A diffuse parenchymal lung disease caused by inhalation of dust and by tissue reaction to their presence. These inorganic, organic, particulate, or vaporized matters usually are inhaled by workers in their occupational environment, leading to the various forms (ASBESTOSIS; BYSSINOSIS; and others). Similar air pollution can also have deleterious effects on the general population.
A diffuse parenchymal lung disease caused by accumulation of inhaled CARBON or coal dust. The disease can progress from asymptomatic anthracosis to massive lung fibrosis. This lung lesion usually occurs in coal MINERS, but can be seen in urban dwellers and tobacco smokers.
A natural fuel formed by partial decomposition of vegetable matter under certain environmental conditions.
A form of pneumoconiosis resulting from inhalation of dust containing crystalline form of SILICON DIOXIDE, usually in the form of quartz. Amorphous silica is relatively nontoxic.
Earth or other matter in fine, dry particles. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)
Individuals responsible for fabrication of dental appliances.
A film base coated with an emulsion designed for use with x-rays.
A condition characterized by the presence of RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS associated with a specific form of pneumoconiosis, often in coal miners and asbestos workers.
A form of pneumoconiosis caused by inhalation of asbestos fibers which elicit potent inflammatory responses in the parenchyma of the lung. The disease is characterized by interstitial fibrosis of the lung, varying from scattered sites to extensive scarring of the alveolar interstitium.
Finely powdered native hydrous magnesium silicate. It is used as a dusting powder, either alone or with starch or boric acid, for medicinal and toilet preparations. It is also an excipient and filler for pills, tablets, and for dusting tablet molds. (From Merck Index, 11th ed)
The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents that occurs as a result of one's occupation.
Quartz (SiO2). A glassy or crystalline form of silicon dioxide. Many colored varieties are semiprecious stones. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)
The most common mineral of a group of hydrated aluminum silicates, approximately H2Al2Si2O8-H2O. It is prepared for pharmaceutical and medicinal purposes by levigating with water to remove sand, etc. (From Merck Index, 11th ed) The name is derived from Kao-ling (Chinese: "high ridge"), the original site. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)
Insurance coverage providing compensation and medical benefits to individuals because of work-connected injuries or disease.
Transparent, tasteless crystals found in nature as agate, amethyst, chalcedony, cristobalite, flint, sand, QUARTZ, and tridymite. The compound is insoluble in water or acids except hydrofluoric acid.
A polyvinyl resin used extensively in the manufacture of plastics, including medical devices, tubing, and other packaging. It is also used as a rubber substitute.
X-ray visualization of the chest and organs of the thoracic cavity. It is not restricted to visualization of the lungs.
Either of the pair of organs occupying the cavity of the thorax that effect the aeration of the blood.
Diseases caused by factors involved in one's employment.
The maximum exposure to a biologically active physical or chemical agent that is allowed during an 8-hour period (a workday) in a population of workers, or during a 24-hour period in the general population, which does not appear to cause appreciable harm, whether immediate or delayed for any period, in the target population. (From Lewis Dictionary of Toxicology, 1st ed)
A form of pneumoconiosis resulting from inhalation of iron in the mining dust or welding fumes.
X-ray screening of large groups of persons for diseases of the lung and heart by means of radiography of the chest.
An institute of the CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL AND PREVENTION which is responsible for assuring safe and healthful working conditions and for developing standards of safety and health. Research activities are carried out pertinent to these goals.
A process in which normal lung tissues are progressively replaced by FIBROBLASTS and COLLAGEN causing an irreversible loss of the ability to transfer oxygen into the bloodstream via PULMONARY ALVEOLI. Patients show progressive DYSPNEA finally resulting in death.
The volume of air that is exhaled by a maximal expiration following a maximal inspiration.
The science, art, or technology dealing with processes involved in the separation of metals from their ores, the technique of making or compounding the alloys, the techniques of working or heat-treating metals, and the mining of metals. It includes industrial metallurgy as well as metallurgical techniques employed in the preparation and working of metals used in dentistry, with special reference to orthodontic and prosthodontic appliances. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p494)
Asbestos. Fibrous incombustible mineral composed of magnesium and calcium silicates with or without other elements. It is relatively inert chemically and used in thermal insulation and fireproofing. Inhalation of dust causes asbestosis and later lung and gastrointestinal neoplasms.
A geographical area of the United States with no definite boundaries but comprising northeastern Alabama, northwestern Georgia, northwestern South Carolina, western North Carolina, eastern Kentucky, eastern Tennessee, western Virginia, West Virginia, western Maryland, southwestern Pennsylvania, southern Ohio, and southern New York.
Any of the numerous types of clay which contain varying proportions of Al2O3 and SiO2. They are made synthetically by heating aluminum fluoride at 1000-2000 degrees C with silica and water vapor. (From Hawley's Condensed Chemical Dictionary, 11th ed)
Air pollutants found in the work area. They are usually produced by the specific nature of the occupation.
Diseases of the respiratory system in general or unspecified or for a specific respiratory disease not available.
Inflammation of the large airways in the lung including any part of the BRONCHI, from the PRIMARY BRONCHI to the TERTIARY BRONCHI.
Subcutaneous nodules seen in 20-30% of rheumatoid arthritis patients. They may arise anywhere on the body, but are most frequently found over the bony prominences. The nodules are characterized histologically by dense areas of fibrinoid necrosis with basophilic streaks and granules, surrounded by a palisade of cells, mainly fibroblasts and histiocytes.
Facilities for the performance of services related to dental treatment but not done directly in the patient's mouth.
Measure of the maximum amount of air that can be expelled in a given number of seconds during a FORCED VITAL CAPACITY determination . It is usually given as FEV followed by a subscript indicating the number of seconds over which the measurement is made, although it is sometimes given as a percentage of forced vital capacity.
Finely divided solid matter with particle sizes smaller than a micrometeorite, thus with diameters much smaller than a millimeter, moving in interplanetary space. (NASA Thesaurus, 1994)
Any solid objects moving in interplanetary space that are smaller than a planet or asteroid but larger than a molecule. Meteorites are any meteoroid that has fallen to a planetary surface. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
The environment outside the earth or its atmosphere. The environment may refer to a closed cabin (such as a space shuttle or space station) or to space itself, the moon, or other planets.
Medical specialty concerned with environmental factors that may impinge upon human disease, and development of methods for the detection, prevention, and control of environmentally related disease.
It is a form of protection provided by law. In the United States this protection is granted to authors of original works of authorship, including literary, dramatic, musical, artistic, and certain other intellectual works. This protection is available to both published and unpublished works. (from Circular of the United States Copyright Office, 6/30/2008)
Medical specialty concerned with the promotion and maintenance of the physical and mental health of employees in occupational settings.
Further or repeated use of equipment, instruments, devices, or materials. It includes additional use regardless of the original intent of the producer as to disposability or durability. It does not include the repeated use of fluids or solutions.
Persons whose profession is to give legal advice and assistance to clients and represent them in legal matters. (American Heritage Dictionary, 3d ed)

Cohort study of art glass workers in Tuscany, Italy: mortality from non-malignant diseases. (1/300)

This investigation studies cause-specific mortality of art glass workers employed in 17 industrial facilities in Tuscany, Italy. A cohort of 3,390 workers employed for at least 1 year was enumerated from company payrolls. Follow-up was between the start of employment in each factory and 31 December 1993. The cause-specific expected mortality was computed relative to Tuscany rates and specified for gender, 5-year age groups and calendar year. Separate analyses were carried out for the jobs of makers and formers and for batch mixers. Among males (3, 180 individuals) observed mortality for non-cancer causes was higher than expected for hypertensive disease [standardized mortality ratio (SMR) = 178, 90% confidence interval (90% CI) = 96-301], pneumoconiosis (SMR = 200, 90% CI = 94-376) and diseases of the genitourinary system (SMR = 169, 90% CI = 95-279). Increases for the above causes were shown also among makers and formers: hypertensive disease (SMR = 182, 90% CI = 85-341), pneumoconiosis (SMR = 250, 90% CI = 109-493) and diseases of the genitourinary system (SMR = 224, 90% CI = 121-380). For batch mixers an increase was present for cerebrovascular disease. The observed mortality for cancer causes was above the expected for cancers of the larynx, lung, stomach and brain. This study points to the existence for Tuscan glass workers of health effects in addition to cancer; previously observed carcinogenic effects were also confirmed.  (+info)

Airways inflammation among workers in a paper industry. (2/300)

Exposure to organic dusts may cause airways inflammation in a large proportion of exposed persons. Most studies have relied on questionnaires and spirometry for diagnosis. To assess the possibility of determining the presence of inflammation using clinical diagnostic procedures, a study was undertaken among workers in a paper industry. Participants were 83 workers and 44 controls. Airborne endotoxin and (1-->3)-beta-D-glucan levels at the worksites were determined. The effects of this exposure were evaluated using a questionnaire, spirometry and measurements of airway responsiveness (methacholine) and levels of eosinophil cationic protein (ECP), myeloperoxidase (MPO), and C-reactive protein (CRP) in serum. The workers had a decreased baseline forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) and an increased airway responsiveness compared with controls. The concentrations of ECP and MPO were elevated compared with controls. There was a relation between exposure to endotoxin and (1-->3)-beta-D-glucan and airway responsiveness as well as ECP levels, when controlling for age, sex, smoking habits, atopy and asthma. The results suggest an increased prevalence of subjective respiratory symptoms, and an increased airway responsiveness among exposed workers. There was also a relationship between the serum concentration of eosinophil cationic protein and airway responsiveness. Taken together, the results suggest the presence of airways inflammation in the workers.  (+info)

Pneumoconiosis among Cretan dental technicians. (3/300)

Pneumoconiosis among dental technicians has recently emerged as an area of research in interstitial lung disease. This study was carried out to estimate the prevalence of pneumoconiosis in Greek dental technicians on the island of Crete. Fifty-one of the 58 dental technicians of the Heraklion Dental Technicians' Association completed an exposure history questionnaire and underwent a clinical examination, including chest radiographs, and spirometric assessment of lung volume and diffusing capacity. Values were compared with 51 control subjects. Five dental technicians showed radiological evidence of pneumoconiosis. Mean lung function values of the dental technicians, even in those with pneumoconiosis, were not significantly different from controls. No significant changes in lung function parameters were associated with smoking, exposure to metals and other contaminants. Dental technicians, however, reported more respiratory symptoms than controls (p = 0.008). Symptoms were associated to the absence of a ventilation system. We concluded that occupational exposure in dental technicians in Crete did not affect lung function. The prevalence of pneumoconiosis in this study was 9. 8%.  (+info)

Clinical, pathological and mineralogical features in two autopsy cases of workers exposed to agalmatolite dust. (4/300)

