Pollination: The transfer of POLLEN grains (male gametes) to the plant ovule (female gamete).Flowers: The reproductive organs of plants.Bees: Insect members of the superfamily Apoidea, found almost everywhere, particularly on flowers. About 3500 species occur in North America. They differ from most WASPS in that their young are fed honey and pollen rather than animal food.Orchidaceae: A plant family of the order Orchidales, subclass Liliidae, class Liliopsida (monocotyledons). All orchids have the same bilaterally symmetrical flower structure, with three sepals, but the flowers vary greatly in color and shape.Pollen: The fertilizing element of plants that contains the male GAMETOPHYTES.Plant Nectar: Sugar-rich liquid produced in plant glands called nectaries. It is either produced in flowers or other plant structures, providing a source of attraction for pollinating insects and animals, as well as being a nutrient source to animal mutualists which provide protection of plants against herbivores.Ficus: A plant genus of the family MORACEAE. It is the source of the familiar fig fruit and the latex from this tree contains FICAIN.Hymenoptera: An extensive order of highly specialized insects including bees, wasps, and ants.Insects: The class Insecta, in the phylum ARTHROPODA, whose members are characterized by division into three parts: head, thorax, and abdomen. They are the dominant group of animals on earth; several hundred thousand different kinds having been described. Three orders, HEMIPTERA; DIPTERA; and SIPHONAPTERA; are of medical interest in that they cause disease in humans and animals. (From Borror et al., An Introduction to the Study of Insects, 4th ed, p1)Wasps: Any of numerous winged hymenopterous insects of social as well as solitary habits and having formidable stings.Erysimum: A plant genus of the family BRASSICACEAE. Some members contain CARDIAC GLYCOSIDES.Reproduction: The total process by which organisms produce offspring. (Stedman, 25th ed)Angiosperms: Members of the group of vascular plants which bear flowers. They are differentiated from GYMNOSPERMS by their production of seeds within a closed chamber (OVARY, PLANT). The Angiosperms division is composed of two classes, the monocotyledons (Liliopsida) and dicotyledons (Magnoliopsida). Angiosperms represent approximately 80% of all known living plants.Aquilegia: A plant genus of the family RANUNCULACEAE that contains aquiledine, isoaquiledine and cycloartane-type glycosides.Centaurium: A plant genus of the family GENTIANACEAE. Triterpene lactones and other compounds have been isolated from species of this genus. The common name of century plant has also been used for the AGAVE genus.Iris Plant: A plant genus of the family IRIDACEAE that contains IRIP, a type-1 ribosome-inactivating protein, and iridals (TRITERPENES).Proteaceae: A plant family of the order Proteales, subclass Rosidae class Magnoliopsida. Cluster roots, bottlebrush-like clusters of rootlets which form in response to poor soil, are common in this family.Bignoniaceae: A plant family of the order Lamiales. The family is characterized by oppositely paired, usually compound leaves and bell- or funnel-shaped, bisexual flowers having a five-lobed calyx and corolla.Mimulus: A plant genus of the family Phrymaceae. Members contain 6-geranylflavanones and mimulone.Reproductive Isolation: Mechanisms that prevent different populations from exchanging genes (GENE FLOW), resulting in or maintaining GENETIC SPECIATION. It can either prevent mating to take place or ensure that any offspring produced is either inviable or sterile, thereby preventing further REPRODUCTION.Inflorescence: A cluster of FLOWERS (as opposed to a solitary flower) arranged on a main stem of a plant.Commelinaceae: A plant family of the order Commelinales, subclass Commelinidae, class Liliopsida (monocotyledons) that are often somewhat succulent. The leaves are alternate, simple, parallel-veined, and usually with a closed sheathing base. The flowers are often in cymes and have 3 petals and 3 sepals.Seeds: The encapsulated embryos of flowering plants. They are used as is or for animal feed because of the high content of concentrated nutrients like starches, proteins, and fats. Rapeseed, cottonseed, and sunflower seed are also produced for the oils (fats) they yield.Petunia: A plant genus of the family SOLANACEAE. Members contain steroidal glycosides.Ecosystem: A functional system which includes the organisms of a natural community together with their environment. (McGraw Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Opuntia: A plant genus of the family CACTACEAE. Species with cylindrical joints are called Cholla; flat jointed ones are Prickly-pear.Plant Physiological Phenomena: The physiological processes, properties, and states characteristic of plants.Apocynaceae: The dogbane family of the order Gentianales. Members of the family have milky, often poisonous juice, smooth-margined leaves, and flowers in clusters. Asclepiadacea (formerly the milkweed family) has been included since 1999 and before 1810.Asclepias: A plant genus of the family ASCLEPIADACEAE. This is the true milkweed; APOCYNUM & EUPHORBIA hirta are rarely called milkweed. Asclepias asthmatica has been changed to TYLOPHORA.Diptera: An order of the class Insecta. Wings, when present, number two and distinguish Diptera from other so-called flies, while the halteres, or reduced hindwings, separate Diptera from other insects with one pair of wings. The order includes the families Calliphoridae, Oestridae, Phoridae, SARCOPHAGIDAE, Scatophagidae, Sciaridae, SIMULIIDAE, Tabanidae, Therevidae, Trypetidae, CERATOPOGONIDAE; CHIRONOMIDAE; CULICIDAE; DROSOPHILIDAE; GLOSSINIDAE; MUSCIDAE; TEPHRITIDAE; and PSYCHODIDAE. The larval form of Diptera species are called maggots (see LARVA).Beekeeping: The management and maintenance of colonies of honeybees.Chamaecrista: A plant genus of the family FABACEAE. Some species were reclassified from CASSIA and Senna.Honey: A sweet viscous liquid food, produced in the honey sacs of various bees from nectar collected from flowers. The nectar is ripened into honey by inversion of its sucrose sugar into fructose and glucose. It is somewhat acidic and has mild antiseptic properties, being sometimes used in the treatment of burns and lacerations.Color: The visually perceived property of objects created by absorption or reflection of specific wavelengths of light.Drosera: A plant genus of the family Droseraceae, order Nepenthales, subclass Dilleniidae, class Magnoliopsida, that contains naphthoquinone glucosides. The name sundew is rarely used for PYROLA.Feeding Behavior: Behavioral responses or sequences associated with eating including modes of feeding, rhythmic patterns of eating, and time intervals.Nelumbo: A plant genus of the family NELUMBONACEAE. The common name of lotus is also for LOTUS and NYMPHAEA.Cactaceae: The cactus plant family of the order Caryophyllales, subclass Caryophyllidae, class Magnoliopsida. Cacti are succulent perennial plants well adapted to dry regions.Crops, Agricultural: Cultivated plants or agricultural produce such as grain, vegetables, or fruit. (From American Heritage Dictionary, 1982)Delphinium: A plant genus of the family RANUNCULACEAE. Members contain ACONITINE and other diterpenoid alkaloids.Self-Fertilization: The fusion of a male gamete with a female gamete from the same individual animal or plant.Liliaceae: A