Polysomnography: Simultaneous and continuous monitoring of several parameters during sleep to study normal and abnormal sleep. The study includes monitoring of brain waves, to assess sleep stages, and other physiological variables such as breathing, eye movements, and blood oxygen levels which exhibit a disrupted pattern with sleep disturbances.Sleep Apnea, Obstructive: A disorder characterized by recurrent apneas during sleep despite persistent respiratory efforts. It is due to upper airway obstruction. The respiratory pauses may induce HYPERCAPNIA or HYPOXIA. Cardiac arrhythmias and elevation of systemic and pulmonary arterial pressures may occur. Frequent partial arousals occur throughout sleep, resulting in relative SLEEP DEPRIVATION and daytime tiredness. Associated conditions include OBESITY; ACROMEGALY; MYXEDEMA; micrognathia; MYOTONIC DYSTROPHY; adenotonsilar dystrophy; and NEUROMUSCULAR DISEASES. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p395)Sleep Apnea Syndromes: Disorders characterized by multiple cessations of respirations during sleep that induce partial arousals and interfere with the maintenance of sleep. Sleep apnea syndromes are divided into central (see SLEEP APNEA, CENTRAL), obstructive (see SLEEP APNEA, OBSTRUCTIVE), and mixed central-obstructive types.Sleep Apnea, Central: A condition associated with multiple episodes of sleep apnea which are distinguished from obstructive sleep apnea (SLEEP APNEA, OBSTRUCTIVE) by the complete cessation of efforts to breathe. This disorder is associated with dysfunction of central nervous system centers that regulate respiration.Sleep: A readily reversible suspension of sensorimotor interaction with the environment, usually associated with recumbency and immobility.Sleep Stages: Periods of sleep manifested by changes in EEG activity and certain behavioral correlates; includes Stage 1: sleep onset, drowsy sleep; Stage 2: light sleep; Stages 3 and 4: delta sleep, light sleep, deep sleep, telencephalic sleep.Continuous Positive Airway Pressure: A technique of respiratory therapy, in either spontaneously breathing or mechanically ventilated patients, in which airway pressure is maintained above atmospheric pressure throughout the respiratory cycle by pressurization of the ventilatory circuit. (On-Line Medical Dictionary [Internet]. Newcastle upon Tyne(UK): The University Dept. of Medical Oncology: The CancerWEB Project; c1997-2003 [cited 2003 Apr 17]. Available from: http://cancerweb.ncl.ac.uk/omd/)Snoring: Rough, noisy breathing during sleep, due to vibration of the uvula and soft palate.Sleep, REM: A stage of sleep characterized by rapid movements of the eye and low voltage fast pattern EEG. It is usually associated with dreaming.Sleep Disorders: Conditions characterized by disturbances of usual sleep patterns or behaviors. Sleep disorders may be divided into three major categories: DYSSOMNIAS (i.e. disorders characterized by insomnia or hypersomnia), PARASOMNIAS (abnormal sleep behaviors), and sleep disorders secondary to medical or psychiatric disorders. (From Thorpy, Sleep Disorders Medicine, 1994, p187)Disorders of Excessive Somnolence: Disorders characterized by hypersomnolence during normal waking hours that may impair cognitive functioning. Subtypes include primary hypersomnia disorders (e.g., IDIOPATHIC HYPERSOMNOLENCE; NARCOLEPSY; and KLEINE-LEVIN SYNDROME) and secondary hypersomnia disorders where excessive somnolence can be attributed to a known cause (e.g., drug affect, MENTAL DISORDERS, and SLEEP APNEA SYNDROME). (From J Neurol Sci 1998 Jan 8;153(2):192-202; Thorpy, Principles and Practice of Sleep Medicine, 2nd ed, p320)Adenoidectomy: Excision of the adenoids. (Dorland, 28th ed)Tonsillectomy: Surgical removal of a tonsil or tonsils. (Dorland, 28th ed)Wakefulness: A state in which there is an enhanced potential for sensitivity and an efficient responsiveness to external stimuli.Nocturnal Myoclonus Syndrome: Excessive periodic leg movements during sleep that cause micro-arousals and interfere with the maintenance of sleep. This condition induces a state of relative sleep deprivation which manifests as excessive daytime hypersomnolence. The movements are characterized by repetitive contractions of the tibialis anterior muscle, extension of the toe, and intermittent flexion of the hip, knee and ankle. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p387)Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders: Disorders characterized by impairment of the ability to initiate or maintain sleep. This may occur as a primary disorder or in association with another medical or psychiatric condition.Oximetry: The determination of oxygen-hemoglobin saturation of blood either by withdrawing a sample and passing it through a classical photoelectric oximeter or by electrodes attached to some translucent part of the body like finger, earlobe, or skin fold. It includes non-invasive oxygen monitoring by pulse oximetry.Actigraphy: The measurement and recording of MOTOR ACTIVITY to assess rest/activity cycles.Arousal: Cortical vigilance or readiness of tone, presumed to be in response to sensory stimulation via the reticular activating system.Parasomnias: Movements or behaviors associated with sleep, sleep stages, or partial arousals from sleep that may impair sleep maintenance. Parasomnias are generally divided into four groups: arousal disorders, sleep-wake transition disorders, parasomnias of REM sleep, and nonspecific parasomnias. (From Thorpy, Sleep Disorders Medicine, 1994, p191)Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Positive-Pressure Respiration: A method of mechanical ventilation in which pressure is maintained to increase the volume of gas remaining in the lungs at the end of expiration, thus reducing the shunting of blood through the lungs and improving gas exchange.Cheyne-Stokes Respiration: An abnormal pattern of breathing characterized by alternating periods of apnea and deep, rapid breathing. The cycle begins with slow, shallow breaths that gradually increase in depth and rate and is then followed by a period of apnea. The period of apnea can last 5 to 30 seconds, then the cycle repeats every 45 seconds to 3 minutes.Respiration: The act of breathing with the LUNGS, consisting of INHALATION, or the taking into the lungs of the ambient air, and of EXHALATION, or the expelling of the modified air which contains more CARBON DIOXIDE than the air taken in (Blakiston's Gould Medical Dictionary, 4th ed.). This does not include tissue respiration (= OXYGEN CONSUMPTION) or cell respiration (= CELL RESPIRATION).Mandibular Advancement: Moving a retruded mandible forward to a normal position. It is commonly performed for malocclusion and retrognathia. (From Jablonski's Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Uvula: A fleshy extension at the back of the soft palate that hangs above the opening of the throat.Narcolepsy: A condition characterized by recurrent episodes of daytime somnolence and lapses in consciousness (microsomnias) that may be associated with automatic behaviors and AMNESIA. CATAPLEXY; SLEEP PARALYSIS, and hypnagogic HALLUCINATIONS frequently accompany narcolepsy. The pathophysiology of this disorder includes