synthetic polymers, DNA complexes, protein-drug conjugates, and carrier erythrocytes among others have been employed as biodegradable drug carriers.Chemistry, Pharmaceutical: Chemistry dealing with the composition and preparation of agents having PHARMACOLOGIC ACTIONS or diagnostic use.Mifepristone: A progestational and glucocorticoid hormone antagonist. Its inhibition of progesterone induces bleeding during the luteal phase and in early pregnancy by releasing endogenous prostaglandins from the endometrium or decidua. As a glucocorticoid receptor antagonist, the drug has been used to treat hypercortisolism in patients with nonpituitary CUSHING SYNDROME.Nelson Syndrome: A syndrome characterized by HYPERPIGMENTATION, enlarging pituitary mass, visual defects secondary to compression of the OPTIC CHIASM, and elevated serum ACTH. It is caused by the expansion of an underlying ACTH-SECRETING PITUITARY ADENOMA that grows in the absence of feedback inhibition by adrenal CORTICOSTEROIDS, usually after ADRENALECTOMY.Flatfishes: Common name for the order Pleuronectiformes. A very distinctive group in that during development they become asymmetrical, i.e., one eye migrates to lie adjacent to the other. They swim on the eyeless side. FLOUNDER, sole, and turbot, along with several others, are included in this order.Food Habits: Acquired or learned food preferences.Plants, Genetically Modified: PLANTS, or their progeny, whose GENOME has been altered by GENETIC ENGINEERING.
... is found under pines (Pinus ponderosa, P. contorta subsp. murrayana) and firs (Abies concolor and Abies ... species) at elevations of 3,000 to 7,000 feet (910 to 2,130 m). It is often buried under needle duff and fruits from May to ... The large, edible fruiting bodies known as mushrooms appear under pine trees, generally in May to June. It has a pinkish to ...
It is found in all parts of the ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa), especially the needles. This gives its toxic and ... It is also present in the lodgepole pine (P. contorta), the jeffrey pine (P. jeffreyi) and possibly in the monterey pine (P. ... radiata). Wang, S; Panter, KE; Gardner, DR; Evans, RC; Bunch, TD (2004). "Effects of the pine needle abortifacient, ... "The toxic and abortifacient effects of ponderosa pine". Vet. Pathol. 33 (1): 22-8. doi:10.1177/030098589603300103. PMID 8826003 ...
In nature, it associates with two- and three-needle pines, especially lodgepole and ponderosa pine. Under controlled laboratory ... Suggs EG, Grand LF (1971). "Formation of mycorrhizae in monoxenic culture by pond pine (Pinus serotina)". Canadian Journal of ... and three-needled pines, especially lodgepole and ponderosa pine. The fungus is found throughout North America, and has been ... 2000). "The mycorrhizal status of Pinus". In Richardson DM. Ecology and Biogeography of Pinus. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge ...
The vegetation is a sparse mix of ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) and Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii). Other plants in the ... and needle and thread grass. This species was first discovered in Larimer County, Colorado, in the 1890s. Today there are about ...
menziesii) Ponderosa Pine (Pinus ponderosa) White Fir (Abies concolor) Lodgepole Pine (Pinus contorta) The Needles are a series ... Other tree species include: Jeffrey Pine (Pinus jeffreyi) Red Fir (Abies magnifica) Coast Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii ... The Needles are a series of granite spires atop a narrow ridge above the Kern River. Forest headquarters are located in ... Mountain Project - The Needles "Proclamation - Adding Lands to the Sequoia National Forest". Retrieved 2009-12-04. Davis, ...
The larvae feed on Pinus ponderosa. Young larvae bore into young needles of their host plant. Larvae complete development in a ... Coleotechnites ponderosae, the ponderosa pine needleminer, is a moth of the Gelechiidae family. It is found in the United ... single needle, pupating in midsummer. Coleotechnites at funet mothphotographersgroup Two New Pine Feeding species of ...
This area is home to some of North America's largest stands of old growth forest including ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa), ... and needle-and-thread on the sagebrush steppe, with western juniper on shallow, rocky soils. Riparian areas support white alder ... Forests are dominated by Douglas-fir, ponderosa pine, and lodgepole pine, with subalpine fir, western larch, and grand fir; ... The region is dominated by Western ponderosa pine, lodgepole pine, Douglas-fir, and grand fir, with western larch, ninebark, ...
Ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) Purple coneflower (Echinacea angustifolia) Purple prairie-clover (Petalostemon purpurea or ... Needle-and-thread grass also called porcupine grass (Hesperostipa comata) Pasture sagewort (Artemisia frigida) Pin cherry ( ...
This variability may be a sign of hybridization with the closely related ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa). The cones are single ... It is a tree growing to 25-35 m tall, with a trunk diameter of up 1.2 m (3 ft 11 in). The needles are in bundles of 3, 4, or 5 ... Another related pine, Cooper's pine (Pinus cooperi) is also treated as a variety of Arizona pine by some authors, as Pinus ... The Arizona pine had been thought to be a variant of Ponderosa pine by some botanists, but is now recognized as a distinct ...
Pinus contorta), with two needles per fascicle, and ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) and Jeffrey pine (Pinus jeffreyi), which ... Pinus albicaulis, whose many common names include whitebark pine, white pine, pitch pine, scrub pine, and creeping pine, grows ... Distinguishing whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis), from the related limber pine (Pinus flexilis), also a "white pine", is much ... Whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) is a member of the white pine group, Pinus subgenus Strobus, section Strobus and like all ...
