Polymers of ETHYLENE OXIDE and water, and their ethers. They vary in consistency from liquid to solid depending on the molecular weight indicated by a number following the name. They are used as SURFACTANTS, dispersing agents, solvents, ointment and suppository bases, vehicles, and tablet excipients. Some specific groups are NONOXYNOLS, OCTOXYNOLS, and POLOXAMERS.
Synthetic thermoplastics that are tough, flexible, inert, and resistant to chemicals and electrical current. They are often used as biocompatible materials for prostheses and implants.
A vinyl polymer made from ethylene. It can be branched or linear. Branched or low-density polyethylene is tough and pliable but not to the same degree as linear polyethylene. Linear or high-density polyethylene has a greater hardness and tensile strength. Polyethylene is used in a variety of products, including implants and prostheses.
A generic grouping for dihydric alcohols with the hydroxy groups (-OH) located on different carbon atoms. They are viscous liquids with high boiling points for their molecular weights.
An ethylene compound with two hydroxy groups (-OH) located on adjacent carbons. They are viscous and colorless liquids. Some are used as anesthetics or hypnotics. However, the class is best known for their use as a coolant or antifreeze.
Agents that are used to stimulate evacuation of the bowels.
A clear, colorless, viscous organic solvent and diluent used in pharmaceutical preparations.
Forms to which substances are incorporated to improve the delivery and the effectiveness of drugs. Drug carriers are used in drug-delivery systems such as the controlled-release technology to prolong in vivo drug actions, decrease drug metabolism, and reduce drug toxicity. Carriers are also used in designs to increase the effectiveness of drug delivery to the target sites of pharmacological actions. Liposomes, albumin microspheres, soluble synthetic polymers, DNA complexes, protein-drug conjugates, and carrier erythrocytes among others have been employed as biodegradable drug carriers.
A diphenylmethane stimulant laxative used for the treatment of CONSTIPATION and for bowel evacuation. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p871)
The formation of crystalline substances from solutions or melts. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
The formation of a solid in a solution as a result of a chemical reaction or the aggregation of soluble substances into complexes large enough to fall out of solution.
Compounds formed by the joining of smaller, usually repeating, units linked by covalent bonds. These compounds often form large macromolecules (e.g., BIOPOLYMERS; PLASTICS).
The ability of a substance to be dissolved, i.e. to form a solution with another substance. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)
Water swollen, rigid, 3-dimensional network of cross-linked, hydrophilic macromolecules, 20-95% water. They are used in paints, printing inks, foodstuffs, pharmaceuticals, and cosmetics. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)
Synthetic or natural materials, other than DRUGS, that are used to replace or repair any body TISSUES or bodily function.
Malfunction of implantation shunts, valves, etc., and prosthesis loosening, migration, and breaking.
Artificial, single or multilaminar vesicles (made from lecithins or other lipids) that are used for the delivery of a variety of biological molecules or molecular complexes to cells, for example, drug delivery and gene transfer. They are also used to study membranes and membrane proteins.
Relating to the size of solids.
Nanometer-sized particles that are nanoscale in three dimensions. They include nanocrystaline materials; NANOCAPSULES; METAL NANOPARTICLES; DENDRIMERS, and QUANTUM DOTS. The uses of nanoparticles include DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEMS and cancer targeting and imaging.
The complex formed by the binding of antigen and antibody molecules. The deposition of large antigen-antibody complexes leading to tissue damage causes IMMUNE COMPLEX DISEASES.
The testing of materials and devices, especially those used for PROSTHESES AND IMPLANTS; SUTURES; TISSUE ADHESIVES; etc., for hardness, strength, durability, safety, efficacy, and biocompatibility.
A clear, odorless, tasteless liquid that is essential for most animal and plant life and is an excellent solvent for many substances. The chemical formula is hydrogen oxide (H2O). (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
Characteristics or attributes of the outer boundaries of objects, including molecules.
Systems for the delivery of drugs to target sites of pharmacological actions. Technologies employed include those concerning drug preparation, route of administration, site targeting, metabolism, and toxicity.
Infrequent or difficult evacuation of FECES. These symptoms are associated with a variety of causes, including low DIETARY FIBER intake, emotional or nervous disturbances, systemic and structural disorders, drug-induced aggravation, and infections.
Usually inert substances added to a prescription in order to provide suitable consistency to the dosage form. These include binders, matrix, base or diluent in pills, tablets, creams, salves, etc.
Chemistry dealing with the composition and preparation of agents having PHARMACOLOGIC ACTIONS or diagnostic use.
The scattering of x-rays by matter, especially crystals, with accompanying variation in intensity due to interference effects. Analysis of the crystal structure of materials is performed by passing x-rays through them and registering the diffraction image of the rays (CRYSTALLOGRAPHY, X-RAY). (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
Replacement for a hip joint.
Polyphenolic compounds with molecular weights of around 500-3000 daltons and containing enough hydroxyl groups (1-2 per 100 MW) for effective cross linking of other compounds (ASTRINGENTS). The two main types are HYDROLYZABLE TANNINS and CONDENSED TANNINS. Historically, the term has applied to many compounds and plant extracts able to render skin COLLAGEN impervious to degradation. The word tannin derives from the Celtic word for OAK TREE which was used for leather processing.
A synthetic disaccharide used in the treatment of constipation and hepatic encephalopathy. It has also been used in the diagnosis of gastrointestinal disorders. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p887)
Polyester polymers formed from terephthalic acid or its esters and ethylene glycol. They can be formed into tapes, films or pulled into fibers that are pressed into meshes or woven into fabrics.
Agents that modify interfacial tension of water; usually substances that have one lipophilic and one hydrophilic group in the molecule; includes soaps, detergents, emulsifiers, dispersing and wetting agents, and several groups of antiseptics.
The washing of a body cavity or surface by flowing water or solution for therapy or diagnosis.
Agents that produce a soft formed stool, and relax and loosen the bowels, typically used over a protracted period, to relieve CONSTIPATION.
Derivatives of propylene glycol (1,2-propanediol). They are used as humectants and solvents in pharmaceutical preparations.
Liquids that dissolve other substances (solutes), generally solids, without any change in chemical composition, as, water containing sugar. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)
Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the luminal surface of the colon.
Chemical compounds derived from acids by the elimination of a molecule of water.
The preparation, mixing, and assembling of a drug. (From Remington, The Science and Practice of Pharmacy, 19th ed, p1814)
The plan and delineation of prostheses in general or a specific prosthesis.
Magnesium oxide (MgO). An inorganic compound that occurs in nature as the mineral periclase. In aqueous media combines quickly with water to form magnesium hydroxide. It is used as an antacid and mild laxative and has many nonmedicinal uses.
The protoplasm and plasma membrane of plant, fungal, bacterial or archaeon cells without the CELL WALL.
A group of glucose polymers made by certain bacteria. Dextrans are used therapeutically as plasma volume expanders and anticoagulants. They are also commonly used in biological experimentation and in industry for a wide variety of purposes.
The sum of the weight of all the atoms in a molecule.
The adhesion of gases, liquids, or dissolved solids onto a surface. It includes adsorptive phenomena of bacteria and viruses onto surfaces as well. ABSORPTION into the substance may follow but not necessarily.
Dissolution of bone that particularly involves the removal or loss of calcium.
A polyester used for absorbable sutures & surgical mesh, especially in ophthalmic surgery. 2-Hydroxy-propanoic acid polymer with polymerized hydroxyacetic acid, which forms 3,6-dimethyl-1,4-dioxane-dione polymer with 1,4-dioxane-2,5-dione copolymer of molecular weight about 80,000 daltons.
Chemical analysis based on the phenomenon whereby light, passing through a medium with dispersed particles of a different refractive index from that of the medium, is attenuated in intensity by scattering. In turbidimetry, the intensity of light transmitted through the medium, the unscattered light, is measured. In nephelometry, the intensity of the scattered light is measured, usually, but not necessarily, at right angles to the incident light beam.
The chemical and physical integrity of a pharmaceutical product.
Particles consisting of aggregates of molecules held loosely together by secondary bonds. The surface of micelles are usually comprised of amphiphatic compounds that are oriented in a way that minimizes the energy of interaction between the micelle and its environment. Liquids that contain large numbers of suspended micelles are referred to as EMULSIONS.
A network of cross-linked hydrophilic macromolecules used in biomedical applications.
Formation of a firm impassable mass of stool in the RECTUM or distal COLON.
Strongly cationic polymer that binds to certain proteins; used as a marker in immunology, to precipitate and purify enzymes and lipids. Synonyms: aziridine polymer; Epamine; Epomine; ethylenimine polymer; Montrek; PEI; Polymin(e).
A nonionic polyoxyethylene-polyoxypropylene block co-polymer with the general formula HO(C2H4O)a(-C3H6O)b(C2H4O)aH. It is available in different grades which vary from liquids to solids. It is used as an emulsifying agent, solubilizing agent, surfactant, and wetting agent for antibiotics. Poloxamer is also used in ointment and suppository bases and as a tablet binder or coater. (Martindale The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 31st ed)
Specific alloys not less than 85% chromium and nickel or cobalt, with traces of either nickel or cobalt, molybdenum, and other substances. They are used in partial dentures, orthopedic implants, etc.
Biocompatible materials usually used in dental and bone implants that enhance biologic fixation, thereby increasing the bond strength between the coated material and bone, and minimize possible biological effects that may result from the implant itself.
Enzymes that activate one or more COMPLEMENT PROTEINS in the complement system leading to the formation of the COMPLEMENT MEMBRANE ATTACK COMPLEX, an important response in host defense. They are enzymes in the various COMPLEMENT ACTIVATION pathways.
The normality of a solution with respect to HYDROGEN ions; H+. It is related to acidity measurements in most cases by pH = log 1/2[1/(H+)], where (H+) is the hydrogen ion concentration in gram equivalents per liter of solution. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)
Nanometer-sized, hollow, spherically-shaped objects that can be utilized to encapsulate small amounts of pharmaceuticals, enzymes, or other catalysts (Glossary of Biotechnology and Nanobiotechnology, 4th ed).
Microscopy in which the object is examined directly by an electron beam scanning the specimen point-by-point. The image is constructed by detecting the products of specimen interactions that are projected above the plane of the sample, such as backscattered electrons. Although SCANNING TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY also scans the specimen point by point with the electron beam, the image is constructed by detecting the electrons, or their interaction products that are transmitted through the sample plane, so that is a form of TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY.
The study of crystal structure using X-RAY DIFFRACTION techniques. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
Substances that dissociate into two or more ions, to some extent, in water. Solutions of electrolytes thus conduct an electric current and can be decomposed by it (ELECTROLYSIS). (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)
Fusion of somatic cells in vitro or in vivo, which results in somatic cell hybridization.
The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.
Tendency of fluids (e.g., water) to move from the less concentrated to the more concentrated side of a semipermeable membrane.
The pressure required to prevent the passage of solvent through a semipermeable membrane that separates a pure solvent from a solution of the solvent and solute or that separates different concentrations of a solution. It is proportional to the osmolality of the solution.
Condition of having pores or open spaces. This often refers to bones, bone implants, or bone cements, but can refer to the porous state of any solid substance.
Substances which are of little or no therapeutic value, but are necessary in the manufacture, compounding, storage, etc., of pharmaceutical preparations or drug dosage forms. They include SOLVENTS, diluting agents, and suspending agents, and emulsifying agents. Also, ANTIOXIDANTS; PRESERVATIVES, PHARMACEUTICAL; COLORING AGENTS; FLAVORING AGENTS; VEHICLES; EXCIPIENTS; OINTMENT BASES.
The branch of medicine concerned with the application of NANOTECHNOLOGY to the prevention and treatment of disease. It involves the monitoring, repair, construction, and control of human biological systems at the molecular level, using engineered nanodevices and NANOSTRUCTURES. (From Freitas Jr., Nanomedicine, vol 1, 1999).
A carrier or inert medium used as a solvent (or diluent) in which the medicinally active agent is formulated and or administered. (Dictionary of Pharmacy, 1986)
Substances that provide protection against the harmful effects of freezing temperatures.
Tree-like, highly branched, polymeric compounds. They grow three-dimensionally by the addition of shells of branched molecules to a central core. The overall globular shape and presence of cavities gives potential as drug carriers and CONTRAST AGENTS.
Dosage forms of a drug that act over a period of time by controlled-release processes or technology.
A polyvinyl polymer of variable molecular weight; used as suspending and dispersing agent and vehicle for pharmaceuticals; also used as blood volume expander.
A long-acting barbiturate that depresses most metabolic processes at high doses. It is used as a hypnotic and sedative and may induce dependence. Barbital is also used in veterinary practice for central nervous system depression.
Serum albumin from cows, commonly used in in vitro biological studies. (From Stedman, 25th ed)
Derivatives of phosphatidic acids in which the phosphoric acid is bound in ester linkage to an ethanolamine moiety. Complete hydrolysis yields 1 mole of glycerol, phosphoric acid and ethanolamine and 2 moles of fatty acids.
Colloids formed by the combination of two immiscible liquids such as oil and water. Lipid-in-water emulsions are usually liquid, like milk or lotion. Water-in-lipid emulsions tend to be creams. The formation of emulsions may be aided by amphiphatic molecules that surround one component of the system to form MICELLES.
A ubiquitous sodium salt that is commonly used to season food.
Accumulation of a drug or chemical substance in various organs (including those not relevant to its pharmacologic or therapeutic action). This distribution depends on the blood flow or perfusion rate of the organ, the ability of the drug to penetrate organ membranes, tissue specificity, protein binding. The distribution is usually expressed as tissue to plasma ratios.
The evaluation of incidents involving the loss of function of a device. These evaluations are used for a variety of purposes such as to determine the failure rates, the causes of failures, costs of failures, and the reliability and maintainability of devices.
Substances used to cause adherence of tissue to tissue or tissue to non-tissue surfaces, as for prostheses.
The part of the pelvis that comprises the pelvic socket where the head of FEMUR joins to form HIP JOINT (acetabulofemoral joint).
A cellulose of varied carboxyl content retaining the fibrous structure. It is commonly used as a local hemostatic and as a matrix for normal blood coagulation.
A series of steps taken in order to conduct research.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
The resistance that a gaseous or liquid system offers to flow when it is subjected to shear stress. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)
Replacement of the hip joint.
Polymers of organic acids and alcohols, with ester linkages--usually polyethylene terephthalate; can be cured into hard plastic, films or tapes, or fibers which can be woven into fabrics, meshes or velours.
A diuretic and renal diagnostic aid related to sorbitol. It has little significant energy value as it is largely eliminated from the body before any metabolism can take place. It can be used to treat oliguria associated with kidney failure or other manifestations of inadequate renal function and has been used for determination of glomerular filtration rate. Mannitol is also commonly used as a research tool in cell biological studies, usually to control osmolarity.
An oxide of aluminum, occurring in nature as various minerals such as bauxite, corundum, etc. It is used as an adsorbent, desiccating agent, and catalyst, and in the manufacture of dental cements and refractories.
The time it takes for a substance (drug, radioactive nuclide, or other) to lose half of its pharmacologic, physiologic, or radiologic activity.
The property of objects that determines the direction of heat flow when they are placed in direct thermal contact. The temperature is the energy of microscopic motions (vibrational and translational) of the particles of atoms.
Substances that are used in place of blood, for example, as an alternative to BLOOD TRANSFUSIONS after blood loss to restore BLOOD VOLUME and oxygen-carrying capacity to the blood circulation, or to perfuse isolated organs.
Uptake of substances through the lining of the INTESTINES.
A yellow metallic element with the atomic symbol Au, atomic number 79, and atomic weight 197. It is used in jewelry, goldplating of other metals, as currency, and in dental restoration. Many of its clinical applications, such as ANTIRHEUMATIC AGENTS, are in the form of its salts.
Classic quantitative assay for detection of antigen-antibody reactions using a radioactively labeled substance (radioligand) either directly or indirectly to measure the binding of the unlabeled substance to a specific antibody or other receptor system. Non-immunogenic substances (e.g., haptens) can be measured if coupled to larger carrier proteins (e.g., bovine gamma-globulin or human serum albumin) capable of inducing antibody formation.
Preparations of Cassia senna and C. angustifolia (see SENNA PLANT). They contain sennosides, which are anthraquinone type CATHARTICS and are used in many different preparations as laxatives.
Nanoparticles produced from metals whose uses include biosensors, optics, and catalysts. In biomedical applications the particles frequently involve the noble metals, especially gold and silver.
The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.
An abnormally low volume of blood circulating through the body. It may result in hypovolemic shock (see SHOCK).
A spectroscopic technique in which a range of wavelengths is presented simultaneously with an interferometer and the spectrum is mathematically derived from the pattern thus obtained.
A colorless and flammable gas at room temperature and pressure. Ethylene oxide is a bactericidal, fungicidal, and sporicidal disinfectant. It is effective against most micro-organisms, including viruses. It is used as a fumigant for foodstuffs and textiles and as an agent for the gaseous sterilization of heat-labile pharmaceutical and surgical materials. (From Reynolds, Martindale The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p794)
A group of compounds that are monomethyl derivatives of pyridines. (From Dorland, 28th ed)
A subclass of IMIDES with the general structure of pyrrolidinedione. They are prepared by the distillation of ammonium succinate. They are sweet-tasting compounds that are used as chemical intermediates and plant growth stimulants.
The application of scientific knowledge or technology to pharmacy and the pharmaceutical industry. It includes methods, techniques, and instrumentation in the manufacture, preparation, compounding, dispensing, packaging, and storing of drugs and other preparations used in diagnostic and determinative procedures, and in the treatment of patients.
A highly polar organic liquid, that is used widely as a chemical solvent. Because of its ability to penetrate biological membranes, it is used as a vehicle for topical application of pharmaceuticals. It is also used to protect tissue during CRYOPRESERVATION. Dimethyl sulfoxide shows a range of pharmacological activity including analgesia and anti-inflammation.
Materials which have structured components with at least one dimension in the range of 1 to 100 nanometers. These include NANOCOMPOSITES; NANOPARTICLES; NANOTUBES; and NANOWIRES.
Substances used for the detection, identification, analysis, etc. of chemical, biological, or pathologic processes or conditions. Indicators are substances that change in physical appearance, e.g., color, at or approaching the endpoint of a chemical titration, e.g., on the passage between acidity and alkalinity. Reagents are substances used for the detection or determination of another substance by chemical or microscopical means, especially analysis. Types of reagents are precipitants, solvents, oxidizers, reducers, fluxes, and colorimetric reagents. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed, p301, p499)
The homogeneous mixtures formed by the mixing of a solid, liquid, or gaseous substance (solute) with a liquid (the solvent), from which the dissolved substances can be recovered by physical processes. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)
A poly(dimethylsiloxane) which is a polymer of 200-350 units of dimethylsiloxane, along with added silica gel. It is used as an antiflatulent, surfactant, and ointment base.
A peptide which is a homopolymer of lysine.
Spherical particles of nanometer dimensions.
Catalyze the joining of preformed ribonucleotides or deoxyribonucleotides in phosphodiester linkage during genetic processes. EC 6.5.1.
The concentration of osmotically active particles in solution expressed in terms of osmoles of solute per liter of solution. Osmolality is expressed in terms of osmoles of solute per kilogram of solvent.
Replacement for a knee joint.
Chymotrypsinogen is a zymogen, specifically an inactive precursor form of the enzyme chymotrypsin, which is produced in the pancreas and activated in the small intestine to help digest proteins by cleaving specific peptide bonds.
Reagents with two reactive groups, usually at opposite ends of the molecule, that are capable of reacting with and thereby forming bridges between side chains of amino acids in proteins; the locations of naturally reactive areas within proteins can thereby be identified; may also be used for other macromolecules, like glycoproteins, nucleic acids, or other.
Dimethylformamide (DMF) is an organic compound, commonly used as a solvent, which is not typically considered a medication or therapeutic agent in clinical medicine.
Inorganic salts of phosphoric acid.
A subcomponent of complement C1, composed of six copies of three polypeptide chains (A, B, and C), each encoded by a separate gene (C1QA; C1QB; C1QC). This complex is arranged in nine subunits (six disulfide-linked dimers of A and B, and three disulfide-linked homodimers of C). C1q has binding sites for antibodies (the heavy chain of IMMUNOGLOBULIN G or IMMUNOGLOBULIN M). The interaction of C1q and immunoglobulin activates the two proenzymes COMPLEMENT C1R and COMPLEMENT C1S, thus initiating the cascade of COMPLEMENT ACTIVATION via the CLASSICAL COMPLEMENT PATHWAY.
Differential thermal analysis in which the sample compartment of the apparatus is a differential calorimeter, allowing an exact measure of the heat of transition independent of the specific heat, thermal conductivity, and other variables of the sample.
Passage of food (sometimes in the form of a test meal) through the gastrointestinal tract as measured in minutes or hours. The rate of passage through the intestine is an indicator of small bowel function.
Completed forms of the pharmaceutical preparation in which prescribed doses of medication are included. They are designed to resist action by gastric fluids, prevent vomiting and nausea, reduce or alleviate the undesirable taste and smells associated with oral administration, achieve a high concentration of drug at target site, or produce a delayed or long-acting drug effect.
Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.
The location of the atoms, groups or ions relative to one another in a molecule, as well as the number, type and location of covalent bonds.
The tendency of a gas or solute to pass from a point of higher pressure or concentration to a point of lower pressure or concentration and to distribute itself throughout the available space. Diffusion, especially FACILITATED DIFFUSION, is a major mechanism of BIOLOGICAL TRANSPORT.
Proteins prepared by recombinant DNA technology.
A plant genus of the family FABACEAE.
Hard or soft soluble containers used for the oral administration of medicine.
The hemispheric articular surface at the upper extremity of the thigh bone. (Stedman, 26th ed)
Uptake of substances through the SKIN.
A biocompatible polymer used as a surgical suture material.
Deacetylated CHITIN, a linear polysaccharide of deacetylated beta-1,4-D-glucosamine. It is used in HYDROGEL and to treat WOUNDS.
The thermodynamic interaction between a substance and WATER.
Zirconium. A rather rare metallic element, atomic number 40, atomic weight 91.22, symbol Zr. (From Dorland, 28th ed)
Electrophoresis in which a polyacrylamide gel is used as the diffusion medium.
Rounded objects made of coral, teflon, or alloplastic polymer and covered with sclera, and which are implanted in the orbit following enucleation. An artificial eye (EYE, ARTIFICIAL) is usually attached to the anterior of the orbital implant for cosmetic purposes.
The span of viability of a cell characterized by the capacity to perform certain functions such as metabolism, growth, reproduction, some form of responsiveness, and adaptability.
A key intermediate in metabolism. It is an acid compound found in citrus fruits. The salts of citric acid (citrates) can be used as anticoagulants due to their calcium chelating ability.
Elimination of ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTANTS; PESTICIDES and other waste using living organisms, usually involving intervention of environmental or sanitation engineers.
Biological activities and function of the whole organism in human, animal, microorgansims, and plants, and of the biosphere.
Property of membranes and other structures to permit passage of light, heat, gases, liquids, metabolites, and mineral ions.
Chemical reaction in which monomeric components are combined to form POLYMERS (e.g., POLYMETHYLMETHACRYLATE).
Methylester of cellulose. Methylcellulose is used as an emulsifying and suspending agent in cosmetics, pharmaceutics and the chemical industry. It is used therapeutically as a bulk laxative.
A method of separation of two or more substances by repeated distribution between two immiscible liquid phases that move past each other in opposite directions. It is a form of liquid-liquid chromatography. (Stedman, 25th ed)
Liquids transforming into solids by the removal of heat.
Solutions used to store organs and minimize tissue damage, particularly while awaiting implantation.
Materials incorporated mechanically in plastics (usually PVC) to increase flexibility, workability or distensibility; due to the non-chemical inclusion, plasticizers leach out from the plastic and are found in body fluids and the general environment.
Small uniformly-sized spherical particles, of micrometer dimensions, frequently labeled with radioisotopes or various reagents acting as tags or markers.
Regulatory genes which encode a cyclic AMP receptor protein required for L-arabinose utilization in E. coli. It is an example of positive control or regulation of gene expression in the bacterial operon.
Process of using a rotating machine to generate centrifugal force to separate substances of different densities, remove moisture, or simulate gravitational effects. It employs a large motor-driven apparatus with a long arm, at the end of which human and animal subjects, biological specimens, or equipment can be revolved and rotated at various speeds to study gravitational effects. (From Websters, 10th ed; McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
The development and use of techniques to study physical phenomena and construct structures in the nanoscale size range or smaller.
The major immunoglobulin isotype class in normal human serum. There are several isotype subclasses of IgG, for example, IgG1, IgG2A, and IgG2B.
The joint that is formed by the articulation of the head of FEMUR and the ACETABULUM of the PELVIS.
A cell line derived from cultured tumor cells.
Colloids with a solid continuous phase and liquid as the dispersed phase; gels may be unstable when, due to temperature or other cause, the solid phase liquefies; the resulting colloid is called a sol.
Method of tissue preparation in which the tissue specimen is frozen and then dehydrated at low temperature in a high vacuum. This method is also used for dehydrating pharmaceutical and food products.
Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.
A solution or compound that is introduced into the RECTUM with the purpose of cleansing the COLON or for diagnostic procedures.
Substances made up of an aggregation of small particles, as that obtained by grinding or trituration of a solid drug. In pharmacy it is a form in which substances are administered. (From Dorland, 28th ed)
A repeat operation for the same condition in the same patient due to disease progression or recurrence, or as followup to failed previous surgery.
A family of marine mollusks in the class BIVALVIA, commonly known as oysters. They have a rough irregular shell closed by a single adductor muscle.
Injections made into a vein for therapeutic or experimental purposes.
The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.
Liquid chromatographic techniques which feature high inlet pressures, high sensitivity, and high speed.
A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria (GRAM-NEGATIVE FACULTATIVELY ANAEROBIC RODS) commonly found in the lower part of the intestine of warm-blooded animals. It is usually nonpathogenic, but some strains are known to produce DIARRHEA and pyogenic infections. Pathogenic strains (virotypes) are classified by their specific pathogenic mechanisms such as toxins (ENTEROTOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI), etc.
SURFACE-ACTIVE AGENTS that induce a dispersion of undissolved material throughout a liquid.
A genus of PICORNAVIRIDAE causing infectious hepatitis naturally in humans and experimentally in other primates. It is transmitted through fecal contamination of food or water. HEPATITIS A VIRUS is the type species.
4-carbon straight chain aliphatic hydrocarbons substituted with two hydroxyl groups. The hydroxyl groups cannot be on the same carbon atom.
An inorganic compound that occurs in nature as the mineral brucite. It acts as an antacid with cathartic effects.
The characteristic 3-dimensional shape of a protein, including the secondary, supersecondary (motifs), tertiary (domains) and quaternary structure of the peptide chain. PROTEIN STRUCTURE, QUATERNARY describes the conformation assumed by multimeric proteins (aggregates of more than one polypeptide chain).
Volume of biological fluid completely cleared of drug metabolites as measured in unit time. Elimination occurs as a result of metabolic processes in the kidney, liver, saliva, sweat, intestine, heart, brain, or other site.
Artificially produced membranes, such as semipermeable membranes used in artificial kidney dialysis (RENAL DIALYSIS), monomolecular and bimolecular membranes used as models to simulate biological CELL MEMBRANES. These membranes are also used in the process of GUIDED TISSUE REGENERATION.
Chromatography on non-ionic gels without regard to the mechanism of solute discrimination.
Poly-2-methylpropenoic acids. Used in the manufacture of methacrylate resins and plastics in the form of pellets and granules, as absorbent for biological materials and as filters; also as biological membranes and as hydrogens. Synonyms: methylacrylate polymer; poly(methylacrylate); acrylic acid methyl ester polymer.
An oxidoreductase that catalyzes the conversion of HYDROGEN PEROXIDE to water and oxygen. It is present in many animal cells. A deficiency of this enzyme results in ACATALASIA.
Products made by baking or firing nonmetallic minerals (clay and similar materials). In making dental restorations or parts of restorations the material is fused porcelain. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed & Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)
A quality of cell membranes which permits the passage of solvents and solutes into and out of cells.
A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.
Sulfuric acid diammonium salt. It is used in CHEMICAL FRACTIONATION of proteins.