sleep-onset rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, which normally follows stage III or IV sleep. (From Neurology 1998 Feb;50(2 Suppl 1):S2-S7)Palate, Soft: A movable fold suspended from the posterior border of the hard palate. The uvula hangs from the middle of the lower border.Monitoring, Ambulatory: The use of electronic equipment to observe or record physiologic processes while the patient undergoes normal daily activities.Pharynx: A funnel-shaped fibromuscular tube that conducts food to the ESOPHAGUS, and air to the LARYNX and LUNGS. It is located posterior to the NASAL CAVITY; ORAL CAVITY; and LARYNX, and extends from the SKULL BASE to the inferior border of the CRICOID CARTILAGE anteriorly and to the inferior border of the C6 vertebra posteriorly. It is divided into the NASOPHARYNX; OROPHARYNX; and HYPOPHARYNX (laryngopharynx).Hypoventilation: A reduction in the amount of air entering the pulmonary alveoli.Body Mass Index: An indicator of body density as determined by the relationship of BODY WEIGHT to BODY HEIGHT. BMI=weight (kg)/height squared (m2). BMI correlates with body fat (ADIPOSE TISSUE). Their relationship varies with age and gender. For adults, BMI falls into these categories: below 18.5 (underweight); 18.5-24.9 (normal); 25.0-29.9 (overweight); 30.0 and above (obese). (National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)Monitoring, Physiologic: The continuous measurement of physiological processes, blood pressure, heart rate, renal output, reflexes, respiration, etc., in a patient or experimental animal; includes pharmacologic monitoring, the measurement of administered drugs or their metabolites in the blood, tissues, or urine.Rhinomanometry: Technique for measuring air pressure and the rate of airflow in the nasal cavity during respiration.Oxygen: An element with atomic symbol O, atomic number 8, and atomic weight [15.99903; 15.99977]. It is the most abundant element on earth and essential for respiration.Sleep Deprivation: The state of being deprived of sleep under experimental conditions, due to life events, or from a wide variety of pathophysiologic causes such as medication effect, chronic illness, psychiatric illness, or sleep disorder.Restless Legs Syndrome: A disorder characterized by aching or burning sensations in the lower and rarely the upper extremities that occur prior to sleep or may awaken the patient from sleep.Somnambulism: A parasomnia characterized by a partial arousal that occurs during stage IV of non-REM sleep. Affected individuals exhibit semipurposeful behaviors such as ambulation and are difficult to fully awaken. Children are primarily affected, with a peak age range of 4-6 years.Airway Obstruction: Any hindrance to the passage of air into and out of the lungs.Circadian Rhythm: The regular recurrence, in cycles of about 24 hours, of biological processes or activities, such as sensitivity to drugs and stimuli, hormone secretion, sleeping, and feeding.Electroencephalography: Recording of electric currents developed in the brain by means of electrodes applied to the scalp, to the surface of the brain, or placed within the substance of the brain.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Respiration Disorders: Diseases of the respiratory system in general or unspecified or for a specific respiratory disease not available.Azabicyclo Compounds: Bicyclic bridged compounds that contain a nitrogen which has three bonds. The nomenclature indicates the number of atoms in each path around the rings, such as [2.2.2] for three equal length paths. Some members are TROPANES and BETA LACTAMS.Pulmonary Ventilation: The total volume of gas inspired or expired per unit of time, usually measured in liters per minute.Anoxia: Relatively complete absence of oxygen in one or more tissues.Adenoids: A collection of lymphoid nodules on the posterior wall and roof of the NASOPHARYNX.Apnea: A transient absence of spontaneous respiration.Sleep Disorders, Circadian Rhythm: Dyssomnias associated with disruption of the normal 24 hour sleep wake cycle secondary to travel (e.g., JET LAG SYNDROME), shift work, or other causes.Nasal Obstruction: Any hindrance to the passage of air into and out of the nose. The obstruction may be unilateral or bilateral, and may involve any part of the NASAL CAVITY.Orthodontic Appliances, Removable: Dental devices such as RETAINERS, ORTHODONTIC used to improve gaps in teeth and structure of the jaws. These devices can be removed and reinserted at will.Oropharynx: The middle portion of the pharynx that lies posterior to the mouth, inferior to the SOFT PALATE, and superior to the base of the tongue and EPIGLOTTIS. It has a digestive function as food passes from the mouth into the oropharynx before entering ESOPHAGUS.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Respiratory Mechanics: The physical or mechanical action of the LUNGS; DIAPHRAGM; RIBS; and CHEST WALL during respiration. It includes airflow, lung volume, neural and reflex controls, mechanoreceptors, breathing patterns, etc.Electrooculography: Recording of the average amplitude of the resting potential arising between the cornea and the retina in light and dark adaptation as the eyes turn a standard distance to the right and the left. The increase in potential with light adaptation is used to evaluate the condition of the retinal pigment epithelium.Diagnosis, Computer-Assisted: Application of computer programs designed to assist the physician in solving a diagnostic problem.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Tongue: A muscular organ in the mouth that is covered with pink tissue called mucosa, tiny bumps called papillae, and thousands of taste buds. The tongue is anchored to the mouth and is vital for chewing, swallowing, and for speech.Fluid Shifts: Translocation of body fluids from one compartment to another, such as from the vascular to the interstitial compartments. Fluid shifts are associated with profound changes in vascular permeability and WATER-ELECTROLYTE IMBALANCE. The shift can also be from the lower body to the upper body as in conditions of weightlessness.Hypnotics and Sedatives: Drugs used to induce drowsiness or sleep or to reduce psychological excitement or anxiety.Pierre Robin Syndrome: Congenital malformation characterized by MICROGNATHIA or RETROGNATHIA; GLOSSOPTOSIS and CLEFT PALATE. The mandibular abnormalities often result in difficulties in sucking and swallowing. The syndrome may be isolated or associated with other syndromes (e.g., ANDERSEN SYNDROME; CAMPOMELIC DYSPLASIA). Developmental mis-expression of SOX9 TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR gene on chromosome 17q and its surrounding region is associated with the syndrome.Sleep Arousal Disorders: Sleep disorders characterized by impaired arousal from the deeper stages of sleep (generally stage III or IV sleep).Delta Rhythm: Brain waves seen on EEG characterized by a high amplitude and a frequency of 4 Hz and below. They are considered the "deep sleep waves" observed during sleep in dreamless states, infancy, and in some brain disorders.Comorbidity: The presence of co-existing or additional diseases with reference to an initial diagnosis or with reference to the index condition that is the subject of study. Comorbidity may affect the ability of affected individuals to function and also their survival; it may be used as a prognostic indicator for length of hospital stay, cost factors, and outcome or survival.Cataplexy: A condition characterized by transient weakness or paralysis of somatic musculature triggered by an emotional stimulus or physical exertion. Cataplexy is frequently associated with NARCOLEPSY. During a cataplectic attack, there is a marked reduction in muscle tone similar to the normal physiologic hypotonia that accompanies rapid eye movement sleep (SLEEP, REM). (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p396)Airway Resistance: Physiologically, the opposition to flow of air caused by the forces of friction. As a part of pulmonary function testing, it is the ratio of driving pressure to the rate of air flow.