Distribution of ponderosa pine is from Critchfield and Little. The closely related five-needled Arizona pine (Pinus arizonica) ... ponderosa pine) Gymnosperm Database: Pinus ponderosa Calflora Database: Pinus ponderosa (ponderosa pine, western yellow pine) ... Pinus ponderosa, commonly known as the ponderosa pine, bull pine, blackjack pine, or western yellow-pine, is a very large pine ... Pinus ponderosa subsp. ponderosa Douglas ex C. Lawson - Columbia ponderosa pine, North plateau ponderosa pine. Southeast ...
Pinus ponderosa) does not thrive. Jeffrey pine is more stress tolerant than the closely related Ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa ... Another distinguishing characteristic is that the needles of Jeffrey pine are glaucous, less bright green than those of ... Jeffrey pine (Pinus jeffreyi) also known as Jeffrey's pine, yellow pine and black pine, is a North American pine tree. It is ... The Jeffrey pine is closely related to the ponderosa pine and is similar in appearance. One way to distinguish between them is ...
... is found on pine trees (Pinus spp.) with two or three needles such as ponderosa pine, jack pine, and scots ... "Pine-oak Gall Rust and Pine-pine Gall Rust." Pine-oak and Pine-pine Gall Rusts. N.p., n.d. Web. 20 Oct. 2014. Pine-Pine Gall ... western yellow pine (P. ponderosa), and the European Scots pine (P. sylvestris). A variety of other pines, such as Pinus nigra ... Pine-pine gall rust, also known as western gall rust, is a fungal disease of pine trees. This plant disease is caused by ...
The larvae feed on the tips of Pinus species, including Pinus ponderosa. Young larvae feed between needles or mine them, while ... Rhyacionia at tortricidae.com Bug Guide Rhyacionia bushnelli (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) Damaged Tips Within Ponderosa Pine: ... Rhyacionia bushnelli, the western pine tip moth, is a moth of the Tortricidae family. It is found in the United States, ... Distribution and Sampling Universe Forest Health Protection and State Forestry Organizations - Western Pine Tip Moth. ...
Ponderosa pine/Douglas-fir forest). The number of trees in the world, according to a 2015 estimate, is 3 trillion, of which 1.4 ... In the Northern Hemisphere pines Pinus, spruces Picea, larches Larix, firs Abies, Douglas firs Pseudotsuga and hemlocks Tsuga, ... needle-leaved) trees, or mixed. Boreal forests occupy the subarctic zone and are generally evergreen and coniferous. Temperate ... followed by pine (26,9%), spruce (18.3%), grey alder (9.7%), aspen (8,0%), black alder (5.7%), oak/ash (1.2%) and finally ...
... including ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa), shortleaf pine (Pinus echinata), red pine (Pinus resinosa), incense-cedar ( ... Additionally, the crown may become thin and foliage (leaves or needles) becomes chlorotic. The characteristic symptom of most ... It has a wide host and geographic range throughout North America and causes considerable economic damage in pine plantations in ... Hosts consist of pines and some other conifers and hardwoods, ...
Distribution of ponderosa pine is from Critchfield and Little.[36] The closely related five-needled Arizona pine (Pinus ... Pinus ponderosa, commonly known as the ponderosa pine,[2] bull pine, blackjack pine,[3] or western yellow-pine,[4] is a very ... Pinus ponderosa subsp. ponderosa Douglas ex C. Lawson - Columbia ponderosa pine, North plateau ponderosa pine.[29] ... Calflora Database: Pinus ponderosa (ponderosa pine, western yellow pine). *Jepson Manual eFlora (TJM2) treatment of Pinus ...
This species is related to Pinus ponderosa (Ponderosa pine), and included in the same subsection Ponderosae. The tree is found ... The leaves are needle-like, dark green, five to seven per fascicle (mostly six, this high number unique in the genus), 14-24 cm ... Pinus durangensis, the Durango pine, is a pine tree species endemic to the Sierra Madre Occidental mountain range of ... Gymnosperm Database: Pinus durangensis Farjon, A. & Styles, B. T. (1997). Pinus (Pinaceae). Flora Neotropica Monograph 75: 171- ...
The Coulter pine is closely related to the Jeffrey pine, with which it shares habitats, and the ponderosa pine. Coulter pines ... Coulter pine) Jepson Manual treatment USDA Plants Profile for Pinus coulteri (Coulter pine) Pinus coulteri (Coulter pine) - U.C ... The leaves are needle-like, in bundles of three, glaucous gray-green, 15-30 cm (5.9-11.8 in) long and stout, 2 mm (0.079 in) ... The Coulter pine or big-cone pine, Pinus coulteri, is a native of the coastal mountains of Southern California and northern ...
Subgenus Pinus [edit]. Subgenus Pinus includes the yellow and hard pines. Pines in this subgenus have one to five needles per ... P. ponderosa - ponderosa pine. *P. pseudostrobus - smooth-bark Mexican pine. *P. sabiniana - gray pine ... while pines with two fibrovascular bundles per leaf, (subgenus Pinus) were called diploxylon pines. Diploxylon pines tend to ... Section Pinus[edit]. Section Pinus has two or three needles per fascicle. Cones of all species have thick scales, and all ...
