NorwayHealth Policy: Decisions, usually developed by government policymakers, for determining present and future objectives pertaining to the health care system.Policy Making: The decision process by which individuals, groups or institutions establish policies pertaining to plans, programs or procedures.Organizational Policy: A course or method of action selected, usually by an organization, institution, university, society, etc., from among alternatives to guide and determine present and future decisions and positions on matters of public interest or social concern. It does not include internal policy relating to organization and administration within the corporate body, for which ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION is available.Policy: A course or method of action selected to guide and determine present and future decisions.Rats, Inbred BNEnvironmental Policy: A course of action or principle adopted or proposed by a government, party, business, or individual that concerns human interactions with nature and natural resources.Picea: A plant genus in the family PINACEAE, order Pinales, class Pinopsida, division Coniferophyta. They are evergreen, pyramidal trees with whorled branches and thin, scaly bark. Each of the linear, spirally arranged leaves is jointed near the stem on a separate woody base.Nutrition Policy: Guidelines and objectives pertaining to food supply and nutrition including recommendations for healthy diet.Social Control Policies: Decisions for determining and guiding present and future objectives from among alternatives.Politics: Activities concerned with governmental policies, functions, etc.United StatesSmoke-Free Policy: Prohibition against tobacco smoking in specific areas to control TOBACCO SMOKE POLLUTION.Family Planning Policy: A course or method of action selected, usually by a government, to guide and determine present and future decisions on population control by limiting the number of children or controlling fertility, notably through family planning and contraception within the nuclear family.Public Health: Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.ScandinaviaEuropeGovernment Regulation: Exercise of governmental authority to control conduct.Health Promotion: Encouraging consumer behaviors most likely to optimize health potentials (physical and psychosocial) through health information, preventive programs, and access to medical care.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Arctic Regions: The Arctic Ocean and the lands in it and adjacent to it. It includes Point Barrow, Alaska, most of the Franklin District in Canada, two thirds of Greenland, Svalbard, Franz Josef Land, Lapland, Novaya Zemlya, and Northern Siberia. (Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p66)Taxes: Governmental levies on property, inheritance, gifts, etc.State Government: The level of governmental organization and function below that of the national or country-wide government.SvalbardHealth Care Reform: Innovation and improvement of the health care system by reappraisal, amendment of services, and removal of faults and abuses in providing and distributing health services to patients. It includes a re-alignment of health services and health insurance to maximum demographic elements (the unemployed, indigent, uninsured, elderly, inner cities, rural areas) with reference to coverage, hospitalization, pricing and cost containment, insurers' and employers' costs, pre-existing medical conditions, prescribed drugs, equipment, and services.Commerce: The interchange of goods or commodities, especially on a large scale, between different countries or between populations within the same country. It includes trade (the buying, selling, or exchanging of commodities, whether wholesale or retail) and business (the purchase and sale of goods to make a profit). (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed, p411, p2005 & p283)Health Services Accessibility: The degree to which individuals are inhibited or facilitated in their ability to gain entry to and to receive care and services from the health care system. Factors influencing this ability include geographic, architectural, transportational, and financial considerations, among others.International Cooperation: The interaction of persons or groups of persons representing various nations in the pursuit of a common goal or interest.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Smoking: Inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning TOBACCO.European Union: The collective designation of three organizations with common membership: the European Economic Community (Common Market), the European Coal and Steel Community, and the European Atomic Energy Community (Euratom). It was known as the European Community until 1994. It is primarily an economic union with the principal objectives of free movement of goods, capital, and labor. Professional services, social, medical and paramedical, are subsumed under labor. The constituent countries are Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, and the United Kingdom. (The World Almanac and Book of Facts 1997, p842)Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Seoul virus: A species of HANTAVIRUS causing a less severe form of HEMORRHAGIC FEVER WITH RENAL SYNDROME in Asia (primarily Korea and Japan). It is transmitted by rats, especially Rattus rattus and R. norvegicus.Federal Government: The level of governmental organization and function at the national or country-wide level.Delivery of Health Care: The concept concerned with all aspects of providing and distributing health services to a patient population.National Health Programs: Components of a national health care system which