An agalmatolite miner and processor showed large shadows at the bilateral hila accompanied by surrounding emphysematous changes and irregular shadows on chest X-ray films. Chest CT scans were characterized by a mixture of tiny irregular structures and small round opacities. Histopathological examination revealed massive fibrosis, which corresponded to large shadows, but only a small number of typical silicotic nodules, indicating mixed dust pneumoconiosis. Mineralogical examination of the autopsy lungs showed quartz, pyrophyllite, mica, and kaolinite. Quartz accounted for 70% of the amount of all mineral dust in both patients, but pyrophyllite accounted for 10.8% and 14.4%. The pulmonary mineral dust composition in the two patients was well consistent with the mineral composition of the raw clays in the agalmatolite mine. In the two patients, chest X-ray findings and histopathological findings of the lungs also suggested agalmatolite pneumoconiosis, which was confirmed by mineral analysis of the lungs.  (+info)

Respiratory abnormalities among male foundry workers in central Taiwan. (5/300)

The objectives of this study were to determine the relationship between exposure levels and respiratory abnormalities, to measure FVC and FEV1(1) changes per year based on work duties and to investigate the prevalence of and factors related to pneumoconiosis. A total of 583 male workers from 50 iron foundries in central Taiwan were investigated. First, workers' respiratory symptoms were categorized using a modified American Thoracic Society (ATS) questionnaire and then were verified by physician's examination. Next, pulmonary function tests were performed including: forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) and forced expiratory flow rate. A chest radiograph was used to diagnose pneumoconiosis according to ILO criteria. Furnace workers were found to have the highest prevalence of chronic phlegm, thoracic disorders and chronic bronchitis. In general, smokers had a higher prevalence of respiratory symptoms as compared with non-smokers. Pulmonary function abnormalities and pneumoconiosis were closely linked to smoking and work duration. After adjusting for age, height and smoking there was a significant decrease based on work duration in FVC and FEV1 for furnace and moulding workers compared with after-processing and administrative workers. The overall prevalence of pneumoconiosis was 8.8%, highest among furnace (16.3%) and after-processing workers (11.4%) and lowest among administrative workers (2.5%). Using multiple logistic regression, the risk of developing pneumoconiosis (as compared with the administrative workers) for furnace workers was highest (8.98 times greater risk), followed by after-processing workers (6.77 times greater risk) and moulding workers (5.41 times greater risk). Prolonged exposure to free silica, and smoking habits, can result in respiratory abnormalities among foundry workers.  (+info)

Clearance of man made mineral fibres from the lungs of sheep. (6/300)

OBJECTIVES: To compare the clearance rate, the related pathology, and the chemical and morphological changes of three man made mineral fibres (MMMFs) in the sheep model of pneumoconiosis. METHODS: Fibrous particles were extracted from lung parenchyma and analysed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). RESULTS: The concentration of MMMF11, MMMF21, refractory ceramic fibre (RCF-1), and crocidolite asbestos fibres decreased with time according to a slow and a fast kinetic component. There was a statistical difference in the four regression lines as a function of time and the type of fibres (p < 0.001). The diameter of MMMFs decreased during the course of the time, whereas the crocidolite fibres did not seem to show any change. There was a statistical difference in the four regression lines as a function of time (p = 0.037) and type of fibres (p < 0.001). Ferruginous bodies were counted in the 40 sheep for which the latency period was 2 years. No typical ferruginous bodies were found in the groups exposed to MMMFs. The geometric mean concentration of asbestos bodies in the group exposed to crocidolite was 2421 bodies/g lung tissue (95% CI 385 to 15260). CONCLUSIONS: The number of initially retained fibres decreased with time according to a slow and a fast kinetic component. MMMF11 and MMMF21 have similar clearance, faster than RCF-1 and crocidolite. The geometric mean diameter and length of MMMF decreased with time, but crocidolite did not. After 2 years in the sheep tracheal lobe, ferruginous bodies were not found in all three MMMF groups but were substantial in the crocidolite group. Clearance is thought to proceed through dissolution and macrophage translocation.  (+info)

Characterization of dust exposure for the study of chronic occupational lung disease: a comparison of different exposure assessment strategies. (7/300)

Various exposure assessment strategies were compared in the study of the relation between dust exposure and 11-year lung function change in 1,172 miners with 36,824 concurrently measured personal dust samples available from the 1969-1981 US National Study of Coal Workers' Pneumoconiosis. A miner's average exposure was assessed by calculating average exposures based on dust samples taken from each individual and by using different job exposure matrices (JEMs) with different underlying exposure categorizations, based on occupational categories, job title, mine, and time, to obtain average exposure estimates. For each grouping procedure, intragroup and intergroup variances and the pooled standard error of the mean were calculated to assess relative efficiency. The results show that considerable variation in slopes of exposure-response relations was found using different exposure assessment strategies. Standard errors of the slopes of the exposure-response relations with exposure on an individual basis compared with JEMs. Exposure assessment on an individual basis was extremely sensitive to the number of exposure measurements per individual. The study demonstrates the advantages and disadvantages of different exposure assessment strategies and shows the need for explicit publication of exposure assessment strategies for epidemiologic studies. Careful assessment of the influence of misclassification error in the exposure assessment on exposure-response modeling is warranted.  (+info)

Silicosis and coal workers' pneumoconiosis. (8/300)

Exposure to coal mine dust and/or crystalline silica results in pneumoconiosis with initiation and progression of pulmonary fibrosis. This review presents characteristics of simple and complicated coal workers' pneumoconiosis (CWP) as well as pathologic indices of acute and chronic silicosis by summarizing results of in vitro, animal, and human investigations. These results support four basic mechanisms in the etiology of CWP and silicosis: a) direct cytotoxicity of coal dust or silica, resulting in lung cell damage, release of lipases and proteases, and eventual lung scarring; b) activation of oxidant production by pulmonary phagocytes, which overwhelms the antioxidant defenses and leads to lipid peroxidation, protein nitrosation, cell injury, and lung scarring; c) activation of mediator release from alveolar macrophages and epithelial cells, which leads to recruitment of polymorphonuclear leukocytes and macrophages, resulting in the production of proinflammatory cytokines and reactive species and in further lung injury and scarring; d) secretion of growth factors from alveolar macrophages and epithelial cells, stimulating fibroblast proliferation and eventual scarring. Results of in vitro and animal studies provide a basis for proposing these mechanisms for the initiation and progression of pneumoconiosis. Data obtained from exposed workers lend support to these mechanisms.  (+info)