The larvae feed on the needles of Pinus ponderosa. Exoteleia at funet mothphotographersgroup Hodges, R.W, 1985. A new species ... Exoteleia anomala, the ponderoa pine needle miner, is a moth of the Gelechiidae family. It is found in the United States, where ... reared from Ponderosa pine. Journal of the Lepidopterists' Society, 39(2): 139 Bug Guide. ...
In addition to pinyon and ponderosa pine seeds, pinyon jays eat Rocky Mountain bristlecone pine (Pinus aristata) seeds, limber ... Seeds are buried in the litter of dead needles and twigs, and between organic material and mineral soil. Seeds are cached close ... Ponderosa pines of the southwestern United States include interior ponderosa pine (P. p. var. scopulorum) and Arizona pine (P. ... "ponderosa pine" refers to interior ponderosa pine and Arizona pine, unless otherwise specified. Pinyon jays form large flocks ...
However, black-tailed jackrabbits browse Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii), ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa), lodgepole pine ... Needle-and-thread grass (Stipa comata) and Indian ricegrass (Oryzopsis hymenoides) are preferred grasses. Other preferred ... Pinus-Juniperus spp.) woodlands; and early seral (succeeding each other), low- to mid-elevation coniferous forests. It is also ...
... also extends a short distance into Wyoming where ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) is present. Abert's ... Needle clusters are clipped from the twigs, the outer bark is removed, the inner bark is consumed, and then the twig is ... dry interior ponderosa pine forests. In Arizona, ponderosa pine forests are most extensive between 5,500 and 8,500 feet (1,700 ... Where Mexican pinyon (Pinus cembroides) seeds are available, Abert's squirrels consume them in preference to ponderosa pine ...
Abert's squirrel also feeds on the seeds in preference to those of the ponderosa pine. Mexican pinyon was the first pinyon pine ... The leaves ('needles') are in mixed pairs and threes, slender, 3 centimetres (1.2 in) to 6 centimetres (2.4 in) long, and dull ... Pinus cembroides, also known as pinyon pine, Mexican pinyon, Mexican nut pine, and Mexican stone pine, is a pine in the pinyon ... They are also collected for human consumption, being the most widely used pine nut in Mexico. This is a common pine with a wide ...
... is a large coniferous pine (evergreen) tree. The bark helps to distinguish it from other species. Mature to over-mature individuals have yellow to orange-red bark in broad to very broad plates with black crevices. Younger trees have blackish-brown bark, referred to as "blackjacks" by early loggers. Ponderosa pine's five subspecies, as classified by some botanists, can be identified by their characteristically bright-green needles (contrasting with blue-green needles that distinguish Jeffrey pine). The Pacific subspecies has the longest-7.8 in (19.8 cm)-and most flexible needles in plume-like fascicles of three. The Columbia ponderosa pine has long-4.7-8.1 in (12.0-20.5 cm)-and relatively flexible needles in fascicles of three. The Rocky Mountains subspecies has shorter-3.6-5.7 in (9.2-14.4 cm)-and stout ...
The thyrotropin-releasing hormone receptor (TRHR) is a G protein-coupled receptor which binds the tripeptide thyrotropin releasing hormone. The TRHR are found in the brain and when bound by TRH act (through phospholipase C) to increase intracellular inositol trisphosphate. GRCh38: Ensembl release 89: ENSG00000174417 - Ensembl, May 2017 GRCm38: Ensembl release 89: ENSMUSG00000038760 - Ensembl, May 2017 "Human PubMed Reference:". "Mouse PubMed Reference:". Yamada M, Monden T, Konaka S, Mori M (November 1993). "Assignment of human thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) receptor gene to chromosome 8". Somatic Cell and Molecular Genetics. 19 (6): 577-80. doi:10.1007/BF01233384. PMID 8128317. Gershengorn MC (1993). "Thyrotropin-releasing hormone receptor: cloning and regulation of its expression". Recent Progress in Hormone Research. 48: 341-63. PMID 8382829. Short RE, James LF, Panter KE, Staigmiller RB, Bellows RA, Malcolm J, Ford SP (November 1992). "Effects of feeding ponderosa ...
An abortifacient ("that which will cause a miscarriage" from Latin: abortus "miscarriage" and faciens "making") is a substance that induces abortion. Abortifacients for animals that have mated undesirably are known as mismating shots. Common abortifacients used in performing medical abortions include mifepristone, which is typically used in conjunction with misoprostol in a two-step approach. Oxytocin is commonly used to induce abortion in the second or third trimester. There are also several herbal mixtures with abortifacient claims, though there are no available data on the efficacy of these plants in humans. Prostaglandin analogues, such as misoprostol or gemeprost (both synthetic prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) analogues), are often used to terminate pregnancy up to 24 or 60 days of gestation, in combination with mifepristone (a progesterone receptor antagonist) or methotrexate (an antifolate). Misoprostol administered vaginally is more effective than when administered orally. Misoprostol is ...