monocot family within the order Liliales. This family is divided by some botanists into other families such as Convallariaceae, Hyacinthaceae and Amaryllidaceae. Amaryllidaceae, which have inferior ovaries, includes CRINUM; GALANTHUS; LYCORIS; and NARCISSUS and are known for AMARYLLIDACEAE ALKALOIDS.Melastomataceae: A plant family of the order Myrtales, subclass Rosidae, class Magnoliopsida composed of tropical plants with parallel-nerved leaves.Acanthaceae: A plant family of the order Lamiales. It is characterized by simple leaves in opposite pairs, cystoliths (enlarged cells containing crystals of calcium carbonate), and bilaterally symmetrical and bisexual flowers that are usually crowded together. The common name for Ruellia of wild petunia is easily confused with PETUNIA.Iridaceae: A monocot plant family of the Liliopsida class. It is classified by some in the Liliales order and some in the Asparagales order.Mediterranean Region: The MEDITERRANEAN SEA, the MEDITERRANEAN ISLANDS, and the countries bordering on the sea collectively.Primula: A plant genus of the family PRIMULACEAE. It can cause CONTACT DERMATITIS. SAPONINS have been identified in the root.Fruit: The fleshy or dry ripened ovary of a plant, enclosing the seed or seeds.Daphne: A plant genus of the family THYMELAEACEAE. They are evergreen shrubs much cultivated in garden borders and rock gardens in mild climates. Members contain mezerein, flavonoids, and COUMARINS such as daphnetin and daphnin.Raphanus: A plant genus of the family BRASSICACEAE known for its peppery red root.Biological Evolution: The process of cumulative change over successive generations through which organisms acquire their distinguishing morphological and physiological characteristics.Malpighiaceae: A plant family of the order Polygalales, subclass Rosidae class, Magnoliopsida that are mostly shrubs and small trees. Many of the members contain indole alkaloids.Penstemon: A plant genus of the family Plantaginaceae. Members contain phenylpropanoid and iridoid glycosides.Biodiversity: The variety of all native living organisms and their various forms and interrelationships.Gentianaceae: A plant family of the order Gentianales, subclass Asteridae, class Magnoliopsida.Silene: A plant genus of the family CARYOPHYLLACEAE. The common name of campion is also used with LYCHNIS. The common name of 'pink' can be confused with other plants.Species Specificity: The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.Odors: The volatile portions of substances perceptible by the sense of smell. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Ecotype: Geographic variety, population, or race, within a species, that is genetically adapted to a particular habitat. An ecotype typically exhibits phenotypic differences but is capable of interbreeding with other ecotypes.Elettaria: A plant genus of the family ZINGIBERACEAE, order Zingiberales, subclass Zingiberidae. Elettaria cardamomum (L.) Maton is the source of Cardamom used in SPICES.Birds: Warm-blooded VERTEBRATES possessing FEATHERS and belonging to the class Aves.Sex Attractants: Pheromones that elicit sexual attraction or mating behavior usually in members of the opposite sex in the same species.Colony Collapse: The sudden collapse and disappearance or diminution of a colony of organisms.Ericaceae: The heath plant family of the order Ericales, subclass Dilleniidae, class Magnoliopsida that are generally shrubs or small trees. Leaves are alternate, simple, and leathery; flowers are symmetrical with a 4- or 5-parted corolla of partly fused petals.Helleborus: A plant genus of the family RANUNCULACEAE. Members contain hellebrin (BUFANOLIDES). The extract is the basis of Boicil preparation used to treat rheumatism.Boraginaceae: The Borage plant family is in the class Magnoliopsida, subclass Asteridae, order Lamiales. It is characterized by hairy foliage, usually alternate and simple; flowers are funnel-shaped or tubular. Some of the species contain PYRROLIZIDINE ALKALOIDS.Datura: A plant genus of the family SOLANACEAE. Members contain TROPANES. The common name of trumpet flower is also sometimes used for GELSEMIUM.Euphorbiaceae: The spurge family of flowering plants, in the order Euphorbiales, contains some 7,500 species in 275 genera. The family consists of annual and perennial herbs and woody shrubs or trees.Yucca: A genus (and common name) in the AGAVACEAE family. It is known for SAPONINS in the root that are used in SOAPS.Agriculture: The science, art or practice of cultivating soil, producing crops, and raising livestock.Symbiosis: The relationship between two different species of organisms that are interdependent; each gains benefits from the other or a relationship between different species where both of the organisms in question benefit from the presence of the other.Beetles: INSECTS of the order Coleoptera, containing over 350,000 species in 150 families. They possess hard bodies and their mouthparts are adapted for chewing.Narcissus: A plant genus of the family LILIACEAE. Members contain ungiminorine and LECTINS.Coumaphos: A organothiophosphorus cholinesterase inhibitor that is used as an anthelmintic, insecticide, and as a nematocide.Geranium: A plant genus of the family GERANIACEAE. Geranium is also used as a common name for PELARGONIUM.Sympatry: In evolutionary theory, overlapping geographic distribution of diverging species. In sympatric GENETIC SPECIATION, genetic diversion occurs without geographic separation.Organic Agriculture: Systems of agriculture which adhere to nationally regulated standards that restrict the use of pesticides, non-organic fertilizers, genetic engineering, growth hormones, irradiation, antibiotics, and non-organic ANIMAL FEED.Campanulaceae: A plant family of the order Campanulales, subclass Asteridae, class MagnoliopsidaSaxifragaceae: The saxifrage plant family of the order ROSALES, subclass Rosidae, class Magnoliopsida. The leaves are alternate and sometimes deeply lobed or form rosettes. The flowers have both male and female parts and 4 or 5 sepals and petals; they are usually in branched clusters. The fruit is a capsule with many seeds.Borneo: An island in the Malay Archipelago, east of Sumatra, north of Java, and west of Celebes. It is the third largest island in the world. Its name is a Portuguese alteration of BRUNEI, located on it. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p163; Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p73)Theales: A plant order of the subclass Dilleniidae, class Magnoliopsida. It includes 18 families, approximately 175 genera, and 3,400 species. Its members are mostly tropical trees and shrubs.Clusia: A plant genus of the family CLUSIACEAE. Members contain benzophenones.Moths: Insects of the suborder Heterocera of the order LEPIDOPTERA.Volatile Organic Compounds: Organic compounds that have a relatively high VAPOR PRESSURE at room temperature.Population Dynamics: The pattern of any process, or the interrelationship of phenomena, which affects growth or change within a population.Ranunculaceae: The buttercup plant family of the order Ranunculales, subclass Magnoliidae, class Magnoliopsida. The leaves are usually alternate and stalkless. The flowers usually have two to five free sepals and may be radially symmetrical or irregular.Clerodendrum: A plant genus of the family Lamiaceae. Inerminosides (iridoid glycosides); colebroside A; STEROIDS; STEROLS; terpenoid glucosides; and abietane DITERPENES have been found in this genus.Geography: The science dealing with the earth and its life, especially the description of land, sea, and air and the distribution of plant and animal life, including humanity and human industries with reference to the mutual relations of these elements. (From Webster, 3d ed)Hybridization, Genetic: The genetic process of crossbreeding between genetically dissimilar parents to produce a hybrid.Solanaceae: A plant family of the order Solanales, subclass Asteridae. Among the most important are POTATOES; TOMATOES; CAPSICUM (green and red peppers); TOBACCO; and BELLADONNA.Nosema: A genus of parasitic FUNGI in the family Nosematidae. Some species are pathogenic for invertebrates of economic importance while others are being researched for possible roles in controlling pest INSECTS. They are also pathogenic in humans.Manduca: A genus of sphinx or hawk moths of the family Sphingidae. These insects are used in molecular biology studies during all stages of their life cycle.Tulipa: A plant genus of the family LILIACEAE. Members contain tuliposides and tulipalins and have been associated with allergic contact dermatitis in florists.Parasites: Invertebrate organisms that live on or in another organism (the host), and benefit at the expense of the other. Traditionally excluded from definition of parasites are pathogenic BACTERIA; FUNGI; VIRUSES; and PLANTS; though they may live parasitically.Seed Dispersal: The various physical methods which include wind, insects, animals, tension, and water, by which a plant scatters its seeds away from the parent plant.Myrtaceae: The myrtle plant family of the order Myrtales. It includes several aromatic medicinal plants such as EUCALYPTUS.Herbivory: The act of feeding on plants by animals.Plant Infertility: The failure of PLANTS to complete fertilization and obtain seed (SEEDS) as a result of defective POLLEN or ovules, or other aberrations. (Dict. of Plant Genet. and Mol. Biol., 1998)Tropical Climate: A climate which is typical of equatorial and tropical regions, i.e., one with continually high temperatures with considerable precipitation, at least during part of the year. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Behavior, Animal: The observable response an animal makes to any situation.Heliconiaceae: A plant family of the order ZINGIBERALES, subclass Zingiberidae, class Liliopsida.Ecology: The branch of science concerned with the interrelationship of organisms and their ENVIRONMENT, especially as manifested by natural cycles and rhythms, community development and structure, interactions between different kinds of organisms, geographic distributions, and population alterations. (Webster's, 3d ed)Nitro Compounds: Compounds having the nitro group, -NO2, attached to carbon. When attached to nitrogen they are nitramines and attached to oxygen they are NITRATES.Trees: Woody, usually tall, perennial higher plants (Angiosperms, Gymnosperms, and some Pterophyta) having usually a main stem and numerous branches.Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Scrophularia: A plant genus of the family SCROPHULARIACEAE. Members contain iridoids.Pigmentation: Coloration or discoloration of a part by a pigment.Cordia: A plant genus of the family BORAGINACEAE. Members contain TRITERPENES and naphthoxirene.Salvia: A genus in the mint family (LAMIACEAE).Plants: Multicellular, eukaryotic life forms of kingdom Plantae (sensu lato), comprising the VIRIDIPLANTAE; RHODOPHYTA; and GLAUCOPHYTA; all of which acquired chloroplasts by direct endosymbiosis of CYANOBACTERIA. They are characterized by a mainly photosynthetic mode of nutrition; essentially unlimited growth at localized regions of cell divisions (MERISTEMS); cellulose within cells providing rigidity; the absence of organs of locomotion; absence of nervous and sensory systems; and an alternation of haploid and diploid generations.Araceae: A plant family of the order Arales, subclass Arecidae, class Liliopsida (monocot). Many members contain OXALIC ACID and calcium oxalate (OXALATES).Mauritania: A republic in western Africa, southwest of ALGERIA and west of MALI. Its capital is Nouakchott.Conservation of Natural Resources: The protection, preservation, restoration, and rational use of all resources in the total environment.Plantago: A plant genus of the family Plantaginaceae. The small plants usually have a dense tuft of basal leaves and long, leafless stalks bearing a terminal spike of small flowers. The seeds, known as PSYLLIUM, swell in water and are used as laxatives. The leaves have been used medicinally.Snow: Frozen water crystals that fall from the ATMOSPHERE.Adaptation, Biological: Changes in biological features that help an organism cope with its ENVIRONMENT. These changes include physiological (ADAPTATION, PHYSIOLOGICAL), phenotypic and genetic changes.Breeding: The production of offspring by selective mating or HYBRIDIZATION, GENETIC in animals or plants.Gene Flow: The change in gene frequency in a population due to migration of gametes or individuals (ANIMAL MIGRATION) across population barriers. In contrast, in GENETIC DRIFT the cause of gene frequency changes are not a result of population or gamete movement.Population Density: Number of individuals in a population relative to space.Seasons: Divisions of the year according to some regularly recurrent phenomena usually astronomical or climatic. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Food Chain: The sequence of transfers of matter and energy from organism to organism in the form of FOOD. Food chains intertwine locally into a food web because most organisms consume more than one type of animal or plant. PLANTS, which convert SOLAR ENERGY to food by PHOTOSYNTHESIS, are the primary food source. In a predator chain, a plant-eating animal is eaten by a larger animal. In a parasite chain, a smaller organism consumes part of a larger host and may itself be parasitized by smaller organisms. In a saprophytic chain, microorganisms live on dead organic matter.Rubiaceae: The Madder plant family of the order Rubiales, subclass Asteridae, class Magnoliopsida includes important medicinal plants that provide QUININE; IPECAC; and COFFEE. They have opposite leaves and interpetiolar stipules.Cucurbita: A plant genus of the family CUCURBITACEAE, order Violales, subclass Dilleniidae, which includes pumpkin, gourd and squash.Asteraceae: A large plant family of the order Asterales, subclass Asteridae, class Magnoliopsida. The family is also known as Compositae. Flower petals are joined near the base and stamens alternate with the corolla lobes. The common name of "daisy" refers to several genera of this family including Aster; CHRYSANTHEMUM; RUDBECKIA; TANACETUM.Plant Dispersal: The physical distribution of plants in various forms and stages of development through time and space.Quantitative Trait, Heritable: A characteristic showing quantitative inheritance such as SKIN PIGMENTATION in humans. (From A Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)Dipterocarpaceae: A plant family of the order Theales.ColoradoViola: A plant genus of the family VIOLACEAE. Some species in this genus are called bouncing bet which is a common name more often used with SAPONARIA OFFICINALIS. Members contain macrocyclic peptides.French Guiana: A French overseas department on the northeast coast of South America. Its capital is Cayenne. It was first settled by the French in 1604. Early development was hindered because of the presence of a penal colony. The name of the country and the capital are variants of Guyana, possibly from the native Indian Guarani guai (born) + ana (kin), implying a united and interrelated race of people. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p418 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p195)Antirrhinum: A plant genus of the family Plantaginaceae. Members contain DEFICIENS PROTEIN.Genetic Speciation: The splitting of an ancestral species into daughter species that coexist in time (King, Dictionary of Genetics, 6th ed). Causal factors may include geographic isolation, HABITAT geometry, migration, REPRODUCTIVE ISOLATION, random GENETIC DRIFT and MUTATION.UtahSpiders: Arthropods of the class ARACHNIDA, order Araneae. Except for mites and ticks, spiders constitute the largest order of arachnids, with approximately 37,000 species having been described. The majority of spiders are harmless, although some species can be regarded as moderately harmful since their bites can lead to quite severe local symptoms. (From Barnes, Invertebrate Zoology, 5th ed, p508; Smith, Insects and Other Arthropods of Medical Importance, 1973, pp424-430)Plant Epidermis: A thin layer of cells forming the outer integument of seed plants and ferns. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Alkenes: Unsaturated hydrocarbons of the type Cn-H2n, indicated by the suffix -ene. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed, p408)Nesting Behavior: Animal behavior associated with the nest; includes construction, effects of size and material; behavior of the adult during the nesting period and the effect of the nest on the behavior of the young.Self-Incompatibility in Flowering Plants: One of many different processes which occur in ANGIOSPERMS by which genetic diversity is maintained while INBREEDING is prevented.Wind: The motion of air relative to the earth's surface.Hibiscus: A plant genus of the family MALVACEAE. Members contain CITRIC ACID; MALATES; ANTHOCYANINS; FLAVONOIDS; GLYCOSIDES; DIETARY FIBER; and LIGNANS. Hibiscus sabdariffa is common constituent of HERBAL TEAS. Hibiscus cannabinus is a source of hemp fiber for TEXTILES.Insect Viruses: Viruses infecting insects, the largest family being BACULOVIRIDAE.Dendrobium: A plant genus of the family ORCHIDACEAE that contains dihydroayapin (COUMARINS) and phenanthraquinones.Urbanization: The process whereby a society changes from a rural to an urban way of life. It refers also to the gradual increase in the proportion of people living in urban areas.Appetitive Behavior: Animal searching behavior. The variable introductory phase of an instinctive behavior pattern or sequence, e.g., looking for food, or sequential courtship patterns prior to mating.Ants: Insects of the family Formicidae, very common and widespread, probably the most successful of all the insect groups. All ants are social insects, and most colonies contain three castes, queens, males, and workers. Their habits are often very elaborate and a great many studies have been made of ant behavior. Ants produce a number of secretions that function in offense, defense, and communication. (From Borror, et al., An Introduction to the Study of Insects, 4th ed, p676)Zingiberaceae: A plant family of the order Zingiberales, subclass Zingiberidae, class Liliopsida. It includes plants which have both flavoring and medicinal properties such as GINGER; turmeric (CURCUMA), and cardamom (ELETTARIA).Butterflies: Slender-bodies diurnal insects having large, broad wings often strikingly colored and patterned.Acetoin: A product of fermentation. It is a component of the butanediol cycle in microorganisms. In mammals it is oxidized to carbon dioxide.Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Sagittaria: A plant genus of the family ALISMATACEAE that grows in salty marshes and is used for phytoremediation of oil spills. The unisexual flowers have 3 sepals and 3 petals. Members contain trifoliones (DITERPENES).Passeriformes: A widely distributed order of perching BIRDS, including more than half of all bird species.Selection, Genetic: Differential and non-random reproduction of different genotypes, operating to alter the gene frequencies within a population.Fabaceae: The large family of plants characterized by pods. Some are edible and some cause LATHYRISM or FAVISM and other forms of poisoning. Other species yield useful materials like gums from ACACIA and various LECTINS like PHYTOHEMAGGLUTININS from PHASEOLUS. Many of them harbor NITROGEN FIXATION bacteria on their roots. Many but not all species of "beans" belong to this family.Brassica napus: A plant species of the family BRASSICACEAE best known for the edible roots.Extinction, Biological: The ceasing of existence of a species or taxonomic groups of organisms.Eugenol: A cinnamate derivative of the shikamate pathway found in CLOVE OIL and other PLANTS.Sexual Behavior, Animal: Sexual activities of animals.Host-Parasite Interactions: The relationship between an invertebrate and another organism (the host), one of which lives at the expense of the other. Traditionally excluded from definition of parasites are pathogenic BACTERIA; FUNGI; VIRUSES; and PLANTS; though they may live parasitically.Predatory Behavior: Instinctual behavior pattern in which food is obtained by killing and consuming other species.Biota: The spectrum of different living organisms inhabiting a particular region, habitat, or biotope.Ovule: The element in plants that contains the female GAMETOPHYTES.Adaptation, Physiological: The non-genetic biological changes of an organism in response to challenges in its ENVIRONMENT.ArgentinaTime Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Lepidoptera: A large order of insects comprising the butterflies and moths.Inbreeding: The mating of plants or non-human animals which are closely related genetically.Genetic Variation: Genotypic differences observed among individuals in a population.Anthocyanins: A group of FLAVONOIDS derived from FLAVONOLS, which lack the ketone oxygen at the 4-position. They are glycosylated versions of cyanidin, pelargonidin or delphinidin. The conjugated bonds result in blue, red, and purple colors in flowers of plants.Volatilization: A phase transition from liquid state to gas state, which is affected by Raoult's law. It can be accomplished by fractional distillation.Host Specificity: The properties of a pathogen that makes it capable of infecting one or more specific hosts. The pathogen can include PARASITES as well as VIRUSES; BACTERIA; FUNGI; or PLANTS.Introduced Species: Non-native organisms brought into a region, habitat, or ECOSYSTEM by human activity.BrazilEndangered Species: An animal or plant species in danger of extinction. Causes can include human activity, changing climate, or change in predator/prey ratios.Flight, Animal: The use of wings or wing-like appendages to remain aloft and move through the air.Crosses, Genetic: Deliberate breeding of two different individuals that results in offspring that carry part of the genetic material of each parent. The parent organisms must be genetically compatible and may be from different varieties or closely related species.Oils, Volatile: Oils which evaporate readily. The volatile oils occur in aromatic plants, to which they give odor and other characteristics. Most volatile oils consist of a mixture of two or more TERPENES