Pneumoconiosis is a group of diseases that includes asbestosis, silicosis and coal workers pneumoconiosis, also known as black lung.. According to the American Lung Association, pneumoconiosis is a general term given to any lung disease caused by dusts that are inhaled and deposited deep into the lungs. Its usually considered work-related.. Not all types of dust cause pneumoconiosis. However, different types of dust cause different types of pneumoconiosis. Exposure to asbestos, silica and coal dust are the most common causes of pneumoconiosis, ALA states. Pneumoconiosis has no cure, but it can be prevented.. ...
Progressive Massive Fibrosis (PMF), characterized by the development of large conglomerate masses of dense fibrosis (usually in the upper lung zones), can complicate silicosis and coal workers pneumoconiosis. Conglomerate masses may also occur in other pneumoconioses, such as talcosis, berylliosis (CBD), kaolin pneumoconiosis, and pneumoconiosis from carbon compounds, such as carbon black, graphite, and oil shale. Conglomerate masses can also develop in sarcoidosis, but usually near the hilae and with surrounding paracitricial emphysema. The disease arises firstly through the deposition of silica or coal dust (or other dust) within the lung, and then through the bodys immunological reactions to the dust. According to the International Labour Office (ILO), PMF requires the presence of large opacity exceeding 1 cm (by x-ray). By pathology standards, the lesion in histologic section must exceed 2 cm to meet the definition of PMF. In PMF, lesions most commonly occupy the upper lung zone, and are ...
Coal workers' pneumoconiosis ( CWP ), also known as black lung disease or black lung , is caused by long exposure to coal dust . It is common in coal miners and others who work with coal. It is similar to both silicosis from inhaling silica dust and to the long-term effects of tobacco smoking. Inhaled coal dust progressively builds up in the lungs and cannot be removed by the body; this leads to inflammation , fibrosis , and in worse cases, necrosis . Coal workers' pneumoconiosis , severe state, develops after the initial, milder form of the disease known as anthracosis (anthrac - coal, carbon). This is often asymptomatic and is found to at least some extent in all urban dwellers due to air pollution. Prolonged exposure to large amounts of coal dust can result in more serious forms of the disease, simple coal workers' pneumoconiosis and complicated coal workers' pneumoconiosis (or progressive massive fibrosis , or PMF). More commonly, workers exposed to coal dust develop industrial
An association between Mycobacterium malmoense and underlying lung disease has been described. The purpose of this study was to further explore this relationship and in particular to identify any relationship between Coal Workers Pneumoconiosis (CWP) and M. malmoense infection. Patient charts were …
From a group of 1,461 working coal miners who participated in an epidemiological study, 223 men with simple pneumoconiosis were selected on the basis of the type of small rounded opacity noted to be present in their chest films. No differences in spirometry or lung volumes were found between those with the micronodular (q) and those with pinhead (p) opacities. Twenty five nonsmoking miners with ca
Progressive Massive Fibrosis: Progressive massive fibrosis is a lung disease that is predominantly reported in people who work in mines.
In Colombia, coal miner pneumoconiosis is considered a public health problem due to its irreversibility, high cost on diagnosis, and lack of data related to its prevalence in the country. Therefore, a cross-sectional study was carried out in order to determine the prevalence of pneumoconiosis in underground coal mining workers in two regions of Colombia. The results showed a 35.9% prevalence of pneumoconiosis in the study group (42.3% in region 1 and 29.9% in region 2). An association was found between a radiologic diagnosis of pneumoconiosis and a medium risk level of exposure to carbon dust (OR: 2.901, 95% CI: 0.937, 8.982), medium size companies (OR: 2.301, 95% CI: 1.260–4.201), length of mining work greater than 25 years (OR: 3.222, 95% CI: 1.806–5.748), and a history of smoking for more than one year (OR: 1.479, 95% CI: 0.938–2.334). These results establish the need to generate an intervention strategy aimed at preventing the identified
Coal workers pneumoconiosis (CWP) is a chronic occupational lung disease caused by long-term inhalation of dust, which triggers inflammation of the alveoli, eventually resulting in irreversible lung damage. CWP ranges in severity from simple to advanced; the most severe form is progressive massive fibrosis (PMF). Advanced CWP is debilitating and often fatal. To prevent CWP, the Coal Mine Health a
Retrospective analysis of the data of hospitalized coal worker patients suffering from pneumoconiosis in the Tangshan money home since 2005. Using these data which provide seniority of exposure to...
Lipid peroxidation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of pneumoconiosis. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) generated from lipid peroxidation might be used to detect pneumoconiosis. The objective of this study was to develop a breath test for pneumoconiosis. A case-control study was designed. Breath and ambient air were analysed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. After blank correction to prevent contamination from ambient air, we used canonical discriminant analysis (CDA) to assess the discrimination accuracy and principal component analysis (PCA) to generate a prediction score. The prediction accuracy was calculated and validated using the International Classification of Radiographs of the Pneumoconiosis criteria combined with an abnormal pulmonary function test as a reference standard. We generated a receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve and calculated the area under the ROC curve (AUC) to estimate the screening accuracy of the breath test. We enrolled 200 stone workers. After
Prevalence is defined as the number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time per 100,000 people. Pneumoconiosis is a chronic lung disease typified by lung scarring and other interstitial damage caused by exposure to dust and other containments, in this case specifically: coal.. ...
Pneumoconiosis is a chronic lung disease typified by lung scarring and other interstitial damage caused by exposure to dust and other containments, in this case specifically: coal.. ...
Objective: This study aimed to examine the sensitivity and specificity of occupational health doctors (OHDs) reading of early-stage pneumoconiosis radiographs. Materials and Methods: A screening test was applied, and 33 OHDs consented to participate in the study. There were atotal of 67 chest radiographs, which consisted of normal and early-stage pneumoconiosis film. The cut-point for disease was set at profusion0/1 and 1/0. Mean sensitivity and specificity for small opacity detection were analyzed. Results: The median sensitivity of ILO profusion of 0/1 or above was 88% (IQR 10.3), and the median sensitivity of film with a 1/0 cutoff pointwas slightly higher at90% (IQR 10.3).The average specificity for ILO profusion of 0/1 or above was 43.3% (SD21.1). Upon increasing the cut-point at profusion1/0, the average specificity increased to 47.0% (SD 20.9). Conclusion: This study showed that occupational health doctors were able to interpret chest radiographs of workers with early-stage pneumoconiosis. This
Purpose To assess the level of concordance between chest radiographic classifications of A and B Readers in a national surveillance program offered to U.S. coal miners over an approximate 36-year period. Materials and Methods The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Coal Workers Health Surveillance Program (CWHSP) is a surveillance program with nonresearch designation and is exempt from Human Subjects Review Board approval (11-DRDS-NR03). Thirty-six years of data (1979-2015) from the CWHSP were analyzed, which included all conventional screen-film radiographs with a classification by at least one A Reader and one B Reader ...
Methods are disclosed for treating, preventing or reducing the risk of developing occupational lung diseases, such as pneumoconiosis. In several embodiments, the methods include administering a therapeutically effective amount of the suppressive ODN to a subject having or at risk of developing a pneumoconiosis, thereby treating or inhibiting the pneumoconiosis. In several examples, thee subject can have or be at risk of developing silicosis, asbestosis or berryliosis. The method can include selecting a subject exposed to, or at risk of exposure to, inorganic particles, including, but not limited to silica, asbestos, berrylium, coal dust, or bauxite.
Looking for Pneumoconioses? Find out information about Pneumoconioses. a group of lung diseases, classified as occupational diseases, caused by prolonged inhalation of industrial dust and characterized by the development of... Explanation of Pneumoconioses
If you have suffered from black lung as a result of workplace negligence, contact our specialist occupational lawyers who can help you claim the compensation you deserve.
If you have suffered from black lung as a result of workplace negligence, contact our specialist occupational lawyers who can help you claim the compensation you deserve.
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The Palaszczuk Government will invest $25 million over the next two years to deliver more reforms to protect the health and safety of the states coal workers.. Natural Resources and Mines Minister Dr Anthony Lynham made the commitment today as the governments response was tabled in Parliament to the Coal Workers Pneumoconiosis Select Committee report no. 2-Inquiry into the re-identification of coal workers pneumoconiosis in Queensland. The Palaszczuk Governments focus has always been to eradicate this insidious disease that does not belong in the 21stcentury, Dr Lynham said.. As I told Parliament this week, we have worked tirelessly to rapidly implement significant reforms to date.. We support all of the reports 68 recommendations, particularly:. ...
Cardiology news, research and treatment articles offering cardiology healthcare professionals cardiology information and resources to keep them informed.
The first part of this book deals with the methods used to define and study occupational respiratory diseases and includes an assessment of chest x-rays, pulmonary function data, and lung impairment. The second part of the book deals with specific classes of respiratory diseases, their definition, epidemiology, diagnosis and treatment. Specific topics in the second section are pneumoconioses (silicosis, acute silicosis, silicate pneumoconiosis, asbestosis, coal workers pneumoconiosis and exposure to other carbonaceous dusts, beryllium disease, pulmonary reactions to miscellaneous mineral dusts as well as man made mineral fibers and miscellaneous pneumoconioses), occupational asthma and rhinitis, hypersensitivity, chronic airways obstruction (chronic bronchitis and emphysema), byssinosis, effects of inhaled toxic agents (acute and chronic respiratory effects, and acute systemic effects of inhaled occupational agents), neoplasms (epidemiology of occupationally induced lung cancer, pathology of ...
If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Centers RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.. ...
We recycle x ray film from all industries and medical imaging practices. We pickup all x ray film recycling and purge, sort, pack and transport it for you.
Data obtained from exposed workers lend support to these mechanisms.1,5. Pneumoconiosis is still an important health problem in Turkey. In a survey of 12 300 coal workers, approximately 12% of the miners were found to have pneumoconiosis.4 The present study is the first to evaluate the cellular profile in miners in Turkey.. The yield of cells in BAL fluid is significantly dependent on the condition of the prealveolar airway.7 Recovery of fluid may markedly be attenuated in subjects with airflow obstruction.8 Occupational dust exposure leads to airflow obstruction and focal emphysema adjacent to the coal macule. The instilled BAL fluid may be trapped in the alveolar space in such subjects with airflow obstruction and emphysema.6,9 We observed airflow obstruction in all miners, except those with simple pneumoconiosis, compared with the smoker and/or the non-smoker controls. The amount of recovered BAL fluid was significantly lower in all miners with or without pneumoconiosis than in the non-smoker ...
It wasnt supposed to happen to coal miners in Mark McCowans generation. It wasnt supposed to strike so early and so hard. At age 47 and just seven years after his first diagnosis, McCowan shouldnt have a chest X-ray that looks this bad.. Im seeing more definition in the mass, McCowan says, pausing for deep breaths as he holds the X-ray film up to the light of his living room window in Pounding Mill, Va.. The mass is larger and more defined in the right upper lobe, he continues, clinically describing the solid streak that shows up white on the X-ray of his lungs. If you know white is bad and black is good, Im in a lot of trouble.. McCowan went from a clean X-ray at age 35 to progressive massive fibrosis - an advanced stage of coal workers pneumoconiosis, or black lung - in just five years.. You go from being normal to where … one day you try to do something you used to do, and you cant do it and youre just heaving to catch your breath, McCowan says. And you say this is crazy. ...