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Hypercapnia: A clinical manifestation of abnormal increase in the amount of carbon dioxide in arterial blood.Heart Rate: The number of times the HEART VENTRICLES contract per unit of time, usually per minute.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Supine Position: The posture of an individual lying face up.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Dyssomnias: A broad category of sleep disorders characterized by either hypersomnolence or insomnia. The three major subcategories include intrinsic (i.e., arising from within the body) (SLEEP DISORDERS, INTRINSIC), extrinsic (secondary to environmental conditions or various pathologic conditions), and disturbances of circadian rhythm. (From Thorpy, Sleep Disorders Medicine, 1994, p187)Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Nose: A part of the upper respiratory tract. It contains the organ of SMELL. The term includes the external nose, the nasal cavity, and the PARANASAL SINUSES.Cephalometry: The measurement of the dimensions of the HEAD.Respiratory Physiological Phenomena: Physiological processes and properties of the RESPIRATORY SYSTEM as a whole or of any of its parts.Kleine-Levin Syndrome: A rare condition characterized by recurrent hypersomnias associated with hyperphagia, occurring primarily in males in the second to third decade of life. Clinical features include mental confusion, excessive sleep requirements (approximately 18 hours per day), restlessness, and in some cases hallucinations. Episodes have a duration of days to weeks, and may recur several times per year. This condition may resolve spontaneously over several years. (From Adams, et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p569)REM Sleep Behavior Disorder: A disorder characterized by episodes of vigorous and often violent motor activity during REM sleep (SLEEP, REM). The affected individual may inflict self injury or harm others, and is difficult to awaken from this condition. Episodes are usually followed by a vivid recollection of a dream that is consistent with the aggressive behavior. This condition primarily affects adult males. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p393)Neck: The part of a human or animal body connecting the HEAD to the rest of the body.Obesity: A status with BODY WEIGHT that is grossly above the acceptable or desirable weight, usually due to accumulation of excess FATS in the body. The standards may vary with age, sex, genetic or cultural background. In the BODY MASS INDEX, a BMI greater than 30.0 kg/m2 is considered obese, and a BMI greater than 40.0 kg/m2 is considered morbidly obese (MORBID OBESITY).Inhalation: The act of BREATHING in.Equipment Design: Methods of creating machines and devices.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Electromyography: Recording of the changes in electric potential of muscle by means of surface or needle electrodes.Orthodontic Appliances: Devices used for influencing tooth position. Orthodontic appliances may be classified as fixed or removable, active or retaining, and intraoral or extraoral. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p19)Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Signal Processing, Computer-Assisted: Computer-assisted processing of electric, ultrasonic, or electronic signals to interpret function and activity.Carbon Dioxide: A colorless, odorless gas that can be formed by the body and is necessary for the respiration cycle of plants and animals.Plethysmography, Impedance: Recording changes in electrical impedance between electrodes placed on opposite sides of a part of the body, as a measure of volume changes in the path of the current. (Stedman, 25th ed)Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Patient Compliance: Voluntary cooperation of the patient in following a prescribed regimen.Palatine Tonsil: A round-to-oval mass of lymphoid tissue embedded in the lateral wall of the PHARYNX. There is one on each side of the oropharynx in the fauces between the anterior and posterior pillars of the SOFT PALATE.Statistics, Nonparametric: A class of statistical methods applicable to a large set of probability distributions used to test for correlation, location, independence, etc. In most nonparametric statistical tests, the original scores or observations are replaced by another variable containing less information. An important class of nonparametric tests employs the ordinal properties of the data. Another class of tests uses information about whether an observation is above or below some fixed value such as the median, and a third class is based on the frequency of the occurrence of runs in the data. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed, p1284; Corsini, Concise Encyclopedia of Psychology, 1987, p764-5)Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Sudden Infant Death: The abrupt and unexplained death of an apparently healthy infant under one year of age, remaining unexplained after a thorough case investigation, including performance of a complete autopsy, examination of the death scene, and review of the clinical history. (Pediatr Pathol 1991 Sep-Oct;11(5):677-84)Masks: Devices that cover the nose and mouth to maintain aseptic conditions or to administer inhaled anesthetics or other gases. (UMDNS, 1999)Dreams: A series of thoughts, images, or emotions occurring during sleep which are dissociated from the usual stream of consciousness of the waking state.Oxyhemoglobins: A compound formed by the combination of hemoglobin and oxygen. It is a complex in which the oxygen is bound directly to the iron without causing a change from the ferrous to the ferric state.Transducers, Pressure: Transducers that are activated by pressure changes, e.g., blood pressure.Insomnia, Fatal Familial: An autosomal dominant disorder characterized by degeneration of the THALAMUS and progressive insomnia. It is caused by a mutation in the prion protein (PRIONS).Respiratory Rate: The number of times an organism breathes with the lungs (RESPIRATION) per unit time, usually per minute.Blood Pressure: PRESSURE of the BLOOD on the ARTERIES and other BLOOD VESSELS.Cross-Over Studies: Studies comparing two or more treatments or interventions in which the subjects or patients, upon completion of the course of one treatment, are switched to another. In the case of two treatments, A and B, half the subjects are randomly allocated to receive these in the order A, B and half to receive them in the order B, A. A criticism of this design is that effects of the first treatment may carry over into the period when the second is given. (Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.Fatigue: The state of weariness following a period of exertion, mental or physical, characterized by a decreased capacity for work and reduced efficiency to respond to stimuli.Blood Gas Analysis: Measurement of oxygen and carbon dioxide in the blood.Reference Values: The range or frequency distribution of a measurement in a population (of organisms, organs or things) that has not been selected for the presence of disease or abnormality.