Stabilization of poly-L-lysine/DNA polyplexes for in vivo gene delivery to the liver. (1/6763)

We are developing a self-assembling non-viral in vivo gene delivery vehicle based on poly-l-lysine and plasmid DNA. We have characterized poly-l-lysines of different chain lengths for DNA condensation and strength of DNA binding. Poly-l-lysine chains >20 residues bound DNA efficiently in physiological saline, while shorter chains did not. Attachment of asialoorosomucoid to PLL increased the PLL chain length required for efficient DNA binding in saline and for efficient DNA condensation. By electron microscopy, poly-l-lysine/DNA polyplexes appeared as toroids 25-50 nm in diameter or rods 40-80 nm long; conjugation of asialoorosomucoid to the polylysine component increased the size of resulting polyplexes to 50-90 nm. In water, poly-l-lysine and asialoorosomucoid-PLL polyplexes have effective diameters of 46 and 87.6 nm, respectively. Polyplexes containing only poly-l-lysine and DNA aggregated in physiological saline at all charge ratios and aggregated at neutral charge ratios in water. Attachment of asialoorosomucoid lessened, but did not eliminate, the aggregation of PLL polyplexes, and did not result in efficient delivery of polyplexes to hepatocytes. Conjugation of polyethylene glycol to poly-l-lysine sterically stabilized resulting polyplexes at neutral charge ratios by shielding the surfaces. For efficient in vivo gene delivery, polyplexes will need to be sterically stabilized to prevent aggregation and interaction with serum components.  (+info)

Partial purification and properties of porcine thymus lactosylceramide beta-galactosidase. (2/6763)

Porcine thymus lactosylceramide beta-galactosidase was purified by a simple procedure. In the final step of isoelectric focusing the enzyme was separated into two peaks of pI 6.3 (peak I) and 7.0 (peak II), which showed 3,600- and 4,000-fold enhancement of lactosylceramide-hydrolysing activity, respectively. The two peaks had identical mobility on polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The apparent molecular weight was 34,000. Neither monosialoganglioside (GM1) nor galactosylceramide was hydrolysed by the purified enzyme fractions. The optimal pH was at 4.6, and sodium taurocholate was essential for the reaction. The apparent Km was 2.3 x 10-5 M. The reaction was stimulated by sodium chloride and linoleic acid, while it was strongly inhibited by Triton X-100 and bovine serum albumin. Galactosylceramide, p-nitrophenyl beta-galactoside, and p-nitrophenol were weak inhibitors. No effects of GM1 and galactose were observed on the hydrolysis of lactosylceramide.  (+info)

Further studies on the mechanism of adrenaline-induced lipolysis in lipid micelles. (3/6763)

Lipase [EC 3.1.1.3] depleted lipid micelles, in which lipolysis was not elicited by adrenaline, were prepared from lipid micelles. When these lipase-depleted lipid micelles incubated with adipose tissue extract containing lipase activity, adrenaline-induced lipolysis was restored to almost the same level as that of native lipid micelles. Adrenaline-induced lipolysis was not restored when the lipase-depleted lipid micelles were homogenized or sonicated. Various tissue extracts from kidney, lung, liver, and pancreas, and post-heparin plasma, which contained lipase activity, restored adrenaline-induced lipolysis in lipase-depleted lipid micelles.  (+info)

A lipid modified ubiquitin is packaged into particles of several enveloped viruses. (4/6763)

An anti-ubiquitin cross-reactive protein which migrates more slowly (6.5 kDa) by SDS-PAGE than ubiquitin was identified in African swine fever virus particles. This protein was extracted into the detergent phase in Triton X-114 phase separations, showing that it is hydrophobic, and was radiolabelled with both [3H]palmitic acid and [32P]orthophosphate. This indicates that the protein has a similar structure to the membrane associated phosphatidyl ubiquitin described in baculovirus particles. A similar molecule was found in vaccinia virus and herpes simplex virus particles, suggesting that it may be a component of uninfected cell membranes, which is incorporated into membrane layers in virions during morphogenesis.  (+info)

Structural and functional consequences of antigenic modulation of red blood cells with methoxypoly(ethylene glycol). (5/6763)

We previously showed that the covalent modification of the red blood cell (RBC) surface with methoxypoly(ethylene glycol) [mPEG; MW approximately 5 kD] could significantly attenuate the immunologic recognition of surface antigens. However, to make these antigenically silent RBC a clinically viable option, the mPEG-modified RBC must maintain normal cellular structure and functions. To this end, mPEG-derivatization was found to have no significant detrimental effects on RBC structure or function at concentrations that effectively blocked antigenic recognition of a variety of RBC antigens. Importantly, RBC lysis, morphology, and hemoglobin oxidation state were unaffected by mPEG-modification. Furthermore, as shown by functional studies of Band 3, a major site of modification, PEG-binding does not affect protein function, as evidenced by normal SO4- flux. Similarly, Na+ and K+ homeostasis were unaffected. The functional aspects of the mPEG-modified RBC were also maintained, as evidenced by normal oxygen binding and cellular deformability. Perhaps most importantly, mPEG-derivatized mouse RBC showed normal in vivo survival ( approximately 50 days) with no sensitization after repeated transfusions. These data further support the hypothesis that the covalent attachment of nonimmunogenic materials (eg, mPEG) to intact RBC may have significant application in transfusion medicine, especially for the chronically transfused and/or allosensitized patient.  (+info)

Enhancement of endocytosis due to aminophospholipid transport across the plasma membrane of living cells. (6/6763)

Formation of intracellular vesicles is initiated by membrane budding. Here we test the hypothesis that the plasma membrane surface area asymmetry could be a driving force for vesicle formation during endocytosis. The inner layer phospholipid number was therefore increased by adding exogenous aminophospholipids to living cells, which were then translocated from the outer to the inner layer of the membrane by the ubiquitous flippase. Addition of either phosphatidylserine or phosphatidylethanolamine led to an enhancement of endocytosis, showing that the observed acceleration does not depend on the lipid polar head group. Conversely, a closely related aminophospholipid that is not recognized by the flippase, lyso-alpha-phosphatidylserine, inhibited endocytosis, and similar results were obtained with a cholesterol derivative that also remains in the plasma membrane outer layer. Thus an increase of lipid concentration in the inner layer enhanced internalization, whereas an increase of the lipid concentration in the outer layer inhibited internalization. These experiments suggest that transient asymmetries in lipid concentration might contribute to the formation of endocytic vesicles.  (+info)

The pharmacokinetics of artemisinin after administration of two different suppositories to healthy Vietnamese subjects. (7/6763)

Eight healthy Vietnamese male subjects received 400 mg artemisinin formulated into fatty suppositories (FS), and six different subjects received 500 mg of artemisinin formulated in polyethylene glycol suppositories (PEGS). Plasma concentrations were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection; concentration versus time curves were analyzed with nonparametric methods. No statistically significant differences were found between the two formulations. The maximum concentration (Cmax) was 100 +/- 102 microg/L (mean +/- SD, range = 24-330) microg/L (FS), the pharmacokinetic lag time (Tlag) was 1.3 +/- 1.0 hr (range = 0-3) (FS), and the time of the maximum concentration (Tmax) was 7.1 +/- 2.1 hr (range = 3-10) hr (FS). Because artemisinin is not available for intravenous dosage, absolute bioavailability cannot be assessed. However, compared with a previous study on oral artemisinin in healthy Vietnamese subjects, bioavailability relative to oral administration was estimated to be approximately 30%. We conclude that therapeutic blood concentrations of artemisinin can be reached after rectal dosage. The dose after rectal administration should probably be higher than after oral administration; doubling or tripling the oral dose might be necessary, which would imply a rectal dose of at least 20 mg/kg of body weight given twice a day.  (+info)

Opposite behavior of two isozymes when refolding in the presence of non-ionic detergents. (8/6763)

GroEL has a greater affinity for the mitochondrial isozyme (mAAT) of aspartate aminotransferase than for its cytosolic counterpart (cAAT) (Mattingly JR Jr, Iriarte A, Martinez-Carrion M, 1995, J Biol Chem 270:1138-1148), two proteins that share a high degree of sequence similarity and an almost identical spatial structure. The effect of detergents on the refolding of these large, dimeric isozymes parallels this difference in behavior. The presence of non-ionic detergents such as Triton X-100 or lubrol at concentrations above their critical micelle concentration (CMC) interferes with reactivation of mAAT unfolded in guanidinium chloride but increases the yield of cAAT refolding at low temperatures. The inhibitory effect of detergents on the reactivation of mAAT decreases progressively as the addition of detergents is delayed after starting the refolding reaction. The rate of disappearance of the species with affinity for binding detergents coincides with the slowest of the two rate-limiting steps detected in the refolding pathway of mAAT. Limited proteolysis studies indicate that the overall structure of the detergent-bound mAAT resembles that of the protein in a complex with GroEL. The mAAT folding intermediates trapped in the presence of detergents can resume reactivation either upon dilution of the detergent below its CMC or by adding beta-cyclodextrin. Thus, isolation of otherwise transient productive folding intermediates for further characterization is possible through the use of detergents.  (+info)

Polyethylene glycols (PEGs) are a family of synthetic, water-soluble polymers with a wide range of molecular weights. They are commonly used in the medical field as excipients in pharmaceutical formulations due to their ability to improve drug solubility, stability, and bioavailability. PEGs can also be used as laxatives to treat constipation or as bowel cleansing agents prior to colonoscopy examinations. Additionally, some PEG-conjugated drugs have been developed for use in targeted cancer therapies.

In a medical context, PEGs are often referred to by their average molecular weight, such as PEG 300, PEG 400, PEG 1500, and so on. Higher molecular weight PEGs tend to be more viscous and have longer-lasting effects in the body.

It's worth noting that while PEGs are generally considered safe for use in medical applications, some people may experience allergic reactions or hypersensitivity to these compounds. Prolonged exposure to high molecular weight PEGs has also been linked to potential adverse effects, such as decreased fertility and developmental toxicity in animal studies. However, more research is needed to fully understand the long-term safety of PEGs in humans.

I believe there may be some confusion in your question as Polyethylenes are not a medical term, but rather a category of synthetic polymers commonly used in various industrial and medical applications. Here's a brief overview:

Polyethylene (PE) is a type of thermoplastic polymer made from the monomer ethylene. It is a versatile material with numerous applications due to its chemical resistance, durability, and flexibility. There are several types of polyethylenes, including:

1. Low-density polyethylene (LDPE): This type has a lower density and more branching in its molecular structure, which results in less crystallinity. LDPE is known for its flexibility and is often used in packaging films, bags, and containers.
2. High-density polyethylene (HDPE): HDPE has a higher density and less branching, resulting in greater crystallinity. It is more rigid than LDPE and is commonly used in applications such as bottles, pipes, and containers.
3. Linear low-density polyethylene (LLDPE): This type combines the flexibility of LDPE with some of the strength and rigidity of HDPE. LLDPE has fewer branches than LDPE but more than HDPE. It is often used in film applications, such as stretch wrap and agricultural films.
4. Ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE): UHMWPE has an extremely high molecular weight, resulting in exceptional wear resistance, impact strength, and chemical resistance. It is commonly used in medical applications, such as orthopedic implants and joint replacements, due to its biocompatibility and low friction coefficient.

While polyethylenes are not a medical term per se, they do have significant medical applications, particularly UHMWPE in orthopedic devices.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Polyethylene" is not a medical term. It is a type of synthetic plastic that is commonly used in various industrial and consumer products. Medical definitions typically refer to substances or conditions related to human health, treatment, or disease processes. If you have any questions related to medical terminology or concepts, I'd be happy to help!

Glycols are a type of organic compound that contain two hydroxyl (OH) groups attached to adjacent carbon atoms. They are colorless, odorless, and have a sweet taste. The most common glycols are ethylene glycol and propylene glycol. Ethylene glycol is widely used as an automotive antifreeze and in the manufacture of polyester fibers and resins, while propylene glycol is used as a food additive, in pharmaceuticals, and as a solvent in various industries. Glycols are also used as a coolant, humectant, and in the production of unsaturated polyester resins. Exposure to high levels of glycols can cause irritation to the eyes, skin, and respiratory tract, and ingestion can be harmful or fatal.

Ethylene glycols are a class of synthetic chemical compounds that are commonly used as automotive antifreeze, de-icing agents, and as raw materials in the manufacture of polyester fibers and resins. The two most common types of ethylene glycol are ethylene glycol monoethyl ether (also known as ethylene glycol monomethyl ether or EGME) and diethylene glycol (DEG).

Ethylene glycols are colorless, odorless liquids with a sweet taste. They are highly toxic to humans and animals if ingested, inhaled, or absorbed through the skin. Exposure can cause a range of symptoms, including nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, dizziness, confusion, seizures, coma, and even death.

In medical terms, ethylene glycols are often referred to as "toxic alcohols" or "antifreeze poisoning" when they cause toxicity in humans. Treatment typically involves supportive care, such as fluid replacement and kidney dialysis, as well as the use of specific antidotes, such as fomepizole or ethanol, to prevent further absorption and metabolism of the toxic alcohol.

Cathartics are a type of medication that stimulates bowel movements and evacuates the intestinal tract. They are often used to treat constipation or to prepare the bowel for certain medical procedures, such as colonoscopies. Common cathartic medications include laxatives, enemas, and suppositories.

Cathartics work by increasing the muscle contractions of the intestines, which helps to move stool through the digestive tract more quickly. They may also increase the amount of water in the stool, making it softer and easier to pass. Some cathartics, such as bulk-forming laxatives, work by absorbing water and swelling in the intestines, which helps to bulk up the stool and stimulate a bowel movement.

While cathartics can be effective at relieving constipation, they should be used with caution. Overuse of cathartics can lead to dependence on them for bowel movements, as well as electrolyte imbalances and other complications. It is important to follow the instructions carefully when using cathartic medications and to speak with a healthcare provider if constipation persists or worsens.

Propylene glycol is not a medical term, but rather a chemical compound. However, it does have various applications in the medical field. Medically, propylene glycol can be used as a:

1. Vehicle for intravenous (IV) medications: Propylene glycol helps dissolve drugs that are not water-soluble and allows them to be administered intravenously. It is used in the preparation of some IV medications, including certain antibiotics, antivirals, and chemotherapeutic agents.
2. Preservative: Propylene glycol acts as a preservative in various medical products, such as topical ointments, eye drops, and injectable solutions, to prevent bacterial growth and increase shelf life.
3. Humectant: In some medical devices and pharmaceutical formulations, propylene glycol is used as a humectant, which means it helps maintain moisture and prevent dryness in the skin or mucous membranes.

The chemical definition of propylene glycol (C3H8O2) is:

A colorless, nearly odorless, viscous liquid belonging to the alcohol family. It is a diol, meaning it contains two hydroxyl groups (-OH), and its molecular formula is C3H8O2. Propylene glycol is miscible with water and most organic solvents and has applications in various industries, including pharmaceuticals, food processing, cosmetics, and industrial manufacturing.

A drug carrier, also known as a drug delivery system or vector, is a vehicle that transports a pharmaceutical compound to a specific site in the body. The main purpose of using drug carriers is to improve the efficacy and safety of drugs by enhancing their solubility, stability, bioavailability, and targeted delivery, while minimizing unwanted side effects.

Drug carriers can be made up of various materials, including natural or synthetic polymers, lipids, inorganic nanoparticles, or even cells and viruses. They can encapsulate, adsorb, or conjugate drugs through different mechanisms, such as physical entrapment, electrostatic interaction, or covalent bonding.

Some common types of drug carriers include:

1. Liposomes: spherical vesicles composed of one or more lipid bilayers that can encapsulate hydrophilic and hydrophobic drugs.
2. Polymeric nanoparticles: tiny particles made of biodegradable polymers that can protect drugs from degradation and enhance their accumulation in target tissues.
3. Dendrimers: highly branched macromolecules with a well-defined structure and size that can carry multiple drug molecules and facilitate their release.
4. Micelles: self-assembled structures formed by amphiphilic block copolymers that can solubilize hydrophobic drugs in water.
5. Inorganic nanoparticles: such as gold, silver, or iron oxide nanoparticles, that can be functionalized with drugs and targeting ligands for diagnostic and therapeutic applications.
6. Cell-based carriers: living cells, such as red blood cells, stem cells, or immune cells, that can be loaded with drugs and used to deliver them to specific sites in the body.
7. Viral vectors: modified viruses that can infect cells and introduce genetic material encoding therapeutic proteins or RNA interference molecules.

The choice of drug carrier depends on various factors, such as the physicochemical properties of the drug, the route of administration, the target site, and the desired pharmacokinetics and biodistribution. Therefore, selecting an appropriate drug carrier is crucial for achieving optimal therapeutic outcomes and minimizing side effects.

Bisacodyl is a stimulant laxative that is used to treat constipation and to clean out the intestines before a colonoscopy or other medical procedures. It works by increasing the muscle contractions in the intestines, which helps to move stool through the bowels and promotes bowel movements. Bisacodyl is available as a tablet or suppository, and it is typically taken at night to produce a bowel movement the next morning.

Bisacodyl is a prescription medication, and it should be used under the guidance of a healthcare professional. It is important to follow the instructions for use carefully, as improper use can increase the risk of side effects such as dehydration, electrolyte imbalances, and dependence on laxatives.

Some common side effects of bisacodyl include abdominal cramping, diarrhea, and nausea. These side effects are usually mild and go away on their own. However, if they are severe or persist, it is important to talk to a healthcare professional. In rare cases, bisacodyl can cause more serious side effects such as allergic reactions, heart problems, and intestinal inflammation. If you experience any of these side effects, seek medical attention immediately.

It is important to note that bisacodyl is not recommended for long-term use, as it can lead to dependence on laxatives and other health problems. It should only be used as directed by a healthcare professional and for the shortest duration necessary to treat constipation or prepare for a medical procedure.

Crystallization is a process in which a substance transitions from a liquid or dissolved state to a solid state, forming a crystal lattice. In the medical context, crystallization can refer to the formation of crystals within the body, which can occur under certain conditions such as changes in pH, temperature, or concentration of solutes. These crystals can deposit in various tissues and organs, leading to the formation of crystal-induced diseases or disorders.

For example, in patients with gout, uric acid crystals can accumulate in joints, causing inflammation, pain, and swelling. Similarly, in nephrolithiasis (kidney stones), minerals in the urine can crystallize and form stones that can obstruct the urinary tract. Crystallization can also occur in other medical contexts, such as in the formation of dental calculus or plaque, and in the development of cataracts in the eye.

Chemical precipitation is a process in which a chemical compound becomes a solid, insoluble form, known as a precipitate, from a liquid solution. This occurs when the concentration of the compound in the solution exceeds its solubility limit and forms a separate phase. The reaction that causes the formation of the precipitate can be a result of various factors such as changes in temperature, pH, or the addition of another chemical reagent.

In the medical field, chemical precipitation is used in diagnostic tests to detect and measure the presence of certain substances in body fluids, such as blood or urine. For example, a common test for kidney function involves adding a chemical reagent to a urine sample, which causes the excess protein in the urine to precipitate out of solution. The amount of precipitate formed can then be measured and used to diagnose and monitor kidney disease.

Chemical precipitation is also used in the treatment of certain medical conditions, such as heavy metal poisoning. In this case, a chelating agent is administered to bind with the toxic metal ions in the body, forming an insoluble compound that can be excreted through the urine or feces. This process helps to reduce the amount of toxic metals in the body and alleviate symptoms associated with poisoning.

In the context of medical definitions, polymers are large molecules composed of repeating subunits called monomers. These long chains of monomers can have various structures and properties, depending on the type of monomer units and how they are linked together. In medicine, polymers are used in a wide range of applications, including drug delivery systems, medical devices, and tissue engineering scaffolds. Some examples of polymers used in medicine include polyethylene, polypropylene, polystyrene, polyvinyl chloride (PVC), and biodegradable polymers such as polylactic acid (PLA) and polycaprolactone (PCL).

Solubility is a fundamental concept in pharmaceutical sciences and medicine, which refers to the maximum amount of a substance (solute) that can be dissolved in a given quantity of solvent (usually water) at a specific temperature and pressure. Solubility is typically expressed as mass of solute per volume or mass of solvent (e.g., grams per liter, milligrams per milliliter). The process of dissolving a solute in a solvent results in a homogeneous solution where the solute particles are dispersed uniformly throughout the solvent.

Understanding the solubility of drugs is crucial for their formulation, administration, and therapeutic effectiveness. Drugs with low solubility may not dissolve sufficiently to produce the desired pharmacological effect, while those with high solubility might lead to rapid absorption and short duration of action. Therefore, optimizing drug solubility through various techniques like particle size reduction, salt formation, or solubilization is an essential aspect of drug development and delivery.

Hydrogels are defined in the medical and biomedical fields as cross-linked, hydrophilic polymer networks that have the ability to swell and retain a significant amount of water or biological fluids while maintaining their structure. They can be synthesized from natural, synthetic, or hybrid polymers.

Hydrogels are known for their biocompatibility, high water content, and soft consistency, which resemble natural tissues, making them suitable for various medical applications such as contact lenses, drug delivery systems, tissue engineering, wound dressing, and biosensors. The physical and chemical properties of hydrogels can be tailored to specific uses by adjusting the polymer composition, cross-linking density, and network structure.

Biocompatible materials are non-toxic and non-reacting substances that can be used in medical devices, tissue engineering, and drug delivery systems without causing harm or adverse reactions to living tissues or organs. These materials are designed to mimic the properties of natural tissues and are able to integrate with biological systems without being rejected by the body's immune system.

Biocompatible materials can be made from a variety of substances, including metals, ceramics, polymers, and composites. The specific properties of these materials, such as their mechanical strength, flexibility, and biodegradability, are carefully selected to meet the requirements of their intended medical application.

Examples of biocompatible materials include titanium used in dental implants and joint replacements, polyethylene used in artificial hips, and hydrogels used in contact lenses and drug delivery systems. The use of biocompatible materials has revolutionized modern medicine by enabling the development of advanced medical technologies that can improve patient outcomes and quality of life.

Prosthesis failure is a term used to describe a situation where a prosthetic device, such as an artificial joint or limb, has stopped functioning or failed to meet its intended purpose. This can be due to various reasons, including mechanical failure, infection, loosening of the device, or a reaction to the materials used in the prosthesis.

Mechanical failure can occur due to wear and tear, manufacturing defects, or improper use of the prosthetic device. Infection can also lead to prosthesis failure, particularly in cases where the prosthesis is implanted inside the body. The immune system may react to the presence of the foreign material, leading to inflammation and infection.

Loosening of the prosthesis can also cause it to fail over time, as the device becomes less stable and eventually stops working properly. Additionally, some people may have a reaction to the materials used in the prosthesis, leading to tissue damage or other complications that can result in prosthesis failure.

In general, prosthesis failure can lead to decreased mobility, pain, and the need for additional surgeries or treatments to correct the problem. It is important for individuals with prosthetic devices to follow their healthcare provider's instructions carefully to minimize the risk of prosthesis failure and ensure that the device continues to function properly over time.

Liposomes are artificially prepared, small, spherical vesicles composed of one or more lipid bilayers that enclose an aqueous compartment. They can encapsulate both hydrophilic and hydrophobic drugs, making them useful for drug delivery applications in the medical field. The lipid bilayer structure of liposomes is similar to that of biological membranes, which allows them to merge with and deliver their contents into cells. This property makes liposomes a valuable tool in delivering drugs directly to targeted sites within the body, improving drug efficacy while minimizing side effects.

In the context of medical and health sciences, particle size generally refers to the diameter or dimension of particles, which can be in the form of solid particles, droplets, or aerosols. These particles may include airborne pollutants, pharmaceutical drugs, or medical devices such as nanoparticles used in drug delivery systems.

Particle size is an important factor to consider in various medical applications because it can affect the behavior and interactions of particles with biological systems. For example, smaller particle sizes can lead to greater absorption and distribution throughout the body, while larger particle sizes may be filtered out by the body's natural defense mechanisms. Therefore, understanding particle size and its implications is crucial for optimizing the safety and efficacy of medical treatments and interventions.

Nanoparticles are defined in the field of medicine as tiny particles that have at least one dimension between 1 to 100 nanometers (nm). They are increasingly being used in various medical applications such as drug delivery, diagnostics, and therapeutics. Due to their small size, nanoparticles can penetrate cells, tissues, and organs more efficiently than larger particles, making them ideal for targeted drug delivery and imaging.

Nanoparticles can be made from a variety of materials including metals, polymers, lipids, and dendrimers. The physical and chemical properties of nanoparticles, such as size, shape, charge, and surface chemistry, can greatly affect their behavior in biological systems and their potential medical applications.