Found largely in temperate and tropical climates, currently there are known more than 75 species[1] of bioluminescent fungi, all of which are members of the order Agaricales (Basidiomycota) with one exceptional ascomycete belonging to the order Xylariales.[2] All known bioluminescent Agaricales are mushroom-forming, white-spored agarics that belong to four distinct evolutionary lineages. The Omphalotus lineage (comprising the genera Omphalotus and Neonothopanus) contains 12 species, the Armillaria lineage has 10 known species, while the Mycenoid lineage (Mycena, Panellus, Prunulus, Roridomyces) has more than 50 species. The recently discovered Lucentipes lineage contains two species, Mycena lucentipes and Gerronema viridilucens, which belong to a family that has not yet been formally named.[3] Armillaria mellea is the most widely distributed of the luminescent fungi, found across Asia, Europe, North America, and South Africa.[4] Bioluminescent fungi emit a greenish light at a wavelength of ...
List of fungus species in the genus Aspergillus. The Aspergillus genus includes several hundred fungus species, including: Contents A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Aspergillus acidusAspergillus aculeatinusAspergillus aculeatus Aspergillus aeneusAspergillus affinisAspergillus alabamensisAspergillus alliaceus Aspergillus amazonicusAspergillus ambiguusAspergillus amoenusAspergillus amstelodamiAspergillus amyloliquefaciensAspergillus amylovorusAspergillus anomalusAspergillus anthodesmisAspergillus apicalisAspergillus appendiculatusAspergillus arachidicolaAspergillus arenariusAspergillus arviiAspergillus asperescensAspergillus assulatusAspergillus astellatusAspergillus aurantiobrunneusAspergillus aureofulgensAspergillus aureolatusAspergillus aureoterreusAspergillus aureusAspergillus auricomusAspergillus australensisAspergillus austroafricanusAspergillus avenaceusAspergillus awamori Top A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Aspergillus baarnensisAspergillus ...
... is available to women in limited circumstances, including endangerment of their health or economic hardship. Chapter XXIX of the Penal Code of Japan makes abortion de jure illegal in the country, but exceptions to the law are broad enough that it is widely accepted and practiced. Meanwhile, the Maternal Health Protection Law allows approved doctors to practice abortion with the consent of the mother and her spouse, if the pregnancy has resulted from rape, or if the continuation of the pregnancy may severely endanger the maternal health because of physical reasons or economic reasons. Anyone trying to practice abortion without the consent of the woman will be punished, including the doctors. No abortifacient has been approved in Japan. Approved doctors, however, can choose to use imported abortifacient under the same terms above. Any other people who abort the fetus using abortifacient will be punished. Emergency contraceptive pills were approved by the Ministry of Health, ...
... is a falcate-spored graminicolous plant pathogenic fungi species, first isolated from warm-season grasses. Crouch, J. A.; Clarke, B. B.; White, J. F.; Hillman, B. I. (2009). "Systematic analysis of the falcate-spored graminicolous Colletotrichum and a description of six new species from warm-season grasses". Mycologia. 101 (5): 717-732. doi:10.3852/08-230. ISSN 0027-5514. Hyde, K. D., et al. "Colletotrichum-names in current use." Fungal Diversity39.1 (2009): 147-182. Crouch, J. A., and L. A. Beirn. "Anthracnose of cereals and grasses." Fungal Diversity 39 (2009): 19. Colletotrichum axonopodi at the Encyclopedia of Life ...
... , known as Brewer spruce,[2][3] Brewer's weeping spruce, or weeping spruce, is a species of spruce native to western North America, where it is one of the rarest on the continent, endemic to the Klamath Mountains of southwest Oregon and northwest California. The specific epithet breweriana is in honor of the American botanist William Henry Brewer.[4][5] DNA analyses[6][7] have shown that Picea breweriana has a basal position in the Picea clade,[6] suggesting that Picea originated in North America. It grows at moderately high altitudes, from 1000-2700 m.[8][9][10][11][12] It is a large evergreen coniferous tree growing to 20-40 m tall, exceptionally 54 m, and with a trunk diameter of up to 1.5 m. The bark is thin and scaly, and purple-gray in color. The crown is very distinct, distinguished by level branches with vertically pendulous branchlets, each branch forming a 'curtain' of foliage. The pendulous foliage only develops when the tree grows to about 1.5-2 m tall; young trees ...
... or Taheebo is herbal tea made from the inner bark of the Pau d'arco tree[1] Handroanthus impetiginosus.. Lapacho is used in the herbal medicine of several South and Central American indigenous peoples to treat a number of ailments including infection, fever and stomach complaints.[1] The active ingredients such as lapachol have been found to possess significant abortifacient and reproductive toxicity effects for rats.[2][3][4]. Taheebo is the common name for the inner bark of the Red or Purple Lapacho tree. This tree grows high in the Andes of the South American rainforest. The Red Lapacho's purple-colored inner bark was one of the main medicines used by the Incas and has been used for over 1,000 years by the Kallawaya.[5]. Lapacho is promoted as a treatment for a number of human ailments, including cancer. According to the American Cancer Society, "available evidence from well-designed, controlled studies does not support this substance as an effective treatment for cancer in humans", ...
Dean, Gillian; Schwarz, Eleanor Bimla (2011). "Intrauterine contraceptives (IUCs)". In Hatcher, Robert A.; Trussell, James; Nelson, Anita L.; Cates, Willard Jr.; Kowal, Deborah; Policar, Michael S. Contraceptive technology (20th revised ed.). New York: Ardent Media. pp. 147-191. ISBN 978-1-59708-004-0. ISSN 0091-9721. OCLC 781956734.p.150: Mechanism of action Although the precise mechanism of action is not known, currently available IUCs work primarily by preventing sperm from fertilizing ova.26 IUCs are not abortifacients: they do not interrupt an implanted pregnancy.27 Pregnancy is prevented by a combination of the "foreign body effect" of the plastic or metal frame and the specific action of the medication (copper or levonorgestrel) that is released. Exposure to a foreign body causes a sterile inflammatory reaction in the intrauterine environment that is toxic to sperm and ova and impairs implantation.28,29 The production of cytotoxic peptides and activation of enzymes lead to inhibition of ...