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Trazodone: A serotonin uptake inhibitor that is used as an antidepressive agent. It has been shown to be effective in patients with major depressive disorders and other subsets of depressive disorders. It is generally more useful in depressive disorders associated with insomnia and anxiety. This drug does not aggravate psychotic symptoms in patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorders. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual, 1994, p309)ROC Curve: A graphic means for assessing the ability of a screening test to discriminate between healthy and diseased persons; may also be used in other studies, e.g., distinguishing stimuli responses as to a faint stimuli or nonstimuli.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Oxygen Inhalation Therapy: Inhalation of oxygen aimed at restoring toward normal any pathophysiologic alterations of gas exchange in the cardiopulmonary system, as by the use of a respirator, nasal catheter, tent, chamber, or mask. (From Dorland, 27th ed & Stedman, 25th ed)Posture: The position or attitude of the body.Wrist: The region of the upper limb between the metacarpus and the FOREARM.Autonomic Nervous System: The ENTERIC NERVOUS SYSTEM; PARASYMPATHETIC NERVOUS SYSTEM; and SYMPATHETIC NERVOUS SYSTEM taken together. Generally speaking, the autonomic nervous system regulates the internal environment during both peaceful activity and physical or emotional stress. Autonomic activity is controlled and integrated by the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM, especially the HYPOTHALAMUS and the SOLITARY NUCLEUS, which receive information relayed from VISCERAL AFFERENTS.Double-Blind Method: A method of studying a drug or procedure in which both the subjects and investigators are kept unaware of who is actually getting which specific treatment.Obesity, Morbid: The condition of weighing two, three, or more times the ideal weight, so called because it is associated with many serious and life-threatening disorders. In the BODY MASS INDEX, morbid obesity is defined as having a BMI greater than 40.0 kg/m2.Arnold-Chiari Malformation: A group of congenital malformations involving the brainstem, cerebellum, upper spinal cord, and surrounding bony structures. Type II is the most common, and features compression of the medulla and cerebellar tonsils into the upper cervical spinal canal and an associated MENINGOMYELOCELE. Type I features similar, but less severe malformations and is without an associated meningomyelocele. Type III has the features of type II with an additional herniation of the entire cerebellum through the bony defect involving the foramen magnum, forming an ENCEPHALOCELE. Type IV is a form a cerebellar hypoplasia. Clinical manifestations of types I-III include TORTICOLLIS; opisthotonus; HEADACHE; VERTIGO; VOCAL CORD PARALYSIS; APNEA; NYSTAGMUS, CONGENITAL; swallowing difficulties; and ATAXIA. (From Menkes, Textbook of Child Neurology, 5th ed, p261; Davis, Textbook of Neuropathology, 2nd ed, pp236-46)Heart Failure: A heterogeneous condition in which the heart is unable to pump out sufficient blood to meet the metabolic need of the body. Heart failure can be caused by structural defects, functional abnormalities (VENTRICULAR DYSFUNCTION), or a sudden overload beyond its capacity. Chronic heart failure is more common than acute heart failure which results from sudden insult to cardiac function, such as MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION.Electrocardiography: Recording of the moment-to-moment electromotive forces of the HEART as projected onto various sites on the body's surface, delineated as a scalar function of time. The recording is monitored by a tracing on slow moving chart paper or by observing it on a cardioscope, which is a CATHODE RAY TUBE DISPLAY.Pharyngeal Muscles: The muscles of the PHARYNX are voluntary muscles arranged in two layers. The external circular layer consists of three constrictors (superior, middle, and inferior). The internal longitudinal layer consists of the palatopharyngeus, the salpingopharyngeus, and the stylopharyngeus. During swallowing, the outer layer constricts the pharyngeal wall and the inner layer elevates pharynx and LARYNX.Intermittent Positive-Pressure Ventilation: Application of positive pressure to the inspiratory phase when the patient has an artificial airway in place and is connected to a ventilator.Placebo Effect: An effect usually, but not necessarily, beneficial that is attributable to an expectation that the regimen will have an effect, i.e., the effect is due to the power of suggestion.Linear Models: Statistical models in which the value of a parameter for a given value of a factor is assumed to be equal to a + bx, where a and b are constants. The models predict a linear regression.Quality of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.Respiratory Muscles: These include the muscles of the DIAPHRAGM and the INTERCOSTAL MUSCLES.Hypertension: Persistently high systemic arterial BLOOD PRESSURE. Based on multiple readings (BLOOD PRESSURE DETERMINATION), hypertension is currently defined as when SYSTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently greater than 140 mm Hg or when DIASTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently 90 mm Hg or more.Anthropometry: The technique that deals with the measurement of the size, weight, and proportions of the human or other primate body.Hypertrophy: General increase in bulk of a part or organ due to CELL ENLARGEMENT and accumulation of FLUIDS AND SECRETIONS, not due to tumor formation, nor to an increase in the number of cells (HYPERPLASIA).Occlusal Splints: Rigid or flexible appliances that overlay the occlusal surfaces of the teeth. They are used to treat clenching and bruxism and their sequelae, and to provide temporary relief from muscle or temporomandibular joint pain.Sympathetic Nervous System: The thoracolumbar division of the autonomic nervous system. Sympathetic preganglionic fibers originate in neurons of the intermediolateral column of the spinal cord and project to the paravertebral and prevertebral ganglia, which in turn project to target organs. The sympathetic nervous system mediates the body's response to stressful situations, i.e., the fight or flight reactions. It often acts reciprocally to the parasympathetic system.
