Privacy: The state of being free from intrusion or disturbance in one's private life or affairs. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed, 1993)Confidentiality: The privacy of information and its protection against unauthorized disclosure.Genetic Privacy: The protection of genetic information about an individual, family, or population group, from unauthorized disclosure.Health Policy: Decisions, usually developed by government policymakers, for determining present and future objectives pertaining to the health care system.Computer Security: Protective measures against unauthorized access to or interference with computer operating systems, telecommunications, or data structures, especially the modification, deletion, destruction, or release of data in computers. It includes methods of forestalling interference by computer viruses or so-called computer hackers aiming to compromise stored data.Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act: Public Law 104-91 enacted in 1996, was designed to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the healthcare system, protect health insurance coverage for workers and their families, and to protect individual personal health information.Policy Making: The decision process by which individuals, groups or institutions establish policies pertaining to plans, programs or procedures.Organizational Policy: A course or method of action selected, usually by an organization, institution, university, society, etc., from among alternatives to guide and determine present and future decisions and positions on matters of public interest or social concern. It does not include internal policy relating to organization and administration within the corporate body, for which ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION is available.Policy: A course or method of action selected to guide and determine present and future decisions.Health Records, Personal: Longitudinal patient-maintained records of individual health history and tools that allow individual control of access.Disclosure: Revealing of information, by oral or written communication.Environmental Policy: A course of action or principle adopted or proposed by a government, party, business, or individual that concerns human interactions with nature and natural resources.United StatesSecurity Measures: Regulations to assure protection of property and equipment.Civil Rights: Legal guarantee protecting the individual from attack on personal liberties, right to fair trial, right to vote, and freedom from discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, age, disability, or national origin. (from http://www.usccr.gov/ accessed 1/31/2003)Medical Records Systems, Computerized: Computer-based systems for input, storage, display, retrieval, and printing of information contained in a patient's medical record.Biological Specimen Banks: Facilities that collect, store, and distribute tissues, e.g., cell lines, microorganisms, blood, sperm, milk, breast tissue, for use by others. Other uses may include transplantation and comparison of diseased tissues in the identification of cancer.Information Dissemination: The circulation or wide dispersal of information.Informed Consent: Voluntary authorization, by a patient or research subject, with full comprehension of the risks involved, for diagnostic or investigative procedures, and for medical and surgical treatment.Government Regulation: Exercise of governmental authority to control conduct.Patient Rights: Fundamental claims of patients, as expressed in statutes, declarations, or generally accepted moral principles. (Bioethics Thesaurus) The term is used for discussions of patient rights as a group of many rights, as in a hospital's posting of a list of patient rights.Electronic Health Records: Media that facilitate transportability of pertinent information concerning patient's illness across varied providers and geographic locations. Some versions include direct linkages to online consumer health information that is relevant to the health conditions and treatments related to a specific patient.Health Information Management: Management of the acquisition, organization, retrieval, and dissemination of health information.Patient Access to Records: The freedom of patients to review their own medical, genetic, or other health-related records.Biomedical Research: Research that involves the application of the natural sciences, especially biology and physiology, to medicine.Public Health: Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Patient Identification Systems: Organized procedures for establishing patient identity, including use of bracelets, etc.Nutrition Policy: Guidelines and objectives pertaining to food supply and nutrition including recommendations for healthy diet.Computer Communication Networks: A system containing any combination of computers, computer terminals, printers, audio or visual display devices, or telephones interconnected by telecommunications equipment or cables: used to transmit or receive information. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Social Control Policies: Decisions for determining and guiding present and future objectives from among alternatives.Politics: Activities concerned with governmental policies, functions, etc.Public Opinion: The attitude of a significant portion of a population toward any given proposition, based upon a measurable amount of factual evidence, and involving some degree of reflection, analysis, and reasoning.Information Management: Management of the acquisition, organization, storage, retrieval, and dissemination of information. (From Thesaurus of ERIC Descriptors, 1994)Smoke-Free Policy: Prohibition against tobacco smoking in specific areas to control TOBACCO SMOKE POLLUTION.State Government: The level of governmental organization and function below that of the national or country-wide government.Family Planning Policy: A course or method of action selected, usually by a government, to guide and determine present and future decisions on population control by limiting the number of children or controlling fertility, notably through family planning and contraception within the nuclear family.Duty to Warn: A health professional's obligation to breach patient CONFIDENTIALITY to warn third parties of the danger of their being assaulted or of contracting a serious infection.Ethics, Research: The moral obligations governing the conduct of research. Used for discussions of research ethics as a general topic.Medical Records: Recording of pertinent information concerning patient's illness or illnesses.Internet: A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.Genetic Research: Research into the cause, transmission, amelioration, elimination, or enhancement of inherited disorders and traits.Ethics, Medical: The principles of professional conduct concerning the rights and duties of the physician, relations with patients and fellow practitioners, as well as actions of the physician in patient care and interpersonal relations with patient families.Information Systems: Integrated set of files, procedures, and equipment for the storage, manipulation, and retrieval of information.Medical Record Linkage: The creation and maintenance of medical and vital records in multiple institutions in a manner that will facilitate the combined use of the records of identified individuals.Minors: A person who has not attained the age at which full civil rights are accorded.Medical Informatics: The field of information science concerned with the analysis and dissemination of medical data through the application of computers to various aspects of health care and medicine.Pastoral Care: Counseling or comfort given by ministers, priests, rabbis, etc., to those in need of help with emotional problems or stressful situations.Social Responsibility: The obligations and accountability assumed in carrying out actions or ideas on behalf of others.Focus Groups: A method of data collection and a QUALITATIVE RESEARCH tool in which a small group of individuals are brought together and allowed to interact in a discussion of their opinions about topics, issues, or questions.Ethics Committees, Research: Hospital or other institutional committees established to protect the welfare of research subjects. Federal regulations (the "Common Rule" (45 CFR 46)) mandate the use of these committees to monitor federally-funded biomedical and behavioral research involving human subjects.Conflict of Interest: A situation in which an individual might benefit personally from official or professional actions. It includes a conflict between a person's private interests and official responsibilities in a position of trust. The term is not restricted to government officials. The concept refers both to actual conflict of interest and the appearance or perception of conflict.Canada: The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.Delivery of Health Care: The concept concerned with all aspects of providing and distributing health services to a patient population.Social Media: Platforms that provide the ability and tools to create and publish information accessed via the INTERNET. Generally these platforms have three characteristics with content user generated, high degree of interaction between creator and viewer, and easily integrated with other sites.Adolescent Medicine: A branch of medicine pertaining to the diagnosis and treatment of diseases occurring during the period of ADOLESCENCE.Personal Autonomy: Self-directing freedom and especially moral independence. An ethical principle holds that the autonomy of persons ought to be respected. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Local Government: Smallest political subdivisions within a country at which general governmental functions are carried-out.Consumer Health Information: Information intended for potential users of medical and healthcare services. There is an emphasis on self-care and preventive approaches as well as information for community-wide dissemination and use.Patient Advocacy: Promotion and protection of the rights of patients, frequently through a legal process.Qualitative Research: Any type of research that employs nonnumeric information to explore individual or group characteristics, producing findings not arrived at by statistical procedures or other quantitative means. (Qualitative Inquiry: A Dictionary of Terms Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 1997)United States Dept. of Health and Human Services: A cabinet department in the Executive Branch of the United States Government concerned with administering those agencies and offices having programs pertaining to health and human services.Copyright: It is a form of protection provided by law. In the United States this protection is granted to authors of original works of authorship, including literary, dramatic, musical, artistic, and certain other intellectual works. This protection is available to both published and unpublished works. (from Circular of the United States Copyright Office, 6/30/2008)Ethics Consultation: Services provided by an individual ethicist (ETHICISTS) or an ethics team or committee (ETHICS COMMITTEES, CLINICAL) to address the ethical issues involved in a specific clinical case. The central purpose is to improve the process and outcomes of patients' care by helping to identify, analyze, and resolve ethical problems.Attitude: An enduring, learned predisposition to behave in a consistent way toward a given class of objects, or a persistent mental and/or neural state of readiness to react to a certain class of objects, not as they are but as they are conceived to be.Records as Topic: The commitment in writing, as authentic evidence, of something having legal importance. The concept includes certificates of birth, death, etc., as well as hospital, medical, and other institutional records.