administer specific services, e.g., national health insurance.Financing, Government: Federal, state, or local government organized methods of financial assistance.Developing Countries: Countries in the process of change with economic growth, that is, an increase in production, per capita consumption, and income. The process of economic growth involves better utilization of natural and human resources, which results in a change in the social, political, and economic structures.Reindeer: A genus of deer, Rangifer, that inhabits the northern parts of Europe, Asia, and America. Caribou is the North American name; reindeer, the European. They are often domesticated and used, especially in Lapland, for drawing sleds and as a source of food. Rangifer is the only genus of the deer family in which both sexes are antlered. Most caribou inhabit arctic tundra and surrounding arboreal coniferous forests and most have seasonal shifts in migration. They are hunted extensively for their meat, skin, antlers, and other parts. (From Webster, 3d ed; Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1397)Schools: Educational institutions.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Great BritainSocioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Salmo salar: A commercially important species of SALMON in the family SALMONIDAE, order SALMONIFORMES, which occurs in the North Atlantic.Public Opinion: The attitude of a significant portion of a population toward any given proposition, based upon a measurable amount of factual evidence, and involving some degree of reflection, analysis, and reasoning.Registries: The systems and processes involved in the establishment, support, management, and operation of registers, e.g., disease registers.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Tobacco Industry: The aggregate business enterprise of agriculture, manufacture, and distribution related to tobacco and tobacco-derived products.Government: The complex of political institutions, laws, and customs through which the function of governing is carried out in a specific political unit.Internationality: The quality or state of relating to or affecting two or more nations. (After Merriam-Webster Collegiate Dictionary, 10th ed)Canada: The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.Conflict of Interest: A situation in which an individual might benefit personally from official or professional actions. It includes a conflict between a person's private interests and official responsibilities in a position of trust. The term is not restricted to government officials. The concept refers both to actual conflict of interest and the appearance or perception of conflict.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.World Health: The concept pertaining to the health status of inhabitants of the world.Consumer Advocacy: The promotion and support of consumers' rights and interests.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Health Priorities: Preferentially rated health-related activities or functions to be used in establishing health planning goals. This may refer specifically to PL93-641.Program Evaluation: Studies designed to assess the efficacy of programs. They may include the evaluation of cost-effectiveness, the extent to which objectives are met, or impact.Fish Diseases: Diseases of freshwater, marine, hatchery or aquarium fish. This term includes diseases of both teleosts (true fish) and elasmobranchs (sharks, rays and skates).Administrative Personnel: Individuals responsible for the development of policy and supervision of the execution of plans and functional operations.Research: Critical and exhaustive investigation or experimentation, having for its aim the discovery of new facts and their correct interpretation, the revision of accepted conclusions, theories, or laws in the light of newly discovered facts, or the practical application of such new or revised conclusions, theories, or laws. (Webster, 3d ed)Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Public Health Administration: Management of public health organizations or agencies.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Evidence-Based Medicine: An approach of practicing medicine with the goal to improve and evaluate patient care. It requires the judicious integration of best research evidence with the patient's values to make decisions about medical care. This method is to help physicians make proper diagnosis, devise best testing plan, choose best treatment and methods of disease prevention, as well as develop guidelines for large groups of patients with the same disease. (from JAMA 296 (9), 2006)Somalia: Somalia is located on the east coast of Africa on and north of the Equator and, with Ethiopia, Eritrea, Djibouti, and Kenya, is often referred to as the Horn of Africa. It comprises Italy's former Trust Territory of Somalia and the former British Protectorate of Somaliland. The capital is Mogadishu.Social Justice: An interactive process whereby members of a community are concerned for the equality and rights of all.Health Plan Implementation: Those actions designed to carry out recommendations pertaining to health plans or programs.Human Rights: The rights of the individual to cultural, social, economic, and educational opportunities as provided by society, e.g., right to work, right to education, and right to social security.Fisheries: Places for cultivation and harvesting of fish, particularly in sea waters. (from McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Local Government: Smallest political subdivisions within a country at which general governmental functions are carried-out.Consumer Participation: Community or individual involvement in the decision-making