Prevalence of sleep apnea in a population of adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Endocr Pract 2007;13(4):355-62. Logan AG et ... Evidence supporting routine polysomnography before bariatric surgery. Obes Surg 2004;14(1):23-6. Oldenburg O et al. Sleep- ... Estimation of the clinically diagnosed proportion of sleep apnea syndrome in middle-aged men and women. Sleep 1997;20(9):705-6 ... High prevalence of unrecognized sleep apnoea in drug-resistant hypertension. J Hypertens 2001;19(12):2271-7. "Founder of ResMed ...
Polysomnography, a type of sleep study, is the gold standard to rule out obstructive sleep apnea. If a home study does not find ... The Home Sleep Test also called an Out of Sleep Center Test (OCST) is used exclusively for the diagnosis of sleep apnea. ... Polysomnography records several body functions during sleep, including brain activity, eye movement, oxygen and carbon dioxide ... Sleep studies can help diagnose or rule out: Sleep-related breathing disorders, such as sleep apnea Sleep-related seizure ...
It is cost-efficient when full polysomnography is not required. Polysomnography is performed in a sleep laboratory while the ... Obstructive Sleep Apnea-Hypopnea Syndrome at eMedicine Gessmann, H.-W.: The Tongue Muscle Training (ZMT®) in nCPAP Patients ... Polysomnography is not routinely used in the evaluation of patients with insomnia or circadian rhythm disorders, except as ... It will usually be a definitive test for sleep apnea. A Multiple Sleep Latency Test (MSLT) is often performed during the entire ...
UARS is similar to certain types of sleep apneas. Symptoms of UARS are similar to those of obstructive sleep apnea, but are ... Even with polysomnography, diagnosis of UARS may be difficult because of insufficient means of measuring changes in airflow. ... It is unclear as to whether UARS is merely a phase that occurs between simple snoring and sleep apneas, or whether UARS is a ... Oral appliances to protrude the tongue and lower jaw forward have been used to reduce sleep apnea and snoring, and hold ...
Polysomnography[edit]. Polysomnography (PSG) is a test used in the study of sleep; the test result is called a polysomnogram. ... This can lead to sleep apnea.[citation needed] Parasomnias[edit]. Main article: Parasomnia ... their sleep was separated into naps including only REM sleep and only NREM sleep using polysomnography. This implies that the ...
Some of the conditions the sleep disorder specialist helps evaluate and treat are; insomnia, sleep apnea, restless legs ... The sleep disorder specialist scores and performs polysomnography and also assists in diagnosing and preparing a treatment plan ...
Treatment of sleep apnea via a continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) device has shown dramatic improvement in apnea and ... Rhythmic Movement Disorder is observed using the standard procedure for polysomnography, which includes video recording, EEG ... In some patients who also experience sleep apnea, episodes of apnea can be followed immediately by RMD-like symptoms, ... This may be due to RMD's comorbidity with sleep apnea, which has been observed in some patients . Many find that their sleep is ...
The society was founded in response to the increase of awareness of sleep apnea and their clinical importance. Over the next ... it broadened to include neurological and physiological interests with strong emphasis on technical aspects and polysomnography ...
When polysomnography is also used, it is primarily for the purpose of ruling out other disorders such as narcolepsy or sleep ... Unless they have another sleep disorder such as sleep apnea in addition to DSPD, patients can sleep well and have a normal need ... or two consecutive nights of polysomnography and an intervening multiple sleep latency test), 2) Continuous temperature ... apnea. If a person can adjust to a normal daytime schedule on her/his own, with just the help of alarm clocks and will-power, ...
Fabiani, Mario (2003). Surgery for Snoring and Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome: Diagnosis and Therapy of Sleep Respiratory ... "Characterization of postoperative edema following laser-assisted uvulopalatoplasty using MRI and polysomnography: implications ... or Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome". The Laryngoscope. 107 (6): 726-734 "Clinical Program - The Stanford Center for Sleep ... or Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome". The Laryngoscope. 107 (6): 726-734. doi:10.1097/00005537-199706000-00005. ISSN 1531-4995 ...
Sleep apnea was identified in 1965. In 1970, the first clinical sleep laboratory was developed at Stanford. The first ... An MSLT is normally performed after a nocturnal polysomnography to ensure both an adequate duration of sleep and to exclude ... Snoring can be detected by a microphone and may be a symptom of obstructive sleep-apnea. The Multiple Sleep Latency Test (MSLT ... For the lattermost, pulse transit time increases when one is aroused from sleep, making it useful in determining sleep apnea. ...
RDI = (RERAs + Hypopneas + apneas) X 60 / TST (in minutes). That is, RDI means the average number of episodes of apnea, ... The respiratory disturbance index (RDI) - or respiratory distress Index - is a formula used in reporting polysomnography (sleep ... Like the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI), it reports on respiratory events during sleep, but unlike the AHI, it also includes ... TST is "total sleep time".) Medicine portal Apnea-hypopnea index Richardson, Mark A., & Friedman, Norman R. (Eds.) (2007). ...
... which resolves their apneas but not their EDS, it is necessary to seek other causes for the EDS. Obstructive sleep apnea " ... Polysomnography shows reduced sleep efficiency and may include alpha intrusion into sleep EEG. It is likely that a number of ... Sleep apnea can occur 10 times as often in uremic patients than in the general population and can affect up to 30-80% of ... Sleep apnea is the most frequent cause of secondary hypersomnia, affecting up to 4% of middle-aged adults, mostly men. Upper ...