It is important to note that the use of nanoparticles in medicine is still a relatively new field, and there are ongoing studies to better understand their safety and efficacy.

An antigen-antibody complex is a type of immune complex that forms when an antibody binds to a specific antigen. An antigen is any substance that triggers an immune response, while an antibody is a protein produced by the immune system to neutralize or destroy foreign substances like antigens.

When an antibody binds to an antigen, it forms a complex that can be either soluble or insoluble. Soluble complexes are formed when the antigen is small and can move freely through the bloodstream. Insoluble complexes, on the other hand, are formed when the antigen is too large to move freely, such as when it is part of a bacterium or virus.

The formation of antigen-antibody complexes plays an important role in the immune response. Once formed, these complexes can be recognized and cleared by other components of the immune system, such as phagocytes, which help to prevent further damage to the body. However, in some cases, the formation of large numbers of antigen-antibody complexes can lead to inflammation and tissue damage, contributing to the development of certain autoimmune diseases.

I'm happy to help! However, I must clarify that "materials testing" is not a medical term per se. It is a term used in various fields, including engineering and materials science, to describe the process of subjecting materials to different tests to evaluate their properties and performance under various conditions.

In the context of medical devices or implants, materials testing may refer to the evaluation of the physical and mechanical properties of materials used in their construction. These tests can include assessments of strength, durability, biocompatibility, and other factors that are critical to ensuring the safety and efficacy of medical devices.

Medical device manufacturers must comply with regulatory standards for materials testing to ensure that their products meet specific requirements for performance, safety, and quality. These standards may vary depending on the type of device, its intended use, and the country or region in which it will be marketed and sold.

Medical definitions of water generally describe it as a colorless, odorless, tasteless liquid that is essential for all forms of life. It is a universal solvent, making it an excellent medium for transporting nutrients and waste products within the body. Water constitutes about 50-70% of an individual's body weight, depending on factors such as age, sex, and muscle mass.

In medical terms, water has several important functions in the human body:

1. Regulation of body temperature through perspiration and respiration.
2. Acting as a lubricant for joints and tissues.
3. Facilitating digestion by helping to break down food particles.
4. Transporting nutrients, oxygen, and waste products throughout the body.
5. Helping to maintain healthy skin and mucous membranes.
6. Assisting in the regulation of various bodily functions, such as blood pressure and heart rate.

Dehydration can occur when an individual does not consume enough water or loses too much fluid due to illness, exercise, or other factors. This can lead to a variety of symptoms, including dry mouth, fatigue, dizziness, and confusion. Severe dehydration can be life-threatening if left untreated.

Surface properties in the context of medical science refer to the characteristics and features of the outermost layer or surface of a biological material or structure, such as cells, tissues, organs, or medical devices. These properties can include physical attributes like roughness, smoothness, hydrophobicity or hydrophilicity, and electrical conductivity, as well as chemical properties like charge, reactivity, and composition.

In the field of biomaterials science, understanding surface properties is crucial for designing medical implants, devices, and drug delivery systems that can interact safely and effectively with biological tissues and fluids. Surface modifications, such as coatings or chemical treatments, can be used to alter surface properties and enhance biocompatibility, improve lubricity, reduce fouling, or promote specific cellular responses like adhesion, proliferation, or differentiation.

Similarly, in the field of cell biology, understanding surface properties is essential for studying cell-cell interactions, cell signaling, and cell behavior. Cells can sense and respond to changes in their environment, including variations in surface properties, which can influence cell shape, motility, and function. Therefore, characterizing and manipulating surface properties can provide valuable insights into the mechanisms of cellular processes and offer new strategies for developing therapies and treatments for various diseases.

Drug delivery systems (DDS) refer to techniques or technologies that are designed to improve the administration of a pharmaceutical compound in terms of its efficiency, safety, and efficacy. A DDS can modify the drug release profile, target the drug to specific cells or tissues, protect the drug from degradation, and reduce side effects.

The goal of a DDS is to optimize the bioavailability of a drug, which is the amount of the drug that reaches the systemic circulation and is available at the site of action. This can be achieved through various approaches, such as encapsulating the drug in a nanoparticle or attaching it to a biomolecule that targets specific cells or tissues.

Some examples of DDS include:

1. Controlled release systems: These systems are designed to release the drug at a controlled rate over an extended period, reducing the frequency of dosing and improving patient compliance.
2. Targeted delivery systems: These systems use biomolecules such as antibodies or ligands to target the drug to specific cells or tissues, increasing its efficacy and reducing side effects.
3. Nanoparticle-based delivery systems: These systems use nanoparticles made of polymers, lipids, or inorganic materials to encapsulate the drug and protect it from degradation, improve its solubility, and target it to specific cells or tissues.
4. Biodegradable implants: These are small devices that can be implanted under the skin or into body cavities to deliver drugs over an extended period. They can be made of biodegradable materials that gradually break down and release the drug.
5. Inhalation delivery systems: These systems use inhalers or nebulizers to deliver drugs directly to the lungs, bypassing the digestive system and improving bioavailability.

Overall, DDS play a critical role in modern pharmaceutical research and development, enabling the creation of new drugs with improved efficacy, safety, and patient compliance.

Constipation is a condition characterized by infrequent bowel movements or difficulty in passing stools that are often hard and dry. The medical definition of constipation varies, but it is generally defined as having fewer than three bowel movements in a week. In addition to infrequent bowel movements, other symptoms of constipation can include straining during bowel movements, feeling like you haven't completely evacuated your bowels, and experiencing hard or lumpy stools.

Constipation can have many causes, including a low-fiber diet, dehydration, certain medications, lack of physical activity, and underlying medical conditions such as irritable bowel syndrome or hypothyroidism. In most cases, constipation can be treated with lifestyle changes, such as increasing fiber intake, drinking more water, and getting regular exercise. However, if constipation is severe, persistent, or accompanied by other symptoms, it's important to seek medical attention to rule out any underlying conditions that may require treatment.

Excipients are inactive substances that serve as vehicles or mediums for the active ingredients in medications. They make up the bulk of a pharmaceutical formulation and help to stabilize, preserve, and enhance the delivery of the active drug compound. Common examples of excipients include binders, fillers, coatings, disintegrants, flavors, sweeteners, and colors. While excipients are generally considered safe and inert, they can sometimes cause allergic reactions or other adverse effects in certain individuals.

Pharmaceutical chemistry is a branch of chemistry that deals with the design, synthesis, and development of chemical entities used as medications. It involves the study of drugs' physical, chemical, and biological properties, as well as their interactions with living organisms. This field also encompasses understanding the absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) of drugs in the body, which are critical factors in drug design and development. Pharmaceutical chemists often work closely with biologists, medical professionals, and engineers to develop new medications and improve existing ones.

X-ray diffraction (XRD) is not strictly a medical definition, but it is a technique commonly used in the field of medical research and diagnostics. XRD is a form of analytical spectroscopy that uses the phenomenon of X-ray diffraction to investigate the crystallographic structure of materials. When a beam of X-rays strikes a crystal, it is scattered in specific directions and with specific intensities that are determined by the arrangement of atoms within the crystal. By measuring these diffraction patterns, researchers can determine the crystal structures of various materials, including biological macromolecules such as proteins and viruses.

In the medical field, XRD is often used to study the structure of drugs and drug candidates, as well as to analyze the composition and structure of tissues and other biological samples. For example, XRD can be used to investigate the crystal structures of calcium phosphate minerals in bone tissue, which can provide insights into the mechanisms of bone formation and disease. Additionally, XRD is sometimes used in the development of new medical imaging techniques, such as phase-contrast X-ray imaging, which has the potential to improve the resolution and contrast of traditional X-ray images.

A hip prosthesis, also known as a total hip replacement, is a surgical implant designed to replace the damaged or diseased components of the human hip joint. The procedure involves replacing the femoral head (the ball at the top of the thigh bone) and the acetabulum (the socket in the pelvis) with artificial parts, typically made from materials such as metal, ceramic, or plastic.

The goal of a hip prosthesis is to relieve pain, improve joint mobility, and restore function, allowing patients to return to their normal activities and enjoy an improved quality of life. The procedure is most commonly performed in individuals with advanced osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, or other degenerative conditions that have caused significant damage to the hip joint.

There are several different types of hip prostheses available, each with its own unique design and set of benefits and risks. The choice of prosthesis will depend on a variety of factors, including the patient's age, activity level, overall health, and specific medical needs. In general, however, all hip prostheses are designed to provide a durable, long-lasting solution for patients suffering from debilitating joint pain and stiffness.

Tannins, also known as tannic acid or gallotannins, are a type of polyphenolic biomolecule found in plants. They are most commonly known for their ability to bind to proteins and other organic compounds, forming insoluble complexes. This property is what gives tannins their characteristic astringent taste and is also the basis for their use in traditional medicine and industry.

In the context of human health, tannins have been studied for their potential beneficial effects on various physiological processes, such as antioxidant activity, anti-inflammatory effects, and inhibition of enzymes involved in cancer development. However, excessive consumption of tannins can also have negative health effects, including stomach irritation, nausea, and liver damage.

Tannins are found in a wide variety of plants, including fruits, vegetables, grains, nuts, bark, leaves, and roots. They are particularly abundant in certain types of food and beverages, such as red wine, tea, coffee, chocolate, and some herbs and spices. In the medical field, tannins have been used topically for their astringent properties to treat wounds, burns, and skin irritations. However, it is important to note that the evidence supporting the health benefits of tannins is still limited and more research is needed to fully understand their effects on human health.

Lactulose is a synthetic disaccharide, specifically a non-absorbable sugar, used in the treatment of chronic constipation and hepatic encephalopathy. It works as an osmotic laxative by drawing water into the large intestine, promoting bowel movements and softening stool. In the case of hepatic encephalopathy, lactulose is metabolized by colonic bacteria to produce acidic byproducts that lower the pH in the gut, which helps prevent the absorption of harmful substances like ammonia into the bloodstream.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Polyethylene Terephthalates" is not a medical term. It is a type of polymer used in the manufacturing of various products, such as plastic bottles and textile fibers. Medically, you might encounter the abbreviation "PET" or "PET scan," which stands for "Positron Emission Tomography." A PET scan is a type of medical imaging that provides detailed pictures of the body's interior. If you have any medical terms you would like defined, I'd be happy to help!

Surfactants, also known as surface-active agents, are amphiphilic compounds that reduce the surface tension between two liquids or between a liquid and a solid. They contain both hydrophilic (water-soluble) and hydrophobic (water-insoluble) components in their molecular structure. This unique property allows them to interact with and stabilize interfaces, making them useful in various medical and healthcare applications.

In the medical field, surfactants are commonly used in pulmonary medicine, particularly for treating respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) in premature infants. The lungs of premature infants often lack sufficient amounts of natural lung surfactant, which can lead to RDS and other complications. Exogenous surfactants, derived from animal sources or synthetically produced, are administered to replace the missing or dysfunctional lung surfactant, improving lung compliance and gas exchange.

Surfactants also have applications in topical formulations for dermatology, as they can enhance drug penetration into the skin, reduce irritation, and improve the spreadability of creams and ointments. Additionally, they are used in diagnostic imaging to enhance contrast between tissues and improve visualization during procedures such as ultrasound and X-ray examinations.

Therapeutic irrigation, also known as lavage, is a medical procedure that involves the introduction of fluids or other agents into a body cavity or natural passageway for therapeutic purposes. This technique is used to cleanse, flush out, or introduce medication into various parts of the body, such as the bladder, lungs, stomach, or colon.

The fluid used in therapeutic irrigation can be sterile saline solution, distilled water, or a medicated solution, depending on the specific purpose of the procedure. The flow and pressure of the fluid are carefully controlled to ensure that it reaches the desired area without causing damage to surrounding tissues.

Therapeutic irrigation is used to treat a variety of medical conditions, including infections, inflammation, obstructions, and toxic exposures. It can also be used as a diagnostic tool to help identify abnormalities or lesions within body cavities.

Overall, therapeutic irrigation is a valuable technique in modern medicine that allows healthcare providers to deliver targeted treatment directly to specific areas of the body, improving patient outcomes and quality of life.

Laxatives are substances or medications that are used to promote bowel movements or loosen the stools, thereby helping in the treatment of constipation. They work by increasing the amount of water in the stool or stimulating the muscles in the intestines to contract and push the stool through. Laxatives can be categorized into several types based on their mechanism of action, including bulk-forming laxatives, lubricant laxatives, osmotic laxatives, saline laxatives, stimulant laxatives, and stool softeners. It is important to use laxatives only as directed by a healthcare professional, as overuse or misuse can lead to serious health complications.

Propylene glycol is not a medical term, but rather a chemical compound. Medically, it is classified as a humectant, which means it helps retain moisture. It is used in various pharmaceutical and cosmetic products as a solvent, preservative, and moisturizer. In medical settings, it can be found in topical creams, oral and injectable medications, and intravenous (IV) fluids.

The chemical definition of propylene glycol is:

Propylene glycol (IUPAC name: propan-1,2-diol) is a synthetic organic compound with the formula CH3CH(OH)CH2OH. It is a viscous, colorless, and nearly odorless liquid that is miscible with water, acetone, and chloroform. Propylene glycol is used as an antifreeze when mixed with water, as a solvent in the production of polymers, and as a moisturizer in various pharmaceutical and cosmetic products. It has a sweet taste and is considered generally recognized as safe (GRAS) by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use as a food additive.

Solvents, in a medical context, are substances that are capable of dissolving or dispersing other materials, often used in the preparation of medications and solutions. They are commonly organic chemicals that can liquefy various substances, making it possible to administer them in different forms, such as oral solutions, topical creams, or injectable drugs.

However, it is essential to recognize that solvents may pose health risks if mishandled or misused, particularly when they contain volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Prolonged exposure to these VOCs can lead to adverse health effects, including respiratory issues, neurological damage, and even cancer. Therefore, it is crucial to handle solvents with care and follow safety guidelines to minimize potential health hazards.

A colonoscopy is a medical procedure used to examine the large intestine, also known as the colon and rectum. It is performed using a flexible tube with a tiny camera on the end, called a colonoscope, which is inserted into the rectum and gently guided through the entire length of the colon.

The procedure allows doctors to visually inspect the lining of the colon for any abnormalities such as polyps, ulcers, inflammation, or cancer. If any polyps are found during the procedure, they can be removed immediately using special tools passed through the colonoscope. Colonoscopy is an important tool in the prevention and early detection of colorectal cancer, which is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide.

Patients are usually given a sedative to help them relax during the procedure, which is typically performed on an outpatient basis in a hospital or clinic setting. The entire procedure usually takes about 30-60 minutes to complete, although patients should plan to spend several hours at the medical facility for preparation and recovery.

Anhydrides are chemical compounds that form when a single molecule of water is removed from an acid, resulting in the formation of a new compound. The term "anhydride" comes from the Greek words "an," meaning without, and "hydor," meaning water.

In organic chemistry, anhydrides are commonly formed by the removal of water from a carboxylic acid. For example, when acetic acid (CH3COOH) loses a molecule of water, it forms acetic anhydride (CH3CO)2O. Acetic anhydride is a reactive compound that can be used to introduce an acetyl group (-COCH3) into other organic compounds.

Inorganic anhydrides are also important in chemistry and include compounds such as sulfur trioxide (SO3), which is an anhydride of sulfuric acid (H2SO4). Sulfur trioxide can react with water to form sulfuric acid, making it a key intermediate in the production of this important industrial chemical.

It's worth noting that some anhydrides can be hazardous and may require special handling and safety precautions.

Drug compounding is the process of combining, mixing, or altering ingredients to create a customized medication to meet the specific needs of an individual patient. This can be done for a variety of reasons, such as when a patient has an allergy to a certain ingredient in a mass-produced medication, or when a patient requires a different dosage or formulation than what is available commercially.

Compounding requires specialized training and equipment, and compounding pharmacists must follow strict guidelines to ensure the safety and efficacy of the medications they produce. Compounded medications are not approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), but the FDA does regulate the ingredients used in compounding and has oversight over the practices of compounding pharmacies.

It's important to note that while compounding can provide benefits for some patients, it also carries risks, such as the potential for contamination or incorrect dosing. Patients should only receive compounded medications from reputable pharmacies that follow proper compounding standards and procedures.

Prosthesis design is a specialized field in medical device technology that involves creating and developing artificial substitutes to replace a missing body part, such as a limb, tooth, eye, or internal organ. The design process typically includes several stages: assessment of the patient's needs, selection of appropriate materials, creation of a prototype, testing and refinement, and final fabrication and fitting of the prosthesis.

The goal of prosthesis design is to create a device that functions as closely as possible to the natural body part it replaces, while also being comfortable, durable, and aesthetically pleasing for the patient. The design process may involve collaboration between medical professionals, engineers, and designers, and may take into account factors such as the patient's age, lifestyle, occupation, and overall health.

Prosthesis design can be highly complex, particularly for advanced devices such as robotic limbs or implantable organs. These devices often require sophisticated sensors, actuators, and control systems to mimic the natural functions of the body part they replace. As a result, prosthesis design is an active area of research and development in the medical field, with ongoing efforts to improve the functionality, comfort, and affordability of these devices for patients.

Magnesium oxide is an inorganic compound with the chemical formula MgO. It is a white, odorless solid that is highly basic and stable. Medically, magnesium oxide is used as a dietary supplement to prevent or treat low amounts of magnesium in the blood. It is also used as a antacid to neutralize stomach acid and as a laxative to relieve constipation.

A protoplast is not a term that is typically used in medical definitions, but rather it is a term commonly used in cell biology and botany. A protoplast refers to a plant or bacterial cell that has had its cell wall removed, leaving only the plasma membrane and the cytoplasmic contents, including organelles such as mitochondria, chloroplasts, ribosomes, and other cellular structures.

Protoplasts can be created through enzymatic or mechanical means to isolate the intracellular components for various research purposes, such as studying membrane transport, gene transfer, or cell fusion. In some cases, protoplasts may be used in medical research, particularly in areas related to plant pathology and genetic engineering of plants for medical applications.

Dextrans are a type of complex glucose polymers that are formed by the action of certain bacteria on sucrose. They are branched polysaccharides consisting of linear chains of α-1,6 linked D-glucopyranosyl units with occasional α-1,3 branches.

Dextrans have a wide range of applications in medicine and industry. In medicine, dextrans are used as plasma substitutes, volume expanders, and anticoagulants. They are also used as carriers for drugs and diagnostic agents, and in the manufacture of immunoadsorbents for the removal of toxins and pathogens from blood.

Dextrans can be derived from various bacterial sources, but the most common commercial source is Leuconostoc mesenteroides B-512(F) or L. dextranicum. The molecular weight of dextrans can vary widely, ranging from a few thousand to several million Daltons, depending on the method of preparation and purification.

Dextrans are generally biocompatible and non-toxic, but they can cause allergic reactions in some individuals. Therefore, their use as medical products requires careful monitoring and testing for safety and efficacy.

Molecular weight, also known as molecular mass, is the mass of a molecule. It is expressed in units of atomic mass units (amu) or daltons (Da). Molecular weight is calculated by adding up the atomic weights of each atom in a molecule. It is a useful property in chemistry and biology, as it can be used to determine the concentration of a substance in a solution, or to calculate the amount of a substance that will react with another in a chemical reaction.

Adsorption is a process in which atoms, ions, or molecules from a gas, liquid, or dissolved solid accumulate on the surface of a material. This occurs because the particles in the adsorbate (the substance being adsorbed) have forces that attract them to the surface of the adsorbent (the material that the adsorbate is adhering to).

In medical terms, adsorption can refer to the use of materials with adsorptive properties to remove harmful substances from the body. For example, activated charcoal is sometimes used in the treatment of poisoning because it can adsorb a variety of toxic substances and prevent them from being absorbed into the bloodstream.

It's important to note that adsorption is different from absorption, which refers to the process by which a substance is taken up and distributed throughout a material or tissue.

Osteolysis is a medical term that refers to the loss or resorption of bone tissue. It's a process where the body's normal bone remodeling cycle is disrupted, leading to an imbalance between bone formation and bone breakdown. This results in the progressive deterioration and destruction of bone.

Osteolysis can occur due to various reasons such as chronic inflammation, mechanical stress, or certain medical conditions like rheumatoid arthritis, Paget's disease, or bone tumors. It can also be a side effect of some medications, such as those used in cancer treatment or for managing osteoporosis.

In severe cases, osteolysis can lead to weakened bones, increased risk of fractures, and deformities. Treatment typically aims to address the underlying cause and may include medication, surgery, or lifestyle changes.

Polyglactin 910 is a type of synthetic absorbable suture made from copolymers of lactide and glycolide. It is designed to gradually break down and be absorbed by the body over time, typically within 56 to 70 days after being used in surgical wounds. This property makes it an ideal choice for soft tissue approximation and laceration repairs.

Polyglactin 910 sutures are often used in various surgical procedures, including orthopedic, ophthalmic, cardiovascular, and general surgery. They come in different sizes and forms, such as plain, reverse cutting, and braided, to suit various surgical needs.

The gradual absorption of Polyglactin 910 sutures helps minimize scarring and reduces the need for suture removal procedures. However, it is essential to note that inflammation may occur during the degradation process, which could potentially lead to adverse reactions in some individuals. Proper wound care and follow-up with healthcare professionals are crucial to ensure optimal healing and manage any potential complications.

Nephelometry and turbidimetry are methods used in clinical laboratories to measure the amount of particles, such as proteins or cells, present in a liquid sample. The main difference between these two techniques lies in how they detect and quantify the particles.

1. Nephelometry: This is a laboratory method that measures the amount of light scattered by suspended particles in a liquid medium at a 90-degree angle to the path of the incident light. When light passes through a sample containing particles, some of the light is absorbed, while some is scattered in various directions. In nephelometry, a light beam is shone into the sample, and a detector measures the intensity of the scattered light at a right angle to the light source. The more particles present in the sample, the higher the intensity of scattered light, which correlates with the concentration of particles in the sample. Nephelometry is often used to measure the levels of immunoglobulins, complement components, and other proteins in serum or plasma.

2. Turbidimetry: This is another laboratory method that measures the amount of light blocked or absorbed by suspended particles in a liquid medium. In turbidimetry, a light beam is shone through the sample, and the intensity of the transmitted light is measured. The more particles present in the sample, the more light is absorbed or scattered, resulting in lower transmitted light intensity. Turbidimetric measurements are typically reported as percent transmittance, which is the ratio of the intensity of transmitted light to that of the incident light expressed as a percentage. Turbidimetry can be used to measure various substances, such as proteins, cells, and crystals, in body fluids like urine, serum, or plasma.

In summary, nephelometry measures the amount of scattered light at a 90-degree angle, while turbidimetry quantifies the reduction in transmitted light intensity due to particle presence. Both methods are useful for determining the concentration of particles in liquid samples and are commonly used in clinical laboratories for diagnostic purposes.

Drug stability refers to the ability of a pharmaceutical drug product to maintain its physical, chemical, and biological properties during storage and use, under specified conditions. A stable drug product retains its desired quality, purity, strength, and performance throughout its shelf life. Factors that can affect drug stability include temperature, humidity, light exposure, and container compatibility. Maintaining drug stability is crucial to ensure the safety and efficacy of medications for patients.

Micelles are structures formed in a solution when certain substances, such as surfactants, reach a critical concentration called the critical micelle concentration (CMC). At this concentration, these molecules, which have both hydrophilic (water-attracting) and hydrophobic (water-repelling) components, arrange themselves in a spherical shape with the hydrophilic parts facing outward and the hydrophobic parts clustered inside. This formation allows the hydrophobic components to avoid contact with water while the hydrophilic components interact with it. Micelles are important in various biological and industrial processes, such as drug delivery, soil remediation, and the formation of emulsions.

A hydrogel is a biomaterial that is composed of a three-dimensional network of crosslinked polymers, which are able to absorb and retain a significant amount of water or biological fluids while maintaining their structure. Hydrogels are similar to natural tissues in their water content, making them suitable for various medical applications such as contact lenses, wound dressings, drug delivery systems, tissue engineering, and regenerative medicine.

Hydrogels can be synthesized from a variety of materials, including synthetic polymers like polyethylene glycol (PEG) or natural polymers like collagen, hyaluronic acid, or chitosan. The properties of hydrogels, such as their mechanical strength, degradation rate, and biocompatibility, can be tailored to specific applications by adjusting the type and degree of crosslinking, the molecular weight of the polymers, and the addition of functional groups or drugs.

Hydrogels have shown great potential in medical research and clinical practice due to their ability to mimic the natural environment of cells and tissues, provide sustained drug release, and promote tissue regeneration.

Fecal impaction is a medical condition where a large mass of dry, hard stool becomes stuck in the rectum and cannot be expelled from the body. This can occur due to chronic constipation or other factors that affect normal bowel movements. Fecal impaction can cause symptoms such as abdominal pain, bloating, nausea, vomiting, and difficulty having a bowel movement. In some cases, it may also lead to more serious complications, such as bowel obstruction or perforation. Treatment typically involves using medications to soften the stool and manual removal of the impaction by a healthcare professional.

Polyethyleneimine (PEI) is not a medical term per se, but a chemical compound that is used in various medical and biomedical applications. Therefore, I will provide you with a chemical definition of PEI:

Polyethyleneimine (PEI) is a synthetic polymer consisting of repeating units of ethylene imine (-CH2-CH2-NH-). It is available in various forms, including linear and branched structures, depending on the synthesis method. The amine groups in PEI can be protonated (positively charged) under acidic conditions, making it a cationic polymer. This property allows PEI to interact strongly with negatively charged molecules such as DNA, RNA, and cell membranes, which is the basis for its use in gene delivery, drug delivery, and as a flocculant in water treatment.

Poloxamers are a type of triblock copolymer made up of a central hydrophobic chain of polyoxypropylene (poly(propylene oxide)) flanked by two hydrophilic chains of polyoxyethylene (poly(ethylene oxide)). They are amphiphilic molecules, meaning they have both hydrophilic and hydrophobic parts.

Poloxamers are often used in the pharmaceutical industry as drug delivery agents, emulsifiers, solubilizers, and stabilizers. They can form micelles in aqueous solutions above their critical micelle concentration (CMC), with the hydrophobic chains oriented toward the interior of the micelle and the hydrophilic chains on the exterior, interacting with the water molecules. This unique property allows poloxamers to solubilize drugs that are otherwise poorly soluble in water, improving their bioavailability.