process.Social Welfare: Organized institutions which provide services to ameliorate conditions of need or social pathology in the community.Tobacco Smoke Pollution: Contamination of the air by tobacco smoke.Population Surveillance: Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.Health Planning: Planning for needed health and/or welfare services and facilities.RestaurantsGuidelines as Topic: A systematic statement of policy rules or principles. Guidelines may be developed by government agencies at any level, institutions, professional societies, governing boards, or by convening expert panels. The text may be cursive or in outline form but is generally a comprehensive guide to problems and approaches in any field of activity. For guidelines in the field of health care and clinical medicine, PRACTICE GUIDELINES AS TOPIC is available.Conservation of Natural Resources: The protection, preservation, restoration, and rational use of all resources in the total environment.Health Care Surveys: Statistical measures of utilization and other aspects of the provision of health care services including hospitalization and ambulatory care.SwedenQualitative Research: Any type of research that employs nonnumeric information to explore individual or group characteristics, producing findings not arrived at by statistical procedures or other quantitative means. (Qualitative Inquiry: A Dictionary of Terms Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 1997)Organizational Case Studies: Descriptions and evaluations of specific health care organizations.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.History, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.Health Care Rationing: Planning for the equitable allocation, apportionment, or distribution of available health resources.Cost-Benefit Analysis: A method of comparing the cost of a program with its expected benefits in dollars (or other currency). The benefit-to-cost ratio is a measure of total return expected per unit of money spent. This analysis generally excludes consideration of factors that are not measured ultimately in economic terms. Cost effectiveness compares alternative ways to achieve a specific set of results.Government Agencies: Administrative units of government responsible for policy making and management of governmental activities.Rats, Inbred F344Universal Coverage: Health insurance coverage for all persons in a state or country, rather than for some subset of the population. It may extend to the unemployed as well as to the employed; to aliens as well as to citizens; for pre-existing conditions as well as for current illnesses; for mental as well as for physical conditions.Cost Control: The containment, regulation, or restraint of costs. Costs are said to be contained when the value of resources committed to an activity is not considered excessive. This determination is frequently subjective and dependent upon the specific geographic area of the activity being measured. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Health Expenditures: The amounts spent by individuals, groups, nations, or private or public organizations for total health care and/or its various components. These amounts may or may not be equivalent to the actual costs (HEALTH CARE COSTS) and may or may not be shared among the patient, insurers, and/or employers.Private Sector: That distinct portion of the institutional, industrial, or economic structure of a country that is controlled or owned by non-governmental, private interests.Social Responsibility: The obligations and accountability assumed in carrying out actions or ideas on behalf of others.Workplace: Place or physical location of work or employment.IcelandDrug and Narcotic Control: Control of drug and narcotic use by international agreement, or by institutional systems for handling prescribed drugs. This includes regulations concerned with the manufacturing, dispensing, approval (DRUG APPROVAL), and marketing of drugs.Resource Allocation: Societal or individual decisions about the equitable distribution of available resources.Social Marketing: Use of marketing principles also used to sell products to consumers to promote ideas, attitudes and behaviors. Design and use of programs seeking to increase the acceptance of a social idea or practice by target groups, not for the benefit of the marketer, but to benefit the target audience and the general society.Decision Making: The process of making a selective intellectual judgment when presented with several complex alternatives consisting of several variables, and usually defining a course of action or an idea.Environmental Health: The science of controlling or modifying those conditions, influences, or forces surrounding man which relate to promoting, establishing, and maintaining health.Health Services Needs and Demand: Health services required by a population or community as well as the health services that the population or community is able and willing to pay for.Disease Outbreaks: Sudden increase in the incidence of a disease. The concept includes EPIDEMICS and PANDEMICS.Biomedical Research: Research that involves the application of the natural sciences, especially biology and physiology, to medicine.Costs and Cost Analysis: Absolute, comparative, or differential costs pertaining to services, institutions, resources, etc., or the analysis and study of these costs.Lobbying: A process whereby representatives of a particular interest group attempt to influence governmental decision makers to accept the policy desires of the lobbying organization.Public Sector: The area of a nation's economy that is tax-supported and under government control.Medicaid: Federal program, created by Public Law 