... whereas heavy snoring is often part of obstructive sleep apnea. Chronotypes Noise health effects Polysomnography ... apnea Primary central sleep apnea of infancy Primary central sleep apnea of prematurity Treatment-emergent central sleep apnea ... Central sleep apnea with Cheyne-Stokes breathing Central sleep apnea due a medical disorder without Cheyne-Stokes breathing ... Central sleep apnea due to high altitude periodic breathing Central sleep apnea due to a medication or substance Primary ...
... polysomnography) in a sleep laboratory. The titrated pressure is the pressure of air at which most (if not all) apneas and ... Given that sleep apnea is a chronic health issue which commonly doesn't go away, ongoing care is usually needed to maintain ... Obstructive sleep apnea occurs when the upper airway becomes narrow as the muscles relax naturally during sleep. This reduces ... Wu, H; Yuan, X; Zhan, X; Li, L; Wei, Y (September 2015). "A review of EPAP nasal device therapy for obstructive sleep apnea ...
These may lead to behavioral/mood changes in patients and facilitate the need for a polysomnography in order to determine the ... 2012). "Circulating phospholipase-A2 activity in obstructive sleep apnea and recurrent tonsillitis". Int J Pediatr ... or obstructive sleep apnea, OSA) and recurrent tonsillitis groups. It showed that human palatine tonsil is an active ... sleep apnea, dysphagia and/or daytime hypersomnolence. ...
Sleep studies using polysomnography have suggested that people who have sleep disruption have elevated nighttime levels of ... Poor sleep quality can occur as a result of, for example, restless legs, sleep apnea or major depression. Poor sleep quality is ... Other risk factors include working night shifts and sleep apnea. Diagnosis is based on sleep habits and an examination to look ... This test may be indicated for patients with symptoms in addition to insomnia, including sleep apnea, obesity, a thick neck ...
... such as sleep apnea and periodic limb movement disorder, seem likely. The overnight sleep study is called polysomnography. It ...
Polysomnography is a test commonly used for diagnosing some sleep disorders. Sleep disorders are broadly classified into ... Some common sleep disorders include insomnia (chronic inability to sleep), sleep apnea (abnormally low breathing during sleep ... This involves a variety of diagnostic methods including polysomnography, sleep diary, multiple sleep latency test, etc. ...
Polysomnography (sleep studies) commonly used for the diagnosis of Sleep apnea Major surgical procedures on the heart and lungs ...
In Canada it is often an RT with additional training to become a Registered Polysomnography Technician (RPSGT) Case management ... 2009). "Clinical guideline for the evaluation, management and long-term care of obstructive sleep apnea in adults". J Clin ... and therapeutic intervention along with diagnosis of sleep related disease such as Obstructive Sleep Apnea or Central Apnea. ... providing around the clock support for home ventilators and other equipment for conditions like sleep apnea. In the clinic or ...
Polysomnography is a test commonly ordered for some sleep disorders. This summary is based largely on the summary provided by ... including obstructive sleep apnea) only if it is adopted pursuant to a rulemaking proceeding. The bill would apply this Act ...
"Clinical usefulness of home oximetry compared with polysomnography for assessment of sleep apnea". Am J Respir Crit Care Med. ... Obstructive sleep apnea, central sleep apnea, mixed sleep apnea[1]. Risk factors. Overweight, family history, allergies, ... "Sleep apnea". Archived from the original on 2014-04-30.. *^ "What Is Sleep Apnea?". Nhlbi health. Archived from the original on ... "Sleep Apnea: Who Is At Risk for Sleep Apnea?". NHLBI: Health Information for the Public. U.S. Department of Health and Human ...
... mainly apneas and hypopneas. Apnea is a complete or near complete cessation of airflow for at least 10 seconds followed by an ... Polysomnography should be avoided unless a person presents indications for polysomnography. (These indications include sleep ... instead of an obstructive apnea. Pulse oximetry determines changes in blood oxygen levels that often occur with sleep apnea and ... Polysomnography (PSG), a type of sleep study, is a multi-parametric test used in the study of sleep and as a diagnostic tool in ...
The nature and severity of breathing problems in patients can be detected in a sleep study called a polysomnography which ... There are three major categories of apnea known as central, obstructive, and mixed apnea. Central apnea is characterized by ... Infantile apnea occurs in children under the age of one and it is more common in premature infants. Symptoms of infantile apnea ... Cases of obstructive apnea are rarely found in infants that are healthy. Mixed apnea is a combination of both central and ...
ছারপোকা অথবা ছার পোকা (ইংরেজি: Bed bug) সিমিসিডে গোত্রের একটি ছোট্ট পরজীবী পতঙ্গবিশেষ। এটি মানুষ ও উষ্ণ রক্তবিশিষ্ট অন্যান্য পোষকের রক্ত খেয়ে বেঁচে থাকে।[১] মূলতঃ এ পোকাটি বিছানা, মশারী, বালিশের এক প্রান্তে বাসা বাঁধলেও ট্রেন কিংবা বাসের আসনেও এদের দেখা মেলে। বিছানার পোকা হলেও এর অন্যতম পছন্দের আবাসস্থল হচ্ছে - ম্যাট্রেস, সোফা এবং অন্যান্য আসবাবপত্র।[২] পুরোপুরি নিশাচর না হলেও ...
Although polysomnography is regarded as the "gold standard," previous studies have shown a high diagnostic accuracy of the ... apnea hypopnea index. CRT. cardiac resynchronization therapy. CSA. central sleep apnea. HF. heart failure. LV. left ventricular ... The number of apneas and hypopneas per hour (apnea-hypopnea index [AHI]) and minimal oxygen saturation (Sao2min) were ... 2003) Sleep apnea and heart failure. Part II: Central sleep apnea. Circulation 107:1822-1826. ...
Reserve polysomnography for high-risk sleep apnea. This tube can get blocked by swelling from frequent colds or enlarged ...