or of a mixture of an eleoptene (the more volatile constituent of a volatile oil) with a stearopten (the more solid constituent). The synonym essential oils refers to the essence of a plant, as its perfume or scent, and not to its indispensability.Altitude: A vertical distance measured from a known level on the surface of a planet or other celestial body.Opsins: Photosensitive proteins in the membranes of PHOTORECEPTOR CELLS such as the rods and the cones. Opsins have varied light absorption properties and are members of the G-PROTEIN-COUPLED RECEPTORS family. Their ligands are VITAMIN A-based chromophores.Chiroptera: Order of mammals whose members are adapted for flight. It includes bats, flying foxes, and fruit bats.DNA, Ribosomal Spacer: The intergenic DNA segments that are between the ribosomal RNA genes (internal transcribed spacers) and between the tandemly repeated units of rDNA (external transcribed spacers and nontranscribed spacers).Plant Proteins: Proteins found in plants (flowers, herbs, shrubs, trees, etc.). The concept does not include proteins found in vegetables for which VEGETABLE PROTEINS is available.Germination: The initial stages of the growth of SEEDS into a SEEDLINGS. The embryonic shoot (plumule) and embryonic PLANT ROOTS (radicle) emerge and grow upwards and downwards respectively. Food reserves for germination come from endosperm tissue within the seed and/or from the seed leaves (COTYLEDON). (Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990)Genes, Plant: The functional hereditary units of PLANTS.ChileCompetitive Behavior: The direct struggle between individuals for environmental necessities or for a common goal.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Sequence Analysis, DNA: A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.Biosynthetic Pathways: Sets of enzymatic reactions occurring in organisms and that form biochemicals by making new covalent bonds.Climate: The longterm manifestations of WEATHER. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Smell: The ability to detect scents or odors, such as the function of OLFACTORY RECEPTOR NEURONS.Evolution, Molecular: The process of cumulative change at the level of DNA; RNA; and PROTEINS, over successive generations.RNA Viruses: Viruses whose genetic material is RNA.Spain: Parliamentary democracy located between France on the northeast and Portugual on the west and bordered by the Atlantic Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea.Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry: A microanalytical technique combining mass spectrometry and gas chromatography for the qualitative as well as quantitative determinations of compounds.Likelihood Functions: Functions constructed from a statistical model and a set of observed data which give the probability of that data for various values of the unknown model parameters. Those parameter values that maximize the probability are the maximum likelihood estimates of the parameters.Plant Oils: Oils derived from plants or plant products.Genetics, Population: The discipline studying genetic composition of populations and effects of factors such as GENETIC SELECTION, population size, MUTATION, migration, and GENETIC DRIFT on the frequencies of various GENOTYPES and PHENOTYPES using a variety of GENETIC TECHNIQUES.South Africa: A republic in southern Africa, the southernmost part of Africa. It has three capitals: Pretoria (administrative), Cape Town (legislative), and Bloemfontein (judicial). Officially the Republic of South Africa since 1960, it was called the Union of South Africa 1910-1960.
They are abundant pollinators that forage at a variety of plants. Bombus bimaculatus is in the Pyrobombus subgenus, which is ... B. bimaculatus is an important pollinator in temperate forest regions as it is still abundant, unlike many other species of ... This may potentially be the reason why B. bimaculatus are such abundant pollinators. Research comparing B. bimaculatus to ... Brian Devore (July-August 2009). "Pollinators". Department of Natural Resources. Minnesota Conservation Volunteer: 12. Cameron ...
Grissell, Eric (6 May 2013). "Carpenter Bees: The (Harmless!) Garden Pollinators". Mother Earth News. "Passion fruit: ...
... which suggests these animals are likely pollinators of Banksia species in general. No pollinators of this species were recorded ... The purpose of coloured nectar is unclear, especially as pollinators such as nocturnal mammals are not thought to forage by ... However, nectar that becomes more obvious by appearance or smell as it ages might encourage pollinators to prioritise it over ... Visitors to (and likely pollinators of) inflorescences include insects and a nocturnal mammal, the white-tailed dunnart. ...
Petals attract pollinators. Spines protect the plants from herbivores (e.g. cacti). Stinging hairs to protect against herbivory ...
"The Cross-Pollinators , Arts and Culture , Style Weekly - Richmond, VA local news, arts, and events". Style Weekly. Retrieved ...
It functions to attract insect or bird pollinators. Attraction is effected by color, scent, and nectar, which may be secreted ... Usually, other structures are present and serve to protect the sporophylls and to form an envelope attractive to pollinators. ... Heteromorphic flowers have short carpels and long stamens, or vice versa, so animal pollinators cannot easily transfer pollen ... The characteristics that attract pollinators account for the popularity of flowers and flowering plants among humans. While the ...
and are pollinators. The male is completely metallic green, while head and pronotum in the female are red and elytra are green ...
"North American Pollinator Protection Campaign NAPPC". North American Pollinator Protection Campaign. Retrieved 6 November 2014 ... Vanbergen, Adam J; Insect Pollinators Initiative (2013). "Threats to an ecosystem service: pressures on pollinators" (PDF). ... Since native pollinators forage in an area within about 500 yards (460 m) of the nest, they can increase the productivity of a ... They are important pollinators of numerous native plant species throughout their range. Megachile campanulae was originally ...
The forgotten pollinators. Washington: Covelo : Island Press. pp. 15-18. ISBN 1-55963-353-0. FWS page USDA Plants Profile ...
"Eremophila and pollinators". Australian Native Plants Society (Australia). Retrieved 2 April 2016. ...
The best studied interaction between animals and Persoonia species is that between the plants and their pollinators. All ... Maynard, G. V. (1995). "Pollinators of Australian Proteaceae". In McCarthy, Patrick. Flora of Australia: Volume 16: Eleagnaceae ... not effective pollinators. The introduced honeybee (Apis mellifera) is also a frequent visitor of Persoonia flowers at most ... sites but it is still unclear whether this species is an effective pollinator. The fleshy fruits of Persoonia species are ...
"Bring Back the Pollinators". www.xerces.org. 2018. Retrieved 1 January 2018. "How to build a pond for wildlife". www.bbowt.org ... Pollinators - Flowers rich in nectar will attract bees and butterflies into the garden, which is of particular importance given ... "Bring Back the Pollinators Campaign". www.xerces.org. 2018. Retrieved 1 January 2018. Tallamy, Douglas (2007). Bringing Nature ... which are valuable pollinators. Sources of water - A water feature, such as a pond, has the potential to support a large ...
