Magnetite Nanoparticles: Synthesized magnetic particles under 100 nanometers possessing many biomedical applications including DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEMS and CONTRAST AGENTS. The particles are usually coated with a variety of polymeric compounds.Nanoparticles: Nanometer-sized particles that are nanoscale in three dimensions. They include nanocrystaline materials; NANOCAPSULES; METAL NANOPARTICLES; DENDRIMERS, and QUANTUM DOTS. The uses of nanoparticles include DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEMS and cancer targeting and imaging.Ferrosoferric Oxide: Iron (II,III) oxide (Fe3O4). It is a black ore of IRON that forms opaque crystals and exerts strong magnetism.Ferric Compounds: Inorganic or organic compounds containing trivalent iron.Polymers: Compounds formed by the joining of smaller, usually repeating, units linked by covalent bonds. These compounds often form large macromolecules (e.g., BIOPOLYMERS; PLASTICS).Dextrans: A group of glucose polymers made by certain bacteria. Dextrans are used therapeutically as plasma volume expanders and anticoagulants. They are also commonly used in biological experimentation and in industry for a wide variety of purposes.Magnetics: The study of MAGNETIC PHENOMENA.Oxides: Binary compounds of oxygen containing the anion O(2-). The anion combines with metals to form alkaline oxides and non-metals to form acidic oxides.Particle Size: Relating to the size of solids.Cell Tracking: Non-invasive imaging of cells that have been labeled non-destructively, such as with nanoemulsions or reporter genes that can be detected by molecular imaging, to monitor their location, viability, cell lineage expansion, response to drugs, movement, or other behaviors in vivo.Contrast Media: Substances used to allow enhanced visualization of tissues.Ferrocyanides: Inorganic salts of the hypothetical acid ferrocyanic acid (H4Fe(CN)6).Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Magnetic Fields: Areas of attractive or repulsive force surrounding MAGNETS.Gold: A yellow metallic element with the atomic symbol Au, atomic number 79, and atomic weight 197. It is used in jewelry, goldplating of other metals, as currency, and in dental restoration. Many of its clinical applications, such as ANTIRHEUMATIC AGENTS, are in the form of its salts.Magnets: Objects that produce a magnetic field.Drug Carriers: Forms to which substances are incorporated to improve the delivery and the effectiveness of drugs. Drug carriers are used in drug-delivery systems such as the controlled-release technology to prolong in vivo drug actions, decrease drug metabolism, and reduce drug toxicity. Carriers are also used in designs to increase the effectiveness of drug delivery to the target sites of pharmacological actions. Liposomes, albumin microspheres, soluble synthetic polymers, DNA complexes, protein-drug conjugates, and carrier erythrocytes among others have been employed as biodegradable drug carriers.Nanotechnology: The development and use of techniques to study physical phenomena and construct structures in the nanoscale size range or smaller.Drug Delivery Systems: Systems for the delivery of drugs to target sites of pharmacological actions. Technologies employed include those concerning drug preparation, route of administration, site targeting, metabolism, and toxicity.Nanostructures: Materials which have structured components with at least one dimension in the range of 1 to 100 nanometers. These include NANOCOMPOSITES; NANOPARTICLES; NANOTUBES; and NANOWIRES.Nanomedicine: The branch of medicine concerned with the application of NANOTECHNOLOGY to the prevention and treatment of disease. It involves the monitoring, repair, construction, and control of human biological systems at the molecular level, using engineered nanodevices and NANOSTRUCTURES. (From Freitas Jr., Nanomedicine, vol 1, 1999).Nanocapsules: Nanometer-sized, hollow, spherically-shaped objects that can be utilized to encapsulate small amounts of pharmaceuticals, enzymes, or other catalysts (Glossary of Biotechnology and Nanobiotechnology, 4th ed).Microscopy, Electron, Transmission: Electron microscopy in which the ELECTRONS or their reaction products that pass down through the specimen are imaged below the plane of the specimen.Metal Nanoparticles: Nanoparticles produced from metals whose uses include biosensors, optics, and catalysts. In biomedical applications the particles frequently involve the noble metals, especially gold and silver.Chitosan: Deacetylated CHITIN, a linear polysaccharide of deacetylated beta-1,4-D-glucosamine. It is used in HYDROGEL and to treat WOUNDS.Silver: Silver. An element with the atomic symbol Ag, atomic number 47, and atomic weight 107.87. It is a soft metal that is used medically in surgical instruments, dental prostheses, and alloys. Long-continued use of silver salts can lead to a form of poisoning known as ARGYRIA.Staining and Labeling: The marking of biological material with a dye or other reagent for the purpose of identifying and quantitating components of tissues, cells or their extracts.Polyethylene Glycols: Polymers of ETHYLENE OXIDE and water, and their ethers. They vary in consistency from liquid to solid depending on the molecular weight indicated by a number following the name. They are used as SURFACTANTS, dispersing agents, solvents, ointment and suppository bases, vehicles, and tablet excipients. Some specific groups are NONOXYNOLS, OCTOXYNOLS, and POLOXAMERS.Iron: A metallic element with atomic symbol Fe, atomic number 26, and atomic weight 55.85. It is an essential constituent of HEMOGLOBINS; CYTOCHROMES; and IRON-BINDING PROTEINS. It plays a role in cellular redox reactions and in the transport of OXYGEN.Surface Properties: Characteristics or attributes of the outer boundaries of objects, including molecules.Polyglycolic Acid: A biocompatible polymer used as a surgical suture material.Polylysine: A peptide which is a homopolymer of lysine.Silicon Dioxide: Transparent, tasteless crystals found in nature as agate, amethyst, chalcedony, cristobalite, flint, sand, QUARTZ, and tridymite. The compound is insoluble in water or acids except hydrofluoric acid.Materials Testing: The testing of materials and devices, especially those used for PROSTHESES AND IMPLANTS; SUTURES; TISSUE ADHESIVES; etc., for hardness, strength, durability, safety, efficacy, and biocompatibility.Biocompatible Materials: Synthetic or natural materials, other than DRUGS, that are used to replace or repair any body TISSUES or bodily function.Coated Materials, Biocompatible: Biocompatible materials usually used in dental and bone implants that enhance biologic fixation, thereby increasing the bond strength between the coated material and bone, and minimize possible biological effects that may result from the implant itself.Cell Survival: The span of viability of a cell characterized by the capacity to perform certain functions such as metabolism, growth, reproduction, some form of responsiveness, and adaptability.Erbium: Erbium. An element of the rare earth family of metals. It has the atomic symbol Er, atomic number 68, and atomic weight 167.26.Microspheres: Small uniformly-sized spherical particles, of micrometer dimensions, frequently labeled with radioisotopes or various reagents acting as tags or markers.Molecular Imaging: The use of molecularly targeted imaging probes to localize and/or monitor biochemical and cellular processes via various imaging modalities that include RADIONUCLIDE