Background: Cytokine gene polymorphism could predispose to different susceptibility to occupational dust exposure.. Aim:We aimed to assess cytokine gene polymorphism contribution to occupational lung diseases development and management.. Materials and methods: Study included 240 patients (pts) with occupational lung diseases (pneumoconiosis, occupational chronic bronchitis, occupational COPD), mean age 569 years old. 60 comparable healthy volunteers with occupational hazards were enrolled. The participants of the study were genotyped on the candidate genes (TNF-α, EPHX1, CAT, IL-1, IL-6) by real time PCR technique.. Results: Allele A of TNF-α gene in G(-308)A position: incidence in pts with occupational lung diseases 44,8% (number of heterozygotes prevailed), incidence in control group 24,5% (wild GG type was more frequent)(χ=6,49; p=0,011).Heterozygotes in G (-308)A position are the risk group of the occupational lung diseases development (sensitivity of the marker 89%, specificity -53%, ...
Bang, K.M., Althouse, R.B., Kim, J.H., Game, S.R. . Recent trends of age-specific pneumoconiosis mortality rates in the United States, 1985-1996: Coal workers pneumoconiosis, asbestosis, and silicosis ...
Pneumoconiosis is an occupational lung disease that is related to coal dust exposure. Macrophages and fibroblasts become activated and focal lung fibrosis occurs.
Rationale and Objectives: Analog film radiographs are typically used to classify pneumoconiosis to allow comparison with standard film radiographs. The aim of this study was to determine if digital radiography is comparable to film for the purpose of classifying pneumoconiotic pleural abnormalities. Materials and Methods: Subjects were 200 asbestos-exposed patients, from whom digital and film chest radiographs were obtained along with chest high-resolution computed tomographic scans.
Rolph Van Der Hoeven, Rolph Van Der Hoeven, Gyorgy Sziraczki, International Labour Office Interdepartmental Project on Structural Ad, International Labour Office Employment Dept ...
Pneumoconiosis is one of the most prevalent occupational diseases in Thailand. The most common forms of the disease are silicosis and asbestosis, and other asbestos-related diseases. The aims of the study are to review the situation of these diseases and describe national strategic and action plans to prevent and control them.
Shenzhen construction worker surrounded by deadly dust. The workers agreed to a provisional arrangement whereby they will receive 2,000 yuan for medical fees and 2,000 yuan for living expenses each month until a final mutually agreed compensation package is worked out. Family members of deceased workers also received 2,000 yuan, to be paid each month until the agreement is finalized.. This group of former construction workers and family members from Sangzhi, Miluo and Leiyang arrived at the Shenzhen Human Resources and Social Security office on 5 November. The workers demanded to be compensated according to the official three-tier scale of pneumoconiosis severity, and without the need to prove a previous employment relationship in Shenzhen.. Most of the workers never signed labour contracts with their employers back in the 1990s when they were working in construction sites in the booming southern Chinese city. This was standard practice at the time and is still commonplace in Chinas informal ...
Two decades of unchecked economic growth has produced an occupational disease crisis in China that requires urgent action from the government. An estimated six million workers in China, predominately poor migrants from the countryside, have already contracted the debilitating and deadly lung disease, pneumoconiosis. It has ruined their lives and left their families
There are more than 200 forms of pulmonary fibrosis, many of which are rare diseases. More about the causes, symptoms, and treatment of this pathological stiffening of the lung tissue.. Synonyms: interstitial lung disease, pneumoconiosis, idiopathic interstitial pneumonia. Definition. Pulmonary fibrosis is not an independent disease, but rather a change in the lung tissue and the surrounding blood vessels, which is accompanied by an increasing loss of function of the lungs. This loss of function occurs because more and more lung tissue changes like connective tissue and the alveoli are, so to speak, suffocated. At the same time, the lungs lose their elasticity more and more to inflate when you breathe in. As a result, pulmonary fibrosis causes chronic shortness of breath with a lack of oxygen, which is ultimately fatal. The course of the disease can sometimes be slowed down. Lung fibrosis is not curable so far.. Frequency. There is no precise information on the frequency of pulmonary fibrosis in ...
Another case of coal workers pneumoconiosis has been diagnosed in Queensland, bringing to total to eight, with warnings of more to come.
Pneumoconiosis is the collective name for a small number of lung diseases and can be triggered by working in dusty environments. You may be entitled to compensation.
Diagnosis and conservative treatment of pneumoconiosis (costs for program #153417) ✔ Academic Hospital Bogenhausen ✔ Department of Pneumology and Pneumological Oncology ✔ BookingHealth.com
Diagnosis of pneumoconiosis (costs for program #220975) ✔ Academic Hospital zum Heiligen Geist ✔ Department of Internal Medicine (oncology, gastroenterology, pulmonology, cardiology, rheumatology) ✔ BookingHealth.com
Looking for online definition of coal workers' pneumonoconiosis in the Medical Dictionary? coal workers' pneumonoconiosis explanation free. What is coal workers' pneumonoconiosis? Meaning of coal workers' pneumonoconiosis medical term. What does coal workers' pneumonoconiosis mean?
Five physicians radiological assessments of coalworkers simple pneumoconiosis (CWP) in 2600 coalminers at 10 British collieries have been studied in relation to the individuals estimated lifetime (mean 33 years) exposure to respirable coalmine dust. Estimates of exposure were based on 20 years of observations at each colliery. Radiographic classifications were clearly associated with the measures of dust exposure. Important unexplained differences between some of the collieries were disclosed. Among men with similar cumulative dust exposures those with longer exposure time had higher prevalence of CWP. In general there was no evidence that the quartz concentrations experienced (average 5% of mixed dust) affected the probability of developing coalworkers simple pneumoconiosis. Some men reacted unfavourably (two or more steps of change on the 12-point radiological scale) over a 10-year period to coalmine dust with a relatively high quartz content.. ...
The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) is offering a series of free, confidential health screenings to coal miners throughout the United States.. The screenings are intended to provide early detection of coal workers pneumoconiosis (CWP), also known as black lung, a serious but preventable occupational lung disease in coal miners caused by breathing respirable coal mine dust.. The health screenings will be provided through the state-of-the-art NIOSH mobile testing unit at convenient community and mine locations.. NIOSH will provide the health screening for these coal miners under its Enhanced Coal Workers Health Surveillance Program. This public health outreach is in response to a well-documented increase in serious disease, and in response to new regulations requiring that health screenings be offered to surface miners.. This years first focus started the week of April 11 and ends on May 20, 2016, in coal mining regions throughout Oklahoma, Arkansas, Texas, ...
Rates of severe coal workers pneumoconiosis - also known as black lung disease - among coal miners have been on the rise recently despite regulations on exposure to dusts associated with mining. Researchers believe the higher rates of more severe lung disease may be due to greater exposure to silica, likely as a byproduct of going after ever-narrowing coal seams that require cutting through more rock to reach. Silica dust is much more toxic to the lungs, but little is known about its contribution to black lung disease at the molecular level, and researchers dont know how silica and coal or other dusts together might interact to influence the development of disease.. A new $750,000 grant from the Alpha Foundation for the Improvement of Mining Safety and Health will support researchers in the University of Illinois at Chicago Mining Education and Research Center working to find out how various mining dusts contribute to lung disease. The center, which is housed in the UIC School of Public ...
Rates of severe coal workers pneumoconiosis - also known as black lung disease - among coal miners have been on the rise recently despite regulations on exposure to dusts associated with mining
Faced with persistent and emerging health risks in 2016, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) continued its mission to develop and transfer into practice new knowledge about occupational safety and health. Challenges NIOSH faced in 2016 included coal workers pneumoconiosis, or black lung disease. Black lung disease cases reached historic lows in the 1990s after the Coal Mine Health and Safety Act became law in 1969 and was amended in 1977. Recent years, however, have seen rising numbers of current and former coal miners diagnosed with the disease. Other diseases became emerging risks for workers in 2016, including Zika virus and the debilitating lung disease obliterative bronchiolitis, which may be a risk for people who work in the coffee processing industry. Throughout the year, NIOSH translated these and other research priorities into informative communication and research products, promoting occupational safety and health for all workers ...
No man should die from coal mining, be it from a methane explosion, a roof collapse or black lung - coal-miners pneumoconiosis.. The Federal Coal Mine Health and Safety Act of 1969, among other things, set standards to reduce dust and created the Black Lung Disability Trust to compensate miners who contracted this disease.. The law worked. Over time there was a 90 percent reduction in miners with this ailment. What was accepted by some people as an occupational hazard became unacceptable and companies changed their practices.. But since the 1990s, black lung has rebounded, researchers with the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health say.. The numbers are still well below the level 45 years ago, when the law passed, but the numbers dont matter. The number of incidences must go down until it is eradicated like smallpox.. Progressive massive fibrosis - one form of black lung - is at its highest rate since the early 1970s for miners in West Virginia, Kentucky and Virginia, according ...
Calcified pulmonary (lung parenchymal) densities can occur in a number of conditions. Micronodules healed varicella pneumonia 1 pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis occupational lung diseases silicosis coal workers pneumoconiosis stannosis b...
GPs are at the forefront in combatting a new epidemic - but its not an infectious disease that has public health experts concerned. An epidemic of silicosis has emerged among workers in the engineered stone industry, bringing into focus the continued risk of lung diseases facing Australian workers across many occupations. As with coal workers pneumoconiosis (CWP), which shocked physicians when it re-emerged among Queensland coal miners a few years ago, it was thought that safe work practices had relegated silicosis to history. The silicosis epidemic among stonemasons in Queensland is a stark reminder of workplace dangers, writes Megan Howe.
This document contains proposed regulations implementing amendments to the Black Lung Benefits Act (BLBA or Act) made by the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA). The ACA amended the BLBA in two ways. First, it revived a rebuttable presumption of total disability or death due to pneumoconiosis for certain claims. Second, it reinstituted derivative entitlement to benefits for certain eligible survivors of coal miners whose lifetime benefit claims were awarded because they were totally disabled due to pneumoconiosis. These survivors need not also prove that the miner died due to coal workers' pneumoconiosis. The proposed rules would clarify how the statutory presumption may be invoked and rebutted and the application and scope of the derivative-survivor-entitlement provision. The proposed rules also eliminate several unnecessary or obsolete provisions. ...
(Reuters Health) - Since the 1990s, annual numbers of U.S. coal miners with new, confirmed cases of an advanced form of so-called black lung disease known as progressive massive fibrosis have been steadily rising, according to a new study.
Beryllium. Radiation. Extrinsic allergic alveolitis. Ankylosing spondylitis. Sarcoidosis. TB. Scoliosis. Coal workers pneumoconiosis. ...