... is an illness featuring muscle tenderness and rhabdomyolysis (muscle cell breakdown) after consuming quail (usually common quail, Coturnix coturnix, from which the name derives) that have fed on poisonous plants. From case histories it is known that the toxin is stable as four-month-old pickled quail have been poisonous. Humans vary in their susceptibility; only one in four people who consumed quail soup containing the toxin fell ill. The toxin is apparently fat-soluble as potatoes fried in quail fat have proved poisonous. Coniine from hemlock consumed by quail has been suggested as the cause, though quail resist eating hemlock. Hellebore has also been suggested as the source of the toxin. It has also been asserted that this evidence points to the seeds of the annual woundwort (Stachys annua) being the causal agent. It has been suggested that Galeopsis ladanum seeds are not responsible. Migration routes and season may affect quail risk. Quail are never poisonous outside the migration ...
The grasshopper feeds on the poisonous plant Calotropis gigantea.[1]. Upon slight pinching of the head or abdomen, the half-grown immature form ejects liquid in a sharp and sudden jet, with a range of two inches or more, from a dorsal opening between the first and second abdominal segments. The discharge is directed towards the pinched area and may be repeated several times. The liquid is pale and milky, slightly viscous and bad-tasting,[1] containing cardiac glycosides that the insect obtains from the plant it feeds upon.[4][5]. In the adult, the discharge occurs under the tegmina and collects as viscous bubbly heap along the sides of the body.[1]. ...
... are a class of chemical compounds found in a variety of plants, particularly in the Euphorbiaceae and Thymelaeaceae families. Chemically, they are ester derivatives of the tetracyclic diterpenoid phorbol. Phorbol esters are known for their ability to promote tumors. In particular, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) is used as a biomedical research tool in models of carcinogenesis. Plants that contain phorbol esters are often poisonous. Goel, G; Makkar, H. P.; Francis, G; Becker, K (2007). "Phorbol esters: Structure, biological activity, and toxicity in animals". International Journal of Toxicology. 26 (4): 279-88. doi:10.1080/10915810701464641. PMID 17661218. Emerit, Ingrid; Cerutti, Peter A. (1981). "Tumour promoter phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate induces chromosomal damage via indirect action". Nature. 293 (5828): 144. Bibcode:1981Natur.293..144E. doi:10.1038/293144a0. PMID 7266668. Abdel-Fatta Rizk (1990). Poisonous Plant Contamination of Edible Plants. CRC Press. pp. ...
... where the species also occurs as a dominant in the understory of ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) and Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga ... Needle-and-thread dominates on some xeric, sandy sites. The presence of ponderosa pine or Douglas fir in shrub communities ... and needle-and-thread (Hesperostipa comata) are well represented in the plant communities. Bluebunch wheatgrass or Idaho fescue ...
Choose pine tree variety with 3, sometimes 2, needles per bundle. ... Ponderosa Pine. (Pinus ponderosa). Loblolly Pine. (Pinus taeda) ... Pine Tree Varieties with Three Needles Per Bundle - Choose. ... Pine Tree Varieties with Three Needles Per Bundle - Choose. ...
Pinus longaeva (67) * thinning (67) * growth (66) * high elevation five-needle pines (66) ... Located near Idaho City, Idaho, the Boise Basin Experimental Forest was established in 1933 to study ponderosa pine management ... Current research opportunities include ponderosa pine restoration, the urban-rural interface, and recreation. ... www.fs.usda.gov/rmrs/keywords/ponderosa-pine-management. ... ponderosa pine management. Keyword: ponderosa pine management. ...
Ponderosa pine needle length: an early indicator of release treatment effectiveness. Growth responses of ponderosa pine ... Though longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) forests have been primarily managed with even-aged methods, interest is increasing ... use of UEA techniques to manage longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) forests are still open to question, because of the ... Effects of basal area on survival and growth of longleaf pine when practicing selection silviculture. Aim of study: Uneven-aged ...
Pregnant cows that consume large amounts of ponderosa pine needles during cold spells show an increased incidence of abortion ... Ponderosa Pine. Common Name(s):. Ponderosa Pine. Yellow Pine Scientific Name:. Pinus ponderosa Laws. ... The branches of ponderosa pine are self-pruning. Ecological Adaptions:. Ponderosa pine is common in mountain and plateau areas ... Ponderosa pine is unpalatable to domestic livestock. Cattle generally browse ponderosa pine seedlings only when herbaceous ...
A pine tree is a variety of conifer, which is characterised by being able to produce cones and having scale- or needle-like ... Ponderosa Pine. The ponderosa pine (pinus ponderosa) is native to western North America, and is characterised by a distinctive ... Lodgepole Pine. According to the Depart of Agriculture, the lodgepole pine (pinus contorta) is also known to produce needles ... Monterey Pine. The Monterey pine (pinus radiata), also known as the insignis pine and the radiata pine, is another western ...