Polysomnography in Kleine-Levin syndrome.. Huang YS, Lin YH, Guilleminault C.. Sleep Center and Child Psychiatry Department, ... with or without obstructive sleep apnea; REM sleep behavior disorder); sleep related seizures; Kleine-Levin syndrome (KLS); ... Interviews, polysomnography, multiple sleep latency test, HLA-typing, and CSF hcrt-1 measurements in Danish patients with ... Polysomnography (without penile tumescence monitoring), performed in 26 of 31 parasomnia cases, documented sexual moaning from ...
Silje K. Namtvedt, obstructive sleep apnea, polysomnogram, polysomnography, sleep disordered breathing, ventricular premature ... The study participants underwent polysomnography to assess for obstructive sleep apnea as well as Holter monitoring for ... Obstructive sleep apnea is a subtype of sleep disordered breathing. In obstructive sleep apnea, there is a physical obstruction ... "Cardiac Arrhythmias in Obstructive Sleep Apnea (from the Akershus Sleep Apnea Project)" The American Journal of Cardiology ...
... also referred to as obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea (OSAH)-is a sleep disorder that involves cessation or significant decrease ... Mixed apnea is an apnea that begins as a central apnea and ends as an obstructive apnea (see the image below). ... Mixed sleep apnea. Note that the apnea (orange arrow) begins as a central apnea (effort absent; red double arrow) and ends as ... Mixed sleep apnea. Note that the apnea (orange arrow) begins as a central apnea (effort absent; red double arrow) and ends as ...
Obstructive sleep apnea: A study by simultaneous polysomnography and ultrasonic imaging.. Siegel H1, Sonies BC, Graham B, ...
Polysomnography provides the following measures: Sleep state (≥2 EEG leads) Electrooculogram (right and left) Submental ... Drugs & Diseases , Pediatrics: General Medicine , Childhood Sleep Apnea Q&A Which measures are provided by polysomnography in ... Compressed overnight polysomnography tracing of a 6-year-old boy who snores, showing multiple events of obstructive apnea ( ... encoded search term (Which measures are provided by polysomnography in the workup of childhood obstructive sleep apnea (OSA)?) ...
Polysomnography remains the criterion standard for establishing the diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in infants, ... Drugs & Diseases , Pediatrics: General Medicine , Childhood Sleep Apnea Q&A What is the role of polysomnography in the workup ... Polysomnography is necessary to document obstructive sleep apnea and gauge its severity. A history of snoring alone is not ... Compressed overnight polysomnography tracing of a 6-year-old boy who snores, showing multiple events of obstructive apnea ( ...
Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is a common condition of childhood with significant associated morbidity. The comprehensive ... with suggestive symptoms involves the overnight recording and assessment of both sleep and respiration by polysomnography in a ... Diagnostic techniques for obstructive sleep apnoea: is polysomnography necessary? Paediatr Respir Rev. 2002 Mar;3(1):18-24. doi ... Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is a common condition of childhood with significant associated morbidity. The comprehensive ...
Quantifying the ventilatory control contribution to sleep apnoea using polysomnography. Philip I. Terrill, Bradley A. Edwards, ... Quantifying the ventilatory control contribution to sleep apnoea using polysomnography. Philip I. Terrill, Bradley A. Edwards, ... Quantifying the ventilatory control contribution to sleep apnoea using polysomnography. Philip I. Terrill, Bradley A. Edwards, ... Quantifying the ventilatory control contribution to sleep apnoea using polysomnography Message Subject (Your Name) has sent you ...
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Sleep apnea detection: accuracy of using automated ECG analysis compared to manually scored polysomnography (apnea hypopnea ... Sleep apnea Cardiopulmonary coupling Cyclic variation of heart rate Apnea Hypopnea Index ... Khayat R, Pleister A (2016) Consequences of Obstructive Sleep Apnea: Cardiovascular Risk of Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Whether ... Measuring sleep quality and sleep apnea (SA) at the point of care utilizing data that is already collected is feasible and cost ...
Comparison of polysomnography with ResCare Autoset in the diagnosis of the sleep apnoea/hypopnoea syndrome. ... Comparison of polysomnography with ResCare Autoset in the diagnosis of the sleep apnoea/hypopnoea syndrome. ... A sleep study using the Autoset system costs 14 pounds compared with 126 pounds for polysomnography. CONCLUSIONS--The Autoset ... BACKGROUND--Increasing referral numbers make the development of simplified accurate methods of diagnosing the sleep apnoea/ ...
In the initial management of patients with a high probability of obstructive sleep apnea, PSG confers no advantage over the ... Diagnosis and Initial Management of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Without Polysomnography: A Randomized Validation Study Ann Intern ... Patients: 68 patients with a high pretest probability of moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea (apnea-hypopnea index [AHI ... Background: Polysomnography (PSG), despite limited availability and high cost, is currently recommended for diagnosis of ...
Laboratory Polysomnography or Limited-Channel Sleep Studies for Obstructive Sleep Apnea. Ann Intern Med. 2017;167:521. doi: ... Laboratory Polysomnography or Limited-Channel Sleep Studies for Obstructive Sleep Apnea Cathy Goldstein, MD, MS ... Chai-Coetzer and colleagues (1) conclude that level 3 testing for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is not inferior to level 1 ... Making and Clinical Outcomes With Laboratory Polysomnography or Limited-Channel Sleep Studies for Obstructive Sleep Apnea: A ...
Polysomnography in Pediatric Otolaryngology: If Not Obstructive Sleep Apnea, What Is It?. ... obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in 53.2%, OSA + central sleep apnea (CSA) in 4.5%, CSA in 0.9%, and non-OSA snoring in 15%. Other ...
... a portable monitoring device for sleep apnea diagnosis in a population based cohort using synchronized home polysomnography.. ... apnea-hypopnea index (AHI), oxygen desaturation index (ODI), and sleep-wake state. The accuracy of WP_100 in RDI, AHI, ODI, and ... To propose a new standard for limited-channel device validation using synchronized polysomnography (PSG) home recordings and a ... assess the accuracy of a portable monitoring device based on peripheral arterial tonometry to diagnose obstructive sleep apnea ...
Overnight polysomnography (OPS) is the gold standard method of evaluating this condition; however, it is time-consuming, ... Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is common in severely obese subjects (body mass index [BMI] , 35). ... Predicting Sleep Apnea and Excessive Day Sleepiness in the Severely Obese*: Indicators for Polysomnography ... Predictors of apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) were sought from an extensive preoperative data collection. Multivariate linear and ...