89-97, Title XIX, a 1965 amendment to the Social Security Act, administered by the states, that provides health care benefits to indigent and medically indigent persons.World Health Organization: A specialized agency of the United Nations designed as a coordinating authority on international health work; its aim is to promote the attainment of the highest possible level of health by all peoples.Economics, Hospital: Economic aspects related to the management and operation of a hospital.Information Dissemination: The circulation or wide dispersal of information.Poverty: A situation in which the level of living of an individual, family, or group is below the standard of the community. It is often related to a specific income level.Insurance Coverage: Generally refers to the amount of protection available and the kind of loss which would be paid for under an insurance contract with an insurer. (Slee & Slee, Health Care Terms, 2d ed)Alcoholic Beverages: Drinkable liquids containing ETHANOL.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Australia: The smallest continent and an independent country, comprising six states and two territories. Its capital is Canberra.Emigration and Immigration: The process of leaving one's country to establish residence in a foreign country.Physician's Practice Patterns: Patterns of practice related to diagnosis and treatment as especially influenced by cost of the service requested and provided.Program Development: The process of formulating, improving, and expanding educational, managerial, or service-oriented work plans (excluding computer program development).Attitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.Cross-Cultural Comparison: Comparison of various psychological, sociological, or cultural factors in order to assess the similarities or diversities occurring in two or more different cultures or societies.Practice Guidelines as Topic: Directions or principles presenting current or future rules of policy for assisting health care practitioners in patient care decisions regarding diagnosis, therapy, or related clinical circumstances. The guidelines may be developed by government agencies at any level, institutions, professional societies, governing boards, or by the convening of expert panels. The guidelines form a basis for the evaluation of all aspects of health care and delivery.United Nations: An international organization whose members include most of the sovereign nations of the world with headquarters in New York City. The primary objectives of the organization are to maintain peace and security and to achieve international cooperation in solving international economic, social, cultural, or humanitarian problems.Models, Theoretical: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of systems, processes, or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Quality of Health Care: The levels of excellence which characterize the health service or health care provided based on accepted standards of quality.Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).State Health Plans: State plans prepared by the State Health Planning and Development Agencies which are made up from plans submitted by the Health Systems Agencies and subject to review and revision by the Statewide Health Coordinating Council.Health Care Costs: The actual costs of providing services related to the delivery of health care, including the costs of procedures, therapies, and medications. It is differentiated from HEALTH EXPENDITURES, which refers to the amount of money paid for the services, and from fees, which refers to the amount charged, regardless of cost.Insurance, Health: Insurance providing coverage of medical, surgical, or hospital care in general or for which there is no specific heading.Physicians: Individuals licensed to practice medicine.
  • This report proposes recommendations to take advantage of the revision of this comprehensive strategic plan in 2018 to improve the horizontal coordination and add more concrete structural policy initiatives, without changing the plan's general orientation nor giving up the sectorial and the consensus principles that form the basis of Norwegian policy making. (oecd.org)
  • Kotsadam, Andreas and Lind, Jo Thori and Modalsli, Jørgen, Call the Midwife - Health Personnel and Mortality in Norway 1887-1921 (January 23, 2018). (ssrn.com)
  • European countries that implemented more stringent mitigation policies earlier in their outbreak response tended to report fewer COVID-19 deaths through the end of June 2020. (cdc.gov)
  • COPENHAGEN, Denmark (AP) - Norway plans to build the world's first tunnel for ships, a 1,700-meter (5,610-feet) passageway burrowed through a piece of rocky peninsula that will allow vessels to avoid a treacherous part of sea. (boston.com)
  • I was therefore disturbed to realize recently that Norway has one of the world's harshest laws criminalizing HIV-Penal Code 155. (poz.com)
  • Norway is among the world's most generous supporters of UNAIDS, the U.N. agency working to mitigate the impact of this mass worldwide epidemic. (poz.com)
  • Norway adopts world's first zero deforestation policy: What does that mean? (csmonitor.com)
  • As the world's second-largest exporter of natural gas and eleventh-largest exporter of oil, Norway plays an important stabilizing role in energy markets and energy security. (state.gov)
  • The first three papers involve issues of government fiscal and monetary policy: the implications of a large and sustained fiscal budget deficit, India's experience with tax reform, and the relevance of the inflation-targeting framework for Indian monetary policy. (brookings.edu)