The flowers attract pollinators. The botanical name of this species has been the subject of a long taxonomic debate, beginning ...
"Ten policies for pollinators". Science. 354 (6315): 975-976. doi:10.1126/science.aai9226. ISSN 0036-8075. PMID 27884996. ...
Heather Holm (2014). Pollinators on Native Plants. Minnetonka, MN: Pollinator Press. pp. 80-81. Hunn, Eugene S. (1990). Nch'i- ... Bumblebees are the only effective cross-pollinators. Various insects chew holes in the top of the flower, near the stem, to ...
Heather Holm (2014). Pollinators on Native Plants. Minnetonka, MN: Pollinator Press. pp. 110-111. Spomer, G. G. (1999). ...
"Bloodroot Wildflowers". Heather Holm (2014). Pollinators on Native Plants. Minnetonka, MN: Pollinator Press. pp. 164-165. Hilty ... which are the most effective pollinators. Sanguinaria canadensis is cultivated as an ornamental plant. The double-flowered ...
Adults are important pollinators. Larvae play an important role in formation and accumulation of humus in soil. Some larvae are ...
V. Colonization by figs (Ficus spp.), their dispersers and pollinators. Journal of Biogeography 28: 1365-1377. Shanahan, M. et ...
ISBN 0-940672-46-4 Heather Holm (2014). Pollinators on Native Plants. Minnetonka, MN: Pollinator Press. pp. 108-109. "Phlox ... Butterflies, skippers, and moths are the most effective pollinators. As they insert their proboscis into the corolla tube, it ...
ISBN 0-88192-627-2. "RHS Plants for Pollinators". Royal Horticultural Society. Retrieved November 11, 2014. Wang GuoLiang (2007 ...
Some species of thrips are beneficial as pollinators or as predators of other insects or mites. In the right conditions, such ... Darwin found that thrips could not be kept out by any netting when he conducted experiments by keeping away larger pollinators ... The genus Cycadothrips is a specialist pollinator of cycads, the flowers of which are adapted for pollination by small insects ... Thrips are likewise the primary pollinators of heathers in the family Ericaceae, and play a significant role in the pollination ...
It may reduce pollinators. The plant is likely introduced to new areas when its seed is distributed with agricultural crop ...
Heather Holm (2014). Pollinators on Native Plants. Minnetonka, MN: Pollinator Press. pp. 110-111. Pink, A. (2004). Gardening ...
"Thrips: the primeval pollinators?". Retrieved 2009-08-15. "Species Thrips setipennis (Bagnall, 1916)". Department of the ...
... specialist pollinator) of Penstemon spp. These insects obtain nectar and/or pollen from the flowers. Short-tongued Halictid ...
However, syrphid flies are not as effective pollinators of alpine herb species as native solitary bees. "Diptera: Syrphidae". ... "The relative importance of solitary bees and syrphid flies as pollinators of two outcrossing plant species in the New Zealand ...
RoboBee Pollinator decline Technological fix "Sticky gels turn insect-sized drones into artificial pollinators". Retrieved 11 ... Materially engineered artificial pollinators are experimental radiowave-controlled micro-drones that use ionic liquid gels for ... "Sticky gels turn insect-sized drones into artificial pollinators". Retrieved 11 February 2017. Chechetka, Svetlana A.; Yu, Yue ... "believe that robotic pollinators could be trained to learn pollination paths using global positioning systems and artificial ...
1. Check all the boxes that are contributing factors to overall pollinator decline according to the video lecture. There will ...
... pollinators, just for kids, coloring pages, teacher resources, ferns, rare plants, plant of the week, pollinator of the month, ... Learn more about pollinators. Get some guidebooks and learn to recognize the pollinators in your neighborhood. Experiment with ... Learn How You Can Use Agroforestry to Help Pollinators (PDF). *Also take a look a the Agroforestry Centers Pollinators Issue ... Large game animals, migratory songbirds and livestock feast on plants dependent on pollinators for propagation. Pollinators ...
Pollinator population declines and conservation[edit]. Main article: Pollinator decline. Pollinators provide a key ecosystem ... Wild pollinators often visit many plant species and plants are visited by many pollinator species. All these relations together ... An estimated one out of every three bites of food comes to us through the work of animal pollinators. The quality of pollinator ... The structure of plant-pollinator networks may have large consequences for the way in which pollinator communities respond to ...
EU Pollinators Initiative is the oldest EU legislation on the environment. It aims to protect all of the 500 wild bird species ... EU Pollinators Initiative. Pollinators are a diverse group of animals that pollinate crops and wild plants. Pollination is the ... The decline in pollinator abundance and diversity leads to the loss of animal pollination. In 2015 the Commission published the ... In Europe, pollinators are primarily insects like bees, hoverflies, butterflies, moths, beetles and other fly species. Some of ...
Learn how to protect pollinators and other wildlife. ... Pollinators are exposed to neonics not just on landscaping ... She attributes the change in part to research on pollinator health risks conducted by industry groups such as the Horticultural ... Nixing Neonics to Protect Pollinators. Gardeners can help safeguard bees and butterflies from the risks posed by neonicotinoid ... Conservationists worry particularly about the impact of insecticides on pollinators such as the rusty patched bumble bee, a ...
Title: Plants, Pollen and Pollinators, Author: Collins , Name: Plants, Pollen and Pollinators, Length: 6 pages, Page: 1, ... More bird pollinators Leathery wings Scaly pollinators Little furry pollinators More furry pollinators Attracting a pollinator ... Contents Plants and pollen The main pollinators Pretty-winged pollinators Unpopular pollinators Hidden wings Hovering ... The main pollinators Bees are the top pollinators in the world. They are responsible for pollinating nearly three-quarters of ...
Pollinators are essential tohuman nutrition and to the survival of natural ecosystems it has beenestimated that 75% of human ... The health and diversity of pollinators has inrecent years become a concern on the local, state, national and ... Pollinator Information and Sources of Funding for Pollinator Habitat from the Connecticut Office of the Natural Resources ... Establishing Pollinator Plantings-- Virginia Keith, Blueberry Hill Organic Farm (PDF Format). Establishing Pollinator Plantings ...
16-17 An Act Concerning Pollinator Health the following individualshave been appointed to a Pollinator Advisory Committee . Dr ... Pollinators are essential tohuman nutrition and to the survival of natural ecosystems it has beenestimated that 75% of human ... Many species of bumblebees and other bees are important pollinators of crop plants, and most bees inall families are ... 2011). Many kinds of animals are pollinators, includinghummingbirds, butterflies, moths, beetles, flies and wasps as well as ...