Pneumoconiosis is an irreversible, preventable disease caused by dust inhalation. Although in other countries, by precautions the incidence decreased to 0,3-5%, it is still 10-15% in our country in pneumoconiosis causing occupations.We aimed to describe the characteristics of our 208 pneumoconiosis workers admitted to Istanbul Occupational Disease Hospital. Patient files between 01st Jan 2008 and 31st Dec 2010 are used for the descriptive study. All of the patients were male with 38,82±13 years of age. The most common workplace was Gaziosmanpasa with 27 cases. The mostly seen works were denim sandblasting, dental technicians, coal mining and casting (%50,5,%12,%6,7,%4,8). The most exposure material was silicium (86,5%). Mean exposure time was 9,9±8,9 years. Profusion according to the ILO classification was in the table. In 37 cases, there was an A opacity and B opacity in 28. The mean FEV1% was 67,27±23,3, FVC%73,78±20,86, FEV1/FVC%85,1±16 and KcO 102,74±28,1. The period between exposure ...
silver extract from x ray films using oxalic acid_ 1 2 9021.4 9021.4 8714.2000000000007 3 2302.3000000000002 2306.1 4 10/31/2403 5 4905 9023 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 1002 1003 1004 1005 1007 1008.1 Selected Chronological Bibliography of Biology and ..
A post-mortem survey of emphysema in coalworkers and non-coalworkers was carried out in men aged 50-70 years dying of ischaemic heart disease (IHD). It was determined that in such men selection for necropsy was similar in coalworkers and non-coalworkers. All lungs were examined in a standard way and …
Occupational lung diseases are occupational diseases affecting the respiratory system, including occupational asthma, black lung disease (coalworkers pneumoconiosis), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), mesothelioma, and silicosis. Infectious lung diseases can also be acquired in an occupational context. Exposure to substances like flock and silica can cause fibrosing lung disease, whereas exposure to carcinogens like asbestos and beryllium can cause lung cancer. Occupational cases of interstitial lung disease may be misdiagnosed as COPD, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, or a myriad of other diseases; leading to a delay in identification of the causative agent. Asbestosis is a fibrosing interstitial lung disease caused by exposure to forms of the mineral asbestos. Asthma is a respiratory disease that can begin or worsen due to exposure at work and is characterized by episodic narrowing of the respiratory tract. Occupational asthma has a variety of causes, including sensitization to a ...
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In Britain data come mainly from the Pneumoconiosis Field Research (PFR) programme conducted by the Institute of Occupational Medicine.6-12 This was based on 24 collieries. At an initial survey during 1953-58 more than 30 000 miners were examined and repeat surveys were subsequently carried out at approximately five yearly intervals. After the third survey conducted during 1963-68 examinations were discontinued at 14 of the 24 collieries, but all 24 were again included in a follow up survey carried out during 1974-80. This focused on a sample of 17 738 miners examined in the first survey (all those with pneumoconiosis and half of the remainder), and aimed to re-examine all survivors, whether or not they were still employed in the coal industry. Information collected at the surveys included details of smoking habits, occupational history and symptoms (elicited by questionnaires), chest radiographs and measurements of lung function (lung function was only assessed in the second and later surveys). ...
Record contained sufficient evidence to support ALJs finding that claimant was totally disabled by pneumoconiosis arising out of his coal mining employment based on his second application for Black Lung Disease benefits, after his first application had been denied by reason of abandonment. Employer conceded that claimant had demonstrated change in his condition of entitlement in that he was now totally disabled, and ALJ could properly find that claimant had labored for at least 15 years in surface mining conditions, which included work in presence of coal and rock dust, that was substantially similar to underground mining conditions, and that employer had failed to rebut resultant 15-year presumption that claimant was totally disabled due to pneumoconiosis. Fact that claimant had extensive history of cigarette smoking, or that record contained medical evidence that was in equipoise on issue regarding presence of totally disabling respiratory impairment did not require different result ...
Chest X Ray Definition A chest x ray is a procedure used to evaluate organs and structures within the chest for symptoms of disease. Chest x rays include views of the lungs, heart, small portions of the gastrointestinal tract, thyroid gland [1] and the bones of the chest area.
Free, official coding info for 2021 ICD-10-CM J62.0 - includes detailed rules, notes, synonyms, ICD-9-CM conversion, index and annotation crosswalks, DRG grouping and more.
Chinese authorities plan to investigate some state-owned mines in order to prevent the spread of pneumoconiosis, or black lung disease, the State Administration of Coal Mine Safety said Thursday.
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Case Study Number 429327 Patient referred by a colleague for root canal therapy on a maxillary second molar. Key tooth to save for a planned fixed bridge.
An ILO chest x-ray uses a standard classification system for identifying pneumoconiosis (occupational lung disease - silicosis is one type).. Its important that a specially qualified radiologist reviews the ILO chest x-ray. To qualify, the radiologist must pass the B reader examination run by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). This certifies them to classify chest x-rays using the ILO system.. Using a B reader has become established practice for detecting early x-ray changes. For a list of qualified Australian B readers, see the NIOSH website (link below). At the time this page was last updated, the NIOSH site listed one B reader in Victoria, at MIA Radiology (link below). There may be other B readers not known to WorkSafe, or who practise outside of Victoria, who can perform the testing.. ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Medical knowledge and the worker: Occupational lung diseases in the United Kingdom, c. 1920-1975. AU - McIvor, A.J.. AU - Johnston, Ronald. PY - 2005. Y1 - 2005. N2 - Focuses has been on the history of occupational health in the UK with particular reference to lung diseases and the development of medical knowledge from the nineteenth century.. AB - Focuses has been on the history of occupational health in the UK with particular reference to lung diseases and the development of medical knowledge from the nineteenth century.. KW - lung disease. KW - occupational helath. KW - medical history. UR - http://dx.doi.org/10.1215/15476715-2-4-63. U2 - 10.1215/15476715-2-4-63. DO - 10.1215/15476715-2-4-63. M3 - Article. VL - 2. SP - 63. EP - 86. JO - Labor: Studies in Working Class History of the Americas. T2 - Labor: Studies in Working Class History of the Americas. JF - Labor: Studies in Working Class History of the Americas. SN - 1547-6715. IS - 4. ER - ...
The widow of a Birmingham worker, who died from occupational lung disease, has launched a search for former colleagues who may be able to help in their battle for justice.
You may find the Guide to the Royal Brompton Occupational Lung Disease Clinic useful - it describes our clinic and outlines the tests you can expect when you visit us for the first time. In any case you will be given a copy of this leaflet when you arrive.The main clinic at the Royal Brompton Hospital Outpatients department takes place every Monday afternoonOutpatients is
Occupational Lung Diseases. Internal Medicine Curriculum Presbyterian Hospital of Dallas October 2003. A Brief History of Occupational Medicine. Ancient Times The Middle Ages Ramazzini (1633-1714) The Industrial Revolution The Modern Era. Ancient Times. Slideshow 177336 by Audrey
Silicosis is a form of occupational lung disease caused by inhalation of crystalline silica dust. It is marked by inflammation and scarring in the form of nodular lesions in the upper lobes of the lungs.It is a type of pneumoconiosis. Silicosis (particularly the acute form) is characterized by shortness of breath, cough, fever, and cyanosis (bluish skin). It may often be misdiagnosed as. ...
Analysis of Data and Probabilities The International Labor Organization (ILO) classification of roentgenograms of the pneumoconioses provides a method for recording abnormalities of the lungs and pleura resulting from the inhalation of inorganic dusts. First developed in the 1950s, and subsequently modified, it allows classification of the roentgenographic changes due to asbestosis as well as […]. ...
Inhalation of this dust could cause acute nonspecific irritant bronchoconstriction particularly in those with twitchy lungs. It could cause subacute bronchitis lasting weeks or, eventually, chronic bronchitis of the type reported in coal miners. It might cause simple siliceous pneumoconiosis (mainly silicates) as described in Bedouin Arab females and others exposed to desert sands, and finally, after years of intense exposure, it could cause the scarring of silicosis.. It is interesting that there has been little acute respiratory disease which can be attributed to inhalation of the ash. Twenty hospitals have been monitored. Those with very heavy exposure in the Moses Lake-Ritzville area had three times the usual emergency room attendances, with some increased admissions. However, physicians offices were closed at the time so it is difficult to assess the relevance of these data. Certainly, patients with asthma and COPD have not crowded into the hospital emergency rooms as they usually do when ...
Coal workers are at risk of developing occupational lung diseases from inhaling hazardous dust. As there is no known cure, early detection helps identify individuals who need treatment and to be removed from risk of further exposure. Tabled 5 December 2019.
MINERS CLAIMS: Check how to get compensation for pneumoconiosis health problems caused by mining and other work-related conditions and diseases.
The mortality of a cohort of 1487 male patients with silicosis in a population-based register followed up from 1980 to 1986 was evaluated with reference to the mortality rates of the general male population. A striking excess of deaths from all causes (observed 368, standardized mortality ratio, SMR 3.00) was noted. Seventy-four percent of the deaths were due to respiratory conditions and complications directly or indirectly related to silicosis. The risk of death was especially higher than expected in younger patients under 45 years of age. Patients with simple silicosis of profusion category 1 did not appear to be at any increased risk of death relative to the general population, but increasing excesses of death were associated with greater extent of simple and conglomerate disease. These increased mortality risks were observed in tuberculosis-free patients as well as in those who never smoked. For the same extent of silicotic disease, the risk of death was higher if tuberculosis occurred. ...
BOHS is the British Occupational Hygiene Society, an organisation whose aim is to achieve a healthy working environment for everyone in the UK. Breathe Freely is an initiative of BOHS aimed at reducing occupational lung disease in the UK.. Setting and problem. Occupational lung disease causes significant debilitating ill-health and approximately 12,000 deaths per year in the UK alone. It is caused by diesel fume, wood dust, welding fume and other hazardous substances. Breathe Freely is a campaign is about raising awareness and providing information on how to tackle the issue of occupational lung disease.. Solution. Breathe Freely has created a series of toolbox talks, checklists and a COSHH (the Control of Substances Hazardous to Health) guide.. ...
The smaller a particle is, the deeper into the pulmonary system it penetrates. Respirable dust, the dust we inhale is made up of particles smaller than 5 thousandths of a millimeter (5 μm). Because the particles are so small, they can penetrate into the deepest parts of the pulmonary system where the air moves too slowly to be able to breathe them out again. The lungs way of protecting themselves is to wrap the foreign particles in nodules of connective tissue, which, in time, leads to pneumoconiosis or COPD (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease). Some types of particles, such as silica and asbestos dust, cannot be broken down by the body and are also sharp, which is why they continue to cause damage long after they have become lodged in the lungs.. The best protection is to remove dust at the source and never allow it to reach the air. Dustcontrol has developed suction castings for most handheld and stationary machine, and also produces tailor-made suction castings.. ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Miliary lung disease revisited. AU - Mauleón, S.. AU - Pallisa, E.. AU - Majó, J.. AU - Martinez-Rodriguez, M.. AU - Cáceres, J.. AU - Andreu Soriano, Jorge. PY - 2002/1/1. Y1 - 2002/1/1. N2 - This article reviews the high-resolution computed tomography imaging features of miliary pattern, a characteristic radiologic manifestation of diffuse micronodular lung disease. The most common entities with this pattern are miliary tuberculosis, pneumoconiosis, sarcoidosis, metastases, and hypersensitivity pneumonia. According to the distribution of the nodules in relation to the secondary lobule, high-resolution computed tomography findings divide miliary patterns into 3 groups: centrilobular, perilymphatic, and random presentation. The radiologic features that help in the differential diagnosis are discussed.. AB - This article reviews the high-resolution computed tomography imaging features of miliary pattern, a characteristic radiologic manifestation of diffuse micronodular lung ...