Validation of British Thoracic Society guidelines for the diagnosis of the sleep apnoea/hypopnoea syndrome: can polysomnography ... Validation of British Thoracic Society guidelines for the diagnosis of the sleep apnoea/hypopnoea syndrome: can polysomnography ... BACKGROUND--The British Thoracic Society report on the diagnosis and treatment of the sleep apnoea/hypopnoea syndrome (SAHS) ... All 10 patients with more than 15 4% desaturations/hour on pulse oximetry had SAHS confirmed on polysomnography (specificity = ...
Glaucoma Progression in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea-Hypopnea Syndrome: Study of The CGMH Polysomnography Database ... Glaucoma Progression in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea-Hypopnea Syndrome: Study of The CGMH Polysomnography Database ... Yuan-Yao Fan, Ming-Hui Sun; Glaucoma Progression in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea-Hypopnea Syndrome: Study of The CGMH ... Purpose : To evaluate the correlations between severity of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), and glaucoma progression in patients ...
Polysomnography§. Difference in medians (95% CI). P value Apnea-hypopnea index (episodes/h). 2.5. 3.2. −0.8 (−2.3 to 0.9). 0.31 ... Ambulatory algorithm vs polysomnography for titration of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) in obstructive sleep apnea ... Ambulatory titration of continuous positive airway pressure was as effective as polysomnography for obstructive sleep apnea PDF ... Diagnosis and initial management of obstructive sleep apnea without polysomnography: a randomized validation study. Ann Intern ...
... whether liraglutide 3.0 mg reduces OSA severity compared with placebo using the primary end point of change in apnea-hypopnea ... Obesity is strongly associated with prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), and weight loss has been shown to reduce ... Polysomnography end points. In both treatment groups, most of the reduction in mean AHI occurred by week 12, with minimal ... Effect of liraglutide 3.0 mg in individuals with obesity and moderate or severe obstructive sleep apnea: the SCALE Sleep Apnea ...
Watch Pat Polysomnography is a medical tool to diagnose patient with sleep apnea. Vikram ENT hospital is equipped with all ... Polysomnography. Sleep study or polysomnography is the typical medical test for identifying the disorders that are related to ... Polysomnography is performed in the sleep labs, which are specifically maintained for the purpose.. We at Vikram Hospital have ... Watchpat Polysomnography. WatchPat is an innovative medical tool that will test the quality of ones sleep. The mechanism makes ...
Split-night polysomnography is an alternative option to overnight polysomnography. In split-night polysomnography, patients who ... Obstructive sleep apnea is defined as five or more episodes of apnea or hypopnea per hour of sleep (called apnea-hypopnea index ... These gaps in breathing are called apneas. The word apnea means absence of breath. An obstructive apnea episode is defined as ... Overnight polysomnography has been the gold standard for diagnosing obstructive sleep apnea in both adults and children. It is ...
Sleep apnea. *Have any medical conditions that may impact efficacy assessments or that may present a safety concern. ... Polysomnography Study of GSK1838262 Extended Release Tablets Versus Placebo in RLS and Associated Sleep Disturbance. The safety ... Study RXP110908, a Polysomnography Study of GSK1838262 (XP13512) Extended Release Tablets Versus Placebo in the Treatment of ... Adjusted Mean Change From Baseline in Time Spent in the N2 Sleep Stage as Measured by Polysomnography at Week 4/10 Using LOCF ...
  • Predictors of apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) were sought from an extensive preoperative data collection. (ovid.com)
  • PSG showed a very short duration of sleep, highly fragmented sleep, and severe OSA (apnea-hypopnea index, 77/h). (sleepmedres.org)
  • Subjects with OSA (apnea-hypopnea index, AHI ≥5 /h, n=200) were enrolled and divided into subjects OSA with insomnia (OSA-I) and subjects with OSA only (OSA-O). OSA-I complained of difficulty falling and/or staying asleep at an initial interview in clinic. (e-jsm.org)
  • Over 86% of participants had OSA with an apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) ≥ 5 events/hr. (diabetesjournals.org)
  • During follow-up up to 15 years, we assessed incident resuscitated or fatal SCD in relation to the presence of OSA, physiological data including the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI), and nocturnal oxygen saturation (O 2 sat) parameters, and relevant comorbidities. (onlinejacc.org)
  • The global sleep apnea devices market is dominated by North America, followed by Europe, Asia, and Rest of the World (RoW). (sbwire.com)
  • The global sleep apnea devices market is segmented on the basis of product, end user, and region. (marketresearch.com)
  • In 2015, ResMed, Inc. (U.S.), Philips Healthcare (Netherlands), and Fisher & Paykel Healthcare Ltd. (New Zealand) dominated the global sleep apnea devices market. (marketresearch.com)
  • The breathing pattern is analyzed for the presence of apneas and hypopneas, determined according to definitions standardized by the AASM (see below). (medscape.com)
  • Measuring sleep quality and sleep apnea (SA) at the point of care utilizing data that is already collected is feasible and cost effective, using validated methods to unlock sleep information embedded in the data. (springer.com)
  • We validated a means to quantify the ventilatory control contribution to OSA pathogenesis using clinical polysomnography, enabling identification of likely responders to therapies targeting ventilatory control. (ersjournals.com)
  • Dr. Thomas Penzel of Philipps-University, Marburg, Germany who provided the data for this analysis, PhysioBank Database https://www.physionet.org/physiobank/database/apnea-ecg/ (assessed November 2016). (springer.com)
  • American Academy of Sleep Medicine 2016 http://www.aasmnet.org/Resources/pdf/sleep-apnea-economic-crisis.pdf (assessed March 2017). (springer.com)
  • The sleep apnea devices market is projected to reach USD 6.70 billion by 2021 from USD 4.59 billion in 2016, growing at a CAGR of 7.8% during the forecast period. (marketresearch.com)
  • The PAP devices segment is estimated to account for the largest share of the global sleep apnea therapeutic devices market in 2016. (marketresearch.com)