Poloxamers have been studied for various medical applications, including as drug carriers for chemotherapy, diagnostic agents, and mucoadhesive materials. Some specific poloxamer compounds have been approved by the FDA for use in pharmaceutical formulations, such as Poloxamer 188 and Poloxamer 407.

In a medical context, poloxamers are not typically used as standalone treatments but rather as components of drug delivery systems or formulations.

Chromium alloys are materials made by combining chromium with other metals, such as nickel, cobalt, or iron. The addition of chromium to these alloys enhances their properties, making them resistant to corrosion and high temperatures. These alloys have a wide range of applications in various industries, including automotive, aerospace, and medical devices.

Chromium alloys can be classified into two main categories: stainless steels and superalloys. Stainless steels are alloys that contain at least 10.5% chromium by weight, which forms a passive oxide layer on the surface of the material, protecting it from corrosion. Superalloys, on the other hand, are high-performance alloys designed to operate in extreme environments, such as jet engines and gas turbines. They contain significant amounts of chromium, along with other elements like nickel, cobalt, and molybdenum.

Chromium alloys have several medical applications due to their excellent properties. For instance, they are used in surgical instruments, dental implants, and orthopedic devices because of their resistance to corrosion and biocompatibility. Additionally, some chromium alloys exhibit superelasticity, a property that allows them to return to their original shape after being deformed, making them suitable for use in stents and other medical devices that require flexibility and durability.

Biocompatible coated materials refer to surfaces or substances that are treated or engineered with a layer or film designed to interact safely and effectively with living tissues or biological systems, without causing harm or adverse reactions. The coating material is typically composed of biomaterials that can withstand the conditions of the specific application while promoting a positive response from the body.

The purpose of these coatings may vary depending on the medical device or application. For example, they might be used to enhance the lubricity and wear resistance of implantable devices, reduce the risk of infection, promote integration with surrounding tissues, control drug release, or prevent the formation of biofilms.

Biocompatible coated materials must undergo rigorous testing and evaluation to ensure their safety and efficacy in various clinical settings. This includes assessing potential cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, sensitization, hemocompatibility, carcinogenicity, and other factors that could impact the body's response to the material.

Examples of biocompatible coating materials include:

1. Hydrogels: Cross-linked networks of hydrophilic polymers that can be used for drug delivery, tissue engineering, or as lubricious coatings on medical devices.
2. Self-assembling monolayers (SAMs): Organosilane or thiol-based molecules that form a stable, well-ordered film on surfaces, which can be further functionalized to promote specific biological interactions.
3. Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG): A biocompatible polymer often used as a coating material due to its ability to reduce protein adsorption and cell attachment, making it useful for preventing biofouling or thrombosis on medical devices.
4. Bioactive glass: A type of biomaterial composed of silica-based glasses that can stimulate bone growth and healing when used as a coating material in orthopedic or dental applications.
5. Drug-eluting coatings: Biocompatible polymers impregnated with therapeutic agents, designed to release the drug over time to promote healing, prevent infection, or inhibit restenosis in various medical devices.

Complement activating enzymes are proteins that play a crucial role in the activation of the complement system, which is a part of the immune system. The complement system is a complex series of biochemical reactions that help to eliminate pathogens and damaged cells from the body.

There are several types of complement activating enzymes, including:

1. Classical pathway activators: These include the C1, C4, and C2 components of the complement system. When activated, they trigger a series of reactions that lead to the formation of the membrane attack complex (MAC), which creates a pore in the membrane of the target cell, leading to its lysis.
2. Alternative pathway activators: These include factors B, D, and P. They are constantly active at low levels and can be activated by surfaces that are not normally found in the body, such as bacterial cell walls. Once activated, they also trigger the formation of the MAC.
3. Lectin pathway activators: These include mannose-binding lectin (MBL) and ficolins. They bind to carbohydrates on the surface of microbes and activate the complement system through the MBL-associated serine proteases (MASPs).

Overall, complement activating enzymes play a critical role in the immune response by helping to identify and eliminate pathogens and damaged cells from the body.

Hydrogen-ion concentration, also known as pH, is a measure of the acidity or basicity of a solution. It is defined as the negative logarithm (to the base 10) of the hydrogen ion activity in a solution. The standard unit of measurement is the pH unit. A pH of 7 is neutral, less than 7 is acidic, and greater than 7 is basic.

In medical terms, hydrogen-ion concentration is important for maintaining homeostasis within the body. For example, in the stomach, a high hydrogen-ion concentration (low pH) is necessary for the digestion of food. However, in other parts of the body such as blood, a high hydrogen-ion concentration can be harmful and lead to acidosis. Conversely, a low hydrogen-ion concentration (high pH) in the blood can lead to alkalosis. Both acidosis and alkalosis can have serious consequences on various organ systems if not corrected.

A nanocapsule is a type of nanoparticle that is characterized by its hollow, spherical structure. It is composed of a polymeric membrane that encapsulates an inner core or "cargo" which can be made up of various substances such as drugs, proteins, or imaging agents. The small size of nanocapsules (typically ranging from 10 to 1000 nanometers in diameter) allows them to penetrate cells and tissue more efficiently than larger particles, making them useful for targeted drug delivery and diagnostic applications.

The polymeric membrane can be designed to be biodegradable or non-biodegradable, depending on the desired application. Additionally, the surface of nanocapsules can be functionalized with various moieties such as antibodies, peptides, or small molecules to enhance their targeting capabilities and improve their stability in biological environments.

Overall, nanocapsules have great potential for use in a variety of medical applications, including cancer therapy, gene delivery, and vaccine development.

Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is a type of electron microscopy that uses a focused beam of electrons to scan the surface of a sample and produce a high-resolution image. In SEM, a beam of electrons is scanned across the surface of a specimen, and secondary electrons are emitted from the sample due to interactions between the electrons and the atoms in the sample. These secondary electrons are then detected by a detector and used to create an image of the sample's surface topography. SEM can provide detailed images of the surface of a wide range of materials, including metals, polymers, ceramics, and biological samples. It is commonly used in materials science, biology, and electronics for the examination and analysis of surfaces at the micro- and nanoscale.

X-ray crystallography is a technique used in structural biology to determine the three-dimensional arrangement of atoms in a crystal lattice. In this method, a beam of X-rays is directed at a crystal and diffracts, or spreads out, into a pattern of spots called reflections. The intensity and angle of each reflection are measured and used to create an electron density map, which reveals the position and type of atoms in the crystal. This information can be used to determine the molecular structure of a compound, including its shape, size, and chemical bonds. X-ray crystallography is a powerful tool for understanding the structure and function of biological macromolecules such as proteins and nucleic acids.

Electrolytes are substances that, when dissolved in water, break down into ions that can conduct electricity. In the body, electrolytes are responsible for regulating various important physiological functions, including nerve and muscle function, maintaining proper hydration and acid-base balance, and helping to repair tissue damage.

The major electrolytes found in the human body include sodium, potassium, chloride, bicarbonate, calcium, magnesium, and phosphate. These electrolytes are tightly regulated by various mechanisms, including the kidneys, which help to maintain their proper balance in the body.

When there is an imbalance of electrolytes in the body, it can lead to a range of symptoms and health problems. For example, low levels of sodium (hyponatremia) can cause confusion, seizures, and even coma, while high levels of potassium (hyperkalemia) can lead to heart arrhythmias and muscle weakness.

Electrolytes are also lost through sweat during exercise or illness, so it's important to replace them through a healthy diet or by drinking fluids that contain electrolytes, such as sports drinks or coconut water. In some cases, electrolyte imbalances may require medical treatment, such as intravenous (IV) fluids or medication.

Cell fusion is the process by which two or more cells combine to form a single cell with a single nucleus, containing the genetic material from all of the original cells. This can occur naturally in certain biological processes, such as fertilization (when a sperm and egg cell fuse to form a zygote), muscle development (where multiple muscle precursor cells fuse together to create multinucleated muscle fibers), and during the formation of bone (where osteoclasts, the cells responsible for breaking down bone tissue, are multinucleated).

Cell fusion can also be induced artificially in laboratory settings through various methods, including chemical treatments, electrical stimulation, or viral vectors. Induced cell fusion is often used in research to create hybrid cells with unique properties, such as cybrid cells (cytoplasmic hybrids) and heterokaryons (nuclear hybrids). These hybrid cells can help scientists study various aspects of cell biology, genetics, and disease mechanisms.

In summary, cell fusion is the merging of two or more cells into one, resulting in a single cell with combined genetic material. This process occurs naturally during certain biological processes and can be induced artificially for research purposes.

In the context of medicine and pharmacology, "kinetics" refers to the study of how a drug moves throughout the body, including its absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (often abbreviated as ADME). This field is called "pharmacokinetics."

1. Absorption: This is the process of a drug moving from its site of administration into the bloodstream. Factors such as the route of administration (e.g., oral, intravenous, etc.), formulation, and individual physiological differences can affect absorption.

2. Distribution: Once a drug is in the bloodstream, it gets distributed throughout the body to various tissues and organs. This process is influenced by factors like blood flow, protein binding, and lipid solubility of the drug.

3. Metabolism: Drugs are often chemically modified in the body, typically in the liver, through processes known as metabolism. These changes can lead to the formation of active or inactive metabolites, which may then be further distributed, excreted, or undergo additional metabolic transformations.

4. Excretion: This is the process by which drugs and their metabolites are eliminated from the body, primarily through the kidneys (urine) and the liver (bile).

Understanding the kinetics of a drug is crucial for determining its optimal dosing regimen, potential interactions with other medications or foods, and any necessary adjustments for special populations like pediatric or geriatric patients, or those with impaired renal or hepatic function.

Osmosis is a physiological process in which solvent molecules move from an area of lower solute concentration to an area of higher solute concentration, through a semi-permeable membrane, with the goal of equalizing the solute concentrations on the two sides. This process occurs naturally and is essential for the functioning of cells and biological systems.

In medical terms, osmosis plays a crucial role in maintaining water balance and regulating the distribution of fluids within the body. For example, it helps to control the flow of water between the bloodstream and the tissues, and between the different fluid compartments within the body. Disruptions in osmotic balance can lead to various medical conditions, such as dehydration, swelling, and electrolyte imbalances.

Osmotic pressure is a fundamental concept in the field of physiology and biochemistry. It refers to the pressure that is required to be applied to a solution to prevent the flow of solvent (like water) into it, through a semi-permeable membrane, when the solution is separated from a pure solvent or a solution of lower solute concentration.

In simpler terms, osmotic pressure is the force that drives the natural movement of solvent molecules from an area of lower solute concentration to an area of higher solute concentration, across a semi-permeable membrane. This process is crucial for maintaining the fluid balance and nutrient transport in living organisms.

The osmotic pressure of a solution can be determined by its solute concentration, temperature, and the ideal gas law. It is often expressed in units of atmospheres (atm), millimeters of mercury (mmHg), or pascals (Pa). In medical contexts, understanding osmotic pressure is essential for managing various clinical conditions such as dehydration, fluid and electrolyte imbalances, and dialysis treatments.

In the context of medical terminology, "porosity" is not a term that is frequently used to describe human tissues or organs. However, in dermatology and cosmetics, porosity refers to the ability of the skin to absorb and retain moisture or topical treatments.

A skin with high porosity has larger pores and can absorb more products, while a skin with low porosity has smaller pores and may have difficulty absorbing products. It is important to note that this definition of porosity is not a medical one but is instead used in the beauty industry.

Pharmaceutic aids, also known as pharmaceutical excipients or additives, are substances that are added to pharmaceutical formulations during the manufacturing process. They are not intended to have any therapeutic effect, but rather to improve the drug's stability, bioavailability, palatability, or patient compliance.

Examples of pharmaceutic aids include binders, fillers, coatings, disintegrants, preservatives, coloring agents, and flavoring agents. Binders help hold the active ingredients together in a solid form, while fillers are used to add bulk to the formulation. Coatings can be used to protect the drug from degradation or to make it easier to swallow. Disintegrants help the tablet or capsule break down quickly in the digestive tract so that the active ingredient can be absorbed more efficiently. Preservatives are added to prevent microbial growth, while coloring and flavoring agents improve the appearance and taste of the medication.

It is important to note that pharmaceutic aids must undergo rigorous testing to ensure their safety and compatibility with the active ingredients in the drug formulation. Some people may have allergies or sensitivities to certain excipients, so it is essential to consider these factors when developing and prescribing medications.

Nanomedicine is a branch of medicine that utilizes nanotechnology, which deals with materials, devices, or systems at the nanometer scale (typically between 1-100 nm), to prevent and treat diseases. It involves the development of novel therapeutics, diagnostics, and medical devices that can interact with biological systems at the molecular level for improved detection, monitoring, and targeted treatment of various diseases and conditions.

Nanomedicine encompasses several areas, including:

1. Drug delivery: Nanocarriers such as liposomes, polymeric nanoparticles, dendrimers, and inorganic nanoparticles can be used to encapsulate drugs, enhancing their solubility, stability, and targeted delivery to specific cells or tissues, thereby reducing side effects.
2. Diagnostics: Nanoscale biosensors and imaging agents can provide early detection and monitoring of diseases with high sensitivity and specificity, enabling personalized medicine and improved patient outcomes.
3. Regenerative medicine: Nanomaterials can be used to create scaffolds and matrices for tissue engineering, promoting cell growth, differentiation, and vascularization in damaged or diseased tissues.
4. Gene therapy: Nanoparticles can be employed to deliver genetic material such as DNA, RNA, or gene-editing tools (e.g., CRISPR-Cas9) for the targeted correction of genetic disorders or cancer treatment.
5. Medical devices: Nanotechnology can improve the performance and functionality of medical devices by enhancing their biocompatibility, strength, and electrical conductivity, as well as incorporating sensing and drug delivery capabilities.

Overall, nanomedicine holds great promise for addressing unmet medical needs, improving diagnostic accuracy, and developing more effective therapies with reduced side effects. However, it also presents unique challenges related to safety, regulation, and scalability that must be addressed before widespread clinical adoption.

"Pharmaceutical vehicles" is not a standard term in medical or pharmaceutical sciences. However, I can provide some context based on the phrase's possible meaning. If by "pharmaceutical vehicles," you mean the carriers or delivery systems for drugs or medications, then the definition would be:

Pharmaceutical vehicles refer to various formulations, preparations, or technologies that facilitate and control the administration of a drug or therapeutic agent to its target site in the body. These can include different types of drug delivery systems such as tablets, capsules, liposomes, nanoparticles, transdermal patches, inhalers, injectables, and other innovative drug carrier technologies.

These pharmaceutical vehicles ensure that the active ingredients are safely and effectively transported to their intended site of action within the body, enhancing therapeutic efficacy while minimizing potential side effects.

Cryoprotective agents are substances that are used to protect biological material from damage during freezing and thawing. These agents work by reducing the amount of ice that forms in the cells, which can help to prevent the formation of damaging ice crystals. Commonly used cryoprotective agents include dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), glycerol, and ethylene glycol.

When biological material, such as cells or tissues, is cooled to very low temperatures for storage or transportation, the water in the cells can freeze and form ice crystals. These ice crystals can damage the cell membranes and other structures within the cell, leading to cell death. Cryoprotective agents help to prevent this by lowering the freezing point of the solution that the cells are stored in, which reduces the amount of ice that forms.

Cryoprotective agents are often used in the field of assisted reproductive technology (ART) to protect sperm, eggs, and embryos during freezing and thawing. They are also used in research settings to preserve cells and tissues for later use. It is important to note that while cryoprotective agents can help to reduce the amount of damage that occurs during freezing and thawing, they cannot completely prevent it. Therefore, it is important to carefully control the freezing and thawing process to minimize any potential harm to the biological material.

Dendrimers are a type of synthetic, nanoscale polymer structures with a well-defined, highly branched, and regularly repeating architecture. They consist of a central core, an inner layer of repetitive branches, and an outer surface that can be functionalized with various groups. Dendrimers have unique properties such as monodispersity, a high degree of symmetry, and the ability to encapsulate or conjugate drugs, genes, and imaging agents, making them useful in drug delivery, gene therapy, diagnostics, and other biomedical applications.

I couldn't find a medical definition specifically for "delayed-action preparations." However, in the context of pharmacology, it may refer to medications or treatments that have a delayed onset of action. These are designed to release the active drug slowly over an extended period, which can help to maintain a consistent level of the medication in the body and reduce the frequency of dosing.

Examples of delayed-action preparations include:

1. Extended-release (ER) or controlled-release (CR) formulations: These are designed to release the drug slowly over several hours, reducing the need for frequent dosing. Examples include extended-release tablets and capsules.
2. Transdermal patches: These deliver medication through the skin and can provide a steady rate of drug delivery over several days. Examples include nicotine patches for smoking cessation or fentanyl patches for pain management.
3. Injectable depots: These are long-acting injectable formulations that slowly release the drug into the body over weeks to months. An example is the use of long-acting antipsychotic injections for the treatment of schizophrenia.
4. Implantable devices: These are small, biocompatible devices placed under the skin or within a body cavity that release a steady dose of medication over an extended period. Examples include hormonal implants for birth control or drug-eluting stents used in cardiovascular procedures.

Delayed-action preparations can improve patient compliance and quality of life by reducing dosing frequency, minimizing side effects, and maintaining consistent therapeutic levels.

Povidone, also known as PVP or polyvinylpyrrolidone, is not a medication itself but rather a pharmaceutical ingredient used in various medical and healthcare products. It is a water-soluble synthetic polymer that has the ability to bind to and carry other substances, such as drugs or iodine.

In medical applications, povidone is often used as a binder or coating agent in pharmaceutical tablets and capsules. It can also be found in some topical antiseptic solutions, such as those containing iodine, where it helps to stabilize and control the release of the active ingredient.

It's important to note that while povidone is a widely used pharmaceutical ingredient, it is not typically considered a medication on its own.

Barbital is a type of barbiturate drug that was commonly used as a sedative and sleep aid in the past. Its chemical name is sodium 5,5-diethylbarbituric acid, and it is also known by its brand name, Veronal. Barbital has a long duration of action, typically lasting between 6 to 10 hours, and was used for the treatment of insomnia, anxiety, and seizure disorders.

Barbital works by enhancing the activity of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), a neurotransmitter that inhibits the activity of nerve cells in the brain. This results in a sedative effect, reducing anxiety and promoting sleep. However, barbital also has a high potential for abuse and dependence, and its use has declined significantly due to the development of safer and more effective alternative medications.

It is important to note that barbital is a controlled substance, and its possession and use are regulated by law in many countries. It should only be used under the supervision of a licensed healthcare professional, and its use should be avoided in individuals with a history of addiction or substance abuse.

Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) is not a medical term per se, but a biochemical term. It is widely used in medical and biological research. Here's the definition:

Bovine Serum Albumin is a serum albumin protein derived from cows. It is often used as a stabilizer, an emulsifier, or a protein source in various laboratory and industrial applications, including biochemical experiments, cell culture media, and diagnostic kits. BSA has a high solubility in water and can bind to many different types of molecules, making it useful for preventing unwanted interactions between components in a solution. It also has a consistent composition and is relatively inexpensive compared to human serum albumin, which are factors that contribute to its widespread use.

Phosphatidylethanolamines (PE) are a type of phospholipid that are abundantly found in the cell membranes of living organisms. They play a crucial role in maintaining the structural integrity and functionality of the cell membrane. PE contains a hydrophilic head, which consists of an ethanolamine group linked to a phosphate group, and two hydrophobic fatty acid chains. This unique structure allows PE to form a lipid bilayer, where the hydrophilic heads face outwards and interact with the aqueous environment, while the hydrophobic tails face inwards and interact with each other.

PE is also involved in various cellular processes, such as membrane trafficking, autophagy, and signal transduction. Additionally, PE can be modified by the addition of various functional groups or molecules, which can further regulate its functions and interactions within the cell. Overall, phosphatidylethanolamines are essential components of cellular membranes and play a critical role in maintaining cellular homeostasis.

An emulsion is a type of stable mixture of two immiscible liquids, such as oil and water, which are normally unable to mix together uniformly. In an emulsion, one liquid (the dispersed phase) is broken down into small droplets and distributed throughout the other liquid (the continuous phase), creating a stable, cloudy mixture.

In medical terms, emulsions can be used in various pharmaceutical and cosmetic applications. For example, certain medications may be formulated as oil-in-water or water-in-oil emulsions to improve their absorption, stability, or palatability. Similarly, some skincare products and makeup removers contain emulsifiers that help create stable mixtures of water and oils, allowing for effective cleansing and moisturizing.

Emulsions can also occur naturally in the body, such as in the digestion of fats. The bile salts produced by the liver help to form small droplets of dietary lipids (oil) within the watery environment of the small intestine, allowing for efficient absorption and metabolism of these nutrients.

Sodium Chloride is defined as the inorganic compound with the chemical formula NaCl, representing a 1:1 ratio of sodium and chloride ions. It is commonly known as table salt or halite, and it is used extensively in food seasoning and preservation due to its ability to enhance flavor and inhibit bacterial growth. In medicine, sodium chloride is used as a balanced electrolyte solution for rehydration and as a topical wound irrigant and antiseptic. It is also an essential component of the human body's fluid balance and nerve impulse transmission.

Tissue distribution, in the context of pharmacology and toxicology, refers to the way that a drug or xenobiotic (a chemical substance found within an organism that is not naturally produced by or expected to be present within that organism) is distributed throughout the body's tissues after administration. It describes how much of the drug or xenobiotic can be found in various tissues and organs, and is influenced by factors such as blood flow, lipid solubility, protein binding, and the permeability of cell membranes. Understanding tissue distribution is important for predicting the potential effects of a drug or toxin on different parts of the body, and for designing drugs with improved safety and efficacy profiles.

Equipment Failure Analysis is a process of identifying the cause of failure in medical equipment or devices. This involves a systematic examination and evaluation of the equipment, its components, and operational history to determine why it failed. The analysis may include physical inspection, chemical testing, and review of maintenance records, as well as assessment of design, manufacturing, and usage factors that may have contributed to the failure.

The goal of Equipment Failure Analysis is to identify the root cause of the failure, so that corrective actions can be taken to prevent similar failures in the future. This is important in medical settings to ensure patient safety and maintain the reliability and effectiveness of medical equipment.

Tissue adhesives, also known as surgical glues or tissue sealants, are medical devices used to approximate and hold together tissues or wounds in place of traditional sutures or staples. They work by creating a bond between the tissue surfaces, helping to promote healing and reduce the risk of infection. Tissue adhesives can be synthetic or biologically derived and are often used in various surgical procedures, including ophthalmic, dermatological, and pediatric surgeries. Some common types of tissue adhesives include cyanoacrylate-based glues, fibrin sealants, and collagen-based sealants.

The acetabulum is the cup-shaped cavity in the pelvic bone (specifically, the os coxa) where the head of the femur bone articulates to form the hip joint. It provides a stable and flexible connection between the lower limb and the trunk, allowing for a wide range of movements such as flexion, extension, abduction, adduction, rotation, and circumduction. The acetabulum is lined with articular cartilage, which facilitates smooth and frictionless movement of the hip joint. Its stability is further enhanced by various ligaments, muscles, and the labrum, a fibrocartilaginous rim that deepens the socket and increases its contact area with the femoral head.

Oxidized cellulose is a type of modified cellulose that has undergone oxidation, resulting in the introduction of functional groups such as carboxylic acid or aldehyde groups along the cellulose chain. This process can alter the physical and chemical properties of cellulose, making it more soluble in water and capable of forming gels or films.

Oxidized cellulose is used in a variety of applications, including as a wound dressing material, where it can help to promote healing by providing a moist environment that supports tissue regeneration. It can also be used as a thickening or stabilizing agent in food and cosmetic products, or as a component in the manufacture of specialized papers and textiles.

In the context of medical research, "methods" refers to the specific procedures or techniques used in conducting a study or experiment. This includes details on how data was collected, what measurements were taken, and what statistical analyses were performed. The methods section of a medical paper allows other researchers to replicate the study if they choose to do so. It is considered one of the key components of a well-written research article, as it provides transparency and helps establish the validity of the findings.

In the field of medicine, "time factors" refer to the duration of symptoms or time elapsed since the onset of a medical condition, which can have significant implications for diagnosis and treatment. Understanding time factors is crucial in determining the progression of a disease, evaluating the effectiveness of treatments, and making critical decisions regarding patient care.

For example, in stroke management, "time is brain," meaning that rapid intervention within a specific time frame (usually within 4.5 hours) is essential to administering tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a clot-busting drug that can minimize brain damage and improve patient outcomes. Similarly, in trauma care, the "golden hour" concept emphasizes the importance of providing definitive care within the first 60 minutes after injury to increase survival rates and reduce morbidity.

Time factors also play a role in monitoring the progression of chronic conditions like diabetes or heart disease, where regular follow-ups and assessments help determine appropriate treatment adjustments and prevent complications. In infectious diseases, time factors are crucial for initiating antibiotic therapy and identifying potential outbreaks to control their spread.

Overall, "time factors" encompass the significance of recognizing and acting promptly in various medical scenarios to optimize patient outcomes and provide effective care.

Viscosity is a physical property of a fluid that describes its resistance to flow. In medical terms, viscosity is often discussed in relation to bodily fluids such as blood or synovial fluid (found in joints). The unit of measurement for viscosity is the poise, although it is more commonly expressed in millipascals-second (mPa.s) in SI units. Highly viscous fluids flow more slowly than less viscous fluids. Changes in the viscosity of bodily fluids can have significant implications for health and disease; for example, increased blood viscosity has been associated with cardiovascular diseases, while decreased synovial fluid viscosity can contribute to joint pain and inflammation in conditions like osteoarthritis.

Hip arthroplasty, also known as hip replacement surgery, is a medical procedure where the damaged or diseased joint surfaces of the hip are removed and replaced with artificial components. These components typically include a metal or ceramic ball that replaces the head of the femur (thigh bone), and a polyethylene or ceramic socket that replaces the acetabulum (hip socket) in the pelvis.

The goal of hip arthroplasty is to relieve pain, improve joint mobility, and restore function to the hip joint. This procedure is commonly performed in patients with advanced osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, hip fractures, or other conditions that cause significant damage to the hip joint.

There are several types of hip replacement surgeries, including traditional total hip arthroplasty, partial (hemi) hip arthroplasty, and resurfacing hip arthroplasty. The choice of procedure depends on various factors, such as the patient's age, activity level, overall health, and the extent of joint damage.