Focused on the Occupational Health Protection Campaign and the Action Plan for Prevention and Control of Pneumoconiosis, primary activities during this week include promoting knowledge and awareness of occupational health in businesses, providing occupational health management training, conducting questionnaire surveys about awareness of core knowledge on occupational health, and showcasing excellent publicizing portfolios of occupational health.. ...
This page outlines the situation and current status of all the British Airways Concorde plane that were built. Airports needed to reinforce runways to accommodate the massive new jets. As well as, they needed to enlarge their capabilities of handling passengers and baggage from a single flight. Food preparation crews werent prepared to make so many meals at one time. Gypsy Willow- You flew in a Comet!? And lived to inform about it! God Bless You, my dear. Does using important oils (any of them) within the diffuser bother your COPD? A family member has this condition and we are hesitant to recommend the essential oils. Nice that I can ask you.. Avail your self of herbs and other various medicines to build up your immune system. a) fibrosis; b) pleural problems; c) pleural exudation; d) pneumoconiosis; e) tumors of lungs; f) pulmonectomia. Have you do respiratory tests, together with spirometry, to find out how effectively your lungs work. The Lockheed Vega was briefly a state-of-the-artwork ...
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Coal Workers Pneumoconiosis: Number of deaths by state, U.S. residents age 15 and over, 2001-2010 2014-764 September 2014 ... Coal Workers Pneumoconiosis: Age-adjusted death rates by state, U.S. residents age 15 and over, 2001-2010 2014-763 September ... Coal Workers Pneumoconiosis: Number of deaths by sex, race, age group, and median age at death, U.S. residents age 15 and over ... Coal Workers Pneumoconiosis: Death rates (per million population) by race and sex, U.S. residents age 15 and over, 2005-2014 ...
Pneumoconiosis often causes restrictive impairment, although diagnosable pneumoconiosis can occur without measurable impairment ... In 2013 pneumoconiosis resulted in 260,001 deaths up from 251,000 deaths in 1990. Of these deaths 46,000 were due to silicosis ... Pneumoconiosis is the general term for a class of interstitial lung diseases where inhalation of dust has caused interstitial ... "Pneumoconioses". NIOSH Safety and Health Topic. Center for Disease Control. "Black Lung Benefits Act". U.S. Department of Labor ...
... pneumoconiosis" or pneumoconiosis unspecified." Thirty four of the lung transplants (72%) were performed since 2008. The ... A new paper by NIOSH researchers explores the use of lung transplants for individuals with work-related pneumoconiosis, ...
Mortality from coal workers pneumoconiosis in official health statistics and the prevalence of pneumoconiosis among miners ... Although rates of pneumoconiosis in coal miners have declined substantially in the United States since the passage of the ... If quartz is contributing to the greater number of cases of pneumoconiosis in the United States, more effective dust control ... In contrast, Australias underground coal mining industry has reported few new cases of pneumoconiosis for more than 20 years. ...
"Pathology standards for coal workers pneumoconiosis. Report of the Pneumoconiosis Committee of the College of American ... pneumoconiosis and complicated coal workers pneumoconiosis (or progressive massive fibrosis, or PMF). More commonly, workers ... Coal workers pneumoconiosis (CWP), also known as black lung disease or black lung, is caused by long-term exposure to coal ... Coal workers pneumoconiosis, severe state, develops after the initial, milder form of the disease known as anthracosis (from ...
Rheumatoid pneumoconiosis (RP, also known as Caplan syndrome) is swelling (inflammation) and scarring of the lungs. It occurs ... RP; Caplan syndrome; Pneumoconiosis - rheumatoid; Silicosis - rheumatoid pneumoconiosis; Coal workers pneumoconiosis - ... Pneumoconioses. In: Broaddus VC, Mason RJ, Ernst JD, et al, eds. Murray and Nadels Textbook of Respiratory Medicine. 6th ed. ... Rheumatoid pneumoconiosis (RP, also known as Caplan syndrome) is swelling (inflammation) and scarring of the lungs. It occurs ...
Coal Workers Pneumoconiosis Better known as "black lung" (and the best known form of pneumoconiosis) because of the " ... Prolonged exposure can lead to pneumoconiosis.. Kaolin pneumoconiosis Kaolin, "China clay," is an ingredient in the making of " ... Pneumoconiosis, coming from the Greek pneuma (air or wind) and konis (dust), is a condition caused by the inhalation (usually ... Types of pneumoconiosis:. (statistics from the CDC study and the American Lung Association and are for the United States) ...
... is a restrictive disease of the lungs caused by deposition of various kinds of dust in the lungs, inhaled during ... Pneumoconiosis is often detected by a chest X-ray before symptoms develop. Diagnosis is also based on a history of exposure to ... Pneumoconiosis is an occupational disease in which scarring of the alveoli (air sacs) in the lungs occurs due to irritation by ... Pneumoconiosis is a restrictive disease of the lungs caused by deposition of various kinds of dust in the lungs, inhaled during ...
Pneumoconiosis is a lung disease caused by dust particles. Symptoms include breathing difficulty and a cough. It can result ... Pneumoconiosis is often referred to as occupational lung disease. Pneumoconiosis is any lung disease caused by dust particles ... Living with pneumoconiosis. Quitting smoking may be of benefit to those with pneumoconiosis. ... Pneumoconiosis can take a long time to develop, as dust can build up slowly or take many years to cause a reaction in the lungs ...
In this article, learn more about pneumoconiosis, its symptoms, risk factors, and management. ... Pneumoconiosis is a lung disease caused by dust particles. ... What is pneumoconiosis?. Pneumoconiosis is often referred to as ... Coal dust from mining may cause pneumoconiosis. There are clear risk factors for pneumoconiosis and a range of jobs that are ... Living with pneumoconiosis. Quitting smoking may be of benefit to those with pneumoconiosis. ...
Coal workers pneumoconiosis (CWP) is a lung disease that results from breathing in dust from coal, graphite, or man-made ... Pneumoconioses. In: Broaddus VC, Mason RJ, Ernst JD, et al, eds. Murray and Nadels Textbook of Respiratory Medicine. 6th ed. ... Coal workers pneumoconiosis (CWP) is a lung disease that results from breathing in dust from coal, graphite, or man-made ... Ask your provider about treating and managing coal workers pneumoconiosis. Information can be found at the American Lung ...
Pneumoconiosis definition, any chronic lung disease, including anthracosis, asbestosis, and silicosis, caused by the inhalation ... anthracosis, pneumoconiosis. British Dictionary definitions for pneumoconiosis. pneumoconiosis. pneumonoconiosis ( ... pneumoconiosis. C19: shortened from pneumonoconiosis, from pneumo- + -coniosis, from Greek konis dust ... pneumoconiosis. in Medicine. pneumoconiosis. [nōō′mō-kō′nē-ō′sĭs]. n. pl. pneu•mo•co•ni•o•ses (-sēz). *A disease of the lungs, ...
Grouped results showed that rheumatoid pneumoconiosis occurred in between 2·3% and 6·2% of all men affected by pneumoconiosis. ... A slight correlation between rheumatoid pneumoconiosis and simple pneumoconiosis prevalence was also found, but the bulk of the ... A broadened radiological concept of rheumatoid pneumoconiosis was used in diagnosis. The prevalence of simple pneumoconiosis ... The prevalence of P.M.F. was found to increase with increasing simple pneumoconiosis prevalence. ...
... such as pneumoconiosis. In several embodiments, the methods include administering a therapeutically effective amount of the ... thereby treating or inhibiting the pneumoconiosis. In several examples, thee subject can have or be at risk of developing ... suppressive ODN to a subject having or at risk of developing a pneumoconiosis, ... Pneumoconiosis: Lung disease caused by the inhalation of dust or particles. Substances known to cause pneumoconiosis include ...
... there are two basic forms of pneumoconiosis: coal workers pneumoconiosis, or CWP, and progressive massive fibrosis, or PMF. ... Simple pneumoconiosis may include few or mild symptoms. Awareness of pneumoconiosis occurs after a chest X-ray detects mild ... According to the American Lung Association (ALA), there are two basic forms of pneumoconiosis: coal workers pneumoconiosis, or ... Risk factors for pneumoconiosis include exposure to large amounts of dust, exposure for long periods of time and smoking ...
Latest news and research breakthroughs on Pneumoconiosis. Last updated on Mar 11, 2018 with over 1528 News and research items ... Pneumoconiosis - Definition - Symptoms - Causes - Prevention - Treatment. Pneumoconiosis is a group of lung diseases caused by ... Pneumoconiosis - Definition - Symptoms - Causes - Prevention - Treatment. Pneumoconiosis is a group of lung diseases caused by ... Medindia provides you with the latest news and research breakthroughs on Pneumoconiosis. Please find 1528 such items on this ...
The author reviews the problem or pneumoconiosis in Great Britain. After a brief historical introduction the following topics ... classification of pneumoconiosis by X-rays (simple pneumoconiosis, progressive massive" fibrosis); pathology of pneumoconiosis ... The author reviews the problem or pneumoconiosis in Great Britain. After a brief historical introduction the following topics ...
Pneumoconioses. In: Broaddus VC, Mason RJ, Ernst JD, et al, eds. Murray and Nadels Textbook of Respiratory Medicine. 6th ed. ... Coal workers pneumoconiosis (CWP) is a lung disease that results from breathing in dust from coal, graphite, or man-made ... Black lung disease; Pneumoconiosis; Anthrosilicosis. Causes. CWP occurs in two forms: simple and complicated (also called ...
The fight against pneumoconiosis can be won in China and indeed everywhere in the world as it is a preventable disease", she ... The ILO joins national stakeholders in the fight against pneumoconiosis .... The ILO joins national stakeholders in the fight ... ILO/NHC Round Table on Prevention of Pneumoconiosis in Dalian The ILO and the National Health Commission (NHC) gathered with ... Key international labour Conventions related to pneumoconiosis include Convention No. 176 on Safety and Health in Mines and ...
The disease is divided into 2 categories: simple coal workers pneumoconiosis (SCWP) and complicated coal workers ... Coal workers pneumoconiosis (CWP) can be defined as the accumulation of coal dust in the lungs and the tissues reaction to ... pneumoconiosis (CCWP), or progressive massive fibrosis (PMF), depending on the extent of t... ... Coal workers pneumoconiosis (black lung disease). Gross specimen demonstrating simple coal workers pneumoconiosis. View Media ...
If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Centers RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.. ...
Clinical and chest radiographic findings in mica pneumoconiosis ranged from pure nodular pneumoconiosis20 to severe ... Since 1983 we were able to find four reports of mica pneumoconiosis in the literature.5,6,22,23 From these reports it is clear ... "moderately toxic and may induce pneumoconiosis". From the 368 cases of pneumoconiosis associated with mica exposure, only 66 ... silicate pneumoconiosis. Sericite is a fine grained variety of white mica in the form of silky talc-like plates or needles. It ...
Coal workers pneumoconiosis. Definition. Coal workers pneumoconiosis (CWP) is a lung disease that results from breathing in ... Pneumoconioses. In: Broaddus VC, Mason RJ, Ernst JD, et al, eds. Murray and Nadels Textbook of Respiratory Medicine. 6th ed. ... Black lung disease; Pneumoconiosis; Anthrosilicosis. Causes. CWP occurs in two forms: simple and complicated (also called ...
pneumoconiosis. *Consultant(s)*. *Towns*. Asthma, occupational asthma, occupational lung disease, pneumoconiosis, asbestos ... Special Interests word selected:- PNEUMOCONIOSIS * Information available to verified or subscribed users. The first stage in ... pneumoconiosis. *Consultant(s)*. *Towns*. Lung cancer, bronchial asthma, pulmonary fibrosis, COPD, occupational lung disease, ... pneumoconiosis. *Consultant(s)*. *Towns*. Respiratory medicine, acute internal medicine, occupational lung disease, ...
Pneumoconiosis is a lung disease caused by breathing in certain kinds of dust particles that damage your lungs. It is often ... Living with pneumoconiosis. Pneumoconiosis is a chronic, long-term, lung disease. Learn as much as you can about your illness ... Pneumoconiosis. Pneumoconiosis is one of a group of interstitial lung diseases caused by breathing in certain kinds of dust ... Pneumoconiosis can be simple or complicated. Simple pneumoconiosis causes a small amount of scar tissue. The tissue may appear ...