IMAGING; ULTRASONOGRAPHY; MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING; FLUORESCENCE IMAGING; and MICROSCOPY.Green Chemistry Technology: Pollution prevention through the design of effective chemical products that have low or no toxicity and use of chemical processes that reduce or eliminate the use and generation of hazardous substances.Cell Line, Tumor: A cell line derived from cultured tumor cells.Image Enhancement: Improvement of the quality of a picture by various techniques, including computer processing, digital filtering, echocardiographic techniques, light and ultrastructural MICROSCOPY, fluorescence spectrometry and microscopy, scintigraphy, and in vitro image processing at the molecular level.Phantoms, Imaging: Devices or objects in various imaging techniques used to visualize or enhance visualization by simulating conditions encountered in the procedure. Phantoms are used very often in procedures employing or measuring x-irradiation or radioactive material to evaluate performance. Phantoms often have properties similar to human tissue. Water demonstrates absorbing properties similar to normal tissue, hence water-filled phantoms are used to map radiation levels. Phantoms are used also as teaching aids to simulate real conditions with x-ray or ultrasonic machines. (From Iturralde, Dictionary and Handbook of Nuclear Medicine and Clinical Imaging, 1990)Silanes: Compounds similar to hydrocarbons in which a tetravalent silicon atom replaces the carbon atom. They are very reactive, ignite in air, and form useful derivatives.Zinc Oxide: A mild astringent and topical protectant with some antiseptic action. It is also used in bandages, pastes, ointments, dental cements, and as a sunblock.Magnetosomes: Membrane-bound prokaryotic organelles of magnetotactic bacteria that contain chains of MAGNETITE crystals which orient the bacteria to geomagnetic fields.Tissue Distribution: Accumulation of a drug or chemical substance in various organs (including those not relevant to its pharmacologic or therapeutic action). This distribution depends on the blood flow or perfusion rate of the organ, the ability of the drug to penetrate organ membranes, tissue specificity, protein binding. The distribution is usually expressed as tissue to plasma ratios.Nanoshells: Nanometer range spherical cores of particular semiconductor compounds surrounded by an ultrathin metal shell that is commonly made of gold or silver. This configuration gives the nanoshells highly tunable optical properties. They have potential in biomedicine for diagnosis and therapy.Cells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.Nanoconjugates: Tailored macromolecules harboring covalently-bound biologically active modules that target specific tissues and cells. The active modules or functional groups can include drugs, prodrugs, antibodies, and oligonucleotides, which can act synergistically and be multitargeting.Carbocyanines: Compounds that contain three methine groups. They are frequently used as cationic dyes used for differential staining of biological materials.Cerium: An element of the rare earth family of metals. It has the atomic symbol Ce, atomic number 58, and atomic weight 140.12. Cerium is a malleable metal used in industrial applications.Suspensions: Colloids with liquid continuous phase and solid dispersed phase; the term is used loosely also for solid-in-gas (AEROSOLS) and other colloidal systems; water-insoluble drugs may be given as suspensions.Prussian Blue Reaction: The reaction of potassium ferrocyanide with ferric iron to yield a dark blue precipitate at the sites of the ferric iron. Used to determine ferric iron in tissues, particularly in the diagnosis of disorders of iron metabolism.Hyperthermia, Induced: Abnormally high temperature intentionally induced in living things regionally or whole body. It is most often induced by radiation (heat waves, infra-red), ultrasound, or drugs.Drug Compounding: The preparation, mixing, and assembling of a drug. (From Remington, The Science and Practice of Pharmacy, 19th ed, p1814)Fluorescent Dyes: Agents that emit light after excitation by light. The wave length of the emitted light is usually longer than that of the incident light. Fluorochromes are substances that cause fluorescence in other substances, i.e., dyes used to mark or label other compounds with fluorescent tags.Micelles: Particles consisting of aggregates of molecules held loosely together by secondary bonds. The surface of micelles are usually comprised of amphiphatic compounds that are oriented in a way that minimizes the energy of interaction between the micelle and its environment. Liquids that contain large numbers of suspended micelles are referred to as EMULSIONS.Iron Compounds: Organic and inorganic compounds that contain iron as an integral part of the molecule.Polyglactin 910: A polyester used for absorbable sutures & surgical mesh, especially in ophthalmic surgery. 2-Hydroxy-propanoic acid polymer with polymerized hydroxyacetic acid, which forms 3,6-dimethyl-1,4-dioxane-dione polymer with 1,4-dioxane-2,5-dione copolymer of molecular weight about 80,000 daltons.Polystyrenes: Polymerized forms of styrene used as a biocompatible material, especially in dentistry. They are thermoplastic and are used as insulators, for injection molding and casting, as sheets, plates, rods, rigid forms and beads.Lactic Acid: A normal intermediate in the fermentation (oxidation, metabolism) of sugar. The concentrated form is used internally to prevent gastrointestinal fermentation. (From Stedman, 26th ed)Polyesters: Polymers of organic acids and alcohols, with ester linkages--usually polyethylene terephthalate; can be cured into hard plastic, films or tapes, or fibers which can be woven into fabrics, meshes or velours.Nanocomposites: Nanometer-scale composite structures composed of organic molecules intimately incorporated with inorganic molecules. (Glossary of Biotechnology and Nanobiotechology Terms, 4th ed)Microscopy, Fluorescence: Microscopy of specimens stained with fluorescent dye (usually fluorescein isothiocyanate) or of naturally fluorescent materials, which emit light when exposed to ultraviolet or blue light. Immunofluorescence microscopy utilizes antibodies that are labeled with fluorescent dye.Cell Line: Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.Molecular Structure: The location of the atoms, groups or ions relative to one another in a molecule, as well as the number, type and location of covalent bonds.Chemistry, Pharmaceutical: Chemistry dealing with the composition and preparation of agents having PHARMACOLOGIC ACTIONS or diagnostic use.Quantum Dots: Nanometer sized fragments of semiconductor crystalline material which emit PHOTONS. The wavelength is based on the quantum confinement size of the dot. They can be embedded in MICROBEADS for high throughput ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY TECHNIQUES.Delayed-Action Preparations: Dosage forms of a drug that act over a period of time by controlled-release processes or technology.Temperature: The property of objects that determines the direction of heat flow when they are placed in direct thermal contact. The temperature is the energy of microscopic motions (vibrational and translational) of the particles of atoms.Mesenchymal Stromal Cells: Bone-marrow-derived, non-hematopoietic cells that support HEMATOPOETIC STEM CELLS. They have also been isolated from other organs and tissues such as UMBILICAL CORD BLOOD, umbilical vein