Geographic variation in speed of seed germination in central Oregon ponderosa pine ( pinus ponderosa dougl. ex laws). Forest ... Fine roots versus needles: a comparison of 13c and 15n dynamics ina ponderosa pine forest soil ... We investigated the distributioin of biomass and nurtrients in second-growth ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex Laws.) ... The report includes an adaptive genetic variation in seed and seedling traits for ponderosa pine from the east slopes of the ...
Pinus ponderosa (180) * ecosystem management (172) * protected areas (171) * policy (170) * assessment (169) ... High elevation white pines educational website. Documents and Media Posted on: December 03, 2014 ... Innovative control and management of white pine blister rust - the proactive strategy for mountaintop ecosystems Projects ... This website was constructed to increase the awareness of high elevation white pine species, their ecologies and the threats ...
Pinus "Ponderosa Pine" QUART SIZE Native Tree w/ FREE SHIPPING!. Colorado Ponderosa Pine. With an eventual height 50 to 80in ... 50 years, it has dark green needles with beautiful orange-brown bark. Truly one of the most magnificent pines in the world! ...
High elevation five-needle pines are rapidly declining throughout North America. The six species, whitebark (Pinus albicaulis ... ponderosa pine forests (52) * fire regime (52) * white pine blister rust (52) ... limber pine) and P. albicaulis (whitebark pine) which are being decimated by white pine blister rust and mountain pine beetles ... The magnificent high-elevation five-needle white pines: Ecological roles and future outlook. Publications Posted on: June 30, ...
It is the Scotch Pine that surpasses them all in Europe, but in the USA the Douglas Fir in the North and Fraser Fir... ... Scots Pine and Easter Cedar are the favourite choices for Yule and Christmas Trees. ... Ponderosa Pine. Pinus ponderosa. A choice if you wish a tall tree and may be a better choice as a striking lovely colour ... Long needled fir that is sometimes mistaken for a pine. If allowed to mature and grow will live for about 350 years. ...
Two smaller Arizona pine trees are the two-needle pinyon pine and the limber pine, which exists in limited ... ... Among them is the ponderosa pine, an evergreen tree that has a very wide geographic distribution in the western part of North ... Arizona has a few pine tree species that occur naturally in the state. ... Ponderosa Pine. Red-brown bark divided into scaly plates is one of the trademarks of the mature ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa ...
Ponderosa Pine Needle Miner. *0.67 Lb / 100 Gal. *10.5 Oz / 100 Gal ...
Ponderosa Pine Needle Miner. *8.9 Oz / 100 Gal. View * Grasshoppers. *8.9 Oz / 100 Gal ...
Distribution of ponderosa pine is from Critchfield and Little.[36] The closely related five-needled Arizona pine (Pinus ... Pinus ponderosa, commonly known as the ponderosa pine,[2] bull pine, blackjack pine,[3] or western yellow-pine,[4] is a very ... Pinus ponderosa subsp. ponderosa Douglas ex C. Lawson - Columbia ponderosa pine, North plateau ponderosa pine.[29] ... Calflora Database: Pinus ponderosa (ponderosa pine, western yellow pine). *Jepson Manual eFlora (TJM2) treatment of Pinus ...
Grown in a wide range of shapes, sizes and growing requirements, the best pine trees are drought tolerant and tolerate a wide ... Pine trees are part of the genus Pinus, a genus that contains 120 different species of trees that originate from the Northern ... Ponderosa Pine. Ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) is a variety of pine tree that has a moderate growth rate and medium texture. ... The 1- to 3-inch long blue to green needles on Scotch pine trees grow in pairs and cast a yellow tinge in winter. The cones ...
Chapter 6. Diseases and Willamette Valley ponderosas *Needle diseases. *Branch and stem diseases ... Chapter 1. An overview of Willamette Valley ponderosas *History of ponderosa pine in the Willamette Valley ... Establishing & Managing Ponderosa Pine in the Willamette Valley. Book published by the Oregon State University Extension Office ... Chapter 3. Managing stands of Willamette Valley ponderosa pine *Natural stand development ...
Pine-pine gall rust is found on pine trees (Pinus spp.) with two or three needles such as ponderosa pine, jack pine, and scots ... "Pine-oak Gall Rust and Pine-pine Gall Rust." Pine-oak and Pine-pine Gall Rusts. N.p., n.d. Web. 20 Oct. 2014. Pine-Pine Gall ... western yellow pine (P. ponderosa), and the European Scots pine (P. sylvestris). A variety of other pines, such as Pinus nigra ... Pine-pine gall rust, also known as western gall rust, is a fungal disease of pine trees. This plant disease is caused by ...
Boletus rex-veris is found under pines (Pinus ponderosa, P. contorta subsp. murrayana) and firs (Abies concolor and Abies ... species) at elevations of 3,000 to 7,000 feet (910 to 2,130 m). It is often buried under needle duff and fruits from May to ... The large, edible fruiting bodies known as mushrooms appear under pine trees, generally in May to June. It has a pinkish to ...
... (Pinus ponderosa)-also known as yellow, western yellow, pondosa, blackjack, or bull pine-is one of the most ... Needles were used in basketry, and wood was used for timber and building materials. ... ponderosa (Pacific ponderosa pine) and var. scopulorum (Rocky Mountain ponderosa pine), are found in Oregon. ... In its genus, ponderosa pine is second in size only to sugar pine. The Oregon champion, at La Pine State Park in Deschutes ...