Wildlife gardeners across the country share photos and descriptions of prized native plants that attract pollinators to their ... "Planting Perfume for Pollinators". "To Help Butterflies: Cater to Caterpillars!" "The Buzz on Native Pollinators". "The ... For help selecting pollinator-friendly natives for your region, visit the Pollinator Partnership, which offers free planting ... It is great for pollinators (red admiral, above). There is never a day when it is in bloom when it is alone, and if you go out ...
Many pollinators of all types were positive for Ascosphaera fungi, while Microsporidia were rarer, being most frequently found ... Here we carry out a preliminary screening of pollinators (honey bees, five species of bumblebee, three species of wasp, four ... Deformed wing virus therefore does not appear to be a general parasite of pollinators, but does interact significantly with at ... We also detected that most pollinators were positive for Wolbachia, most probably indicating infection with this intracellular ...
Pollinators in Trouble. blockquote {border-left: 5px solid #fff;}. Populations of bees and other pollinators are declining ... Concrete and cement limits pollinator habitat Encyclopedia of Life Photo. Habitat Loss. Pollinators require natural spaces with ... Pollinators require specific plants which provide nutrition and habitat to larval (immature stages) and adults pollinators. ... The types and distributions of pollinators may change; pollinators adapted to warmer temperatures may expand their northward ...
When it comes to pollinators, plants arent usually picky. But one tropical plant seems able to choose its suitors, a new study ... When it comes to pollinators, plants are not usually picky. But one tropical plant seems able to choose its suitors, a new ...
1501566 DISSERTATION RESEARCH: The effects of pollinator diversity loss on plant-pollinator interaction networks and native ... anyone can create more pollinator-friendly spaces and help keep their local pollinator community diverse, healthy and beautiful ... Pollinators come in all shapes and sizes: butterflies, beetles, birds, bats and even humans. The only job requirement is that ... Bees are some of the most important crop pollinators. They increase production of about 75 percent of our crop species. When we ...
Pollinators like honeybees, moths, some birds, and insects are incredibly important to both agriculture and the ecosystem. They ... Pollinator. A mustard moth on a real flower.Bill Damon/Flickr, CC by 2.0. ... Studying Pollinators With 3D-Printed Flowers. And you thought fake flowers were only for craft stores ... They then looked at how a common pollinator, the hawkmoth responded to each of the flower shapes. ...
North American Pollinator Protection Campaign Pollinator.org. The Xerces Society - Pollinator Conservation Program ... are pollinators. It is unknown how many of the listed plants require pollinators. More on endangered pollinators.. ... The Forgotten Pollinators. Island Press, Washington, DC.. Committee on the Status of Pollinators in North America, National ... Declines in pollinators may make plants more vulnerable to extinction (Committee on the Status of Pollinators in North America ...
Pollinators, Predators, and Parasitoids), presented at the 2014 Southern Sustainable Agriculture Working Group conference in Mo ... 4. 2008 Farm Bill Pollinator Habitat Provisions • Pollinators a priority for all USDA land managers & conservationists • ... Integrating Native Pollinators into... by Nancy Adamson 3507 views * Xerces Soceity Marcus Miller Presen... by Profitable ... outlining current USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service pollinator programs Several other pollinator webinars, including ...
Add to Calendar 01/18/2020 09:00 AM 01/18/2020 10:00 AM America/Los_Angeles Pollinators, People, and Plants Visit page - https ... www.huntington.org/events/pollinators-people-and-plants The Huntington - Ahmanson Classroom, Brody Botanical Center ...
The plight of natural insect pollinators like bees (both native or indigenous bees and honey bees), moths and butterflies, ... Developing suitable bee cum pollinator friendly plant mixes (pollinator mixes) consisting of native wildflowers, grasses and/or ... gardens and lawns to help conserving our precious insect pollinators like the bees. Over the time such bee (pollinator) garden ... forest trees are all dependent on natural or biological pollinators like pollinator insects, snails and slugs, birds (humming ...
... dimensional models of flowers and found that flower shapes can evolve in a modular manner in adaptation to distinct pollinators ... For example, does the entire flower adapt to a pollinator, or do only some flower parts evolve to fit a pollinator while other ... How flowers adapt to their pollinators. Modularity facilitates rapid adaptation of single floral organs to different ... In particular, the showy sterile organs of flowers (petals) adapted to the different pollinators more quickly than the rest of ...
Giving Pollinators What They Need in Towns and Cities. *Where and how to improve towns and cities for pollinators by creating ... Pollinator Conservation and Threats. *Well introduce you to the importance and diversity of native pollinators, and why we ... Pollinator Conservation Programs in Georgia. *Share and/or learn about some of the pollinator conservation work that is ... Natural History and Identifying Pollinators. *An introduction to the life history of pollinators, plus pointers for identifying ...
Insect pollinators feed on nectar and pollen, and in the process, transfer pollen to other plants. Bees and other pollinators ... Butterflies, bees, flies, beetles, birds, and bats are examples of common pollinators. Pollination is a crucial step in the ... Pollinators are animals that transfer pollen among flowers, which leads to the production of fruits and seeds. ... Insect pollinators feed on nectar and pollen, and in the process, transfer pollen to other plants. Bees and other pollinators ...
Students of All Ages Help Pollinators Thrive. Pollinators play an important role in the production of the food we eat, the ... With reports of declining numbers and health of pollinators, its important to teach students the impact pollinators have on ... One way to do this is to support the creation and revitalization of habitat where pollinators of all sizes can thrive. ... The grants enabled students to create gardens and new habitats for pollinators as part of the PollinatorLIVE: A Distance ...