After surgery, patients typically require rehabilitation to regain strength, mobility, and function in the affected hip. With proper care and follow-up, most patients can expect significant pain relief and improved quality of life following hip arthroplasty.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Polyesters" is not a medical term. It is a term used in materials science and textile industry to describe a type of synthetic fiber made from polymers characterized by the presence of ester groups in their main chain. If you have any questions related to medical terminology or concepts, I'd be happy to help with those instead!

Mannitol is a type of sugar alcohol (a sugar substitute) used primarily as a diuretic to reduce brain swelling caused by traumatic brain injury or other causes that induce increased pressure in the brain. It works by drawing water out of the body through the urine. It's also used before surgeries in the heart, lungs, and kidneys to prevent fluid buildup.

In addition, mannitol is used in medical laboratories as a medium for growing bacteria and other microorganisms, and in some types of chemical research. In the clinic, it is also used as an osmotic agent in eye drops to reduce the pressure inside the eye in conditions such as glaucoma.

It's important to note that mannitol should be used with caution in patients with heart or kidney disease, as well as those who are dehydrated, because it can lead to electrolyte imbalances and other complications.

Aluminum oxide is a chemical compound with the formula Al2O3. It is also known as alumina and it is a white solid that is widely used in various industries due to its unique properties. Aluminum oxide is highly resistant to corrosion, has a high melting point, and is an electrical insulator.

In the medical field, aluminum oxide is used in a variety of applications such as:

1. Dental crowns and implants: Aluminum oxide is used in the production of dental crowns and implants due to its strength and durability.
2. Orthopedic implants: Aluminum oxide is used in some types of orthopedic implants, such as knee and hip replacements, because of its biocompatibility and resistance to wear.
3. Medical ceramics: Aluminum oxide is used in the production of medical ceramics, which are used in various medical devices such as pacemakers and hearing aids.
4. Pharmaceuticals: Aluminum oxide is used as an excipient in some pharmaceutical products, such as tablets and capsules, to improve their stability and shelf life.
5. Medical research: Aluminum oxide is used in medical research, for example, as a substrate material for growing cells or as a coating material for medical devices.

It's important to note that while aluminum oxide has many useful applications in the medical field, exposure to high levels of aluminum can be harmful to human health. Therefore, it is important to use aluminum oxide and other aluminum-containing materials safely and according to established guidelines.

In the context of pharmacology, "half-life" refers to the time it takes for the concentration or amount of a drug in the body to be reduced by half during its elimination phase. This is typically influenced by factors such as metabolism and excretion rates of the drug. It's a key factor in determining dosage intervals and therapeutic effectiveness of medications, as well as potential side effects or toxicity risks.

Temperature, in a medical context, is a measure of the degree of hotness or coldness of a body or environment. It is usually measured using a thermometer and reported in degrees Celsius (°C), degrees Fahrenheit (°F), or kelvin (K). In the human body, normal core temperature ranges from about 36.5-37.5°C (97.7-99.5°F) when measured rectally, and can vary slightly depending on factors such as time of day, physical activity, and menstrual cycle. Elevated body temperature is a common sign of infection or inflammation, while abnormally low body temperature can indicate hypothermia or other medical conditions.

Blood substitutes, also known as artificial blood or blood surrogates, are fluids that are designed to mimic some of the properties and functions of human blood. They are used as a replacement for blood transfusions in situations where blood is not available or when it is not safe to use. Blood substitutes can be divided into two main categories: oxygen-carrying and non-oxygen-carrying.

Oxygen-carrying blood substitutes contain artificial molecules called hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers (HBOCs) that are designed to carry oxygen from the lungs to the body's tissues. These HBOCs can be derived from human or animal hemoglobin, or they can be synthetically produced.

Non-oxygen-carrying blood substitutes, on the other hand, do not contain hemoglobin and are used primarily to restore intravascular volume and maintain blood pressure in cases of hypovolemia (low blood volume) caused by bleeding or dehydration. These products include crystalloids, such as saline solution and lactated Ringer's solution, and colloids, such as albumin and hydroxyethyl starch solutions.

It is important to note that while blood substitutes can be useful in certain situations, they are not a perfect substitute for human blood. They do not provide all of the functions of blood, such as immune defense and clotting, and their use is associated with some risks, including allergic reactions, kidney damage, and increased oxygen free radical production. Therefore, they should only be used when there is no suitable alternative available.

Intestinal absorption refers to the process by which the small intestine absorbs water, nutrients, and electrolytes from food into the bloodstream. This is a critical part of the digestive process, allowing the body to utilize the nutrients it needs and eliminate waste products. The inner wall of the small intestine contains tiny finger-like projections called villi, which increase the surface area for absorption. Nutrients are absorbed into the bloodstream through the walls of the capillaries in these villi, and then transported to other parts of the body for use or storage.

I believe there may be some confusion in your question. Gold is typically a chemical element with the symbol Au and atomic number 79. It is a dense, soft, malleable, and ductile metal. It is one of the least reactive chemical elements and is solid under standard conditions.

However, if you are referring to "Gold" in the context of medical terminology, it may refer to:

1. Gold salts: These are a group of compounds that contain gold and are used in medicine for their anti-inflammatory properties. They have been used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, although they have largely been replaced by newer drugs with fewer side effects.
2. Gold implants: In some cases, a small amount of gold may be surgically implanted into the eye to treat conditions such as age-related macular degeneration or diabetic retinopathy. The gold helps to hold the retina in place and can improve vision in some patients.
3. Gold thread embedment: This is an alternative therapy used in traditional Chinese medicine, where gold threads are embedded into the skin or acupuncture points for therapeutic purposes. However, there is limited scientific evidence to support its effectiveness.

I hope this information helps! If you have any further questions, please let me know.

Radioimmunoassay (RIA) is a highly sensitive analytical technique used in clinical and research laboratories to measure concentrations of various substances, such as hormones, vitamins, drugs, or tumor markers, in biological samples like blood, urine, or tissues. The method relies on the specific interaction between an antibody and its corresponding antigen, combined with the use of radioisotopes to quantify the amount of bound antigen.

In a typical RIA procedure, a known quantity of a radiolabeled antigen (also called tracer) is added to a sample containing an unknown concentration of the same unlabeled antigen. The mixture is then incubated with a specific antibody that binds to the antigen. During the incubation period, the antibody forms complexes with both the radiolabeled and unlabeled antigens.

After the incubation, the unbound (free) radiolabeled antigen is separated from the antibody-antigen complexes, usually through a precipitation or separation step involving centrifugation, filtration, or chromatography. The amount of radioactivity in the pellet (containing the antibody-antigen complexes) is then measured using a gamma counter or other suitable radiation detection device.

The concentration of the unlabeled antigen in the sample can be determined by comparing the ratio of bound to free radiolabeled antigen in the sample to a standard curve generated from known concentrations of unlabeled antigen and their corresponding bound/free ratios. The higher the concentration of unlabeled antigen in the sample, the lower the amount of radiolabeled antigen that will bind to the antibody, resulting in a lower bound/free ratio.

Radioimmunoassays offer high sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy, making them valuable tools for detecting and quantifying low levels of various substances in biological samples. However, due to concerns about radiation safety and waste disposal, alternative non-isotopic immunoassay techniques like enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) have become more popular in recent years.

Senna extract is a herbal preparation made from the leaves and fruit of the senna plant (Cassia senna or Cassia angustifolia), which belongs to the Fabaceae family. The active components in senna extract are anthraquinone glycosides, primarily sennosides A and B, that have laxative properties.

The medical definition of Senna extract is:
A standardized herbal extract derived from the leaves or fruit of the senna plant, containing a specific amount of sennosides (usually expressed as a percentage). It is used medically as a stimulant laxative to treat constipation and prepare the bowel for diagnostic procedures like colonoscopies. The laxative effect of senna extract is due to increased peristalsis and inhibition of water and electrolyte absorption in the large intestine, which results in softer stools and easier evacuation.

It's important to note that long-term use or misuse of senna extract can lead to dependence, electrolyte imbalances, and potential damage to the colon. Therefore, medical supervision is recommended when using senna extract as a laxative.

Medical definitions generally refer to terms and concepts within the medical field. The term "metal nanoparticles" is more commonly used in materials science, chemistry, and physics. However, I can provide a general scientific definition that could be relevant to medical applications:

Metal nanoparticles are tiny particles with at least one dimension ranging from 1 to 100 nanometers (nm), composed of metals or metal compounds. They have unique optical, electronic, and chemical properties due to their small size and high surface-to-volume ratio, making them useful in various fields, including medical research. In medicine, metal nanoparticles can be used in drug delivery systems, diagnostics, and therapeutic applications such as photothermal therapy and radiation therapy. Examples of metals used for nanoparticle synthesis include gold, silver, and iron.

I believe there may be some confusion in your question. "Rabbits" is a common name used to refer to the Lagomorpha species, particularly members of the family Leporidae. They are small mammals known for their long ears, strong legs, and quick reproduction.

However, if you're referring to "rabbits" in a medical context, there is a term called "rabbit syndrome," which is a rare movement disorder characterized by repetitive, involuntary movements of the fingers, resembling those of a rabbit chewing. It is also known as "finger-chewing chorea." This condition is usually associated with certain medications, particularly antipsychotics, and typically resolves when the medication is stopped or adjusted.

Hypovolemia is a medical condition characterized by a decreased volume of circulating blood in the body, leading to inadequate tissue perfusion and oxygenation. This can occur due to various reasons such as bleeding, dehydration, vomiting, diarrhea, or excessive sweating, which result in a reduced amount of fluid in the intravascular space.

The severity of hypovolemia depends on the extent of fluid loss and can range from mild to severe. Symptoms may include thirst, dry mouth, weakness, dizziness, lightheadedness, confusion, rapid heartbeat, low blood pressure, and decreased urine output. Severe hypovolemia can lead to shock, organ failure, and even death if not treated promptly and effectively.

Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy is a type of infrared spectroscopy that uses the Fourier transform mathematical technique to convert the raw data obtained from an interferometer into a more interpretable spectrum. This technique allows for the simultaneous collection of a wide range of wavelengths, resulting in increased sensitivity and speed compared to traditional dispersive infrared spectroscopy.

FTIR spectroscopy measures the absorption or transmission of infrared radiation by a sample as a function of frequency, providing information about the vibrational modes of the molecules present in the sample. This can be used for identification and quantification of chemical compounds, analysis of molecular structure, and investigation of chemical interactions and reactions.

In summary, FTIR spectroscopy is a powerful analytical technique that uses infrared radiation to study the vibrational properties of molecules, with increased sensitivity and speed due to the use of Fourier transform mathematical techniques and an interferometer.

Ethylene oxide is a colorless gas at room temperature and pressure with a faintly sweet odor. It is used primarily as a sterilant, especially for medical equipment, but also has applications in the manufacture of other chemicals, including antifreeze and textile products. Ethylene oxide is highly flammable and reactive, and exposure can cause irritation to the eyes, skin, and respiratory tract, as well as more serious health effects with prolonged or high-level exposure. It is also a known human carcinogen, meaning that it has been shown to cause cancer in humans.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "picolines" is not a term commonly used in medical definitions. It is a term that refers to a group of chemical compounds known as methylated benzenes or xylenols. They have some industrial uses, but they are not typically relevant in the context of medical definitions or healthcare. If you have any questions related to medical terminology or health concerns, I'd be happy to try and help with those instead!

Succinimides are a group of anticonvulsant medications used to treat various types of seizures. They include drugs such as ethosuximide, methsuximide, and phensuximide. These medications work by reducing the abnormal electrical activity in the brain that leads to seizures.

The name "succinimides" comes from their chemical structure, which contains a five-membered ring containing two nitrogen atoms and a carbonyl group. This structure is similar to that of other anticonvulsant medications, such as barbiturates, but the succinimides have fewer side effects and are less likely to cause sedation or respiratory depression.

Succinimides are primarily used to treat absence seizures, which are characterized by brief periods of staring and lack of responsiveness. They may also be used as adjunctive therapy in the treatment of generalized tonic-clonic seizures and other types of seizures.

Like all medications, succinimides can cause side effects, including nausea, vomiting, dizziness, headache, and rash. More serious side effects, such as blood dyscrasias, liver toxicity, and Stevens-Johnson syndrome, are rare but have been reported. It is important for patients taking succinimides to be monitored regularly by their healthcare provider to ensure safe and effective use of the medication.

Medical technology, also known as health technology, refers to the use of medical devices, medicines, vaccines, procedures, and systems for the purpose of preventing, diagnosing, or treating disease and disability. This can include a wide range of products and services, from simple devices like tongue depressors and bandages, to complex technologies like MRI machines and artificial organs.

Pharmaceutical technology, on the other hand, specifically refers to the application of engineering and scientific principles to the development, production, and control of pharmaceutical drugs and medical devices. This can include the design and construction of manufacturing facilities, the development of new drug delivery systems, and the implementation of quality control measures to ensure the safety and efficacy of pharmaceutical products.

Both medical technology and pharmaceutical technology play crucial roles in modern healthcare, helping to improve patient outcomes, reduce healthcare costs, and enhance the overall quality of life for individuals around the world.

Dimethyl Sulfoxide (DMSO) is an organosulfur compound with the formula (CH3)2SO. It is a polar aprotic solvent, which means it can dissolve both polar and nonpolar compounds. DMSO has a wide range of uses in industry and in laboratory research, including as a cryoprotectant, a solvent for pharmaceuticals, and a penetration enhancer in topical formulations.

In medicine, DMSO is used as a topical analgesic and anti-inflammatory agent. It works by increasing the flow of blood and other fluids to the site of application, which can help to reduce pain and inflammation. DMSO is also believed to have antioxidant properties, which may contribute to its therapeutic effects.

It's important to note that while DMSO has been studied for various medical uses, its effectiveness for many conditions is not well established, and it can have side effects, including skin irritation and a garlic-like taste or odor in the mouth after application. It should be used under the supervision of a healthcare provider.

Nanostructures, in the context of medical and biomedical research, refer to materials or devices with structural features that have at least one dimension ranging between 1-100 nanometers (nm). At this size scale, the properties of these structures can differ significantly from bulk materials, exhibiting unique phenomena that are often influenced by quantum effects.

Nanostructures have attracted considerable interest in biomedicine due to their potential applications in various areas such as drug delivery, diagnostics, regenerative medicine, and tissue engineering. They can be fabricated from a wide range of materials including metals, polymers, ceramics, and carbon-based materials.

Some examples of nanostructures used in biomedicine include:

1. Nanoparticles: These are tiny particles with at least one dimension in the nanoscale range. They can be made from various materials like metals, polymers, or lipids and have applications in drug delivery, imaging, and diagnostics.
2. Quantum dots: These are semiconductor nanocrystals that exhibit unique optical properties due to quantum confinement effects. They are used as fluorescent labels for bioimaging and biosensing applications.
3. Carbon nanotubes: These are hollow, cylindrical structures made of carbon atoms arranged in a hexagonal lattice. They have exceptional mechanical strength, electrical conductivity, and thermal stability, making them suitable for various biomedical applications such as drug delivery, tissue engineering, and biosensors.
4. Nanofibers: These are elongated nanostructures with high aspect ratios (length much greater than width). They can be fabricated from various materials like polymers, ceramics, or composites and have applications in tissue engineering, wound healing, and drug delivery.
5. Dendrimers: These are highly branched, nanoscale polymers with a well-defined structure and narrow size distribution. They can be used as drug carriers, gene delivery vehicles, and diagnostic agents.
6. Nanoshells: These are hollow, spherical nanoparticles consisting of a dielectric core covered by a thin metallic shell. They exhibit unique optical properties that make them suitable for applications such as photothermal therapy, biosensing, and imaging.

Indicators and reagents are terms commonly used in the field of clinical chemistry and laboratory medicine. Here are their definitions:

1. Indicator: An indicator is a substance that changes its color or other physical properties in response to a chemical change, such as a change in pH, oxidation-reduction potential, or the presence of a particular ion or molecule. Indicators are often used in laboratory tests to monitor or signal the progress of a reaction or to indicate the end point of a titration. A familiar example is the use of phenolphthalein as a pH indicator in acid-base titrations, which turns pink in basic solutions and colorless in acidic solutions.

2. Reagent: A reagent is a substance that is added to a system (such as a sample or a reaction mixture) to bring about a chemical reaction, test for the presence or absence of a particular component, or measure the concentration of a specific analyte. Reagents are typically chemicals with well-defined and consistent properties, allowing them to be used reliably in analytical procedures. Examples of reagents include enzymes, antibodies, dyes, metal ions, and organic compounds. In laboratory settings, reagents are often prepared and standardized according to strict protocols to ensure their quality and performance in diagnostic tests and research applications.

In the context of medical terminology, "solutions" refers to a homogeneous mixture of two or more substances, in which one substance (the solute) is uniformly distributed within another substance (the solvent). The solvent is typically the greater component of the solution and is capable of dissolving the solute.

Solutions can be classified based on the physical state of the solvent and solute. For instance, a solution in which both the solvent and solute are liquids is called a liquid solution or simply a solution. A solid solution is one where the solvent is a solid and the solute is either a gas, liquid, or solid. Similarly, a gas solution refers to a mixture where the solvent is a gas and the solute can be a gas, liquid, or solid.

In medical applications, solutions are often used as vehicles for administering medications, such as intravenous (IV) fluids, oral rehydration solutions, eye drops, and topical creams or ointments. The composition of these solutions is carefully controlled to ensure the appropriate concentration and delivery of the active ingredients.

Simethicone is an anti-foaming agent that is commonly used in the medical field, particularly for the treatment of gastric symptoms such as bloating and discomfort caused by excessive gas in the gastrointestinal tract. It works by reducing the surface tension of gas bubbles in the stomach and intestines, allowing them to combine and be expelled more easily from the body.

Simethicone is not absorbed into the bloodstream and has minimal systemic absorption, making it a safe and well-tolerated medication for most individuals. It can be found in various forms, including tablets, chewable tablets, capsules, and liquids, and is often combined with other medications to provide symptomatic relief of gastric discomfort.

It's important to note that simethicone should only be used as directed by a healthcare professional, and individuals should always consult their doctor or pharmacist before taking any new medication.

Polylysine is not a medical term per se, but it is a term used in biochemistry and medicine. Polylysine refers to a synthetic polymer of the amino acid lysine, which is linked together by peptide bonds to form a long, unbranched chain. It is often used in laboratory settings as a tool for scientific research, particularly in the study of protein-protein interactions and cellular uptake mechanisms.

In medicine, polylysine has been explored as a potential drug delivery vehicle, as it can be chemically modified to carry drugs or other therapeutic agents into cells. However, its use in clinical settings is not yet widespread. It's important to note that the term 'polylysine' itself does not have a specific medical definition, but rather refers to a class of biochemical compounds with certain properties.

Nanospheres are defined in the medical context as tiny, spherical particles that have a diameter in the nanometer range (typically between 1 to 1000 nm). They can be made up of various materials such as polymers, lipids, metals or ceramics. Nanospheres have unique properties due to their small size and large surface area, making them useful for a variety of medical applications including drug delivery, diagnostic imaging, and tissue engineering.

In the field of drug delivery, nanospheres can be used to encapsulate drugs and deliver them to specific sites in the body, improving the efficacy and safety of treatments. They can also be designed to target certain cell types or release their cargo in response to specific stimuli. Additionally, nanospheres can be used as contrast agents for medical imaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT).

Overall, nanospheres are a promising tool in the development of new medical technologies and therapies.

Polynucleotide ligases are enzymes that catalyze the formation of phosphodiester bonds between the 3'-hydroxyl and 5'-phosphate ends of two adjacent nucleotides in a polynucleotide chain, such as DNA. These enzymes play a crucial role in the repair and replication of DNA, by sealing breaks or gaps in the sugar-phosphate backbone of the DNA molecule. They are essential for maintaining genomic integrity and stability, and have been widely used in molecular biology research and biotechnological applications, including DNA sequencing, cloning, and genetic engineering. Polynucleotide ligases can be found in various organisms, from bacteria to humans, and they typically require ATP or NAD+ as a cofactor for the ligation reaction.

Osmolar concentration is a measure of the total number of solute particles (such as ions or molecules) dissolved in a solution per liter of solvent (usually water), which affects the osmotic pressure. It is expressed in units of osmoles per liter (osmol/L). Osmolarity and osmolality are related concepts, with osmolarity referring to the number of osmoles per unit volume of solution, typically measured in liters, while osmolality refers to the number of osmoles per kilogram of solvent. In clinical contexts, osmolar concentration is often used to describe the solute concentration of bodily fluids such as blood or urine.

A knee prosthesis, also known as a knee replacement or artificial knee joint, is a medical device used to replace the damaged or diseased weight-bearing surfaces of the knee joint. It typically consists of three components: the femoral component (made of metal) that fits over the end of the thighbone (femur), the tibial component (often made of metal and plastic) that fits into the top of the shinbone (tibia), and a patellar component (usually made of plastic) that replaces the damaged surface of the kneecap.

The primary goal of knee prosthesis is to relieve pain, restore function, and improve quality of life for individuals with advanced knee joint damage due to conditions such as osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, or traumatic injuries. The procedure to implant a knee prosthesis is called knee replacement surgery or total knee arthroplasty (TKA).

Chymotrypsinogen is the inactive precursor form of the enzyme chymotrypsin, which is produced in the pancreas and plays a crucial role in digesting proteins in the small intestine. This zymogen is activated when it is cleaved by another protease called trypsin, resulting in the formation of the active enzyme chymotrypsin. Chymotrypsinogen is synthesized and stored in the pancreas as a proenzyme to prevent premature activation and potential damage to the pancreatic tissue. Once released into the small intestine, trypsin-mediated cleavage of chymotrypsinogen leads to the formation of chymotrypsin, which then contributes to protein breakdown and absorption in the gut.

Cross-linking reagents are chemical agents that are used to create covalent bonds between two or more molecules, creating a network of interconnected molecules known as a cross-linked structure. In the context of medical and biological research, cross-linking reagents are often used to stabilize protein structures, study protein-protein interactions, and develop therapeutic agents.

Cross-linking reagents work by reacting with functional groups on adjacent molecules, such as amino groups (-NH2) or sulfhydryl groups (-SH), to form a covalent bond between them. This can help to stabilize protein structures and prevent them from unfolding or aggregating.

There are many different types of cross-linking reagents, each with its own specificity and reactivity. Some common examples include glutaraldehyde, formaldehyde, disuccinimidyl suberate (DSS), and bis(sulfosuccinimidyl) suberate (BS3). The choice of cross-linking reagent depends on the specific application and the properties of the molecules being cross-linked.

It is important to note that cross-linking reagents can also have unintended effects, such as modifying or disrupting the function of the proteins they are intended to stabilize. Therefore, it is essential to use them carefully and with appropriate controls to ensure accurate and reliable results.

Dimethylformamide (DMF) is an organic compound with the formula (CH3)2NCHO. It is a colorless, hygroscopic liquid with a mild, characteristic odor. DMF is miscible with water and most organic solvents. It is widely used as a commercial solvent, due to its ability to dissolve both polar and non-polar compounds.

In the medical field, exposure to dimethylformamide can occur through inhalation, skin contact, or ingestion during its production, use, or disposal. Acute exposure to high levels of DMF may cause irritation to the eyes, skin, and respiratory tract. Chronic exposure has been associated with liver damage, neurological effects, and reproductive issues in both humans and animals.

It is essential to handle dimethylformamide with appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE), including gloves, safety glasses, and lab coats, to minimize exposure. Engineering controls, such as fume hoods, should also be used when working with this chemical to ensure adequate ventilation and reduce the risk of inhalation exposure.

Phosphates, in a medical context, refer to the salts or esters of phosphoric acid. Phosphates play crucial roles in various biological processes within the human body. They are essential components of bones and teeth, where they combine with calcium to form hydroxyapatite crystals. Phosphates also participate in energy transfer reactions as phosphate groups attached to adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Additionally, they contribute to buffer systems that help maintain normal pH levels in the body.

Abnormal levels of phosphates in the blood can indicate certain medical conditions. High phosphate levels (hyperphosphatemia) may be associated with kidney dysfunction, hyperparathyroidism, or excessive intake of phosphate-containing products. Low phosphate levels (hypophosphatemia) might result from malnutrition, vitamin D deficiency, or certain diseases affecting the small intestine or kidneys. Both hypophosphatemia and hyperphosphatemia can have significant impacts on various organ systems and may require medical intervention.

Complement C1q is a protein that is part of the complement system, which is a group of proteins in the blood that help to eliminate pathogens and damaged cells from the body. C1q is the first component of the classical complement pathway, which is activated by the binding of C1q to antibodies that are attached to the surface of a pathogen or damaged cell.

C1q is composed of six identical polypeptide chains, each containing a collagen-like region and a globular head region. The globular heads can bind to various structures, including the Fc regions of certain antibodies, immune complexes, and some types of cells. When C1q binds to an activating surface, it triggers a series of proteolytic reactions that lead to the activation of other complement components and the formation of the membrane attack complex (MAC), which can punch holes in the membranes of pathogens or damaged cells, leading to their destruction.

In addition to its role in the immune system, C1q has also been found to have roles in various physiological processes, including tissue remodeling, angiogenesis, and the clearance of apoptotic cells. Dysregulation of the complement system, including abnormalities in C1q function, has been implicated in a variety of diseases, including autoimmune disorders, inflammatory diseases, and neurodegenerative conditions.

Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) is a thermoanalytical technique used to measure the difference in the amount of heat required to increase the temperature of a sample and a reference as a function of temperature. It is commonly used to study phase transitions, such as melting, crystallization, and glass transition, as well as chemical reactions, in a wide range of materials, including polymers, pharmaceuticals, and biological samples.

In DSC, the sample and reference are placed in separate pans and heated at a constant rate. The heat flow required to maintain this heating rate is continuously measured for both the sample and the reference. As the temperature of the sample changes during a phase transition or chemical reaction, the heat flow required to maintain the same heating rate will change relative to the reference. This allows for the measurement of the enthalpy change (ΔH) associated with the transition or reaction.

Differential scanning calorimetry is a powerful tool in materials science and research as it can provide information about the thermal behavior, stability, and composition of materials. It can also be used to study the kinetics of reactions and phase transitions, making it useful for optimizing processing conditions and developing new materials.