Pneumoconiosis is a nationwide issue. Employers are often responsible for damages caused by their negligence of the harmful ... If you have been diagnosed with pneumoconiosis, our expert black lung lawyers can examine and compile your case, help you make ... Black lung, also known as pneumoconiosis, is a disease that causes shortness of breath, coughing, and tightness of the chest. ...
Black lung, also known as pneumoconiosis, is a disease that causes a shortness of breath, coughing, and tightness of the chest ...
Retrospective analysis of the data of hospitalized coal worker patients suffering from pneumoconiosis in the Tangshan money ... Coal workers pneumoconiosis BP neural network Incidence seniority Prediction This is a preview of subscription content, log in ... Tian L-j, Liu H-b, Yang Y-l et al (2009) Prediction on the morbidity tendency of coal workers pneumoconiosis in a certain coal ... Li B-p (1995) The progress for the research of the popular trend forecast method of Pneumoconiosis. J Occup Health Damage 04:51 ...
Enabling power: Pneumoconiosis etc. (Workers Compensation) Act 1979, ss. 1 (1) (2) (4), 7 (1) (2). Issued: 13.03.2020. Sifted ... The Pneumoconiosis etc. (Workers Compensation) (Payment of Claims) (Amendment) Regulations 2020. Statutory instruments 242 ...
... or Swansea Pneumoconiosis Medical Panels between 1952 and 1976 on people certified as suffering from asbestosis. The main ... Mortality of workers certified by pneumoconiosis medical panels as having asbestosis Br J Ind Med. 1981 May;38(2):130-7. doi: ... A mortality study has been carried out at the London, Cardiff, or Swansea Pneumoconiosis Medical Panels between 1952 and 1976 ...
  • It occurs in people with rheumatoid arthritis who have breathed in dust, such as from coal ( coal worker's pneumoconiosis ) or silica . (medlineplus.gov)
  • The main way to avoid contracting coal worker's pneumoconiosis is to avoid the inhalation of coal dust. (wikipedia.org)
  • Coal worker's pneumoconiosis (CWP) is a lung disease that results from breathing in dust from coal, graphite, or man-made carbon over a long time. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Ask your provider about treating and managing coal worker's pneumoconiosis. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Gross specimen demonstrating simple coal worker's pneumoconiosis. (medscape.com)
  • Using these data which provide seniority of exposure to dust, time of exposure to dust, age and the dust class as the influence factors of length of service, which build the model of the BP neural network, and forecast the length of service of coal worker's pneumoconiosis. (springer.com)
  • The importance of each variable distribution result shows that the importance of the biggest is seniority of exposure in dust to forecast coal worker's pneumoconiosis (0.632), followed is the dust class (0.247), time of exposure in dust (0.061), and age (0.060). (springer.com)
  • BP neural network model has high forecasting accuracy to forecast the length of service of coal worker's pneumoconiosis. (springer.com)
  • Tian L-j, Liu H-b, Yang Y-l et al (2009) Prediction on the morbidity tendency of coal worker's pneumoconiosis in a certain coal mine. (springer.com)
  • Coal worker's pneumoconiosis, or black lung, is one of over 200 types of pulmonary fibrosis and is classified as an interstitial lung disease. (lung.org)
  • There is no cure for coal worker's pneumoconiosis, but treatment can help manage symptoms and improve quality of life. (lung.org)
  • For coal worker's pneumoconiosis, the scarring can be separated into two types: simple or complicated. (lung.org)
  • Therefore, Colombia, a coal producing and exporting country, in an effort to prevent and eliminate CWP, developed the "national plan for preventing silicosis, coal worker's pneumoconiosis, and asbestosis" which seeks to improve the quality of life of exposed workers and their families, as well as to improve the competitiveness of the companies where exposure to these agents occurs [ 14 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • Asbestosis, silicosis and Coal Worker's Pneumoconiosis (CWP) represent three of the most important occupationally-related dust diseases in Australia. (go.jp)
  • Exposure to coal dust leads to the development of coal worker's pneumoconiosis (CWP), a disease associated with an accumulation of macrophages in the lower respiratory tract. (ersjournals.com)
  • and 2) in addition to alveolar macrophages, fibroblasts (probably myofibroblasts) and hyperplastic type II pneumocytes may also be responsible for this increased level of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 in coal worker's pneumoconiosis. (ersjournals.com)
  • Coal worker's pneumoconiosis occurs in two forms: simple and complicated (also called progressive massive fibrosis, or PMF). (stlukes-stl.com)
  • Your risk of developing coal worker's pneumoconiosis depends on how long you have been around coal dust. (stlukes-stl.com)
  • The Love Save Pneumoconiosis survey showed in detail how the medical costs for migrant workers with pneumoconiosis can quickly add up, leading to severe financial difficulties for the worker's entire family. (china-labour.org.hk)
  • Inhaling these dusts can cause coal worker's pneumoconiosis and silicosis. (readbyqxmd.com)
  • Google News using the search term "Coal Worker's Pneumoconiosis" . (diseaseinfosearch.org)
  • The main types of pneumoconiosis are Asbestosis, Byssinosis (also known as 'Brown Lung Disease'), Coal Worker's Pneumoconiosis (also known as 'Black Lung'), Kaolin Pneumoconiosis, Siderosis (also known as 'Welder's Lung') and Silicosis. (zenlaw.co.uk)
  • For more in-depth explanations and symptoms of the different kinds of pneumoconioses, see our sections on asbestosis, berylliosis, byssinosis, coal worker's pneumoconiosis (also called black lung), and silicosis. (alissaadress.com)
  • As a response to repeated exposure to a single non-fibrogenic dust, such as coal dust, a non-collagenous pneumoconiosis at the beginning (simple coal worker's pneumoconiosis, or CWP) may evolve to a collagenous one (complicated CWP) in progress of time. (oxfordbibliographies.com)
  • The classical and common forms of pneumoconiosis include asbestosis, silicosis, and coal worker's pneumoconiosis, which are caused by inhalation of asbestos, silica, and coal dust, respectively. (oxfordbibliographies.com)
  • Pneumoconiosis caused by asbestos is called asbestosis. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • A mortality study has been carried out at the London, Cardiff, or Swansea Pneumoconiosis Medical Panels between 1952 and 1976 on people certified as suffering from asbestosis. (nih.gov)
  • Over 1,000 pneumoconiosis-related fatalities occurred during this time, 56% of which were caused by asbestosis, 38% by silicosis and 6% by CWP. (go.jp)
  • Overall, this study suggests that pneumoconiosis, particularly asbestosis, continues to be an important occupational disease in Australia. (go.jp)
  • The major pneumoconioses include asbestosis, silicosis, coal workers' pneumoconiosis (black lung disease), and chronic beryllium disease. (bmj.com)
  • Asbestosis, another major type of pneumoconiosis, is covered in a separate topic. (bmj.com)
  • Pneumoconiosis - Classification and external resources Micrograph of asbestosis (with ferruginous bodies), a type of pneumoconiosis. (academic.ru)
  • Pneumoconiosis is an important occupational lung disease that primarily consists of silicosis and asbestosis. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Pneumoconiosis is a group of diseases that includes asbestosis, silicosis and coal workers' pneumoconiosis, also known as black lung. (safetyandhealthmagazine.com)
  • Collagenous pneumoconiosis may occur due to fibrogenic dust, such as silicosis and asbestosis, exposure or by altered tissue response to a non-fibrogenic dust, such as coal dust, which is considered relatively less fibrogenic than silica and asbestos. (oxfordbibliographies.com)
  • Prolonged exposure to large amounts of coal dust can result in more serious forms of the disease, simple coal workers' pneumoconiosis and complicated coal workers' pneumoconiosis (or progressive massive fibrosis, or PMF). (wikipedia.org)
  • The routine chest radiographs of more than 21,000 miners from 23 unselected collieries in the East Midlands have been used for a study of rheumatoid pneumoconiosis and progressive massive fibrosis (P.M.F.). A broadened radiological concept of rheumatoid pneumoconiosis was used in diagnosis. (bmj.com)
  • According to the American Lung Association (ALA), there are two basic forms of pneumoconiosis: coal workers' pneumoconiosis, or CWP, and progressive massive fibrosis, or PMF. (reference.com)
  • Complicated pneumoconiosis is known as progressive massive fibrosis, or PMF. (ahealthyme.com)
  • Complicated pneumoconiosis, also called progressive massive fibrosis, involves more severe scarring over a larger area of the lung tissue. (lung.org)
  • Complicated pneumoconiosis or progressive massive fibrosis frequently leads to respiratory impairment. (hindawi.com)
  • Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) from 16 nonsmoking control subjects and 27 nonsmoking CWP patients (16 with simple pneumoconiosis (SP) and 11 with progressive massive fibrosis (PMF)) was analysed. (ersjournals.com)
  • Each year, 1 to 2% of individuals with simple coal workers' pneumoconiosis develop a more serious form of the disease called progressive massive fibrosis, in which large scars (at least inch in diameter) grow in the lungs as a reaction to the dust. (alissaadress.com)
  • Simple coal workers' pneumoconiosis has no significant effect on spirometric measures, whereas lung function in the more advanced stages of progressive massive fibrosis (PMF) shows an obstructive and restrictive pattern. (enetmd.com)
  • Laney AS, Petsonk EL, Hale JM, Wolfe AL, Attfield MD. Potential determinants of coal workers' pneumoconiosis, advanced pneumoconiosis, and progressive massive fibrosis among underground coal miners in the United States, 2005-2009. (healthdata.org)
  • Pneumoconiosis can happen when a person breathes in dust particles such as asbestos, coal dust, or silica. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • [ 5 ] Coal workers' pneumoconiosis (CWP) is also known as "black lung disease," one of the most common conditions that belong in the category of CMDLD, along with silicosis, mixed-dust pneumoconiosis with coexistent silica exposure, chronic bronchitis, emphysema, and dust-related diffuse fibrosis. (medscape.com)
  • Other types of dusts that can cause pneumoconiosis include silica and asbestos. (ahealthyme.com)
  • You may be diagnosed with pneumoconiosis if you have symptoms and a history of working around coal, asbestos, or silica. (ahealthyme.com)
  • The coal mining industry is the probably the single biggest cause of pneumoconiosis among China's workforce, followed by quarrying, rock blasting and grinding, and also the jewellery industry in which workers are often exposed to high levels of silica dust while polishing gemstones. (clb.org.hk)
  • Occupational exposures to coal, silica, or asbestos are the major causes of the pneumoconiosis or dust-induced lung diseases [ 8 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • Pneumoconiosis, also known as black lung, is a respiratory condition caused by exposure to harmful dusts in the workplace, such as asbestos, coal dust, or silica dust. (edgarsnyder.com)
  • Exposure to asbestos, silica and coal dust are the most common causes of pneumoconiosis, ALA states. (safetyandhealthmagazine.com)
  • Silicosis is a type of pneumoconiosis and a rare and incurable disease caused by the inhalation of silica dust. (zenlaw.co.uk)
  • Update below (1/30/2016) A new paper by NIOSH researchers explores the use of lung transplants for individuals with work-related pneumoconiosis, including black lung disease. (scienceblogs.com)
  • In the past, people who suffered from forms of pneumoconiosis particularly black lung and silicosis were highly susceptible to tuberculosis (something that has become less common due to vaccines and better methods of treatment ). (everything2.com)
  • Coal workers' pneumoconiosis (CWP), also known as black lung disease or black lung, is caused by long-term exposure to coal dust. (wikipedia.org)
  • Different forms of the disease include coal workers' pneumoconiosis (CWP), also known as black lung disease, and byssinosis, also known as brown lung disease, caused by cotton fibers. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Anthracosis has previously been used synonymously for coal workers' pneumoconiosis (CWP) (black lung disease) or for describing the process of detecting a substantial amount of pulmonary carbon deposits on autopsies secondary to recurrent exposure to several factors, such as air pollution, smoke inhalation, or coal dust fragments. (medscape.com)
  • Black lung, also known as pneumoconiosis, is a disease that causes shortness of breath, coughing, and tightness of the chest. (mauriceblackburn.com.au)
  • If you have been diagnosed with pneumoconiosis, our expert black lung lawyers can examine and compile your case, help you make a personal injury claim , and get you the compensation you deserve. (mauriceblackburn.com.au)