  • Unable to use traditional remedies like monetary or fiscal policy stimulus, policymakers may consider automatic fiscal stabilisers. (voxeu.org)
  • In other words, the idea that falling crude prices will help support the krone is to a certain extent self-defeating in the current monetary policy regime. (zerohedge.com)
  • By the way, if the rest of 2016 ends up looking anything like the first two weeks, Norway can go ahead and forget about squeezing a respectable return out of its SWF this year. (zerohedge.com)
  • As cases and deaths from coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in Europe rose sharply in late March, most European countries implemented strict mitigation policies, including closure of nonessential businesses and mandatory stay-at-home orders. (cdc.gov)
  • Data on mitigation policies were obtained from the CDC COVID-19 International Taskforce global mitigation database accessible through WHO* ( 5 ) and the University of Oxford's Coronavirus Government Response Tracker ( 6 ), specifically the Oxford Stringency Index (OSI) ( 6 ), which is a composite index based on nine mitigation policies. (cdc.gov)
  • Norway is reimposing quarantine on more travellers from foreign countries including Cyprus, the government said on Wednesday, and reiterated its advice that Norwegians should avoid travelling abroad amid a jump in the number of new coronavirus cases. (cyprus-mail.com)
  • Norway has one of the highest overdose mortality rates in Europe, with 81 deaths per million in 2015 after Estonia (132 deaths per million) and Sweden (88 deaths per million), according to the European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction. (newsmax.com)
  • DUBLIN (Reuters) - Non-EU Norway called on Brussels and London on Wednesday to ensure that Brexit does not disrupt its trade relations once Britain leaves the European Union. (reuters.com)
  • OSLO, Oct 2 (Reuters) - Norwegian oil services firm Aker Solutions has won a contract from Statoil to deliver five subsea trees and eleven control modules to the Visund field offshore Norway, the firm said on Tuesday. (cnbc.com)
  • Nowadays Svalbard is particularly important for Norway as both the islands and their surrounding waters are a cornerstone for the country's Arctic policy and strategy. (globalpublicpolicywatch.org)
  • Dearing, who conducted the study with researchers from Norway and Harvard Medical School, said the Scandinavian country's approach to child care might explain why so few behavioral problems were found among children included in the study group. (bc.edu)
  • Tax records became easily accessible online in Norway in 2001, allowing everyone in the country to observe the incomes of everyone else. (voxeu.org)
  • Thus, it seems that WHO has contributed not so much to formulating national regulatory instruments for implementing mental health policies as to represent an agency to form a "public health alliance", strengthening the arguments for community-based services in the country. (knowandpol.eu)
  • If for instance we picture a context in country A of a well ordered social policy and country B were it is not working, the chances of effective social work would be higher in country A. Should and could the shape of the policy in country A then be exported to country B? (bibsys.no)
  • The visa policy of Turkey deals with the requirements which a foreign national wishing to enter Turkey must meet to be permitted to travel to, enter and remain in the country. (wikipedia.org)
  • Even though Turkey is a candidate country for the membership in the European Union , it has a more complex visa policy than the visa policy of the Schengen Area . (wikipedia.org)
  • Because of Svalbard, Norway is the only Scandinavian country with a direct coastline along the Arctic Ocean and that northern area is a fundamental element for Norwegian actions regarding the area. (globalpublicpolicywatch.org)
  • We hope that Country Calling Codes has been helpful in finding the UK calling code to make your international call from Norway to Bath, United Kingdom. (countrycallingcodes.com)
  • This publication is the first in a series of three comparative reports on sickness and disability policies in selected OECD countries. (oecd.org)
  • Then I analyze if such policies, using Norway as a model, may be transfer from the one context to the other within the interest area of policy learning, policy making, policy transfer and political development. (bibsys.no)
  • SAS allows us to combine, analyze and provide transparent insight into large amounts of data, so that we can enforce policy more efficiently and account for our actions according to the audit guidelines. (sas.com)
  • In this study, 32 Brown Norway (BN) rats were divided into four groups that were exposed to ovalbumin (OVA) (positive control), rhLF, bovine lactoferrin (bLF) and saline (negative control), respectively, with daily intragastric administration for 42 days. (ingentaconnect.com)
  • In this article we report that the Brown Norway (BN) rat is sensitive to thymic atrophy induced by the estrogen diethylstilbestrol (DES). (deepdyve.com)
  • Citizens' Climate Lobby is a non-profit, non-partisan, grassroots advocacy organization focused on national policies to address climate change. (volunteermatch.org)
  • Norway last week put on hold a plan to further reopen society and urged its citizens to refrain from foreign travel amid the faster spread of the virus. (cyprus-mail.com)
  • Norwegian foreign policy today has to respond to a highly complex and challenging threat landscape. (regjeringen.no)
  • Participation in the UN is a cornerstone of Norwegian foreign policy. (regjeringen.no)