Gastrointestinal transit refers to the movement of food, digestive secretions, and waste products through the gastrointestinal tract, from the mouth to the anus. This process involves several muscles and nerves that work together to propel the contents through the stomach, small intestine, large intestine, and rectum.

The transit time can vary depending on factors such as the type and amount of food consumed, hydration levels, and overall health. Abnormalities in gastrointestinal transit can lead to various conditions, including constipation, diarrhea, and malabsorption. Therefore, maintaining normal gastrointestinal transit is essential for proper digestion, nutrient absorption, and overall health.

A dosage form refers to the physical or pharmaceutical preparation of a drug that determines how it is administered and taken by the patient. The dosage form influences the rate and extent of drug absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion in the body, which ultimately affects the drug's therapeutic effectiveness and safety profile.

There are various types of dosage forms available, including:

1. Solid dosage forms: These include tablets, capsules, caplets, and powders that are intended to be swallowed or chewed. They may contain a single active ingredient or multiple ingredients in a fixed-dose combination.
2. Liquid dosage forms: These include solutions, suspensions, emulsions, and syrups that are intended to be taken orally or administered parenterally (e.g., intravenously, intramuscularly, subcutaneously).
3. Semi-solid dosage forms: These include creams, ointments, gels, pastes, and suppositories that are intended to be applied topically or administered rectally.
4. Inhalation dosage forms: These include metered-dose inhalers (MDIs), dry powder inhalers (DPIs), and nebulizers that are used to deliver drugs directly to the lungs.
5. Transdermal dosage forms: These include patches, films, and sprays that are applied to the skin to deliver drugs through the skin into the systemic circulation.
6. Implantable dosage forms: These include surgically implanted devices or pellets that release drugs slowly over an extended period.

The choice of dosage form depends on various factors, such as the drug's physicochemical properties, pharmacokinetics, therapeutic indication, patient population, and route of administration. The goal is to optimize the drug's efficacy and safety while ensuring patient compliance and convenience.

"Cattle" is a term used in the agricultural and veterinary fields to refer to domesticated animals of the genus *Bos*, primarily *Bos taurus* (European cattle) and *Bos indicus* (Zebu). These animals are often raised for meat, milk, leather, and labor. They are also known as bovines or cows (for females), bulls (intact males), and steers/bullocks (castrated males). However, in a strict medical definition, "cattle" does not apply to humans or other animals.

Molecular structure, in the context of biochemistry and molecular biology, refers to the arrangement and organization of atoms and chemical bonds within a molecule. It describes the three-dimensional layout of the constituent elements, including their spatial relationships, bond lengths, and angles. Understanding molecular structure is crucial for elucidating the functions and reactivities of biological macromolecules such as proteins, nucleic acids, lipids, and carbohydrates. Various experimental techniques, like X-ray crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM), are employed to determine molecular structures at atomic resolution, providing valuable insights into their biological roles and potential therapeutic targets.

Diffusion, in the context of medicine and physiology, refers to the process by which molecules move from an area of high concentration to an area of low concentration until they are evenly distributed throughout a space or solution. This passive transport mechanism does not require energy and relies solely on the random motion of particles. Diffusion is a vital process in many biological systems, including the exchange of gases in the lungs, the movement of nutrients and waste products across cell membranes, and the spread of drugs and other substances throughout tissues.

Recombinant proteins are artificially created proteins produced through the use of recombinant DNA technology. This process involves combining DNA molecules from different sources to create a new set of genes that encode for a specific protein. The resulting recombinant protein can then be expressed, purified, and used for various applications in research, medicine, and industry.

Recombinant proteins are widely used in biomedical research to study protein function, structure, and interactions. They are also used in the development of diagnostic tests, vaccines, and therapeutic drugs. For example, recombinant insulin is a common treatment for diabetes, while recombinant human growth hormone is used to treat growth disorders.

The production of recombinant proteins typically involves the use of host cells, such as bacteria, yeast, or mammalian cells, which are engineered to express the desired protein. The host cells are transformed with a plasmid vector containing the gene of interest, along with regulatory elements that control its expression. Once the host cells are cultured and the protein is expressed, it can be purified using various chromatography techniques.

Overall, recombinant proteins have revolutionized many areas of biology and medicine, enabling researchers to study and manipulate proteins in ways that were previously impossible.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Lespedeza" is not a medical term. It is a genus of plants commonly known as bush clover or lespedeza. These plants are native to warm temperate and subtropical regions of the world, including parts of North America, Asia, and Africa. They have been used in some traditional medicine practices, but there is no widely recognized medical definition associated with "Lespedeza." If you have any questions related to a specific medical term or concept, I'd be happy to help if I can!

A capsule is a type of solid pharmaceutical dosage form in which the drug is enclosed in a small shell or container, usually composed of gelatin or other suitable material. The shell serves to protect the drug from degradation, improve its stability and shelf life, and facilitate swallowing by making it easier to consume. Capsules come in various sizes and colors and can contain one or more drugs in powder, liquid, or solid form. They are typically administered orally but can also be used for other routes of administration, such as rectal or vaginal.

The femoral head is the rounded, ball-like top portion of the femur (thigh bone) that fits into the hip socket (acetabulum) to form the hip joint. It has a smooth, articular cartilage surface that allows for smooth and stable articulation with the pelvis. The femoral head is connected to the femoral neck, which is a narrower section of bone that angles downward and leads into the shaft of the femur. Together, the femoral head and neck provide stability and range of motion to the hip joint.

Skin absorption, also known as percutaneous absorption, refers to the process by which substances are taken up by the skin and pass into the systemic circulation. This occurs when a substance is applied topically to the skin and penetrates through the various layers of the epidermis and dermis until it reaches the capillaries, where it can be transported to other parts of the body.

The rate and extent of skin absorption depend on several factors, including the physicochemical properties of the substance (such as its molecular weight, lipophilicity, and charge), the concentration and formulation of the product, the site of application, and the integrity and condition of the skin.

Skin absorption is an important route of exposure for many chemicals, drugs, and cosmetic ingredients, and it can have both therapeutic and toxicological consequences. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms and factors that influence skin absorption is crucial for assessing the safety and efficacy of topical products and for developing strategies to enhance or reduce their absorption as needed.

Polyglycolic acid (PGA) is a synthetic polymer of glycolic acid, which is commonly used in surgical sutures. It is a biodegradable material that degrades in the body through hydrolysis into glycolic acid, which can be metabolized and eliminated from the body. PGA sutures are often used for approximating tissue during surgical procedures due to their strength, handling properties, and predictable rate of absorption. The degradation time of PGA sutures is typically around 60-90 days, depending on factors such as the size and location of the suture.

Chitosan is a complex carbohydrate that is derived from the exoskeletons of crustaceans, such as shrimp and crabs. It is made up of chains of N-acetyl-d-glucosamine and d-glucosamine units. Chitosan has been studied for its potential medical and health benefits, including its ability to lower cholesterol levels, promote weight loss, and help control blood sugar levels. It is also used in wound care products due to its antibacterial and absorbent properties. However, more research is needed to confirm these potential benefits and establish recommended dosages and safety guidelines.

Hydrophobic interactions: These are the interactions that occur between non-polar molecules or groups of atoms in an aqueous environment, leading to their association or aggregation. The term "hydrophobic" means "water-fearing" and describes the tendency of non-polar substances to repel water. When non-polar molecules or groups are placed in water, they tend to clump together to minimize contact with the polar water molecules. These interactions are primarily driven by the entropy increase of the system as a whole, rather than energy minimization. Hydrophobic interactions play crucial roles in various biological processes, such as protein folding, membrane formation, and molecular self-assembly.

Hydrophilic interactions: These are the interactions that occur between polar molecules or groups of atoms and water molecules. The term "hydrophilic" means "water-loving" and describes the attraction of polar substances to water. When polar molecules or groups are placed in water, they can form hydrogen bonds with the surrounding water molecules, which helps solvate them. Hydrophilic interactions contribute to the stability and functionality of various biological systems, such as protein structure, ion transport across membranes, and enzyme catalysis.

Zirconium is not a medical term, but it is a chemical element with the symbol Zr and atomic number 40. It is a gray-white, strong, corrosion-resistant transition metal that is used primarily in nuclear reactors, as an opacifier in glazes for ceramic cookware, and in surgical implants such as artificial joints due to its biocompatibility.

In the context of medical devices or implants, zirconium alloys may be used for their mechanical properties and resistance to corrosion. For example, zirconia (a form of zirconium dioxide) is a popular material for dental crowns and implants due to its durability, strength, and natural appearance.

However, it's important to note that while zirconium itself is not considered a medical term, there are various medical applications and devices that utilize zirconium-based materials.

Electrophoresis, polyacrylamide gel (EPG) is a laboratory technique used to separate and analyze complex mixtures of proteins or nucleic acids (DNA or RNA) based on their size and electrical charge. This technique utilizes a matrix made of cross-linked polyacrylamide, a type of gel, which provides a stable and uniform environment for the separation of molecules.

In this process:

1. The polyacrylamide gel is prepared by mixing acrylamide monomers with a cross-linking agent (bis-acrylamide) and a catalyst (ammonium persulfate) in the presence of a buffer solution.
2. The gel is then poured into a mold and allowed to polymerize, forming a solid matrix with uniform pore sizes that depend on the concentration of acrylamide used. Higher concentrations result in smaller pores, providing better resolution for separating smaller molecules.
3. Once the gel has set, it is placed in an electrophoresis apparatus containing a buffer solution. Samples containing the mixture of proteins or nucleic acids are loaded into wells on the top of the gel.
4. An electric field is applied across the gel, causing the negatively charged molecules to migrate towards the positive electrode (anode) while positively charged molecules move toward the negative electrode (cathode). The rate of migration depends on the size, charge, and shape of the molecules.
5. Smaller molecules move faster through the gel matrix and will migrate farther from the origin compared to larger molecules, resulting in separation based on size. Proteins and nucleic acids can be selectively stained after electrophoresis to visualize the separated bands.

EPG is widely used in various research fields, including molecular biology, genetics, proteomics, and forensic science, for applications such as protein characterization, DNA fragment analysis, cloning, mutation detection, and quality control of nucleic acid or protein samples.

Orbital implants are medical devices used in the field of ophthalmology, specifically for orbital fracture repair and enucleation or evisceration procedures. They serve as a replacement for the natural eye structure (the eyeball) when it is removed due to various reasons such as severe trauma, tumors, or painful blind eyes.

Orbital implants are typically made of biocompatible materials like porous polyethylene, hydroxyapatite, or glass. These materials allow for the growth of fibrovascular tissue into the pores, which helps to integrate the implant with the surrounding tissues and minimize movement. The size of the implant is chosen based on the individual patient's needs and may vary from 16mm to 24mm in diameter.

The primary function of orbital implants is to restore the volume and shape of the eye socket, maintain proper eyelid position and function, and provide a foundation for the attachment of an ocular prosthesis (artificial eye) that can be worn over the implant to give a more natural appearance.

Cell survival refers to the ability of a cell to continue living and functioning normally, despite being exposed to potentially harmful conditions or treatments. This can include exposure to toxins, radiation, chemotherapeutic drugs, or other stressors that can damage cells or interfere with their normal processes.

In scientific research, measures of cell survival are often used to evaluate the effectiveness of various therapies or treatments. For example, researchers may expose cells to a particular drug or treatment and then measure the percentage of cells that survive to assess its potential therapeutic value. Similarly, in toxicology studies, measures of cell survival can help to determine the safety of various chemicals or substances.

It's important to note that cell survival is not the same as cell proliferation, which refers to the ability of cells to divide and multiply. While some treatments may promote cell survival, they may also inhibit cell proliferation, making them useful for treating diseases such as cancer. Conversely, other treatments may be designed to specifically target and kill cancer cells, even if it means sacrificing some healthy cells in the process.

Citric acid is a weak organic acid that is widely found in nature, particularly in citrus fruits such as lemons and oranges. Its chemical formula is C6H8O7, and it exists in a form known as a tribasic acid, which means it can donate three protons in chemical reactions.

In the context of medical definitions, citric acid may be mentioned in relation to various physiological processes, such as its role in the Krebs cycle (also known as the citric acid cycle), which is a key metabolic pathway involved in energy production within cells. Additionally, citric acid may be used in certain medical treatments or therapies, such as in the form of citrate salts to help prevent the formation of kidney stones. It may also be used as a flavoring agent or preservative in various pharmaceutical preparations.

Environmental biodegradation is the breakdown of materials, especially man-made substances such as plastics and industrial chemicals, by microorganisms such as bacteria and fungi in order to use them as a source of energy or nutrients. This process occurs naturally in the environment and helps to break down organic matter into simpler compounds that can be more easily absorbed and assimilated by living organisms.

Biodegradation in the environment is influenced by various factors, including the chemical composition of the substance being degraded, the environmental conditions (such as temperature, moisture, and pH), and the type and abundance of microorganisms present. Some substances are more easily biodegraded than others, and some may even be resistant to biodegradation altogether.

Biodegradation is an important process for maintaining the health and balance of ecosystems, as it helps to prevent the accumulation of harmful substances in the environment. However, some man-made substances, such as certain types of plastics and industrial chemicals, may persist in the environment for long periods of time due to their resistance to biodegradation, leading to negative impacts on wildlife and ecosystems.

In recent years, there has been increasing interest in developing biodegradable materials that can break down more easily in the environment as a way to reduce waste and minimize environmental harm. These efforts have led to the development of various biodegradable plastics, coatings, and other materials that are designed to degrade under specific environmental conditions.

Biological processes refer to the series of interactions and reactions that occur within a living organism in order to maintain life. These processes are often complex and involve multiple systems and structures within the body. They can include things like metabolism, cell division, growth and development, respiration, circulation, immune response, and digestion, among others.

Biological processes are typically regulated by a combination of genetic and environmental factors, and they can be influenced by various internal and external stimuli. The study of biological processes is a key area of focus in the field of biology, as understanding these processes can shed light on how living organisms function, grow, reproduce, and respond to changes in their environment.

In medical terms, understanding biological processes is essential for developing effective treatments for various diseases and conditions. By studying the underlying mechanisms that contribute to disease, researchers can identify potential targets for therapeutic intervention and develop new drugs or other treatments designed to modulate specific biological processes.

In the context of medicine and physiology, permeability refers to the ability of a tissue or membrane to allow the passage of fluids, solutes, or gases. It is often used to describe the property of the capillary walls, which control the exchange of substances between the blood and the surrounding tissues.

The permeability of a membrane can be influenced by various factors, including its molecular structure, charge, and the size of the molecules attempting to pass through it. A more permeable membrane allows for easier passage of substances, while a less permeable membrane restricts the movement of substances.

In some cases, changes in permeability can have significant consequences for health. For example, increased permeability of the blood-brain barrier (a specialized type of capillary that regulates the passage of substances into the brain) has been implicated in a number of neurological conditions, including multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, and traumatic brain injury.

Polymerization is not exclusively a medical term, but it is widely used in the field of medical sciences, particularly in areas such as biochemistry and materials science. In a broad sense, polymerization refers to the process by which small molecules, known as monomers, chemically react and join together to form larger, more complex structures called polymers.

In the context of medical definitions:

Polymerization is the chemical reaction where multiple repeating monomer units bind together covalently (through strong chemical bonds) to create a long, chain-like molecule known as a polymer. This process can occur naturally or be induced artificially through various methods, depending on the type of monomers and desired polymer properties.

In biochemistry, polymerization plays an essential role in forming important biological macromolecules such as DNA, RNA, proteins, and polysaccharides. These natural polymers are built from specific monomer units—nucleotides for nucleic acids (DNA and RNA), amino acids for proteins, and sugars for polysaccharides—that polymerize in a highly regulated manner to create the final functional structures.

In materials science, synthetic polymers are often created through polymerization for various medical applications, such as biocompatible materials, drug delivery systems, and medical devices. These synthetic polymers can be tailored to have specific properties, such as degradation rates, mechanical strength, or hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity, depending on the desired application.

Methylcellulose is a semisynthetic, inert, viscous, and tasteless white powder that is soluble in cold water but not in hot water. It is derived from cellulose through the process of methylation. In medical contexts, it is commonly used as a bulk-forming laxative to treat constipation, as well as a lubricant in ophthalmic solutions and a suspending agent in pharmaceuticals.

When mixed with water, methylcellulose forms a gel-like substance that can increase stool volume and promote bowel movements. It is generally considered safe for most individuals, but like any medication or supplement, it should be used under the guidance of a healthcare provider.

Countercurrent distribution is a laboratory technique used in the separation and purification of chemical compounds, including drugs and natural products. It is based on the principle of countercurrent flow, where two immiscible liquids (such as an organic solvent and water) are passed through a series of connected tubes in opposite directions.

In the context of biochemistry and pharmacology, countercurrent distribution is often used to purify and analyze compounds that are present in complex biological mixtures, such as blood or plant extracts. The mixture is first loaded onto the top of the column, and then a series of solvent washes and extractions are performed to separate the components based on their partition coefficients between the two liquids.

The technique allows for the separation of compounds with similar chemical properties but different partition coefficients, making it a valuable tool in the analysis of complex mixtures. The distribution of each component is plotted as a function of the tube number, resulting in a characteristic elution profile that can be used to identify and quantify the compound of interest.

In summary, countercurrent distribution is a laboratory technique for separating and purifying chemical compounds based on their partition coefficients between two immiscible liquids passed through connected tubes in opposite directions.

"Freezing" is a term used in the medical field to describe a phenomenon that can occur in certain neurological conditions, most notably in Parkinson's disease. It refers to a sudden and temporary inability to move or initiate movement, often triggered by environmental factors such as narrow spaces, turning, or approaching a destination. This can increase the risk of falls and make daily activities challenging for affected individuals.

Freezing is also known as "freezing of gait" (FOG) when it specifically affects a person's ability to walk. During FOG episodes, the person may feel like their feet are glued to the ground, making it difficult to take steps forward. This can be very distressing and debilitating for those affected.

It is important to note that "freezing" has different meanings in different medical contexts, such as in the field of orthopedics, where it may refer to a loss of joint motion due to stiffness or inflammation. Always consult with a healthcare professional for accurate information tailored to your specific situation.

Organ preservation solutions are specialized fluids used to maintain the viability and functionality of organs ex vivo (outside the body) during the process of transplantation. These solutions are designed to provide optimal conditions for the organ by preventing tissue damage, reducing metabolic activity, and minimizing ischemic injuries that may occur during the time between organ removal from the donor and implantation into the recipient.

The composition of organ preservation solutions typically includes various ingredients such as:

1. Cryoprotectants: These help prevent ice crystal formation and damage to cell membranes during freezing and thawing processes, especially for organs like the heart and lungs that require deep hypothermia for preservation.
2. Buffers: They maintain physiological pH levels and counteract acidosis caused by anaerobic metabolism in the absence of oxygen supply.
3. Colloids: These substances, such as hydroxyethyl starch or dextran, help preserve oncotic pressure and prevent cellular edema.
4. Electrolytes: Balanced concentrations of ions like sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium, chloride, and bicarbonate are essential for maintaining physiological osmolarity and membrane potentials.
5. Energy substrates: Glucose, lactate, or other energy-rich compounds can serve as fuel sources to support the metabolic needs of the organ during preservation.
6. Antioxidants: These agents protect against oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation induced by ischemia-reperfusion injuries.
7. Anti-inflammatory agents and immunosuppressants: Some solutions may contain substances that mitigate the inflammatory response and reduce immune activation in the transplanted organ.

Examples of commonly used organ preservation solutions include University of Wisconsin (UW) solution, Histidine-Tryptophan-Ketoglutarate (HTK) solution, Custodiol HTK solution, and Euro-Collins solution. The choice of preservation solution depends on the specific organ being transplanted and the duration of preservation required.

Plasticizers are substances added to polymers or plastics to increase their flexibility, workability, and durability. They achieve this by reducing the intermolecular forces between polymer chains, thereby lowering the glass transition temperature (Tg) of the material. This allows the plastic to remain flexible even at lower temperatures. Common plasticizers include phthalates, adipates, and epoxy compounds. It is important to note that some plasticizers can have potential health concerns, and their use may be regulated in certain applications.

Microspheres are tiny, spherical particles that range in size from 1 to 1000 micrometers in diameter. They are made of biocompatible and biodegradable materials such as polymers, glass, or ceramics. In medical terms, microspheres have various applications, including drug delivery systems, medical imaging, and tissue engineering.

In drug delivery, microspheres can be used to encapsulate drugs and release them slowly over time, improving the efficacy of the treatment while reducing side effects. They can also be used for targeted drug delivery, where the microspheres are designed to accumulate in specific tissues or organs.

In medical imaging, microspheres can be labeled with radioactive isotopes or magnetic materials and used as contrast agents to enhance the visibility of tissues or organs during imaging procedures such as X-ray, CT, MRI, or PET scans.

In tissue engineering, microspheres can serve as a scaffold for cell growth and differentiation, promoting the regeneration of damaged tissues or organs. Overall, microspheres have great potential in various medical applications due to their unique properties and versatility.

I'm happy to help! However, I believe there might be a slight mistake in your question. "araC" is not a term that is typically associated with genes in medical or genetic contexts. It is possible that you may have meant "araC," which is an abbreviation for the chemical name of a drug called cytarabine, which is used to treat various types of cancer.

If you are asking about genes, I would be happy to provide some information on that topic! Genes are segments of DNA that contain the instructions for making proteins or regulating gene expression. They are passed down from parents to offspring and can influence various traits and characteristics, including physical features, metabolism, and susceptibility to certain diseases.

If you have any further questions or need clarification on a specific genetic concept, please let me know!

Centrifugation is a laboratory technique that involves the use of a machine called a centrifuge to separate mixtures based on their differing densities or sizes. The mixture is placed in a rotor and spun at high speeds, causing the denser components to move away from the center of rotation and the less dense components to remain nearer the center. This separation allows for the recovery and analysis of specific particles, such as cells, viruses, or subcellular organelles, from complex mixtures.

The force exerted on the mixture during centrifugation is described in terms of relative centrifugal force (RCF) or g-force, which represents the number of times greater the acceleration due to centrifugation is than the acceleration due to gravity. The RCF is determined by the speed of rotation (revolutions per minute, or RPM), the radius of rotation, and the duration of centrifugation.

Centrifugation has numerous applications in various fields, including clinical laboratories, biochemistry, molecular biology, and virology. It is a fundamental technique for isolating and concentrating particles from solutions, enabling further analysis and characterization.

Nanotechnology is not a medical term per se, but it is a field of study with potential applications in medicine. According to the National Nanotechnology Initiative, nanotechnology is defined as "the understanding and control of matter at the nanoscale, at dimensions between approximately 1 and 100 nanometers, where unique phenomena enable novel applications."

In the context of medicine, nanotechnology has the potential to revolutionize the way we diagnose, treat, and prevent diseases. Nanomedicine involves the use of nanoscale materials, devices, or systems for medical applications. These can include drug delivery systems that target specific cells or tissues, diagnostic tools that detect biomarkers at the molecular level, and tissue engineering strategies that promote regeneration and repair.

While nanotechnology holds great promise for medicine, it is still a relatively new field with many challenges to overcome, including issues related to safety, regulation, and scalability.

Immunoglobulin G (IgG) is a type of antibody, which is a protective protein produced by the immune system in response to foreign substances like bacteria or viruses. IgG is the most abundant type of antibody in human blood, making up about 75-80% of all antibodies. It is found in all body fluids and plays a crucial role in fighting infections caused by bacteria, viruses, and toxins.

IgG has several important functions:

1. Neutralization: IgG can bind to the surface of bacteria or viruses, preventing them from attaching to and infecting human cells.
2. Opsonization: IgG coats the surface of pathogens, making them more recognizable and easier for immune cells like neutrophils and macrophages to phagocytose (engulf and destroy) them.
3. Complement activation: IgG can activate the complement system, a group of proteins that work together to help eliminate pathogens from the body. Activation of the complement system leads to the formation of the membrane attack complex, which creates holes in the cell membranes of bacteria, leading to their lysis (destruction).
4. Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC): IgG can bind to immune cells like natural killer (NK) cells and trigger them to release substances that cause target cells (such as virus-infected or cancerous cells) to undergo apoptosis (programmed cell death).
5. Immune complex formation: IgG can form immune complexes with antigens, which can then be removed from the body through various mechanisms, such as phagocytosis by immune cells or excretion in urine.

IgG is a critical component of adaptive immunity and provides long-lasting protection against reinfection with many pathogens. It has four subclasses (IgG1, IgG2, IgG3, and IgG4) that differ in their structure, function, and distribution in the body.

The hip joint, also known as the coxal joint, is a ball-and-socket type synovial joint that connects the femur (thigh bone) to the pelvis. The "ball" is the head of the femur, while the "socket" is the acetabulum, a concave surface on the pelvic bone.

The hip joint is surrounded by a strong fibrous capsule and is reinforced by several ligaments, including the iliofemoral, ischiofemoral, and pubofemoral ligaments. The joint allows for flexion, extension, abduction, adduction, medial and lateral rotation, and circumduction movements, making it one of the most mobile joints in the body.

The hip joint is also supported by various muscles, including the gluteus maximus, gluteus medius, gluteus minimus, iliopsoas, and other hip flexors and extensors. These muscles provide stability and strength to the joint, allowing for weight-bearing activities such as walking, running, and jumping.

A cell line that is derived from tumor cells and has been adapted to grow in culture. These cell lines are often used in research to study the characteristics of cancer cells, including their growth patterns, genetic changes, and responses to various treatments. They can be established from many different types of tumors, such as carcinomas, sarcomas, and leukemias. Once established, these cell lines can be grown and maintained indefinitely in the laboratory, allowing researchers to conduct experiments and studies that would not be feasible using primary tumor cells. It is important to note that tumor cell lines may not always accurately represent the behavior of the original tumor, as they can undergo genetic changes during their time in culture.

In medical terms, "gels" are semi-solid colloidal systems in which a solid phase is dispersed in a liquid medium. They have a viscous consistency and can be described as a cross between a solid and a liquid. The solid particles, called the gel network, absorb and swell with the liquid component, creating a system that has properties of both solids and liquids.

Gels are widely used in medical applications such as wound dressings, drug delivery systems, and tissue engineering due to their unique properties. They can provide a moist environment for wounds to heal, control the release of drugs over time, and mimic the mechanical properties of natural tissues.