subendothelium, and WHARTON JELLY. These cells are considered to be a source of multipotent stem cells because they include subpopulations of mesenchymal stem cells.Diagnostic Imaging: Any visual display of structural or functional patterns of organs or tissues for diagnostic evaluation. It includes measuring physiologic and metabolic responses to physical and chemical stimuli, as well as ultramicroscopy.Macrophages: The relatively long-lived phagocytic cell of mammalian tissues that are derived from blood MONOCYTES. Main types are PERITONEAL MACROPHAGES; ALVEOLAR MACROPHAGES; HISTIOCYTES; KUPFFER CELLS of the liver; and OSTEOCLASTS. They may further differentiate within chronic inflammatory lesions to EPITHELIOID CELLS or may fuse to form FOREIGN BODY GIANT CELLS or LANGHANS GIANT CELLS. (from The Dictionary of Cell Biology, Lackie and Dow, 3rd ed.)Microscopy, Electron, Scanning: Microscopy in which the object is examined directly by an electron beam scanning the specimen point-by-point. The image is constructed by detecting the products of specimen interactions that are projected above the plane of the sample, such as backscattered electrons. Although SCANNING TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY also scans the specimen point by point with the electron beam, the image is constructed by detecting the electrons, or their interaction products that are transmitted through the sample plane, so that is a form of TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY.DNA: A deoxyribonucleotide polymer that is the primary genetic material of all cells. Eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms normally contain DNA in a double-stranded state, yet several important biological processes transiently involve single-stranded regions. DNA, which consists of a polysugar-phosphate backbone possessing projections of purines (adenine and guanine) and pyrimidines (thymine and cytosine), forms a double helix that is held together by hydrogen bonds between these purines and pyrimidines (adenine to thymine and guanine to cytosine).Kinetics: The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.Titanium: A dark-gray, metallic element of widespread distribution but occurring in small amounts; atomic number, 22; atomic weight, 47.90; symbol, Ti; specific gravity, 4.5; used for fixation of fractures. (Dorland, 28th ed)Protein Biosynthesis: The biosynthesis of PEPTIDES and PROTEINS on RIBOSOMES, directed by MESSENGER RNA, via TRANSFER RNA that is charged with standard proteinogenic AMINO ACIDS.Polyethyleneimine: Strongly cationic polymer that binds to certain proteins; used as a marker in immunology, to precipitate and purify enzymes and lipids. Synonyms: aziridine polymer; Epamine; Epomine; ethylenimine polymer; Montrek; PEI; Polymin(e).Immunomagnetic Separation: A cell-separation technique where magnetizable microspheres or beads are first coated with monoclonal antibody, allowed to search and bind to target cells, and are then selectively removed when passed through a magnetic field. Among other applications, the technique is commonly used to remove tumor cells from the marrow (BONE MARROW PURGING) of patients who are to undergo autologous bone marrow transplantation.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Gadolinium: Gadolinium. An element of the rare earth family of metals. It has the atomic symbol Gd, atomic number 64, and atomic weight 157.25. Its oxide is used in the control rods of some nuclear reactors.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Calcifying Nanoparticles: Protein-mineral complexes that comprise substrates needed for the normal calcium-carbonate-phosphate homeostasis. Nanobacteria was the prior name for the particles which were originally thought to be microorganisms.Acrylic ResinsDendrimers: Tree-like, highly branched, polymeric compounds. They grow three-dimensionally by the addition of shells of branched molecules to a central core. The overall globular shape and presence of cavities gives potential as drug carriers and CONTRAST AGENTS.Microscopy, Confocal: A light microscopic technique in which only a small spot is illuminated and observed at a time. An image is constructed through point-by-point scanning of the field in this manner. Light sources may be conventional or laser, and fluorescence or transmitted observations are possible.Magnetospirillum: A genus of microaerophilic, gram-negative bacteria that forms crystals of the mineral magnetite in special organelles called MAGNETOSOMES.Electromagnetic Fields: Fields representing the joint interplay of electric and magnetic forces.Spectrophotometry, Atomic: Spectrophotometric techniques by which the absorption or emmision spectra of radiation from atoms are produced and analyzed.Rabbits: The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.Porosity: Condition of having pores or open spaces. This often refers to bones, bone implants, or bone cements, but can refer to the porous state of any solid substance.Cadmium Compounds: Inorganic compounds that contain cadmium as an integral part of the molecule.Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation: Transfer of MESENCHYMAL STEM CELLS between individuals within the same species (TRANSPLANTATION, HOMOLOGOUS) or transfer within the same individual (TRANSPLANTATION, AUTOLOGOUS).Neoplasms: New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.Rats, Nude: A mutant strain of Rattus norvegicus without a thymus and with depressed or absent T-cell function. This strain of rats may have a small amount of hair at times, but then lose it.Spectroscopy, Fourier Transform Infrared: A spectroscopic technique in which a range of wavelengths is presented simultaneously with an interferometer and the spectrum is mathematically derived from the pattern thus obtained.Rhodamines: A family of 3,6-di(substituted-amino)-9-benzoate derivatives of xanthene that are used as dyes and as indicators for various metals; also used as fluorescent tracers in histochemistry.Colloids: Two-phase systems in which one is uniformly dispersed in another as particles small enough so they cannot be filtered or will not settle out. The dispersing or continuous phase or medium envelops the particles of the discontinuous phase. All three states of matter can form colloids among each other.Histocytochemistry: Study of intracellular distribution of chemicals, reaction sites, enzymes, etc., by means of staining reactions, radioactive isotope uptake, selective metal distribution in electron microscopy, or other methods.Stereoisomerism: The phenomenon whereby compounds whose molecules have the same number and kind of atoms and the same atomic arrangement, but differ in their spatial relationships. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 5th ed)Coloring Agents: Chemicals and substances that impart color including soluble dyes and insoluble pigments. They are used in INKS; PAINTS; and as INDICATORS AND REAGENTS.Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy: Spectroscopic method of measuring the magnetic moment of elementary particles such as atomic nuclei, protons or electrons. It is employed in clinical applications such as NMR Tomography (MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING).Mice, Inbred BALB CMolecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Equipment Design: Methods of creating machines and devices.Escherichia coli: A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria (GRAM-NEGATIVE FACULTATIVELY ANAEROBIC RODS) commonly found in the lower part of the intestine of warm-blooded animals. It is usually nonpathogenic, but some strains are known to produce DIARRHEA and pyogenic infections. Pathogenic strains (virotypes) are classified by their specific pathogenic mechanisms such as toxins (ENTEROTOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI), etc.Nanotubes: Nanometer-sized tubes composed of various substances including carbon (CARBON NANOTUBES), boron nitride, or nickel vanadate.Solubility: The ability of a substance to be dissolved, i.e. to form a solution with another substance. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Magnetic Resonance Angiography: Non-invasive method of vascular imaging and determination of internal anatomy without injection of contrast media or radiation exposure. The technique is used especially in CEREBRAL ANGIOGRAPHY as well as for studies of other vascular structures.Umbilical Cord: The flexible rope-like structure that connects a developing FETUS to the PLACENTA in mammals. The cord contains blood vessels which carry oxygen and nutrients from the mother to the fetus and waste products away from the fetus.Absorbable Implants: Implants constructed of materials designed to be absorbed by the body without producing an immune response. They are usually composed of plastics and are frequently used in orthopedics and orthodontics.Protein Synthesis Inhibitors: Compounds which inhibit the synthesis of proteins. They are usually ANTI-BACTERIAL AGENTS or toxins. Mechanism of the action of inhibition includes the interruption of peptide-chain elongation, the blocking the A site of ribosomes, the misreading of the genetic code or the prevention of the attachment of oligosaccharide side chains to glycoproteins.Adsorption: The adhesion of gases, liquids, or dissolved solids onto a surface. It includes adsorptive phenomena of bacteria and viruses onto surfaces as well. ABSORPTION into the substance may follow but not necessarily.RNA, Messenger: RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.Drug Stability: The chemical and physical integrity of a pharmaceutical product.Mice, Nude: Mutant mice homozygous for the recessive gene "nude" which fail to develop a thymus. They are useful in tumor studies and studies on immune responses.Silver Nitrate: A silver salt with powerful germicidal activity. It has been used topically to prevent OPHTHALMIA NEONATORUM.Biopolymers: Polymers synthesized by living organisms. They play a role in the formation of macromolecular structures and are synthesized via the covalent linkage of biological molecules, especially AMINO ACIDS; NUCLEOTIDES; and CARBOHYDRATES.Poloxamer: A nonionic polyoxyethylene-polyoxypropylene block co-polymer with the general formula HO(C2H4O)a(-C3H6O)b(C2H4O)aH. It is available in different grades which vary from liquids to solids. It is used as an emulsifying agent, solubilizing agent, surfactant, and wetting agent for antibiotics. Poloxamer is also used in ointment and suppository bases and as a tablet binder or coater. (Martindale The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 31st ed)Flow Cytometry: Technique using an instrument system for making, processing, and displaying one or more measurements on individual cells obtained from a cell suspension. Cells are usually stained with one or more fluorescent dyes specific to cell components of interest, e.g., DNA, and fluorescence of each cell is measured as it rapidly transverses the excitation beam (laser or mercury arc lamp). Fluorescence provides a quantitative measure of various biochemical and biophysical properties of the cell, as well as a basis for cell sorting. Other measurable optical parameters include light absorption and light scattering, the latter being applicable to the measurement of cell size, shape, density, granularity, and stain uptake.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Antineoplastic Agents: Substances that inhibit or prevent the proliferation of NEOPLASMS.Cell Proliferation: All of the processes involved in increasing CELL NUMBER including CELL DIVISION.Technology, Pharmaceutical: The application of scientific knowledge or technology to pharmacy and the pharmaceutical industry. It includes methods, techniques, and instrumentation in the manufacture, preparation, compounding, dispensing, packaging, and storing of drugs and other preparations used in diagnostic and determinative procedures, and in the treatment of patients.Molecular Imprinting: A methodology for chemically synthesizing polymer molds of specific molecules or recognition sites of specific molecules. Applications for molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) include separations, assays and biosensors, and catalysis.Emulsions: Colloids formed by the combination of two immiscible liquids such as oil and water. Lipid-in-water emulsions are usually liquid, like milk or lotion. Water-in-lipid emulsions tend to be creams. The formation of emulsions may be aided by amphiphatic molecules that surround one component of the system to form MICELLES.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Rats, Sprague-Dawley: A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.Polymerization: Chemical reaction in which monomeric components are combined to form POLYMERS (e.g., POLYMETHYLMETHACRYLATE).Rats, Wistar: A strain of albino rat developed at the Wistar Institute that has spread widely at other institutions. This has markedly diluted the original strain.Glioma: Benign and malignant central nervous system neoplasms derived from glial cells (i.e., astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, and ependymocytes). Astrocytes may give rise to astrocytomas (ASTROCYTOMA) or glioblastoma multiforme (see GLIOBLASTOMA). Oligodendrocytes give rise to oligodendrogliomas (OLIGODENDROGLIOMA) and ependymocytes may undergo transformation to become EPENDYMOMA; CHOROID PLEXUS NEOPLASMS; or colloid cysts of the third ventricle. (From Escourolle et al., Manual of Basic Neuropathology, 2nd ed, p21)Excipients: Usually inert substances added to a prescription in order to provide suitable consistency to the dosage form. These include binders, matrix, base or diluent in pills, tablets, creams, salves, etc.Hydrogen-Ion Concentration: The normality of a solution with respect to HYDROGEN ions; H+. It is related to acidity measurements in most cases by pH = log 1/2[1/(H+)], where (H+) is the hydrogen ion concentration in gram equivalents per liter of solution. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Mice, Inbred C57BLNanospheres: Spherical particles of nanometer dimensions.Biosensing Techniques: Any of a variety of procedures which use biomolecular probes to measure the presence or concentration of biological molecules, biological structures, microorganisms, etc., by translating a biochemical interaction at the probe surface into a quantifiable physical signal.Cyanoacrylates: A group of compounds having the general formula CH2=C(CN)-COOR; it polymerizes on contact with moisture; used as tissue adhesive; higher homologs have hemostatic and antibacterial properties.Feasibility Studies: Studies to determine the advantages or disadvantages, practicability, or capability of accomplishing a projected plan, study, or project.Silver Compounds: Inorganic compounds that contain silver as an integral part of the molecule.Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.PolyvinylsMagnetic Phenomena: Characteristics, properties, and effects of magnetic substances and magnetic fields.Liver: A large lobed glandular organ in the abdomen of vertebrates that is responsible for detoxification, metabolism, synthesis and storage of various substances.Thermogravimetry: Technique whereby the weight of a sample can be followed over a period of time while its temperature is being changed (usually increased at a constant rate).Cyclization: Changing an open-chain hydrocarbon to a closed ring. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 5th ed)Biomimetic Materials: Materials fabricated by BIOMIMETICS techniques, i.e., based on natural processes found in biological systems.Acrylamides: Colorless, odorless crystals that are used extensively in research laboratories for the preparation of polyacrylamide gels for electrophoresis and in organic synthesis, and polymerization. Some of its polymers are used in sewage and wastewater treatment, permanent press fabrics, and as soil conditioning agents.Spectrophotometry, Ultraviolet: Determination of the spectra of ultraviolet absorption by specific molecules in gases or liquids, for example Cl2, SO2, NO2, CS2, ozone, mercury vapor, and various unsaturated compounds. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Gadolinium DTPA: A complex of gadolinium with a chelating agent, diethylenetriamine penta-acetic acid (DTPA see PENTETIC ACID), that is given to enhance the image in cranial and spinal MRIs. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p706)Cycloheximide: Antibiotic substance isolated from streptomycin-producing strains of Streptomyces griseus. It acts by inhibiting elongation during protein synthesis.X-Ray Diffraction: The scattering of x-rays by matter, especially crystals, with accompanying variation in intensity due to interference effects. Analysis of the crystal structure of materials is performed by passing x-rays through them and registering the diffraction image of the rays (CRYSTALLOGRAPHY, X-RAY). (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Diffusion: The tendency of a gas or solute to pass from a point of higher pressure or concentration to a point of lower pressure or concentration and to distribute itself throughout the available space. Diffusion, especially FACILITATED DIFFUSION, is a major mechanism of BIOLOGICAL TRANSPORT.Nanotubes, Carbon: Nanometer-sized tubes composed mainly of CARBON. Such nanotubes are used as probes for high-resolution structural and chemical imaging of biomolecules with ATOMIC FORCE MICROSCOPY.Molecular Conformation: The characteristic three-dimensional shape of a molecule.DNA Replication: The process by which a DNA molecule is duplicated.Swine: Any of various animals that constitute the family Suidae and comprise stout-bodied, short-legged omnivorous mammals with thick skin, usually covered with coarse bristles, a rather long mobile snout, and small tail. Included are the genera Babyrousa, Phacochoerus (wart hogs), and Sus, the latter containing the domestic pig (see SUS SCROFA).Water: A clear, odorless, tasteless liquid that is essential for most animal and plant life and is an excellent solvent for many substances. The chemical formula is hydrogen oxide (H2O). (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Hydrophobic and Hydrophilic Interactions: The thermodynamic interaction between a substance and WATER.Brain Neoplasms: Neoplasms of the intracranial components of the central nervous system, including the cerebral hemispheres, basal ganglia, hypothalamus, thalamus, brain stem, and cerebellum. Brain neoplasms are subdivided into primary (originating from brain tissue) and secondary (i.e., metastatic) forms. Primary neoplasms are subdivided into benign and malignant forms. In general, brain tumors may also be classified by age of onset, histologic type, or presenting location in the brain.Peptides: Members of the class of compounds composed of AMINO ACIDS joined together by peptide bonds between adjacent amino acids into linear, branched or cyclical structures. OLIGOPEPTIDES are composed of approximately 2-12 amino acids. Polypeptides are composed of approximately 13 or more amino acids. PROTEINS are linear polypeptides that are normally synthesized on RIBOSOMES.Surface-Active Agents: Agents that modify interfacial tension of water; usually substances that have one lipophilic and one hydrophilic group in the molecule; includes soaps, detergents, emulsifiers, dispersing and wetting agents, and several groups of antiseptics.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Catalysis: The facilitation of a chemical reaction by material (catalyst) that is not consumed by the reaction.Stem Cell Transplantation: The transfer of STEM CELLS from one individual to another within the same species (TRANSPLANTATION, HOMOLOGOUS) or between species (XENOTRANSPLANTATION), or transfer within the same individual (TRANSPLANTATION, AUTOLOGOUS). The source and location of the stem cells determines their potency or pluripotency to differentiate into various cell types.TritiumSilicon: A trace element that constitutes about 27.6% of the earth's crust in the form of SILICON DIOXIDE. It does not occur free in nature. Silicon has the atomic symbol Si, atomic number 14, and atomic weight [28.084; 28.086].Povidone: A polyvinyl polymer of variable molecular weight; used as suspending and dispersing agent and vehicle for pharmaceuticals; also used as blood volume expander.Bacterial Proteins: Proteins found in any species of bacterium.Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted: Methods developed to aid in the interpretation of ultrasound, radiographic images, etc., for diagnosis of disease.Chemistry Techniques, Synthetic: Methods used for the chemical synthesis of compounds. Included under this heading are laboratory methods used to synthesize a variety of chemicals and drugs.Molecular Weight: The sum of the weight of all the atoms in a molecule.Lecithins: A complex mixture of PHOSPHOLIPIDS; GLYCOLIPIDS; and TRIGLYCERIDES; with substantial amounts of PHOSPHATIDYLCHOLINES; PHOSPHATIDYLETHANOLAMINES; and PHOSPHATIDYLINOSITOLS, which are sometimes loosely termed as 1,2-diacyl-3-phosphocholines. Lecithin is a component of the CELL MEMBRANE and commercially extracted from SOYBEANS and EGG YOLK. The emulsifying and surfactant properties are useful in FOOD ADDITIVES and for forming organogels (GELS).RNA: A polynucleotide consisting essentially of chains with a repeating backbone of phosphate and ribose units to which nitrogenous bases are attached. RNA is unique among biological macromolecules in that it can encode genetic information, serve as an abundant structural component of cells, and also possesses catalytic activity. (Rieger et al., Glossary of Genetics: Classical and Molecular, 5th ed)Photoelectron Spectroscopy: The study of the energy of electrons ejected from matter by the photoelectric effect, i.e., as a direct result of absorption of energy from electromagnetic radiation. As the energies of the electrons are characteristic of a specific element, the measurement of the energy of these electrons is a technique used to determine the chemical composition of surfaces.Semiconductors: Materials that have a limited and usually variable electrical conductivity. They are particularly useful for the production of solid-state electronic devices.Stem Cells: Relatively undifferentiated cells that retain the ability to divide and proliferate throughout postnatal life to provide progenitor cells that can differentiate into specialized cells.Methacrylates: Acrylic acids or acrylates which are substituted in the C-2 position with a methyl group.AcrylatesCell Movement: The movement of cells from one location to another. Distinguish from CYTOKINESIS which is the process of dividing the CYTOPLASM of a cell.Plasmids: Extrachromosomal, usually CIRCULAR DNA molecules that are self-replicating and transferable from one organism to another. They are found in a variety of bacterial, archaeal, fungal, algal, and plant species. They are used in GENETIC ENGINEERING as CLONING VECTORS.Leucine: An essential branched-chain amino acid important for hemoglobin formation.Fullerenes: A polyhedral CARBON structure composed of around 60-80 carbon atoms in pentagon and hexagon configuration. They are named after Buckminster Fuller because of structural resemblance to geodesic domes. Fullerenes can be made in high temperature such as arc discharge in an inert atmosphere.Chemistry, Organic: The study of the structure, preparation, properties, and reactions of carbon compounds. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Gelatin: A product formed from skin, white connective tissue, or bone COLLAGEN. It is used as a protein food adjuvant, plasma substitute, hemostatic, suspending agent in pharmaceutical preparations, and in the manufacturing of capsules and suppositories.Gene Transfer Techniques: The introduction of functional (usually cloned) GENES into cells. A variety of techniques and naturally occurring processes are used for the gene transfer such as cell hybridization, LIPOSOMES or microcell-mediated gene transfer, ELECTROPORATION, chromosome-mediated gene transfer, TRANSFECTION, and GENETIC TRANSDUCTION. Gene transfer may result in genetically transformed cells and individual organisms.Methylcellulose: Methylester of cellulose. Methylcellulose is used as an emulsifying and suspending agent in cosmetics, pharmaceutics and the chemical industry. It is used therapeutically as a bulk laxative.Transcription, Genetic: The biosynthesis of RNA carried out on a template of DNA. The biosynthesis of DNA from an RNA template is called REVERSE TRANSCRIPTION.Microscopy, Atomic Force: A type of scanning probe microscopy in which a probe systematically rides across the surface of a sample being scanned in a raster pattern. The vertical position is recorded as a spring attached to the probe rises and falls in response to peaks and valleys on the surface. These deflections produce a topographic map of the sample.Gold Compounds: Inorganic compounds that contain gold as an integral part of the molecule.Lipids: A generic term for fats and lipoids, the alcohol-ether-soluble constituents of protoplasm, which are insoluble in water. They comprise the fats, fatty oils, essential oils, waxes, phospholipids, glycolipids, sulfolipids, aminolipids, chromolipids (lipochromes), and fatty acids. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Hexuronic Acids: Term used to designate tetrahydroxy aldehydic acids obtained by oxidation of hexose sugars, i.e. glucuronic acid, galacturonic acid, etc. Historically, the name hexuronic acid was originally given to ascorbic acid.Atherosclerosis: A thickening and loss of elasticity of the walls of ARTERIES that occurs with formation of ATHEROSCLEROTIC PLAQUES within the ARTERIAL INTIMA.Carbon Isotopes: Stable carbon atoms that have the same atomic number as the element carbon, but differ in atomic weight. C-13 is a stable carbon isotope.Structure-Activity Relationship: The relationship between the chemical structure of a compound and its biological or pharmacological activity. Compounds are often classed together because they have structural characteristics in common including shape, size, stereochemical arrangement, and distribution of functional groups.Indicators and Reagents: Substances used for the detection, identification, analysis, etc. of chemical, biological, or pathologic processes or conditions. Indicators are substances that change in physical appearance, e.g., color, at or approaching the endpoint of a chemical titration, e.g., on the passage between acidity and alkalinity. Reagents are substances used for the detection or determination of another substance by chemical or microscopical means, especially analysis. Types of reagents are precipitants, solvents, oxidizers, reducers, fluxes, and colorimetric reagents. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed, p301, p499)
"Size Selective Synthesis of Superparamagnetic Nanoparticles in Thin Fluids under Continuous Flow Conditions". Adv. Funct. Mater ... The metallic core of magnetic nanoparticles may be passivated by gentle oxidation, surfactants, polymers and precious metals. ... Higher colloidal stability since they do not magnetically agglomerate Magnetic moment can be tuned with the nanoparticle ... Magnetic nanobeads or nanoparticle clusters composed of FDA-approved oxide superparamagnetic nanoparticles (e.g. maghemite, ...
"Synthesis of Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Used as MRI Contrast Agents: A Parametric Study". Journal of Colloid and Interface ... truly superparamagnetic particles have not yet been prepared from magnetite, i.e. magnetite nanoparticles that completely lose ... "Relaxation of Polymer Coated Fe3O4 Magnetic Nanoparticles in Aqueous Solution". IEEE Transactions on Magnetics. 46 (6): 1541- ... chemically by taking for example mixtures of FeII and FeIII salts and mixing them with alkali to precipitate colloidal Fe3O4. ...
This innovative reference collects state-of-the-art procedures for the construction and design of nanoparticles and porous ... electro-optical spectroscopy of colloidal systems; NMR studies of colloidal oxides; polymer surface dynamics using surface- ... Presenting both synthesis and characterization protocols, Surfaces of Nanoparticles and Porous Materials contains over 3000 ... engineering of nanosize superparamagnetic particles for use in magnetic carrier technology; acid-base behaviour of surfaces of ...
... the synthesis methods and their in vitro biological impact on healthy and cancer cell lines, by describing their potential ... superparamagnetic properties per se, solubility and stability in aqueous solutions, and high bioavailability in vivo) make ... A potential useful alternative was considered to be the use of magnetic iron nanoparticles. The M-IONPs proved to be effective ... these nanoparticles suitable candidates for biomedical uses. The most employed magnetic iron oxides in the biomedical field are ...
2007) Characterization of PEI-coated superparamagnetic iron Oxide nanoparticles for transfection: Size distribution, colloidal ... For biological applications, MNPs must be coated with a biocompatible polymer before or after synthesis in order to prevent ... A couple of these new cancer detecting nanoparticles are gold nanoparticles and magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles encased in a ... Carbohydrate Polymer 69: 467-477.. *Chertok B, Moffat BA, David AE, Yu F, Bergemann C, et al. (2008) Iron oxide nanoparticles ...
Anisotropic nanoparticles. Template-Assisted Colloidal Self-Assembly of Macroscopic Magnetic Metasurfaces. Martin Mayer, Moritz ... Synthesis of Janus plasmonic-magnetic, star-sphere nanoparticles, and their application in SERS detection. Javier Reguera, ... Gold nanotriangles decorated with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. Jordan A Hachtel, Siming Yu, Andrew R Lupini, ... A Multi-coordinating Polymer Ligand Optimized for the Functionalization of Metallic Nanocrystals and Nanorods. Wentao Wang, Xin ...