  • The consultation aims to ensure that all relevant stakeholders that may have an interest in pollinators and pollination have an opportunity to express their views on the problem of pollinator declines and an EU approach to tackle it. (europa.eu)
  • 1998. The potential consequences of pollinator declines on the conservation of biodiversity and stability of food crop yields. (fws.gov)
  • Unfortunately, common pollinators are facing significant population declines. (aqua.org)
  • Pollinators have suffered declines and extinctions in recent years as a result of habitat destruction, with pesticide use and infectious diseases playing a potentially increasing role. (eurekalert.org)
  • This lack stands in contrast to the study of pollinators in Europe, where status has been the subject of systematic investigation for some time, and where declines and extinctions have been definitively documented. (nap.edu)
  • The take-home is: pollinator declines can really matter to human health , with quite scary numbers for vitamin A deficiencies, for example, which can lead to blindness and increase death rates for some diseases, including malaria," said UVM scientist Taylor Ricketts, co-author of the new study. (naturalnews.com)
  • This is the first study that quantifies the potential human health impacts of animal pollinator declines," said Samuel Myers with the Harvard School of Public Health, who is also one of the study's researchers. (naturalnews.com)
  • While earlier studies have examined the links between pollinators and crop yields, and crop yields and nutrient availability, this latest study actually evaluates whether pollinator declines will really affect human nutrition, Myers explains. (naturalnews.com)
  • The findings fit nicely with a similar pattern in recent pollinator trends: two recent papers have suggested that declines in pollinator diversity in the mid-20th Century slowed down or partially reversed over recent decades. (leeds.ac.uk)
  • Despite the stabilisation seen recently, our research shows significant long-term declines in the diversity of nectar sources mirrored in a fall in the diversity of pollinator species. (leeds.ac.uk)
  • With these continued declines, pollinator conservation has become a national priority. (desertmuseum.org)
  • Bees (Hymenoptera: Apoidea: Anthophila) are the primary animal pollinators in most ecosystems ( 8 ). (pnas.org)
  • Parts of the developing world could experience "an increase in neural tube defects from folate deficiency or an increase in blindness and infectious diseases from vitamin A deficiency," he said, "because we have transformed our landscapes in ways that don't support animal pollinators anymore. (naturalnews.com)
  • Animal pollinators fertilize more than 187,500 flowering plants worldwide. (scienceblogs.com)
  • A new law concerning pollinator health was enacted by the state of Connecticut in the 2016 legislative session. (ct.gov)
  • In 2016, with funding from the Commission for Environmental Cooperation, we launched an effort to create pollinator gardens at dozens of sites across the city. (desertmuseum.org)
  • Attracting Pollinators to Your Garden Using Native Plants (Eastern United States) (PDF, 3.5 MB) - developed and published by the USDA Forest Service providing a guide to providing habitats for pollinators in the eastern United States. (fed.us)
  • The grants enabled students to create gardens and new habitats for pollinators as part of the PollinatorLIVE: A Distance Learning Adventure program. (plt.org)
  • Led by researchers at Cornell University, teams have been conducting research, working to restore hospitable habitats for pollinators and educating the general population about the need to protect the literal worker bees of our food production process. (lohud.com)
  • While neonics are indeed less toxic to birds and mammals than most of their predecessors, they can be more dangerous to bees and other pollinators. (nwf.org)
  • At least 3 bat, 5 birds, and 24 butterfly, skipper and moth, one beetle and one fly species in the United States that are federally listed as endangered under the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended, are pollinators. (fws.gov)
  • Bees, butterflies, birds, and other pollinator species can also find new habitat around Wright Technical Center and Wright Learning Center (WTC/WLC) in Buffalo, MN. (plt.org)
  • Beyond the birds and the bees, tens of thousands of species of pollinators that play a significant role in the world's food production and contribute to billions of dollars in food yield are at risk, according to a report released by the United Nations Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES). (cnn.com)
  • Honey bees, butterflies, birds and other pollinators help grow our food, keep our flowers blooming and make our lands healthy. (burpee.com)
  • Additionally, 16 percent of our vertebrate pollinators, like birds and bats, are also facing extinction. (aqua.org)
  • Unlike birds, butterflies are a member of the class Insecta, along with bees and other pollinators. (countercurrents.org)
  • Fruit-eating birds like thrushes and warblers that are known seed dispersers were less numerous in areas with lower fruit abundance, even after controlling for the effects of radiation, providing a direct link between radiation, pollinator abundance, fruit abundance and abundance of frugivores. (nih.gov)
  • Using High-Resolution X-ray computed tomography, the research team produced 3D-models of these flowers and used geometric-morphometric methods to analyse differences in flower shape among species with different pollinators. (newswise.com)
  • In particular, the showy sterile organs of flowers (petals) adapted to the different pollinators more quickly than the rest of the flower: the reproductive organs have evolved more slowly. (newswise.com)
  • In this activity, students learn about plant reproduction and use real data to construct explanations about which flowers are the most attractive to different pollinators. (calacademy.org)
  • Different flowers attract different pollinators. (calacademy.org)
  • The western white-winged dove ( Zenaida asiatica mearnsii ) is unique among migratory pollinators because it is also a game species. (desertmuseum.org)
  • The Commission published on 1 December 2017 a Roadmap for the EU Pollinators Initiative. (europa.eu)
  • Thanks to Dan's leadership, the US Fish and Wildlife Service will double the acres of restored or enhanced habitat for monarchs and other pollinators by September 30, 2017. (pollinator.org)
  • In fiscal year 2017, NIFA plans to dedicate $10 million in funding for pollinator health research. (usda.gov)
  • The good news is that a number of steps can be taken to reduce the risks to pollinators, including practices based on indigenous and local knowledge," said Zakri Abdul Hamid, elected Founding Chair of IPBES, in the statement. (cnn.com)
  • With reports of declining numbers and health of pollinators, it's important to teach students the impact pollinators have on our lives. (plt.org)
  • Recognizing the importance of honey bees and other pollinators to agriculture and the health of natural systems, President Barack Obama established the Pollinator Task Force to develop a national strategy to protect and promote health of pollinators. (usda.gov)
  • Learn how to improve the health of pollinators. (oregonstate.edu)
  • For people making bold strides to improve the health of pollinators. (oregonstate.edu)
  • We hope that through the efforts of PollinatorLIVE and the many students and community members who are working hard to maintain, improve and create pollinator habitat, we will see improved numbers in the future - not only for monarchs, but for all pollinators. (plt.org)
  • Annie Wadleigh, the partnership's main organizer, said the group evolved from a meeting held by the Bayside Neighborhood Association several years ago about the need to support bees and the desire to create pollinator corridors within the city. (pressherald.com)
  • The project helped bring students, parents, teachers, and community partners together to enhance student learning, support the growth of the school's outdoor classroom, and create new habitat for native pollinators. (plt.org)
  • Conservationists worry particularly about the impact of insecticides on pollinators such as the rusty patched bumble bee, a once-common species that has vanished from nearly 90 percent of its range. (nwf.org)
  • On June 8, The Organic Center published a Critical Issue Report taking an in depth look at the challenges faced by honey bees and other pollinators. (ota.com)
  • This week the White House weighed in on how to make things better, releasing a new National Strategy to Promote the Health of Honey Bees and Other Pollinators . (nationalgeographic.com)
  • Having plants available for students to see, touch, and smell increased their understanding of how the Chumash people, as well as pollinators, rely on native plants. (plt.org)
  • Urban environments are growing across the UK, and perhaps surprisingly, flower-rich oases in otherwise uninviting city habitats can support large numbers of pollinators. (bristol.ac.uk)
  • Without pollinators, we don't eat-it's simple as that-and, at the moment, large numbers of pollinators are dying. (usda.gov)