Freeze-drying, also known as lyophilization, is a method of preservation that involves the removal of water from a frozen product by sublimation, which is the direct transition of a solid to a gas. This process allows for the preservation of the original shape and structure of the material while significantly extending its shelf life. In medical contexts, freeze-drying can be used for various purposes, including the long-term storage of pharmaceuticals, vaccines, and diagnostic samples. The process helps maintain the efficacy and integrity of these materials until they are ready to be reconstituted with water and used.

A cell line is a culture of cells that are grown in a laboratory for use in research. These cells are usually taken from a single cell or group of cells, and they are able to divide and grow continuously in the lab. Cell lines can come from many different sources, including animals, plants, and humans. They are often used in scientific research to study cellular processes, disease mechanisms, and to test new drugs or treatments. Some common types of human cell lines include HeLa cells (which come from a cancer patient named Henrietta Lacks), HEK293 cells (which come from embryonic kidney cells), and HUVEC cells (which come from umbilical vein endothelial cells). It is important to note that cell lines are not the same as primary cells, which are cells that are taken directly from a living organism and have not been grown in the lab.

An enema is a medical procedure in which liquid is introduced into the lower part of the large intestine, specifically the sigmoid colon or rectum, through the anus using a special device called an enema kit. The liquid used can be plain water, saline solution, or a medicated solution, and it is typically retained for a short period of time before being expelled.

The purpose of an enema may vary, but it is often used to relieve constipation, prepare the bowel for medical procedures such as colonoscopy, or administer medications or nutrients that cannot be taken by mouth. Enemas can also be used for therapeutic purposes, such as to stimulate the immune system or promote relaxation.

It is important to follow proper instructions when administering an enema to avoid injury or discomfort. Possible side effects of enemas may include cramping, bloating, nausea, or electrolyte imbalances. If you have any health concerns or conditions that may be affected by an enema, it is recommended to consult with a healthcare professional before using one.

In the context of medical terminology, "powders" do not have a specific technical definition. However, in a general sense, powders refer to dry, finely ground or pulverized solid substances that can be dispersed in air or liquid mediums. In medicine, powders may include various forms of medications, such as crushed tablets or capsules, which are intended to be taken orally, mixed with liquids, or applied topically. Additionally, certain medical treatments and therapies may involve the use of medicated powders for various purposes, such as drying agents, abrasives, or delivery systems for active ingredients.

A reoperation is a surgical procedure that is performed again on a patient who has already undergone a previous operation for the same or related condition. Reoperations may be required due to various reasons, such as inadequate initial treatment, disease recurrence, infection, or complications from the first surgery. The nature and complexity of a reoperation can vary widely depending on the specific circumstances, but it often carries higher risks and potential complications compared to the original operation.

Ostreidae is a family of marine bivalve mollusks, commonly known as oysters. These are characterized by a laterally compressed, asymmetrical shell with a rough, scaly or barnacle-encrusted exterior and a smooth, often highly colored interior. The shells are held together by a hinge ligament and the animals use a powerful adductor muscle to close the shell.

Oysters are filter feeders, using their gills to extract plankton and organic particles from the water. They are important ecologically, as they help to filter and clean the water in which they live. Some species are also economically important as a source of food for humans, with the meat being eaten both raw and cooked in various dishes.

It's worth noting that Ostreidae is just one family within the larger grouping of oysters, known as the superfamily Ostreoidea. Other families within this superfamily include the pearl oysters (Pteriidae) and the saddle oysters (Anomiidae).

Intravenous injections are a type of medical procedure where medication or fluids are administered directly into a vein using a needle and syringe. This route of administration is also known as an IV injection. The solution injected enters the patient's bloodstream immediately, allowing for rapid absorption and onset of action. Intravenous injections are commonly used to provide quick relief from symptoms, deliver medications that are not easily absorbed by other routes, or administer fluids and electrolytes in cases of dehydration or severe illness. It is important that intravenous injections are performed using aseptic technique to minimize the risk of infection.

A dose-response relationship in the context of drugs refers to the changes in the effects or symptoms that occur as the dose of a drug is increased or decreased. Generally, as the dose of a drug is increased, the severity or intensity of its effects also increases. Conversely, as the dose is decreased, the effects of the drug become less severe or may disappear altogether.

The dose-response relationship is an important concept in pharmacology and toxicology because it helps to establish the safe and effective dosage range for a drug. By understanding how changes in the dose of a drug affect its therapeutic and adverse effects, healthcare providers can optimize treatment plans for their patients while minimizing the risk of harm.

The dose-response relationship is typically depicted as a curve that shows the relationship between the dose of a drug and its effect. The shape of the curve may vary depending on the drug and the specific effect being measured. Some drugs may have a steep dose-response curve, meaning that small changes in the dose can result in large differences in the effect. Other drugs may have a more gradual dose-response curve, where larger changes in the dose are needed to produce significant effects.

In addition to helping establish safe and effective dosages, the dose-response relationship is also used to evaluate the potential therapeutic benefits and risks of new drugs during clinical trials. By systematically testing different doses of a drug in controlled studies, researchers can identify the optimal dosage range for the drug and assess its safety and efficacy.

High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) is a type of chromatography that separates and analyzes compounds based on their interactions with a stationary phase and a mobile phase under high pressure. The mobile phase, which can be a gas or liquid, carries the sample mixture through a column containing the stationary phase.

In HPLC, the mobile phase is a liquid, and it is pumped through the column at high pressures (up to several hundred atmospheres) to achieve faster separation times and better resolution than other types of liquid chromatography. The stationary phase can be a solid or a liquid supported on a solid, and it interacts differently with each component in the sample mixture, causing them to separate as they travel through the column.

HPLC is widely used in analytical chemistry, pharmaceuticals, biotechnology, and other fields to separate, identify, and quantify compounds present in complex mixtures. It can be used to analyze a wide range of substances, including drugs, hormones, vitamins, pigments, flavors, and pollutants. HPLC is also used in the preparation of pure samples for further study or use.

'Escherichia coli' (E. coli) is a type of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacterium that commonly inhabits the intestinal tract of humans and warm-blooded animals. It is a member of the family Enterobacteriaceae and one of the most well-studied prokaryotic model organisms in molecular biology.

While most E. coli strains are harmless and even beneficial to their hosts, some serotypes can cause various forms of gastrointestinal and extraintestinal illnesses in humans and animals. These pathogenic strains possess virulence factors that enable them to colonize and damage host tissues, leading to diseases such as diarrhea, urinary tract infections, pneumonia, and sepsis.

E. coli is a versatile organism with remarkable genetic diversity, which allows it to adapt to various environmental niches. It can be found in water, soil, food, and various man-made environments, making it an essential indicator of fecal contamination and a common cause of foodborne illnesses. The study of E. coli has contributed significantly to our understanding of fundamental biological processes, including DNA replication, gene regulation, and protein synthesis.

Emulsifying agents, also known as emulsifiers, are substances that help to mix two immiscible liquids, such as oil and water, to form a stable emulsion. Emulsifiers work by reducing the surface tension between the two liquids, allowing them to mix together and remain mixed. They are often used in food production, cosmetics, and pharmaceuticals to create smooth and consistent products. Examples of emulsifying agents include lecithin, egg yolk, and various synthetic compounds.

Hepatovirus is a genus of viruses in the Picornaviridae family, and it's most notably represented by the Human Hepatitis A Virus (HAV). These viruses are non-enveloped, with a single-stranded, positive-sense RNA genome. They primarily infect hepatocytes, causing liver inflammation and disease, such as hepatitis. Transmission of hepatoviruses typically occurs through the fecal-oral route, often via contaminated food or water. The virus causes an acute infection that does not usually become chronic, and recovery is usually complete within a few weeks. Immunity after infection is solid and lifelong.

Butylene glycols are a type of organic compounds that belong to the class of diols, which are chemical compounds containing two hydroxyl groups. Specifically, butylene glycols are composed of a four-carbon chain with two hydroxyl groups located on adjacent carbon atoms.

There are two isomeric forms of butylene glycol: 1,2-butanediol and 1,3-butanediol.

* 1,2-Butanediol (also known as 1,2-butylene glycol) has the hydroxyl groups on the first and second carbon atoms of the chain. It is a colorless, viscous liquid that is used as a solvent, humectant, and antifreeze in various industrial and cosmetic applications.
* 1,3-Butanediol (also known as 1,3-butylene glycol) has the hydroxyl groups on the first and third carbon atoms of the chain. It is also a colorless, viscous liquid that is used as a solvent, humectant, and antifreeze in various industrial and cosmetic applications.

Butylene glycols are generally considered to be safe for use in cosmetics and other consumer products, although they may cause skin irritation or allergic reactions in some individuals. They are also used as intermediates in the synthesis of other chemicals, such as polyesters and polyurethanes.

Magnesium hydroxide is an inorganic compound with the chemical formula Mg(OH)2. It is a white solid that is amphoteric, meaning it can react as both an acid and a base. Magnesium hydroxide is commonly used as an over-the-counter antacid to neutralize stomach acid and relieve symptoms of heartburn, acid indigestion, and upset stomach. It works by increasing the pH of the stomach, which can help to reduce the production of stomach acid.

Magnesium hydroxide is also used as a laxative to relieve constipation, as it has a softening effect on stools and stimulates bowel movements. In addition, magnesium hydroxide is sometimes used in medical procedures to neutralize or wash away stomach acid, for example during endoscopies or the treatment of poisoning.

It's important to note that while magnesium hydroxide is generally considered safe when used as directed, it can cause side effects such as diarrhea, nausea, and abdominal cramps. In addition, people with kidney disease or severe heart or lung conditions should use magnesium hydroxide with caution, as it can worsen these conditions in some cases.

Protein conformation refers to the specific three-dimensional shape that a protein molecule assumes due to the spatial arrangement of its constituent amino acid residues and their associated chemical groups. This complex structure is determined by several factors, including covalent bonds (disulfide bridges), hydrogen bonds, van der Waals forces, and ionic bonds, which help stabilize the protein's unique conformation.

Protein conformations can be broadly classified into two categories: primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary structures. The primary structure represents the linear sequence of amino acids in a polypeptide chain. The secondary structure arises from local interactions between adjacent amino acid residues, leading to the formation of recurring motifs such as α-helices and β-sheets. Tertiary structure refers to the overall three-dimensional folding pattern of a single polypeptide chain, while quaternary structure describes the spatial arrangement of multiple folded polypeptide chains (subunits) that interact to form a functional protein complex.

Understanding protein conformation is crucial for elucidating protein function, as the specific three-dimensional shape of a protein directly influences its ability to interact with other molecules, such as ligands, nucleic acids, or other proteins. Any alterations in protein conformation due to genetic mutations, environmental factors, or chemical modifications can lead to loss of function, misfolding, aggregation, and disease states like neurodegenerative disorders and cancer.

Metabolic clearance rate is a term used in pharmacology to describe the volume of blood or plasma from which a drug is completely removed per unit time by metabolic processes. It is a measure of the body's ability to eliminate a particular substance and is usually expressed in units of volume (e.g., milliliters or liters) per time (e.g., minutes, hours, or days).

The metabolic clearance rate can be calculated by dividing the total amount of drug eliminated by the plasma concentration of the drug and the time over which it was eliminated. It provides important information about the pharmacokinetics of a drug, including its rate of elimination and the potential for drug-drug interactions that may affect metabolism.

It is worth noting that there are different types of clearance rates, such as renal clearance rate (which refers to the removal of a drug by the kidneys) or hepatic clearance rate (which refers to the removal of a drug by the liver). Metabolic clearance rate specifically refers to the elimination of a drug through metabolic processes, which can occur in various organs throughout the body.

Artificial membranes are synthetic or man-made materials that possess properties similar to natural biological membranes, such as selective permeability and barrier functions. These membranes can be designed to control the movement of molecules, ions, or cells across them, making them useful in various medical and biotechnological applications.

Examples of artificial membranes include:

1. Dialysis membranes: Used in hemodialysis for patients with renal failure, these semi-permeable membranes filter waste products and excess fluids from the blood while retaining essential proteins and cells.
2. Hemofiltration membranes: Utilized in extracorporeal circuits to remove larger molecules, such as cytokines or inflammatory mediators, from the blood during critical illnesses or sepsis.
3. Drug delivery systems: Artificial membranes can be used to encapsulate drugs, allowing for controlled release and targeted drug delivery in specific tissues or cells.
4. Tissue engineering: Synthetic membranes serve as scaffolds for cell growth and tissue regeneration, guiding the formation of new functional tissues.
5. Biosensors: Artificial membranes can be integrated into biosensing devices to selectively detect and quantify biomolecules, such as proteins or nucleic acids, in diagnostic applications.
6. Microfluidics: Artificial membranes are used in microfluidic systems for lab-on-a-chip applications, enabling the manipulation and analysis of small volumes of fluids for various medical and biological purposes.

Gel chromatography is a type of liquid chromatography that separates molecules based on their size or molecular weight. It uses a stationary phase that consists of a gel matrix made up of cross-linked polymers, such as dextran, agarose, or polyacrylamide. The gel matrix contains pores of various sizes, which allow smaller molecules to penetrate deeper into the matrix while larger molecules are excluded.

In gel chromatography, a mixture of molecules is loaded onto the top of the gel column and eluted with a solvent that moves down the column by gravity or pressure. As the sample components move down the column, they interact with the gel matrix and get separated based on their size. Smaller molecules can enter the pores of the gel and take longer to elute, while larger molecules are excluded from the pores and elute more quickly.

Gel chromatography is commonly used to separate and purify proteins, nucleic acids, and other biomolecules based on their size and molecular weight. It is also used in the analysis of polymers, colloids, and other materials with a wide range of applications in chemistry, biology, and medicine.

Polymethacrylic acids are not typically referred to as a medical term, but rather as a chemical one. They are a type of synthetic polymer made up of repeating units of methacrylic acid (MAA). These polymers have various applications in different industries, including the medical field.

In medicine, polymethacrylates are often used in the formulation of controlled-release drug delivery systems, such as beads or microspheres, due to their ability to swell and shrink in response to changes in pH or temperature. This property allows for the gradual release of drugs encapsulated within these polymers over an extended period.

Polymethacrylates are also used in dental applications, such as in the production of artificial teeth and dentures, due to their durability and resistance to wear. Additionally, they can be found in some surgical sealants and adhesives.

While polymethacrylic acids themselves may not have a specific medical definition, their various forms and applications in medical devices and drug delivery systems contribute significantly to the field of medicine.

Catalase is a type of enzyme that is found in many living organisms, including humans. Its primary function is to catalyze the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) into water (H2O) and oxygen (O2). This reaction helps protect cells from the harmful effects of hydrogen peroxide, which can be toxic at high concentrations.

The chemical reaction catalyzed by catalase can be represented as follows:

H2O2 + Catalase → H2O + O2 + Catalase

Catalase is a powerful antioxidant enzyme that plays an important role in protecting cells from oxidative damage. It is found in high concentrations in tissues that produce or are exposed to hydrogen peroxide, such as the liver, kidneys, and erythrocytes (red blood cells).

Deficiency in catalase activity has been linked to several diseases, including cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, and aging. On the other hand, overexpression of catalase has been shown to have potential therapeutic benefits in various disease models, such as reducing inflammation and oxidative stress.

In the field of medicine, ceramics are commonly referred to as inorganic, non-metallic materials that are made up of compounds such as oxides, carbides, and nitrides. These materials are often used in medical applications due to their biocompatibility, resistance to corrosion, and ability to withstand high temperatures. Some examples of medical ceramics include:

1. Bioceramics: These are ceramic materials that are used in medical devices and implants, such as hip replacements, dental implants, and bone grafts. They are designed to be biocompatible, which means they can be safely implanted into the body without causing an adverse reaction.
2. Ceramic coatings: These are thin layers of ceramic material that are applied to medical devices and implants to improve their performance and durability. For example, ceramic coatings may be used on orthopedic implants to reduce wear and tear, or on cardiovascular implants to prevent blood clots from forming.
3. Ceramic membranes: These are porous ceramic materials that are used in medical filtration systems, such as hemodialysis machines. They are designed to selectively filter out impurities while allowing essential molecules to pass through.
4. Ceramic scaffolds: These are three-dimensional structures made of ceramic material that are used in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. They provide a framework for cells to grow and multiply, helping to repair or replace damaged tissues.

Overall, medical ceramics play an important role in modern healthcare, providing safe and effective solutions for a wide range of medical applications.

Cell membrane permeability refers to the ability of various substances, such as molecules and ions, to pass through the cell membrane. The cell membrane, also known as the plasma membrane, is a thin, flexible barrier that surrounds all cells, controlling what enters and leaves the cell. Its primary function is to protect the cell's internal environment and maintain homeostasis.

The permeability of the cell membrane depends on its structure, which consists of a phospholipid bilayer interspersed with proteins. The hydrophilic (water-loving) heads of the phospholipids face outward, while the hydrophobic (water-fearing) tails face inward, creating a barrier that is generally impermeable to large, polar, or charged molecules.

However, specific proteins within the membrane, called channels and transporters, allow certain substances to cross the membrane. Channels are protein structures that span the membrane and provide a pore for ions or small uncharged molecules to pass through. Transporters, on the other hand, are proteins that bind to specific molecules and facilitate their movement across the membrane, often using energy in the form of ATP.

The permeability of the cell membrane can be influenced by various factors, such as temperature, pH, and the presence of certain chemicals or drugs. Changes in permeability can have significant consequences for the cell's function and survival, as they can disrupt ion balances, nutrient uptake, waste removal, and signal transduction.

Sprague-Dawley rats are a strain of albino laboratory rats that are widely used in scientific research. They were first developed by researchers H.H. Sprague and R.C. Dawley in the early 20th century, and have since become one of the most commonly used rat strains in biomedical research due to their relatively large size, ease of handling, and consistent genetic background.

Sprague-Dawley rats are outbred, which means that they are genetically diverse and do not suffer from the same limitations as inbred strains, which can have reduced fertility and increased susceptibility to certain diseases. They are also characterized by their docile nature and low levels of aggression, making them easier to handle and study than some other rat strains.

These rats are used in a wide variety of research areas, including toxicology, pharmacology, nutrition, cancer, and behavioral studies. Because they are genetically diverse, Sprague-Dawley rats can be used to model a range of human diseases and conditions, making them an important tool in the development of new drugs and therapies.

Ammonium sulfate is a chemical compound with the formula (NH4)2SO4. It is a white crystalline solid that is highly soluble in water and is commonly used in fertilizers due to its high nitrogen content. In a medical context, it can be used as a laxative or for lowering the pH of the gastrointestinal tract in certain medical conditions. It may also be used in the treatment of metabolic alkalosis, a condition characterized by an excessively high pH in the blood. However, its use in medical treatments is less common than its use in agricultural and industrial applications.