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Research Subjects: Persons who are enrolled in research studies or who are otherwise the subjects of research.Biometric Identification: A method of differentiating individuals based on the analysis of qualitative or quantitative biological traits or patterns. This process which has applications in forensics and identity theft prevention includes DNA profiles or DNA fingerprints, hand fingerprints, automated facial recognition, iris scan, hand geometry, retinal scan, vascular patterns, automated voice pattern recognition, and ultrasound of fingers.Telemedicine: Delivery of health services via remote telecommunications. This includes interactive consultative and diagnostic services.Attitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Medical Informatics Applications: Automated systems applied to the patient care process including diagnosis, therapy, and systems of communicating medical data within the health care setting.Intellectual Property: Property, such as patents, trademarks, and copyright, that results from creative effort. The Patent and Copyright Clause (Art. 1, Sec. 8, cl. 8) of the United States Constitution provides for promoting the progress of science and useful arts by securing for limited times to authors and inventors, the exclusive right to their respective writings and discoveries. (From Black's Law Dictionary, 5th ed, p1014)Ownership: The legal relation between an entity (individual, group, corporation, or-profit, secular, government) and an object. The object may be corporeal, such as equipment, or completely a creature of law, such as a patent; it may be movable, such as an animal, or immovable, such as a building.Consent Forms: Documents describing a medical treatment or research project, including proposed procedures, risks, and alternatives, that are to be signed by an individual, or the individual's proxy, to indicate his/her understanding of the document and a willingness to undergo the treatment or to participate in the research.Health Services Accessibility: The degree to which individuals are inhibited or facilitated in their ability to gain entry to and to receive care and services from the health care system. Factors influencing this ability include geographic, architectural, transportational, and financial considerations, among others.Research: Critical and exhaustive investigation or experimentation, having for its aim the discovery of new facts and their correct interpretation, the revision of accepted conclusions, theories, or laws in the light of newly discovered facts, or the practical application of such new or revised conclusions, theories, or laws. (Webster, 3d ed)Personal Space: Invisible boundaries surrounding the individual's body which are maintained in relation to others.Attitude to Computers: The attitude and behavior associated with an individual using the computer.Directed Tissue Donation: Tissue, organ, or gamete donation intended for a designated recipient.Organizations: Administration and functional structures for the purpose of collectively systematizing activities for a particular goal.Consumer Participation: Community or individual involvement in the decision-making process.Ethics Committees: Committees established by professional societies, health facilities, or other institutions to consider decisions that have bioethical implications. The role of these committees may include consultation, education, mediation, and/or review of policies and practices. Committees that consider the ethical dimensions of patient care are ETHICS COMMITTEES, CLINICAL; committees established to protect the welfare of research subjects are ETHICS COMMITTEES, RESEARCH.Research Personnel: Those individuals engaged in research.Physicians: Individuals licensed to practice medicine.Guidelines as Topic: A systematic statement of policy rules or principles. Guidelines may be developed by government agencies at any level, institutions, professional societies, governing boards, or by convening expert panels. The text may be cursive or in outline form but is generally a comprehensive guide to problems and approaches in any field of activity. For guidelines in the field of health care and clinical medicine, PRACTICE GUIDELINES AS TOPIC is available.Health Promotion: Encouraging consumer behaviors most likely to optimize health potentials (physical and psychosocial) through health information, preventive programs, and access to medical care.Ethics, Clinical: The identification, analysis, and resolution of moral problems that arise in the care of patients. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Quality of Health Care: The levels of excellence which characterize the health service or health care provided based on accepted standards of quality.Taxes: Governmental levies on property, inheritance, gifts, etc.Outsourced Services: Organizational activities previously performed internally that are provided by external agents.Great BritainPaternalism: Interference with the FREEDOM or PERSONAL AUTONOMY of another person, with justifications referring to the promotion of the person's good or the prevention of harm to the person. (from Cambridge Dictionary of Philosophy, 1995); more generally, not allowing a person to make decisions on his or her own behalf.