Different from the traditional magnetic nanoparticles, the highly negative charged superparamagnetic nanospheres (SMNs), i.e., ... And then, modified Stöber method was employed for synthesis of the different size of [email protected]@SiO2. Different from the ... traditional magnetic nanoparticles, the highly negative charged superparamagnetic nanospheres (SMNs), i.e., the double-shell ... And then, modified Stöber method was employed for synthesis of the different size of [email protected]@SiO2. ...
... this can stimulate another pollution problem related to contamination with nanoparticle themselves.... ... Even though photocatalyst nanoparticles can offer effective degradation of organic pollutants, ... S. Jana et al., Synthesis of superparamagnetic β-MnO2 organosol: a photocatalyst for the oxidative phenol coupling reaction. ... S. Elbasuney, Sustainable steric stabilization of colloidal titania nanoparticles. Appl. Surf. Sci. 409, 438-447 (2017)CrossRef ...
"Size Selective Synthesis of Superparamagnetic Nanoparticles in Thin Fluids under Continuous Flow Conditions". Adv. Funct. Mater ... The metallic core of magnetic nanoparticles may be passivated by gentle oxidation, surfactants, polymers and precious metals. ... Higher colloidal stability since they do not magnetically agglomerate Magnetic moment can be tuned with the nanoparticle ... Magnetic nanobeads or nanoparticle clusters composed of FDA-approved oxide superparamagnetic nanoparticles (e.g. maghemite, ...
We report the synthesis and detailed in vitro evaluation of zwitterionic ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide NPs (USPIONs) ... 7 and possess high colloidal stability, maintaining a hydrodynamic diameter of ca. 15-20 nm over a wide range of pHs (4-10) and ... T1 - Zwitterionic polymer-coated ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with low protein interaction and high ... Zwitterionic polymer-coated ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with low protein interaction and high ...
... chelated on carboxymethyl dextran coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (CMD-SPIONs) was synthesized and the step ... Colloidal synthesis and applications in cellular imaging and magnetically enhanced drug delivery. Colloids Surf. B. ... Long-Term Stability of Two Thermoplastic Polymers Modified with Silver Nanoparticles. Previous Article in Special Issue. ... In situ Synthesis of Dextran Coated Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles by Co-Precipitation. Scheme 1b shows the overall ...
Anisotropic nanoparticles. Synthesis, formation mechanisms and novel characterization tools of (mainly colloidal) anisotropic ... Leibniz Institute of Polymer Research (IPF) Dresden. Paper 10689. 09:10. Studying nanoparticles 3D shape by aspects maps: ... Gold nanotriangles decorated with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles: a compositional and microstructural study. Anna ... Synthesis of Janus plasmonic-magnetic, star-sphere nanoparticles, and their application in SERS detection. Javier Reguera. CIC ...
... interests are focused on the fundamental and practical aspects involved in the synthesis of organic-inorganic colloidal nano- ... After his PhD at the Max-Planck-Institute for Polymer Research in Mainz he was a postdoc at the University of Pennsylvania, USA ... Chemical Adjustment of the Interface Between Silicate Nanoparticles and Biological Media for Imaging and Therapy. High Pressure ... Hydrothermal Procedure: A Tool for Surface Modification of Super-Paramagnetic Nanostructured Materials for Medical Applications ...
... catalytic efficiency of palladium niacin complex immobilized on starch-coated maghemite nanoparticles successfully exploited ... Tartaj P, González-Carreño T, Serna CJ (2002) Synthesis of nanomagnets dispersed in colloidal silica cages with applications in ... Tartaj P, Serna CJ (2003) Synthesis of monodisperse superparamagnetic Fe/silica nanospherical composites. J Am Chem Soc 125: ... Kim J-H, Kim J-W, Shokouhimehr M, Lee Y-S (2005) Polymer-supported N-heterocyclic carbene-palladium complex for heterogeneous ...
The strategy of tethering polymer chain ends onto the surfaces of nanoparticles in order to render the nanoparticles miscible ... Superparamagnetic iron oxide colloidal particles are synthesized by using a high-temperature hydrolysis reaction and then self- ... "Synthesis and Applications of FePt and Their Composite Nanoparticles, " Shouheng Sun, Brown University, hosted by Elena ... However, efficiencies of polymer-polymer and polymer-fullerene OPVs are inadequate for widespread use, and a thorough ...
... vol16-issue5-fulltext-8 RESEARCH ARTICLE Superparamagnetic Poly (3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3 hydroxyvalerate) ... Synthesis and characterization of nanomagnetite particles and their polymer coated forms. Journal of Colloid Interface Science ... PARTICLE SIZE ANALYSIS OF GOLD NANOPARTICLES Scientific interest in well dispersed suspensions of colloidal gold (or ... 3 Superparamagnetic nanoparticles for biomedical applications Synthesis of magnetite The synthesis method used has been widely ...
Colloidal Synthesis Of Metal Nanoparticles Stabilized By TiO2 Nanorods: A Strategy Toward Semiconductor/Metal Nanocomposites ... Interfacing single nanoparticles embedded in ultra thin polymers layers NANOPLATFORM Progetto Bilaterale Italia Spagna CNR CSIC ... Sorafenib delivery nanoplatform based on superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles magnetically targets hepatocellular ... Colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals for assembly: synthesis and functionalization routes (2009) Synthesis and Surface ...
Andrea Lassenberger (2017): Synthesis and characterization of functionalized superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. ... Michael Süss (2016): Synthesis of Stable Colloidal Crystals via Self Assembly. Diplomarbeit / Masterarbeit - Institut für ... 2019): SELF-ASSEMBLY OF POLYMER COATED NANOPARTICLES ON WATER-OIL INTERFACES. Diplomarbeit / Masterarbeit - Institut für ... Noga Gal (2018): Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Core- shell Nanoparticles; Stability and Interactions in Biological Environments ...
Aim of the project is to synthesize superparamagnetic nanoparticles of maghemite or magnetite formed typically by precipitation ... New type of polymer electrolytes based on polymeric ionic liquids. Supervisor: Sabina Abbrent. This project involves synthesis ... Such particles will have to fulfill some requirements, such as colloidal stability in aqueous biological media, ... Self-assembled nanoparticles (NPs) based on micelle-forming polymers with an anticancer drug bound to them by a pH-cleavable ...