  • On Monday, June 16, the Foreign Policy program at Brookings hosted Norwegian Foreign Minister Børge Brende for an address on the importance of dialogue and inclusiveness in post-conflict settings, as well as the need to establish stability and security in these war-torn countries. (brookings.edu)
  • This event also marked the inauguration of the Alan and Jane Batkin International Leaders Forum Series, a new event series hosted by Foreign Policy at Brookings, which will bring global political, diplomatic and thought leaders to Washington, D.C. for major policy addresses. (brookings.edu)
  • In foreign policy it is strongly Atlanticist, and pro-globalization. (wikipedia.org)
  • Norway, which is a founding member of NATO, has pledged not to host foreign forces to allay Moscow's concerns that it could serve as a platform for a surprise attack. (zerohedge.com)
  • Norway has chosen to remain out of the EU but pays hundreds of millions of euros to access the single market as a member of the European Economic Area (EEA) and is also in the European Free Trade Area (EFTA) along with Switzerland, Iceland and Liechtenstein. (reuters.com)
  • Norway has already reintroduced similar constraints for Spain, France, Switzerland and several others, and has put on hold a plan to permit leisure travel from some non-European countries, which has been banned since March. (cyprus-mail.com)
  • In this video, Carl Emmerson argues that the amount of trade and the degree of access to the European Single Market will determine future taxation policies. (voxeu.org)
  • Use Content Manager's powerful content migration capability to enable policy based storage. (ibm.com)
  • For user safety and other reasons, we err on the side of caution in applying this policy, especially for landing pages that link or refer to content that in any way appears to be the online sale of medicines, whether prescription or over-the-counter medicine. (google.com)
  • It seems to me that there are powerful reasons why criminal laws and criminal prosecutions make bad policy in the AIDS epidemic. (poz.com)
  • what kind of terms would be given to Britain after Brexit and whether Britain would get preferential treatment over Norway. (reuters.com)
  • The attack in Norway by Anders Behring Breivik, apparently involving a Ruger Mini-14 assault rifle, is only the most horrific of the mass shootings involving the company's products. (huffingtonpost.com)
  • This is the second volume of the India Policy Forum . (brookings.edu)
  • The journal is jointly promoted by the National Council for Applied Economic Research (NCAER) in New Delhi and the Brookings Institution in Washington, D.C., with the objective of presenting high-quality empirical research on the major economic policy issues that confront contemporary India. (brookings.edu)
  • Our objective is to make the policy discussion accessible to a broad nonspecialist audience inside and outside India. (brookings.edu)
  • All in all, WHO recommendations did not influence developments in Norwegian mental health policies, but subsequent to the World Health Report the Helsinki Declaration and the WHO Action Plan were some times being cited to support policies already approved. (knowandpol.eu)
  • The evaluation report, together with the Government white paper on the humanities in Norway presented earlier this year, will be an important compass for Norwegian humanities research in the years ahead," says Chief Executive of the Research Council, John-Arne Røttingen. (forskningsradet.no)
  • Photo: Thomas Keilman) "The report recommends, among other things, that the Research Council targets its resources better and encourages greater collaboration between researchers across institutions in Norway. (forskningsradet.no)
  • Dearing and colleagues report that important next steps will be follow-up studies involving Norwegian children into later childhood and adolescence, times through which child care effects persist in the US, and collecting more data from countries outside the US to determine the child and family policy environments in which child care does or does not appear to put children at risk. (bc.edu)
  • One might conclude that the relationship between Norway and WHO in this field appears to be: Focussed upon community-based mental health services, particularly in the public health tradition, and to a limited extent upon specialised services. (knowandpol.eu)
  • In limited cases, and where permitted by local law, Google allows exceptions to this policy for public health and safety awareness campaigns from governmental or well-established non-profit health advocacy organizations. (google.com)
  • The Directorate, as part of the Norway Ministry of Health, leads the development and implementation of care services, disease surveillance, public health policy and medical research. (cnbc.com)
  • Former US President Jimmy Carter chairs The Carter Center in Atlanta , a private, nonprofit foundation that includes public policy programs in conflict resolution, human rights, agriculture, global health, and the environment. (csmonitor.com)
  • To many observers, these actions reflect clear disparities between public policy statements and the apparent intentions of industrial countries to avoid common standards of behavior. (csmonitor.com)
  • Norway diagnosed 357 people with Covid-19 last week, the highest since April, but still well below the record 1,733 cases found in a single week in late March, data from the Norwegian Institute of Public Health showed. (cyprus-mail.com)
  • In that capacity The Times of London called Kjaer "the most powerful man in Norway" but the low-key Kjaer still often took public transport to work. (reuters.com)
  • England and Norway had no public systems for financial reporting. (springer.com)