  • Users may opt-out of the use of the DART cookie by visiting the Google Ad and Content Network privacy policy. (google.com)
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  • Dicks and Janes is not responsible for the privacy statements or other content on websites outside of the Dicks and Janes website. (umich.edu)
  • If you make use of a social media network and make content available to such networks, this is not covered by this privacy policy. (fujitsu.com)
  • However this has not been upheld by the higher courts, which have been content to develop the equitable doctrine of Breach of Confidence to protect privacy, following the example set by the UK. (wikipedia.org)
  • We have adopted this Privacy Policy ("Privacy Policy") to explain what information may be collected on our Website, how we use this information, and under what circumstances we may disclose the information to third parties. (inhabitat.com)
  • The following Privacy Policy has been developed to disclose what types of information is gathered and tracked, how the information is used and with whom the information is shared. (boma.org)
  • In some cases, the information you provide may be covered by the Privacy Act of 1974 (Privacy Act), or subject to the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA). (justice.gov)
  • A discussion of the FOIA can be found at https://www.justice.gov/oip/doj-guide-freedom-information-act and a discussion about the Privacy Act can be found at https://www.justice.gov/opcl/privacy-act-1974 . (justice.gov)
  • The work of the advisory committee led to the Privacy Act in 1974. (wikipedia.org)
  • If we are unable to resolve your complaint directly, you may submit your complaint at no cost to you to JAMS at https://www.jamsadr.com/file-an-eu-us-privacy-shield-or-safe-harbor-claim . (emarketer.com)
  • See Privacy Shield Annex 1 at https://www.privacyshield.gov/article?id=ANNEX-I-introduction . (marykay.com)
  • The Google Analytics Privacy Policy is available at https://www.google.com/intl/en/policies/privacy/ . (nsf.gov)
  • Unless otherwise noted in communications you may receive from us, this Privacy Statement does not apply to information you may provide to us through offline methods, for example, at live event premises or via telephone. (daytondailynews.com)
  • The Department maintains and disposes of personal information you provide according to the requirements of the Federal Records Act, Department policies, and the regulations and records schedules approved by the National Archives and Records Administration. (justice.gov)
  • We provide more information on cookies below and in our Cookies Policy . (surveymonkey.com)
  • To provide adequate protections for individuals, privacy legislation must provide for robust, harmonized, and predictable enforcement that individuals can readily access and that yields timely and effective results. (intel.com)
  • In addition to this Privacy Policy, we provide data and privacy information imbedded in our products connected with our Data & Privacy Icon for certain features that ask to use your personal information. (apple.com)
  • In order to send you some of these communications, we may provide your email address to Maropost , which will then be subject to Maropost's Privacy Policy . (motherjones.com)
  • It is a good idea to check their privacy policy when you provide your information to them to fully understand how they will process your data and may share it with others. (samaritanspurse.org)
  • It is recognized as an industry leader in development and implementation of privacy safeguards that protect the individual and preserve the robust flow and use of information. (intel.com)
  • If your Privacy Shield complaint cannot be resolved through the above channels, under certain conditions, EU individuals may invoke binding arbitration for some residual claims not resolved by other redress mechanisms. (marykay.com)
  • We are committed to respecting your right to privacy and also those of others you interact with through our sites or mobile apps. (sikhvideos.org)
  • Mary Kay has further committed to refer unresolved privacy complaints under the EU-U.S. Privacy Shield to an independent dispute resolution mechanism, the BBB EU Privacy Shield, operated by the Council of Better Business Bureaus. (marykay.com)