"Synthesis and antibacterial effects of aqueous colloidal solutions of silver nanoparticles using aminocellulose as a combined ... releasing polymer strands that form a nanoparticle containing the drug to be delivered. This polymer nanoparticle dissolves ... Being super paramagnetic in nature, iron and iron oxide NPs find extensive usage in biomedical applications such as cell ... Synthesis of Magnetic Nanoparticle. Some of the most established methods of synthesis of magnetic nanoparticle are: *Co- ...
Each submicron polymer bead has distributed throughout its interior and surface submicron magnetite crystals. In another aspect ... In one aspect of the invention, a particle comprising a multitude of submicron polymer bead aggregates covalently cross-linked ... Magnetic polymer latex and preparation process. US4421660 *. 15 Dec 1980. 20 Dec 1983. The Dow Chemical Company. Colloidal size ... Synthesis and Isolation of Magnetite Crystals. EXAMPLE 1. To a 500 ml round bottom flask is added a solution of 30.09 grams ( ...
Synthesis, properties and applications of Janus nanoparticles. Nano Today. 2011;6(3):286-308.. 7. Jiang S, Chen Q, Tripathy M, ... Polymer (Guildf). 2012;53(17):3712-3718.. 5. Pradhan S, Xu L, Chen S. Janus Nanoparticles by Interfacial Engineering. Adv Funct ... A superparamagnetic Janus nanocomposite of polystyrene/[email protected] was designed and developed with dual surface containing ... Colloidal particles have solid supports of biomolecules for cell separation, as contrast agents in detection tools for in vivo ...
... superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, BSA, bimodal imaging, MRI, targeted imaging ... Targeted imaging contrast agents for early pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma diagnosis was developed using superparamagnetic ... iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs). For phase transfer of SPIONs, the hydrophobic SPIONs are first treated with ... Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles redispersed in deionized water and functionalized by various water soluble polymers ...
Cai W, Wan J (2007) Facile synthesis of superparamagnetic magnetite nanoparticles in liquid polyols. J Colloid Interface Sci ... Liu X-M, Yang G, Fu S-Y (2007) Mass synthesis of nanocrystalline spinel ferrites by a polymer-pyrolysis route. Mater Sci Eng C ... Barratt G (2003) Colloidal drug carriers: achievements and perspectives. Cell Mol Life Sci 60:21-37. https://doi.org/10.1007/ ... Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) Environmental remediation Sensor Biosensor Synthesis Functionalization Bo Jiang and Luning Lian ...
Crystal structure and superparamagnetic properties of magnetite nanocrystals were also maintained after the complexation of ... chains and dopamine molecules on the surface of iron oxide nanoparticles. Gadolinium ions were subsequently complexed at the ... Gadolinium-labeled magnetite nanoparticles (GMNPs) were synthesized via a bioinspired manner to use as dual contrast agents for ... Fabrication of MnxFe1-xO colloidal solid solution as a dual magnetic-resonance-contrast agent.. *Donghyeuk Choi, Anna Han, +4 ...
Chemical and colloidal stability of carboxylated core-shell magnetite nanoparticles designed for biomedical ... ... This article describes the synthesis and characterization of a novel crosslinked polymer with tricyanuric acid core bearing ... Despite the large efforts to prepare super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MNPs) for biomedical applications, the number ... Degradable cationic shell cross-linked knedel-like nanoparticles: synthesis, degradation, nucleic acid binding, and ... ...
Zhou, W. H. et al.83 fabricated a mussel-inspired molecularly imprinted polymer by coating superparamagnetic nanoparticles for ... The synthesis method first involves loading Pd nanoparticles onto the surface of the ZnO microsphere to form a Pd/ZnO core and ... technologies to solve problems associated with health and the environment using functionalized polymers in bulk and colloidal ... 87 have engineered antibody-functionalised polymer-coated gold nanoparticles targeting cancer cells. Gold nanoparticles (5 nm) ...
  • Hu, H., Chen, C. and Chen, Q. (2013) Magnetically Controllable Colloidal Photonic Crystals: Unique Features and Intriguing Applications. (hanspub.org)
  • The experimental work, synthesis of the materials and their compositional-structural characterisation is complemented with computer simulations of the laser-matter interactions. (icmab.es)
  • The proton relaxivity is enhanced through longer-range interactions with the protons outside the nanoparticle, a radical departure from the molecular chelates currently in use for MRI. (pnas.org)
  • Pubmed ID: 12167056 Colloidal gold nanocrystals have been used to develop a new class of nanobiosensors that is able to recognize and detect specific DNA sequences and single-base mutations in a homogeneous format. (jove.com)
  • Based on this understanding, macromolecular sciences can define new polymer structures that meet required functionalities or functional sequences with fully synthetic, nonpeptidic precision polymers to endeavor toward information-based design of next-generation, purpose-adapted macromolecules. (boernerlab.de)
  • 25. The method of claim 24, wherein the linker molecule has a first functional group capable of binding to the nanoparticle core and a reactive functional group for attachment to the receptor binding moiety. (patentsencyclopedia.com)
  • Binary polymer nanoparticle glasses provide opportunities to realize the facile assembly of disparate components, with control over nanoscale and mesoscale domains, for the development of functional materials. (saxslab.com)
  • Iron oxide nanoparticles were in-situ synthesized by treating the composite film with H2O2 under alkaline conditions. (scientific.net)
  • We have developed a one-pot in-situ, low energy process for the synthesis of highly mono- dispersed, Collagen Functionalized Ferrofluids (CFF) as a templating agent in an aqueous medium. (scirp.org)
  • Lu A-H, Li W-C, Matoussevitch N, Spliethoff B, Bönnemann H, Schüth F (2005) Highly stable carbon-protected cobalt nanoparticles and graphite shells. (springer.com)
  • Ahamed M et al (2011) Oxidative stress mediated apoptosis induced by nickel ferrite nanoparticles in cultured A549 cells. (springer.com)
  • Nanoparticles of Ce1-xMxO2-delta (M = Ca or Zr) coated with Al2O3 with average crystallite size of 10 nm have been synthesised via solution chemistry approach under controlled chemical and hydrodynamic conditions. (diva-portal.org)
  • The understanding of adhesive interaction at the nanoscale between functionalized nanoparticles and biological cells is of great importance to develop effective theranostic nanocarriers for targeted cancer therapy. (readbyqxmd.com)
  • Research on nanoparticle based nanomedicines is also actively undertaken with joint efforts with Singapore National Heart Center and School of Biological Science. (ntu.edu.sg)