  • And for its fertilizer policy, it relies on SAS ® to take an efficient and intelligent approach to detecting and enforcing inspections. (sas.com)
  • Multilateral organizations have a positive influence in global policy diffusion through informational advocacy, technical assistance, and financial aid. (springer.com)
  • This is the paramount question I address at two levels in this thesis: First I look and explore the policy issue: the scope, capacity and implementation condition in two different social contexts: Norway and Bolivia using the child welfare service as an exemplar policy area. (bibsys.no)
  • Earlier implementation of stringent mitigation policies, even by just a few weeks, appears to be important to prevent widespread COVID-19 transmission and reduce the number of deaths. (cdc.gov)
  • Implementation of policies earlier in the course of the outbreak was associated with lower COVID-19-associated mortality during the subsequent months. (cdc.gov)
  • This target is conditional on the availability of flexible mechanisms under the new climate agreement and on Norway being credited for participation in the EU ETS so that this counts towards fulfilment of the commitment. (europa.eu)
  • The relationship between Norway and WHO with respect to mental health is embedded in a long tradition of Norwegian support of the organization. (knowandpol.eu)
  • The image of Norway as an active partner in WHO seems to be related to the history of the relationship between the two (particularly to the role of some highprofile participants), to the extensive funding from Norwegian governments, and to health issues not related to mental health. (knowandpol.eu)
  • Consequently mental health policies did not implicate a zero-sumgame concerning resource allocations between hospitals and community services after the de-institutionalization phase. (knowandpol.eu)
  • There are few indications that Norway played an important role in the work on the Helsinki Declaration and the WHO Action Plan - apart from the issue of user perspectives/participation and services for children and adolescents. (knowandpol.eu)
  • At the Helsinki meeting Norway could not merely present good intentions for future developments. (knowandpol.eu)
  • This article examines the global legislative response to the HIV/AIDS epidemic with a particular focus on how policies were diffused internationally or regionally, or facilitated internally. (springer.com)
  • Many European countries have their own WHO office - Norway does not. (knowandpol.eu)
  • Mitigation policies, including closure of nonessential businesses, restrictions on gatherings and movement, and stay-at-home orders, have been critical to controlling the COVID-19 pandemic in many countries, but they come with high social and economic costs. (cdc.gov)
  • These countries might have saved several thousand lives relative to countries that implemented similar policies, but later. (cdc.gov)
  • Using data from 37 European countries, the impact of the timing of these mitigation policies on mortality from COVID-19 was evaluated. (cdc.gov)
  • Using data from 37 European countries, the impact of the timing and stringency of early mitigation policies on cumulative mortality from COVID-19 on June 30 was assessed. (cdc.gov)
  • however, this index is also weighted on the strictness of each policy, which can vary among countries ( 6 ). (cdc.gov)
  • The present population density of Norway is low compared to other European countries (14.5 people per square mile compared to the U.S. density of 35.2) and during the Viking period, it was even lower. (expeditions.com)
  • Norway has announced that it will be one of the first countries to switch of FM-Radio in a move to switch to completely digital broadcasts. (geeky-gadgets.com)
  • Our analysis engages with the themes of this special issue by focusing on the development of Laboratory Animal Science and Medicine in Norway, which both informed wider transnational developments and was formed by them. (cambridge.org)
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  • Norway, which is rich with North Sea oil, spends $90,000 a year to house each prisoner - three times what is spent on inmates in the United States. (npr.org)
  • For the third consecutive year, Mercer norway has conducted in-depth research to map the Norwegian pension market in order to provide employers with essential information to optimize their pension plans and improve financial security for their employees. (mercer.com)
  • The government last year announced plans to boost spending on the way to shoring up the flagging economy and officials says those measures - which are part of the reason why Norway will pull money from the SWF - should be sufficient to offset the pain from lower crude prices. (zerohedge.com)
  • The US soldiers, which will stay in Norway for a year with the current batch of Marines being replaced after their six-month tour is complete. (zerohedge.com)
  • This study explores how migrants' geographical origin, reason for migration, and duration of residence are associated with admission rates to somatic hospitals in Norway. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Sociodemographic information on all individuals residing in Norway at the start of 2008 was linked to data on all admissions to somatic hospitals during 2008-2011. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The present study analyzes how world region origin, reason for migration, and length of residence are associated with migrants' admissions to somatic hospitals in Norway. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Generally, the indication is that Norway is giving WHO high priority, reflected in offering it extensive financial support and expertise. (knowandpol.eu)