... pine, pine tree, true pine. usage: tall symmetrical pine of western North America having long blue-green needles in bunches of ... sometimes classified as a variety of ponderosa pine. WordNet 3.0 Copyright © 2006 by Princeton University.. All rights reserved ... 1. Jeffrey pine, Jeffreys pine, black pine, Pinus jeffreyi, ...
Pinus ponderosa is a very tall evergreen, reaching 60 to 100 feet in cultivation, up to 230 feet in the wild. The needles are ... Pinus ponderosa is a very tall evergreen, reaching 60 to 100 feet in cultivation, up to 230 feet in the wild. The needles are ... pine needle miner, pine weevil, bark beetles and pinewood nematode. Well situated plants should be relatively trouble free. ... Pines tend to develop tap roots, so one should not attempt to transplant them from the wild. All species are grown from seed, ...
The needles are yellowish-green, three in a bundle, varying from five to eleven inches in length. The cones mature in August of ... Ponderosa Pine. Pinus ponderosa Dougl. Ponderosa Pine Cones Slightly Less Than 1/2 Natural Size ... Ponderosa Pine Tree The Ponderosa (or Western Yellow) Pine is the commonest conifer on the floor of the Yosemite Valley. Dense ... the neighboring Ponderosa Pine he places at not above one hundred and fifty years. This giant pine is twenty-five feet in ...
I live in a forest that is 99% Ponderosa Pine and I think Ponderosa Pines (Pinus ponderosa) are one of the easiest conifers to ... Ponderosa pine is a good example. The needles tend to be too long, but the trunks are as good as any in the world. It doesnt ... Ive had great luck with Ponderosa Pine (Pinus ponderosa); Black Hills Spruce (Picea glauca var. Densata) ; Engelmann Spruce ... About 95+% with ponderosa pine. Maybe only 25% on limber pine. But it can vary considerably from year to year. Last year was ...
... was higher for pine needles (21.61 MJ·kg−1). The Ed of 8.9 GJ·m−3 confirm the good potential of Pinus pinaster biomass tree ... The FVI ranked the wood stem (4658) and top (2861.8) as a better fuelwood and pine needles (394.2) as inferior quality. The ... Maritime Pine) woody biomass and ashes is presented in this study. Physical, thermal and chemical analysis, including density, ... The results from this study indicated, for Pinus pinaster biomass tree components, carbon content ranging from 46.5 to 49.3%, ...
  • Over the period 1883?2013, recruitment of subalpine limber pine ( Pinus flexilis E. James) and Great Basin bristlecone pine ( Pinus longaeva D.K. Bailey) above the upper tree line, below the lower tree line, and across middle-elevation forest borders occurred at localized sites across four mountain ranges in the western Great. (usda.gov)
  • Limber pine ( Pinus flexilis James) stands along the eastern escarpment of the Sierra Nevada, California, experienced significant mortality from 1985 to 1995 during a period of sustained low precipitation and high temperature. (usda.gov)
  • Limber pine (Pinus flexilis) grows naturally in Arizona in a small section in the north-central part of the state. (gardenguides.com)
  • Western pine beetles attack pines mid-trunk then work their way up and down the tree in a spaghetti-like pattern. (sfgate.com)
  • Engraver beetles attack pines near the top and make wishbone-shaped tunnels. (sfgate.com)
  • Cultural practices, such as selecting healthy trees that are suited to your environment, avoiding injuring pines which can allow beetles access through wounds, and thinning dense stands of trees are the best defenses. (sfgate.com)
  • A further warming trend in the west may allow the beetles to invade the five-needle pines at higher elevations that have been largely immune to them. (acousticecology.org)
  • Myrcene was identified as specific defensive compound, since it significantly increased upon inoculation with dead mountain pine beetles. (springer.com)
  • Beetles reared in bolts from trees that experienced water deficit emerged with a higher fat content, demonstrating for the first time experimentally that drought conditions benefit mountain pine beetles. (springer.com)
  • Adams AS, Aylward FO, Adams SM, Erbilgin N, Aukema BH, Currie CR, Suen G, Raffa KF (2013) Mountain pine beetles colonizing historical and naïve host trees are associated with a bacterial community highly enriched in genes contributing to terpene metabolism. (springer.com)
  • In addition, Diplodia sapinea is known to colonize many other conifers growing under unfavorable environmental conditions, including: eastern white pine ( Pinus strobus ), Douglas-fir ( Pseudotsuga menziesii ), as well as Colorado ( Picea pungens ), Norway ( P. abies ), and white spruce ( P. glauca ). (umass.edu)
  • subgenus Pinus ( hard pines ), and subgenus Strobus ( soft pines ). (wikipedia.org)
  • Older classifications split the genus into three subgenera - subgenus Pinus , subgenus Strobus , and subgenus Ducampopinus ( pinyon , bristlecone and lacebark pines) - based on cone, seed and leaf characteristics. (wikipedia.org)
  • Pines with one fibrovascular bundle per leaf, (the former subgenera Strobus and Ducampopinus ) were known as haploxylon pines , while pines with two fibrovascular bundles per leaf, (subgenus Pinus ) were called diploxylon pines . (wikipedia.org)
  • Selection silviculture has become increasingly common for longleaf pine management, yet questions remain regarding residual canopy effects on seedling survival and growth. (usda.gov)
  • Another type, Nana, is a dwarf hybrid that takes on a bushy form and possesses bluish-green needles. (gardenguides.com)