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... is produced by the interaction of ethylene oxide with water, ethylene glycol, or ethylene glycol oligomers ... Polyethylene glycol, Chemindustry.ru "PEG 4000, 6000, 8000, 12000 , Polyethylene glycol". www.venus-goa.com. Retrieved 19 ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to Poly(ethylene glycol). Wikimedia Commons has media related to Polyethylene glycols. ... Polyethylene oxide, or high-molecular-weight polyethylene glycol, is synthesized by suspension polymerization. It is necessary ...
... or PEG propylene glycol cocoates are chemical compounds produced by the ... PEG-120 Propylene Glycol Stearate, PEG-10 Propylene Glycol, PEG-8 Propylene Glycol Cocoate, and PEG-55 Propylene Glycol Oleate ... Their chemical designation is PEG-8, referring to its polyethylene glycol (PEG) molecular chain length. PEG propylene glycol ... "Final Report on the Safety Assessment of PEG-25 Propylene Glycol Stearate, PEG-75 Propylene Glycol Stearate, ...
... densities and kinematic viscosities of poly(propylene glycol) diglycidyl ether and poly(ethylene glycol) monooleate". The ... "Bulk Modification of Poly(lactide) (PLA) via Copolymerization with Poly(propylene glycol) Diglycidylether (PPGDGE)". Polymers. ... Poly(propylene glycol) diglycidyl ether (PPGDGE) is an organic chemical in the glycidyl ether family. There are a number of ... "Poly(propylene glycol) diglycidyl ether". Sigma Aldrich. Jagtap, Ameya Rajendra; More, Aarti (2022-08-01). "Developments in ...
mono-ethylene glycol, di-ethylene glycol and other poly-ethylene glycols) get unavoidably produced. Thus, in-order to prevent ... Among glycols, ethylene glycol is used as antifreeze, in the production of polyester and polyethylene terephthalate (PET - raw ... Most ethylene oxide is used for synthesis of ethylene glycols, including diethylene glycol and triethylene glycol, that ... Liquid ethylene oxide can form polyethylene glycols. The polymerization can proceed via radical and ionic mechanisms, but only ...
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Polyethylene glycol-electrolyte solution is a fixed-dose combination medication sold under various brand names in the US, ... "DailyMed - polyethylene glycol 3350 powder, for solution". dailymed.nlm.nih.gov. Archived from the original on 26 April 2021. ... "Polyethylene glycol 3350 Use During Pregnancy". Drugs.com. Archived from the original on 28 April 2021. Retrieved 19 April 2019 ... "Polyethylene glycol 3350 Uses, Side Effects & Warnings". Drugs.com. Archived from the original on 28 April 2021. Retrieved 19 ...
Kawai F, Kimura T, Tani Y, Yamada H, Ueno T, Fukami H (1983). "Identification of reaction-products of polyethylene-glycol ... Other names in common use include polyethylene glycol dehydrogenase, and alkan-1-ol:(acceptor) oxidoreductase. This enzyme ... 1985). "Identification of the prosthetic group and further characterization of a novel enzyme, polyethylene-glycol ...
Fruijtier-Pölloth C (October 2005). "Safety assessment on polyethylene glycols (PEGs) and their derivatives as used in cosmetic ... Wenande E, Garvey LH (July 2016). "Immediate-type hypersensitivity to polyethylene glycols: a review". Clinical and ... The inclusion of sweet-tasting but toxic diethylene glycol in Chinese-made toothpaste led to a recall in 2007 involving ... The world outcry made Chinese officials ban the practice of using diethylene glycol in toothpaste. Reports have suggested ...
... methoxy polyethylene glycol-epoetin beta; and their quality-assured biosimilars are alternatives Apixaban, edoxaban, and ...
"Methoxy polyethylene glycol-epoetin beta". Drug Information Portal. U.S. National Library of Medicine. Portal: Medicine ( ... Methoxy polyethylene glycol-epoetin beta (Mircera) Recombinant erythropoietin has a variety of glycosylation patterns giving ...
Polyethylene glycol is used to fuse adjacent plasma membranes, but the success rate is low, so a selective medium in which only ... Yang J, Shen MH (2006). "Polyethylene glycol-mediated cell fusion". Nuclear Reprogramming. Methods Mol Biol. Vol. 325. pp. 59- ...
Choi, Lewis Siu Leung; Madden, Thomas D.; Webb, Murray S. (1994-09-30). "Polyethylene glycol modified ceramide lipids and ... including the addition of a chemical called polyethylene glycol (PEG) to further increase the LNP's ability to pass into cells ...
Polyethylene glycols are more commonly used in practical applications. These ligands encapsulate alkali metal cations ( ...
For example, combining lead nitrate and pentaethylene glycol (EO5) in a solution of acetonitrile and methanol followed by slow ... ISBN 978-0-08-037941-8. p. 395 Rogers, Robin D.; Andrew H. Bond; Debra M. Roden (1996). "Structural Chemistry of Poly (ethylene ... glycol). Complexes of Lead(II) Nitrate and Lead(II) Bromide". Inorg. Chem. 35 (24): 6964-6973. doi:10.1021/ic960587b. PMID ...
Cserr HF, Cooper DN, Suri PK, Patlak CS (April 1981). "Efflux of radiolabeled polyethylene glycols and albumin from rat brain ...
Polyethylene glycol was chosen as the polymer. In 1981 Davis and Abuchowski founded Enzon, Inc., which brought three PEGylated ... In both vaccines, the bubbles are coated with a stabilizing molecule of polyethylene glycol. As of December 2020, there is some ... PEGylation (or pegylation) is the process of both covalent and non-covalent attachment or amalgamation of polyethylene glycol ( ... Knop, Katrin; Hoogenboom, Richard; Fischer, Dagmar; Schubert, Ulrich S. (23 August 2010). "Poly(ethylene glycol) in Drug ...
If laxatives are used, milk of magnesia or polyethylene glycol are recommended as first-line agents due to their low cost and ... Lee-Robichaud H, Thomas K, Morgan J, Nelson RL (7 July 2010). "Lactulose versus Polyethylene Glycol for Chronic Constipation". ... In cases of chronic constipation, polyethylene glycol appears superior to lactulose. Prokinetics may be used to improve ...
Examples include cellulose, methyl cellulose, polyvinylpyrrolidone and polyethylene glycol. Tablet coatings protect tablet ... sucrose and polyethylene glycol. Dry binders are added to the powder blend, either after a wet granulation step, or as part of ... polyethylene glycol (PEG)... Binders are classified according to their application: Solution binders are dissolved in a solvent ...
"Poly(ethylene glycol) diglycidyl ether (PEGDGE 600)". www.polysciences.com. Retrieved 2020-05-01. Berdasco, Nancy Anne M.; ...
... from Cellulose Using Sulfuric Acid in Polyethylene Glycol". Organic Syntheses. 97: 38-53. doi:10.15227/orgsyn. ...
Osmotic laxatives such as polyethylene glycol are preferred. Individuals prone to DIOS tend to be at risk for repeated episodes ...
Conservation included treatment with polyethylene glycol. It was later transferred to Portsmouth where maritime archaeology ...
She developed a range of polyethylene glycol nanoparticles that can be cross-linked using hydrazone and oximes. The choice of ... Maynard has shown it is possible to use the fluorous content of poly(ethylene glycol methyl ether methacrylate), fluorous ... "FDA-approved poly (ethylene glycol)-protein conjugate drugs". Polymer Chemistry. 2 (7): 1442-1448. doi:10.1039/c1py00034a. ...
Polyethylene glycols (PEG) irritate the skin and eyes on a weak basis. For PEG aerosols, the American Industrial Hygiene ... In industrial chemistry, polyethylene glycols (PEGs, H(OCH2CH2)nOH) are one of the most widely used polymeric solvent families ... miscibility and light stability of the poly(butylene adipate-co-terephthalate)/poly(propylene carbonate)/polylactide mulch ... Ethylene glycol from renewable sources (cellulose) is commercially available. The physical properties of solvents are important ...
Kaufmann, Merrill R.; Eckard, Alan N. (1971). "Evaluation of water stress control with polyethylene glycols by analysis of ...
Chemically, naloxegol is a pegylated (polyethylene glycol-modified) derivative of α-naloxol. Specifically, the 6-α-hydroxyl ... Technically, the molecule that is attached via the ether link is O-methyl-heptaethylene glycol [that is, methoxyheptaethylene ... glycol, CH3OCH2CH2O(CH2CH2O)5CH2CH2OH], molecular weight 340.4, CAS number 4437-01-8. See "Compound Summary for CID 526555, ...
"BestBETs: Is polyethylene glycol safe and effective for chro..." Retrieved 2007-09-06. Roerig JL, Steffen KJ, Mitchell JE, ... Di Palma JA, Cleveland MV, McGowan J, Herrera JL (2007). "A randomized, multicenter comparison of polyethylene glycol laxative ... Solutions of polyethylene glycol and electrolytes (sodium chloride, sodium bicarbonate, potassium chloride, and sometimes ... "Comparison of a low dose polyethylene glycol electrolyte solution with lactulose for treatment of chronic constipation". Gut. ...
Jonathan G. Huddleston; Heather D. Willauer; Robin D. Rogers (23 June 2000). "Solvatochromic studies in polyethylene glycol- ... "Solvent Properties of Aqueous Biphasic Systems Composed of Polyethylene Glycol and Salt Characterized by the Free Energy of ...
... is a species of bacteria that degrade polyethylene glycol. It is strictly anaerobic, Gram-negative, and ... Schink B, Stieb M (June 1983). "Fermentative degradation of polyethylene glycol by a strictly anaerobic, gram-negative, non- ... Frings J, Schramm E, Schink B (July 1992). "Enzymes Involved in Anaerobic Polyethylene Glycol Degradation by Pelobacter ... Straß, Axel; Schink, Bernhard (1986). "Fermentation of polyethylene glycol via acetaldehyde in Pelobacter venetianus". Applied ...
Methoxy polyethylene glycol-epoetin beta is made from erythropoietin by chemically linking the N-terminal amino group or the ε- ... Methoxy polyethylene glycol-epoetin beta, sold under the brand name Mircera, is a long-acting erythropoietin receptor activator ... "Mircera- methoxy polyethylene glycol-epoetin beta injection, solution". DailyMed. 5 August 2019. Retrieved 9 January 2023. " ... amino group of any lysine present in the protein with methoxy polyethylene glycol butanoic acid.[citation needed] The average ...
Polyethylene Glycol 3350: learn about side effects, dosage, special precautions, and more on MedlinePlus ... Take polyethylene glycol 3350 exactly as directed.. Polyethylene glycol 3350 may be habit-forming. Do not take a larger dose, ... Before taking polyethylene glycol 3350,. *tell your doctor and pharmacist if you are allergic to polyethylene glycol or any ... Polyethylene glycol 3350 is used to treat occasional constipation. Polyethylene glycol 3350 is in a class of medications called ...
Polyethylene Glycol should be used in preference to Lactulose in the treatment of Chronic Constipation. ... Lactulose versus Polyethylene Glycol for Chronic Constipation Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2010 Jul 7:(7):CD007570. doi: 10.1002 ... Lactulose and Polyethylene Glycol (PEG) are both commonly used osmotic laxatives that have been shown to be effective and safe ... Authors conclusions: Polyethylene Glycol should be used in preference to Lactulose in the treatment of Chronic Constipation. ...
Polyethylene Glycol 400 (UNII: B697894SGQ) (Polyethylene Glycol, Unspecified - UNII:3WJQ0SDW1A) Polyethylene Glycol 400. 4 mg ... polyethylene glycol 400, 0.4 % / propylene glycol 0.3 % Ophthalmic Solution. PSN. 2. 477589. polyethylene glycol 400 4 MG/ML / ... SYSTANE HYDRATION PF PRESERVATIVE FREE- polyethylene glycol 400 and propylene glycol solution/ drops. Number of versions: 6. ... SYSTANE HYDRATION PF PRESERVATIVE FREE- polyethylene glycol 400 and propylene glycol solution/ drops. If this SPL contains ...
Keywords: Acute pancreatitis, Inflammation, Polyethylene glycols, Cytokines, AR42J cells, Cell death Core Tip: Acute ... Polyethylene glycols (PEGs) are non-immunogenic, non-toxic water-soluble polymers widely used in biological, chemical, clinical ... Polyethylene glycol 35 ameliorates pancreatic inflammatory response in cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in rats ... The manuscript describes the protective role of 35-kDa molecular weight polyethylene glycol (PEG35) on cerulein-induced AP. ...
In 2018, Top importers of Waxes; artificial and prepared, of polyethylene glycol from Spain were Portugal ($534.59K , 199,308 ... HS Code 340420: Waxes; artificial and prepared, of polyethylene glycol. Please note: Exports is gross exports and Imports is ... Waxes; artificial and prepared, of polyethylene glycol. 2018. Spain. 534.59. 199,308. Kg. ... Waxes; artificial and prepared, of polyethylene glycol. 2018. Spain. 442.06. 217,732. Kg. ...
Extraction of Chicken Antibodies from Egg Yolk by Polyethylene Glycol (PEG) Precipitation at JoVE.com ... IgY Technology Chicken Antibodies Egg Yolk Polyethylene Glycol (PEG) Precipitation Immunization I.m. Vaccination Gene-Gun ... Journal / Immunology and Infection / IgY Technology: Extraction of Chicken Antibodies from Egg Yolk by Polyethylene Glycol (PEG ... This protocol describes in particular the extraction of total IgY from egg yolk by means of polyethylene glycol precipitation ...
Ethylene Glycols and Monofunctional Ethylene Glycols [Chemical Structural Class] Monofunctional Ethylene Glycols [Chemical ... Ethylene Glycols and Monofunctional Ethylene Glycols [Chemical Structural Class] Monofunctional Ethylene Glycols [Chemical ...
In this work, polyethylene glycol functionalized CDs (CD-PEG) were prepared from oil palm empty fruit bunch by a one-pot ... Facile preparation of aqueous-soluble fluorescent polyethylene glycol functionalized carbon dots from palm waste by one-pot ... Facile preparation of aqueous-soluble fluorescent polyethylene glycol functionalized carbon dots from palm waste by one-pot ... Home / KnowledgeBase Articles / Facile preparation of aqueous-soluble fluorescent polyethylene glycol functionalized carbon ...
Immediate IgE-mediated hypersensitivity reactions to polyethylene glycol (PEG) are rare. Our understanding of PEG ... Background: Immediate IgE-mediated hypersensitivity reactions to polyethylene glycol (PEG) are rare. Our understanding of PEG ...
... ... ethylene glycol) (PEG)-based hydrogels. Chapter 1 introduces current treatment for cardiovascular disease (CVD), endothelial ... focuses on the development of approaches for subcutaneous and intravascular ECFC delivery with the aid of biomimetic poly( ...
9.3 Asia-Pacific Poly Propylene Glycol Market Size by Region. 9.3.1 Asia-Pacific Poly Propylene Glycol Sales Quantity by Region ... 4.1 Global Poly Propylene Glycol Market Size by Region. 4.1.1 Global Poly Propylene Glycol Sales Quantity by Region (2018-2029) ... 7.3 North America Poly Propylene Glycol Market Size by Country. 7.3.1 North America Poly Propylene Glycol Sales Quantity by ... 10.3 South America Poly Propylene Glycol Market Size by Country. 10.3.1 South America Poly Propylene Glycol Sales Quantity by ...
Tag: polyethylene glycols. Antiperspirants and Deodorants: Do You Know What You Are Spraying Under Your Arms?. The body has a ...
Polyethylene glycol (PEG) is widely used in industry and medicine. Anti-PEG antibodies have been developed for characterizing ... Accelerated clearance of polyethylene glycol-modified proteins by anti-polyethylene glycol IgM. Bioconjug Chem. 1999;10(3):520- ... Structural basis of polyethylene glycol recognition by antibody. *Cheng-Chung Lee. ORCID: orcid.org/0000-0002-8259-43881 na1, ... Polyethylene glycol (PEG) is widely used in industry and medicine. Anti-PEG antibodies have been developed for characterizing ...
Poly glycol ester, Speciality Polymer, Provides fast resolution of stable emulsions in which water is the internal phase and ...
Dou, S., Zhang, S., Klein, R. J., Runt, J., & Colby, R. H. (2006). Synthesis and characterization of poly(ethylene glycol)- ... Dou, S, Zhang, S, Klein, RJ, Runt, J & Colby, RH 2006, Synthesis and characterization of poly(ethylene glycol)-based single- ... Synthesis and characterization of poly(ethylene glycol)-based single-ion conductors. Chemistry of Materials. 2006 Sep 5;18(18): ... Synthesis and characterization of poly(ethylene glycol)-based single-ion conductors. Shichen Dou, Shihai Zhang, Robert J. Klein ...
Download Clariant Polyethylene Glycols 2007 for free. File size: 310.7 KB. File type: PDF ... Download Clariant Polyethylene Glycols 2007 for free. File size: 310.7 KB. File type: PDF. ...
Supplier and Distributor of Polyethylene Glycol , PEG , Europe , Asia ... Polyethylene Glycol Chemical Structure Composition.. Production. Polyethylene glycol (PEG) is formed by the reaction of ... Polyethylene Glycol (PEG). Polyethylene Glycol (PEG) is a clear, colorless, viscous liquid soluble in water. ... Arpadis is handling the storage, transport, export & import formalities of Polyethylene Glycol globally. ...
PEG 12 is a Polyethylene Glycol compound with an average of 12 ethylene glycol units. It is commonly used as an ingredient in ...
Abstract The Jeffrey Strathern Collection documents the experimental laboratory work performed by Dr. Jeffrey N. Strathern during his tenure at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory in what was known as the "Yeast Group". The collection consists of laboratory notebooks which include photographs and audiographs.. ...
Tradeasia is a world-class chemicals supplier and wholesaler of polyethylene glycol around the globe. Request a price quote for ... Polyethylene glycol is produced by the interaction of ethylene oxide with water, ethylene glycol, or ethylene glycol oligomers ... Polyethylene Glycol (PEG) is a polyether compound that is hydrophilic and nonionic. PEG is also known as polyethylene oxide ( ... Polyethylene glycol (PEG) is used as a chemical intermediate with the primary hydroxyl functionality which allows reactions ...
Polyethylene Glycol also known as Polyethylene Oxide (PEG / PEO) or macrogol , Buy from Certified Distributor , Contact us ... Polyethylene glycol - flexible polymer Polyethylene glycol. Polyethylene glycols (PEGS) are produced by an alkaline ... Polyethylene glycol (PEG) is a polymer compound composed of repeating ethylene glycol units. It is commonly used in various ... Our line product ranges from a polyethylene glycol of 200 USP, all the way to a molecular weight of 35,000. Depending on the ...
Discover the crucial role of polyethylene glycol 3350 para que sirve in managing constipation effectively and safely in ... including the use of polyethylene glycol 3350 as a laxative.. Uses of Polyethylene Glycol 3350 in Colonoscopy. Polyethylene ... What is polyethylene glycol 3350 used for?. Polyethylene glycol 3350 is commonly used as a laxative to treat constipation and ... How should polyethylene glycol 3350 be used?. Polyethylene glycol 3350 should be used according to the instructions provided by ...
Physical and chemical properties of polyethylene glycol March 20,2024. Polyethylene glycol (PEG) is a glycol polymer ... Y-shaped polyethylene glycol (PEG) derivatives March 27,2024. A Y-shaped polyethylene glycol derivative is a specially ... Polyethylene glycol structure March 20,2024. Polyethylene Glycol (PEG) is a polymer widely used in chemical and biomedical ... It is formed by connecting the centroids of three polyethylene glycol (PEG) units, wher... ...
Polyethylene Glycol (PEG) 300 - SDS French. Home / SDS Download / Polyethylene Glycol (PEG) 300 - SDS French ...
Macrogol Stearate or Polyethylene Glycol Stearate USP NF BP Ph Eur Manufacturers Suppliers, SDS MSDS Sheet, Exporters to USA ... Polyethylene glycol stearate;. Polyethylene glycol monostearate;. Poly(oxy-1,2-ethanediyl), α-hydro-ω-hydroxyoctadecanoate CAS ... SDS MSDS Sheet of Macrogol Stearate or Polyethylene Glycol Stearate Manufacturers. Macrogol Stearate. Polyethylene Glycol ... Content of Free Polyethylene Glycols: To pass the test.. Note- This test is for Polyoxyl 40 Stearate only.. Acceptance criteria ...
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Mô tả: POLYETHYLENE GLYCOL 400 (PEG 400) là hợp chất hữu cơ với công thức C2nH4n+2On+1, là một polyether có trọng lượng phân tử ... POLYETHYLENE GLYCOL 400 (PEG 400). Xuất xứ: Hàn Quốc, Malaysia. Quy cách: 230 Kg/phuy. Số CAS: 25322-68-3. Công thức phân tử: C ... Be the first to review "POLYETHYLENE GLYCOL 400 (PEG 400)" Cancel reply. Your email address will not be published. Required ...
... other names and ingredient information for Polyethylene Glycol 25 Soy Sterol. ... Products That Dont Contain Polyethylene Glycol 25 Soy Sterol See All Shoppers choice ™ ... This Polyethylene Glycol 25 Soy Sterol Ingredient Allergy Safety Information page on SkinSAFE works best with javascript ... Propylene Glycol Free. Free of the vehicle (gives substance) propylene glycol and similar vehicles. ...
  • Methoxy polyethylene glycol-epoetin beta, sold under the brand name Mircera, is a long-acting erythropoietin receptor activator (CERA) used for the treatment of anaemia associated with chronic kidney disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • Methoxy polyethylene glycol-epoetin beta is made from erythropoietin by chemically linking the N-terminal amino group or the ε-amino group of any lysine present in the protein with methoxy polyethylene glycol butanoic acid. (wikipedia.org)
  • Polypropylene glycol or polypropylene oxide is the polymer of propylene glycol. (marketsandresearch.biz)
  • According to our latest study, the global Poly Propylene Glycol market size was valued at USD 1803 million in 2022 and is forecast to a readjusted size of USD 2212.5 million by 2029 with a CAGR of 3.0% during review period. (marketsandresearch.biz)
  • Poly Propylene Glycol are mainly classified into the following types: PPG Average Mn ~200-1500, PPG Average Mn ~1500-3000, PPG Average Mn above 3000. (marketsandresearch.biz)
  • Poly Propylene Glycol have wide range of applications, such as Intermediate, Solvent, Skin Care and Cosmetics etc. (marketsandresearch.biz)
  • Asia Pacific is the largest region of Poly Propylene Glycol in the world in the past few years and it will keep increasing in the next few years. (marketsandresearch.biz)
  • This report is a detailed and comprehensive analysis for global Poly Propylene Glycol market. (marketsandresearch.biz)
  • This report profiles key players in the global Poly Propylene Glycol market based on the following parameters - company overview, production, value, price, gross margin, product portfolio, geographical presence, and key developments. (marketsandresearch.biz)
  • Poly Propylene Glycol market is split by Type and by Application. (marketsandresearch.biz)
  • Free of the vehicle (gives substance) propylene glycol and similar vehicles. (skinsafeproducts.com)
  • Polyethylene glycol (PEG) is formed by the reaction of ethylene oxide and water under pressure in the presence of a catalyst. (arpadis.com)
  • PEG is also known as polyethylene oxide (PEO) or polyoxyethylene (POE), depending on its molecular weight. (chemtradeasia.com)
  • Polyethylene glycol is produced by the interaction of ethylene oxide with water, ethylene glycol, or ethylene glycol oligomers. (chemtradeasia.com)
  • Polyethylene glycols (PEGS) are produced by an alkaline polymerization of ethylene oxide (EO) with water, mono- or diethylene glycol. (terchemicals.com)
  • Polyethylene glycol (PEG) is a glycol polymer synthesized by the polymerization of ethylene oxide, with a relative molecular weight (Mr) mainly between 200 and 40,000. (sinopeg.com)
  • Polyethylene glycol 3350 is used to treat occasional constipation. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Polyethylene glycol 3350 is in a class of medications called osmotic laxatives. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Polyethylene glycol 3350 comes as a powder to be mixed with a liquid and taken by mouth. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Take polyethylene glycol 3350 exactly as directed. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Polyethylene glycol 3350 may be habit-forming. (medlineplus.gov)
  • It may take 2 to 4 days for polyethylene glycol 3350 to produce a bowel movement. (medlineplus.gov)
  • If you are using polyethylene glycol 3350 from a bottle, use the measuring line on the bottle cap to measure a single dose (about 1 heaping tablespoon). (medlineplus.gov)
  • If you are using polyethylene glycol 3350 packets, each packet contains a single dose. (medlineplus.gov)
  • If you become pregnant while taking polyethylene glycol 3350, call your doctor. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Polyethylene glycol 3350 may cause side effects. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Welcome to our comprehensive guide on polyethylene glycol 3350, a versatile compound that offers numerous benefits in the realm of digestive health and medical procedures. (ecoplasinnovations.com.sg)
  • Polyethylene glycol 3350, also known as PEG 3350, is commonly utilized as a laxative to relieve occasional constipation and facilitate bowel movements. (ecoplasinnovations.com.sg)
  • Additionally, healthcare professionals often recommend polyethylene glycol 3350 as a pivotal component in preparing the bowel for colonoscopy procedures. (ecoplasinnovations.com.sg)
  • Some of the brand names under which polyethylene glycol 3350 is available include Bi-peglyte, Clearlax, Colyte, Gavilax, and Gavilyte-C. These products provide the same effective relief from constipation and ensure optimal bowel preparation before colonoscopy procedures. (ecoplasinnovations.com.sg)
  • Stay with us as we delve deeper into the specific uses of polyethylene glycol 3350, including its effectiveness in treating functional constipation in children and its usage in colonoscopy and other gastrointestinal procedures. (ecoplasinnovations.com.sg)
  • Join us for an insightful journey through the world of polyethylene glycol 3350 and discover how this remarkable compound can improve your quality of life. (ecoplasinnovations.com.sg)
  • These findings highlight the efficacy and potential benefits of using polyethylene glycol 3350 for treating functional constipation in children, providing a safe and effective alternative to traditional treatments. (ecoplasinnovations.com.sg)
  • When used in accordance with the instructions for use, polyethylene glycol 3350 can help relieve constipation-related symptoms and improve overall digestive health in children. (ecoplasinnovations.com.sg)
  • One commonly used laxative for bowel preparation is polyethylene glycol 3350, which serves as a potent and reliable means to clear the bowel before the procedure. (ecoplasinnovations.com.sg)
  • Supplier, Manufacturer, Exporter of Macrogol Stearate or Polyethylene Glycol Stearate, Muby Chemicals of Mubychem Group, established in 1976, is the original manufacturers of Specialty Chemicals, Pharmaceutical Excipient, Fragrance Food & Flavor chemicals, Reagent Grade Chemicals, Shale Gas Fracturing Chemicals in India. (mubychem.com)
  • The term polypropylene glycol or PPG is reserved for low to medium range molar mass polymer when the nature of the end-group, which is usually a hydroxyl group, still matters. (marketsandresearch.biz)
  • Polyethylene glycol (PEG) is a water-soluble, low immunogenic and biocompatible polymer formed by repeating units of ethylene glycol [ 1 ]. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Ethylene glycol and its oligomers are used as a starting material, and the polymer chain length depends on the ratio of reactants. (chemtradeasia.com)
  • Polyethylene glycol (PEG) is a polymer compound composed of repeating ethylene glycol units. (terchemicals.com)
  • polyethylene glycol is often utilized as a polymer matrix or excipient in various formulations. (terchemicals.com)
  • A Y-shaped polyethylene glycol derivative is a specially structured polymer with a Y-shaped molecular structure. (sinopeg.com)
  • Polyethylene Glycol (PEG) is a polymer widely used in chemical and biomedical fields. (sinopeg.com)
  • Experiments: In this work, we specifically synthesize poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG) chains, grafted onto poly(styrene) (PS) particles in aqueous solution, and adjust the conditions so that strongly anisotropic and isolated polymer-like clusters are formed. (lu.se)
  • Lactulose and Polyethylene Glycol (PEG) are both commonly used osmotic laxatives that have been shown to be effective and safe treatments for chronic constipation. (nih.gov)
  • To identify and review all relevant data in order to determine whether Lactulose or Polyethylene Glycol is more effective at treating chronic constipation and faecal impaction. (nih.gov)
  • We searched the MEDLINE, EMBASE and CINAHL databases, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials for all randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing the use of lactulose and polyethylene glycol in the management of faecal impaction and chronic constipation. (nih.gov)
  • Studies were included if they were randomised controlled trials which compared lactulose with polyethylene glycol in the management of chronic constipation. (nih.gov)
  • The findings of our work indicate that Polyethylene glycol is better than lactulose in outcomes of stool frequency per week, form of stool, relief of abdominal pain and the need for additional products. (nih.gov)
  • Polyethylene Glycol should be used in preference to Lactulose in the treatment of Chronic Constipation. (nih.gov)
  • Group 1 received polyethylene glycol as a maintenance treatment, while group 2 received the classic treatment using lactulose and senna. (ecoplasinnovations.com.sg)
  • Certolizumab pegol is a recombinant, humanized antibody Fab' fragment against tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFα), conjugated to polyethylene glycol (PEG) and in accordance with the CHMP guideline on the environmental risk assessment (EMEA/CHMP/SWP/4447/00) is exempted from testing because of its chemical structure. (janusinfo.se)
  • A series of ionomers was synthesized by melt polycondensation of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) oligomers and dimethyl 5-sulfoisophthalate sodium salt. (psu.edu)
  • PEG 12 is a Polyethylene Glycol compound with an average of 12 ethylene glycol units. (rawsource.com)
  • Polyethylene Glycol (PEG) is a polyether compound that is hydrophilic and nonionic. (chemtradeasia.com)
  • polyethylene glycol is a water-soluble compound that has excellent solvent properties. (terchemicals.com)
  • Polyethylene glycol (PEG) is a polyether compound derived from petroleum with many applications, from medicine to industrial manufacturing. (bvsalud.org)
  • This protocol describes in particular the extraction of total IgY from egg yolk by means of polyethylene glycol precipitation and gives general information about IgY technology. (jove.com)
  • Mô tả: POLYETHYLENE GLYCOL 400 (PEG 400) là hợp chất hữu cơ với công thức C 2n H 4n+2 O n+1 , là một polyether có trọng lượng phân tử trung bình là 400 với nhiều ứng dụng từ sản xuất công nghiệp, dược phẩm. (binhtri.com)
  • Plastic and Placenta: Identification of Polyethylene Glycol (PEG) Compounds in the Human Placenta by HPLC-MS/MS System. (bvsalud.org)
  • A clinical trial conducted in Egypt investigated the efficacy of polyethylene glycol as a maintenance treatment for functional constipation in children. (ecoplasinnovations.com.sg)
  • The results showed that polyethylene glycol was significantly effective in improving fecal masses, number of defecations, painful or hard bowel movements, and other symptoms associated with functional constipation. (ecoplasinnovations.com.sg)
  • Polyethylene glycol was found to be well-tolerated and had long-term efficacy in managing functional constipation in children. (ecoplasinnovations.com.sg)
  • Polyethylene glycol is employed in the preparation of the bowel before colonoscopy to ensure a clear and unobstructed view of the intestinal lining. (ecoplasinnovations.com.sg)
  • Polyethylene glycol hypersensitivity, patient outcomes in a seven year retrospective study. (authorea.com)
  • Polyethylene Glycol Chemical Structure Composition. (arpadis.com)
  • Polyethylene glycol (PEG) is used as a chemical intermediate with the primary hydroxyl functionality which allows reactions typical of alcohols, such as conversion of a functional alcohol group to esters, ethers, amines and acetals. (chemtradeasia.com)
  • Physical and chemical properties of polyethylene glycol March 20,2024. (sinopeg.com)
  • Our line product ranges from a polyethylene glycol of 200 USP, all the way to a molecular weight of 35,000. (terchemicals.com)
  • Polyethylene glycol (PEG) is widely used in industry and medicine. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Product categories of Polyethylene glycol distearate , we are specialized manufacturers from China, Polyethylene glycol distearate , Polyethylene glycol distearate suppliers/factory, wholesale high-quality products of Polyethylene glycol distearate R & D and manufacturing, we have the perfect after-sales service and technical support. (nbrubbers.com)
  • If you want to know more about the products in Polyethylene glycol distearate, please click the product details to view parameters, models, pictures, prices and other information about Polyethylene glycol distearate. (nbrubbers.com)
  • Polyethylene Glycol (PEG) is a clear, colorless, viscous liquid soluble in water. (arpadis.com)
  • Content of Free Polyethylene Glycols: To pass the test. (mubychem.com)
  • polyethylene glycol has lubricating properties, which make it effective in reducing friction and providing lubrication. (terchemicals.com)
  • The most important property of all polyethylene glycols is their solubility in water. (terchemicals.com)
  • Here you can find the related products in Polyethylene glycol distearate , we are professional manufacturer of Polyethylene glycol distearate. (nbrubbers.com)
  • It may contain free polyethylene glycols. (mubychem.com)
  • 17%-27% of free polyethylene glycols for Polyoxyl 40 Stearate only. (mubychem.com)
  • It is formed by connecting the centroids of three polyethylene glycol (PEG) units, wher. (sinopeg.com)
  • We have improved quality control processes of Polyethylene glycol distearate to ensure each export qualified product. (nbrubbers.com)
  • LNP include lipids, phospholipids, cholesterol and polyethylene glycol (PEG), which increases LNP stability. (cdc.gov)
  • Background: Immediate IgE-mediated hypersensitivity reactions to polyethylene glycol (PEG) are rare. (authorea.com)
  • Whatever you are a group or individual, we will do our best to provide you with accurate and comprehensive message about Polyethylene glycol distearate! (nbrubbers.com)
  • polyethylene glycol has hygroscopic properties, meaning it can attract and hold moisture from the surrounding environment. (terchemicals.com)
  • This study compared four solvents (1-propanol, polyethylene glycol [avg. (cdc.gov)
  • Arpadis is handling the storage, transport, export & import formalities of Polyethylene Glycol globally. (arpadis.com)