  • The most familiar softwoods are the Ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa), Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis), Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii), Western Hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla), Western Larch (Larix occidentalis), Pacific Yew (Taxus brevifolia) and the Western Red Cedar (Thuja plicata). (ehow.com)
  • Some small Red Firs and a young Sugar Pine are also to be found in the circle about this tree. (ca.us)
  • Our road up the Valley to the hotels, for the most part, lies among giant pines, or firs, and cedars, from one hundred and seventy-five to two hundred and twenty feet in height, and beneath the refreshing shade of outspreading oaks. (ca.us)
  • Canaan Fir - Photo - Similar to the other eastern firs.Canaan Fir has short, soft needles that are dark green on the upper surface and silvery blue on the underside. (pickyourownchristmastree.org)
  • It is the Scotch Pine that surpasses them all in Europe, but in the USA the Douglas Fir in the North and Fraser Fir in the south seem to grasp the most popularity. (hubpages.com)
  • Scotch pine trees have an irregular pyramidal shape when young that matures to an open, upright spreading form. (gardenguides.com)
  • The 1- to 3-inch long blue to green needles on Scotch pine trees grow in pairs and cast a yellow tinge in winter. (gardenguides.com)
  • Scotch pine trees grow best in full sun and well-drained soil. (gardenguides.com)
  • The result may be a spread of infestation to the huge unaffected population of jack pine in the northern states and Canada. (acousticecology.org)
  • The Lodgepole × Jack Pine Hybrid Zone in Alberta, Canada: A Stepping Stone for the Mountain Pine Beetle on its Journey East Across the Boreal Forest? (springer.com)
  • Section Trifoliae (American hard pines), despite its name (which means "three-leaved"), has two to five needles per fascicle, or rarely eight. (wikipedia.org)
  • All but two American hard pines belong to this section. (wikipedia.org)
  • According to the New Zealand Tree Crops Association, the tree's needles contain negligible amounts of isocupressic acid, but it may still be enough to cause toxic reactions in livestock if they ingest the needles. (ehow.co.uk)
  • For the plant community that is dominated by this tree, see Ponderosa pine forest . (wikipedia.org)
  • Ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) is a variety of pine tree that has a moderate growth rate and medium texture. (gardenguides.com)
  • The narrow to pyramidal shape of the young tree turns irregular as the Ponderosa pine tree matures. (gardenguides.com)
  • Unlike most pines, this tree has a very wide distribution -dry ridges, moist valley bottoms, gravelly slopes. (ca.us)
  • This giant pine is twenty-five feet in circumference-approximately a fourth of the height of the tree-at six feet above the ground, and its first branch is nearly two feet in diameter. (ca.us)
  • Another interesting Ponderosa Pine is the tree in a cleft on the sheer face of El Capitan. (ca.us)
  • Indeed, it is the blue jay's own tree, for the bird uses the twigs and the long needles in making its loosely built nests. (ca.us)
  • In this study, stable carbon isotope ratios in the glucose samples were extracted from annual pine tree rings as bio-indicators of contemporary environmental changes in heavily urbanized areas. (springer.com)
  • Apple seeds are mostly taken up with two large seed leaves plus a thin layer of nutritive endosperm, which differs in origin from the nutritive layer of pine tree seeds. (sfgate.com)
  • Because it is not in the Pine or Fir family, it does not produce sap, so that those with an allergy to sap can still enjoy a Leyland as their Christmas Tree. (pickyourownchristmastree.org)
  • If you live in any of the temperate regions of the world, whether at sea level or high in the mountains, some pine tree is likely to be growing very near you. (wisdom-magazine.com)
  • Pine resin is a component of propolis, a mixture of tree saps collected by bees. (wisdom-magazine.com)
  • And of all pines, this one is also the most refulgent, its long reflective needles scintillant in sunshine, like upraised sabers, so that on a bright and windy day each tree makes a kind of cavalry charge. (earthisland.org)
  • Historical data show that outbreaks of the tree killing mountain pine beetle are often preceded by periods of drought. (springer.com)
  • Infection continues on the host shoots and needles until they have reached 90% of their elongation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Once the fungus penetrates the needles, tissues are rapidly destroyed, resulting in stunted shoots and needles. (umass.edu)
  • Needle-like, in "bundles" of threes, occasionally in two's. (usu.edu)
  • Diplodia shoot blight can be a very destructive disease for two- and three-needle pines in New England. (umass.edu)
  • Current-season buds and shoot tips are attacked, leading to tip blight, stunted and/or wilted needles, resin flow on declining or dead shoots and a general dieback in the canopy near branch tips. (umass.edu)
  • The most conspicuous symptom of Diplodia blight is stunted current season's shoots with undersized brown needles. (umass.edu)
  • Global climate change impacts drought frequency and severity and is implicated in the range expansion of the mountain pine beetle into formerly unsuitable habitats. (springer.com)
  • Adams AS, Six DL, Adams S, Holben W (2008) In vitro interactions between yeasts and bacteria and the fungal symbionts of the mountain pine beetle ( Dendroctonus ponderosae ). (springer.com)
  • Alfaro RI, Campbell E, Hawkes BC (2010) Historical frequency, intensity and extent of mountain pine beetle disturbance in British Columbia B.C. Natural Resources Canada, Canadian Forest Service, Pacific Forestry Centre, Victoria, BC. (springer.com)