  • Coalminers pneumoconiosis: also referred to as black lung, caused by inhalation of dust over a prolonged period of time. (farleys.com)
  • The breathing of coal and rock dust causes black lung, the common name given to the lung diseases pneumoconiosis and silicosis. (oxforddictionaries.com)
  • This topic will cover 3 of the major diseases in this category: silicosis, coal workers' pneumoconiosis (black lung disease), and chronic beryllium disease. (bmj.com)
  • There are three different types of pneumoconiosis: black lung, silicosis and siderosis. (lunginstitute.com)
  • Coal workers' pneumoconiosis (black lung) is a lung disease caused by deposits of coal dust in the lungs. (alissaadress.com)
  • Symptoms of the more complicated type of pneumoconiosis include coughing, lots of phlegm, shortness of breath and difficulty breathing, according to Johns Hopkins. (reference.com)
  • While the symptoms for each condition remain the same, it is important for your doctor to recognize the exact type of pneumoconiosis you have. (lunginstitute.com)
  • The inhalation of different types of dust increases the risk of developing a particular type of Pneumoconiosis. (zenlaw.co.uk)
  • If quartz is contributing to the greater number of cases of pneumoconiosis in the United States, more effective dust control measures, as well as an independent exposure standard for respirable quartz in coal mining, should be implemented to reduce this potentially disabling condition. (cdc.gov)
  • In the puzzle/shooter video game Portal 2, former CEO and founder of Aperture Science Laboratories, Cave Johnson, purportedly contracted and died of lunar pneumoconiosis after prolonged exposure to the moon rocks he was using in teleportation technology research. (wikipedia.org)
  • Pneumoconiosis is a restrictive disease of the lungs caused by deposition of various kinds of dust in the lungs, inhaled during years of exposure, often in extractive industries. (daviddarling.info)
  • All of these substances lead to pneumoconiosis over many years of exposure. (reference.com)
  • Risk factors for pneumoconiosis include exposure to large amounts of dust, exposure for long periods of time and smoking tobacco. (reference.com)
  • An extensive review of the experimental and epidemiological papers, and case studies involving mica exposure up to 1985, reported only a few descriptions of pneumoconiosis due to pure mica exposure in humans and inadequate data on the potential for collagen deposition in experimental animals. (bmj.com)
  • We analyzed the data on new cases of pneumoconiosis from annual reports, including case distributions, patient ages, exposure duration, disease stages, and enterprise types. (mdpi.com)
  • The median exposure duration and diagnosis age of the total pneumoconiosis cases was 13.2 and 61.0 years, respectively. (mdpi.com)
  • An association was found between a radiologic diagnosis of pneumoconiosis and a medium risk level of exposure to carbon dust (OR: 2.901, 95% CI: 0.937, 8.982), medium size companies (OR: 2.301, 95% CI: 1.260-4.201), length of mining work greater than 25 years (OR: 3.222, 95% CI: 1.806-5.748), and a history of smoking for more than one year (OR: 1.479, 95% CI: 0.938-2.334). (hindawi.com)
  • Pneumoconioses make up a group of lung diseases related to exposure to mineral dusts in work environments. (scielo.br)
  • We defined mixed-dust pneumoconiosis (MDP) pathologically as a pneumoconiosis showing dust macules or mixed-dust fibrotic nodules (MDF), with or without silicotic nodules (SN), in an individual with a history of exposure to mixed dust. (nih.gov)
  • Workers, whose exposure results in pneumoconiosis, may be entitled to compensation in some countries. (oxfordmedicine.com)
  • Twenty workers were selected as dust exposure group who exposed to coal dust for more than 2 years and had not been diagnosed as pneumoconiosis. (readbyqxmd.com)
  • Pneumoconiosis is a chronic lung disease typified by lung scarring and other interstitial damage caused by exposure to dust and other containments, in this case specifically: coal. (humanprogress.org)
  • By CDA, 88.8% of subjects were correctly discriminated by their exposure status and the presence of pneumoconiosis. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Such nodules may form in individuals who have had significant exposure to coal dust, even if they don't have coal workers' pneumoconiosis. (alissaadress.com)
  • The pneumoconioses differ in a number of ways from the acute allergic and toxic interstitial diseases that are associated with exposure to organic dusts, principally because of the long latency period (usually 10- 20 years or more) between exposure and recognition of the disease. (enetmd.com)
  • Exposure to coal dust with a quartz concentration greater than 15% is associated with a high risk of a rapidly progressive form of pneumoconiosis that has the characteristics of silicosis. (enetmd.com)
  • The risk of pneumoconiosis is related to the intensity and years of exposure. (enetmd.com)
  • Coal workers' pneumoconiosis (CWP) and silicosis are preventable occupational lung diseases that are typically associated with significant dust exposure. (thecardiologyadvisor.com)
  • This scheme classifies the manifestations under the umbrella of coal mine dust lung disease (CMDLD) which includes classic CWP, silicosis, mixed dust pneumoconiosis and dust related diffuse fibrosis (clinically indistinguishable from idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis absent the exposure history or pathologic evidence). (thecardiologyadvisor.com)
  • They represent the fibrogenic or collagenous side of pneumoconioses, which usually progress to massive fibrosis, even after cessation of dust exposure, whereas other mineral dusts and silicates usually cause non-fibrogenic or non-collagenous forms, which usually remain silent or cause mild disease. (oxfordbibliographies.com)
  • Among individuals with certified occupational exposures to asbestos in the United States, 20% die of pneumoconiosis. (oxforddictionaries.com)
  • Pneumoconiosis - Deposition of particulate matter (such as asbestos and silicon) in the lungs. (academic.ru)
  • A form of pneumoconiosis caused by inhalation of asbestos fibers which elicit potent inflammatory responses in the parenchyma of the lung. (icd10data.com)
  • If you are awarded Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit for your asbestos-related Pneumoconiosis, you may be entitled to a one-off lump sum payment from the government. (zenlaw.co.uk)
  • Rheumatoid pneumoconiosis (RP, also known as Caplan syndrome) is swelling (inflammation) and scarring of the lungs. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Pneumoconiosis is an occupational disease in which scarring of the alveoli (air sacs) in the lungs occurs due to irritation by dust particles. (daviddarling.info)
  • Pneumoconiosis is any lung disease caused by dust particles that can damage the lungs. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Pneumoconiosis can take a long time to develop, as dust can build up slowly or take many years to cause a reaction in the lungs. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • CWP, also known as simple pneumoconiosis, causes small amounts of scarring in the lungs. (reference.com)
  • Awareness of pneumoconiosis occurs after a chest X-ray detects mild scar tissue in the lungs. (reference.com)
  • Pneumoconiosis hardens lung tissue, inflames air sacs inside the lungs and develops scar tissue between these lung sacs. (reference.com)
  • Pneumoconiosis is one of a group of interstitial lung diseases caused by breathing in certain kinds of dust particles that damage your lungs. (ahealthyme.com)
  • For either simple or complicated pneumoconiosis, the damage causes the loss of blood vessels and air sacs in your lungs. (ahealthyme.com)
  • In simple pneumoconiosis, a chest X-ray or CT scan will reveal small amounts of scar tissue, seen as tiny, circular nodules on the lungs. (lung.org)
  • pneumoconiosis - [ˌnju:mə(ʊ)kəʊnɪ əʊsɪs] noun Medicine a disease of the lungs caused by inhalation of dust, characterized by inflammation, coughing, and fibrosis. (academic.ru)
  • The word pneumoconiosis stems from the Greek language and means "dusty lungs. (lunginstitute.com)
  • According to the American Lung Association, pneumoconiosis is a general term given to any lung disease caused by dusts that are inhaled and deposited deep into the lungs. (safetyandhealthmagazine.com)
  • In simple coal workers' pneumoconiosis, coal dust accumulates around the small airways (bronchioles) of the lungs. (alissaadress.com)
  • Pneumoconiosis is defined as the accumulation of dust in the lungs and the reaction of tissues to its presence. (enetmd.com)
  • The International Labour Organization (ILO) defines pneumoconiosis as "the accumulation of dust in the lungs and the tissue reactions to its presence. (oxfordbibliographies.com)
  • Pneumoconiosis is a lung disease caused by certain dust particles that are most often found in a work environment. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • The dust particles that cause pneumoconiosis are usually found in the workplace, so it is often called an occupational lung disease. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Pneumoconiosis is often referred to as occupational lung disease. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Because you are likely to encounter these dusts only in the workplace, pneumoconiosis is called an occupational lung disease. (ahealthyme.com)
  • More than 200 migrant workers from Hunan left Shenzhen today after the municipal government finally agreed to compensate them for their occupational lung disease, pneumoconiosis, contracted while working in the city's construction sites back in the 1990s. (clb.org.hk)
  • So pneumoconiosis is called a work-related lung disease. (brighamandwomens.org)
  • Pneumoconiosis is a lung disease caused by high-intensity or long-term inhalation of certain types of dust. (gerardmaloufpartners.com.au)
  • Pneumoconiosis is a restrictive and occupational lung disease caused by inhalation of dust. (medgadget.com)
  • An estimated six million workers in China, predominately poor migrants from the countryside, have already contracted the debilitating and deadly lung disease, pneumoconiosis. (china-labour.org.hk)
  • Coal workers' pneumoconiosis (CWP) is a chronic occupational lung disease caused by long-term inhalation of coal dust. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Three years ago, a group of 180 migrant workers made national headlines when they travelled back to Shenzhen to demand compensation for the deadly lung disease, pneumoconiosis, they had contracted whilst working on the city's construction sites in the 1990s. (china-labour.org.hk)
  • Pneumoconiosis is an occupational lung disease, which causes a restrictive lung defect. (healthcaremagic.com)
  • Pneumoconiosis is an occupational lung disease caused by breathing in particles of mineral dust. (lunginstitute.com)
  • Coal workers' pneumoconiosis is an environmental lung disease (see Review of Environmental Lung Diseases) that results from inhaling coal dust or graphite over quite a long time, generally 20 years or more. (alissaadress.com)
  • Working with dust particles does not mean that a person will develop pneumoconiosis. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • It is estimated that about 16% of coal miners develop pneumoconiosis from breathing in coal dust. (lunginstitute.com)
  • However, among a group of workers exposed to the same dust, only a fraction develop pneumoconiosis, because of an individual susceptibility. (enetmd.com)
  • In southwestern Hunan, many people mine illegally for a living, and many miners develop pneumoconiosis. (orientindiefilms.com)
  • Although rates of pneumoconiosis in coal miners have declined substantially in the United States since the passage of the Federal Coal Mine Health and Safety Act of 1969, new cases continue to occur, including cases of rapidly progressive disease. (cdc.gov)
  • Pneumoconiosis is almost exclusively an occupational disease and occupational lung diseases are the number one cause of work-related illness in the United States . (everything2.com)
  • In the twenty-five years between 1968 and 1992, 100,890 US residents over age fifteen died of some form of pneumoconiosis ( Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ). (everything2.com)
  • Coal workers' pneumoconiosis, severe state, develops after the initial, milder form of the disease known as anthracosis (from the Greek άνθρακας, or anthracas -coal, carbon). (wikipedia.org)
  • Symptoms of pneumoconiosis include difficulty breathing and a cough, but what makes the disease more than a chest infection? (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • A person with pneumoconiosis may no longer work in an environment with dust that has caused the disease. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • The seminar took place on July 16 in Dalian and followed the adoption of the first ever National Action Plan on the Prevention and Control of Pneumoconiosis, demonstrating the commitment of the Chinese government to fight the occupational disease. (ilo.org)
  • The fight against pneumoconiosis can be won in China and indeed everywhere in the world as it is a preventable disease", she said. (ilo.org)
  • This type of the disease is sometimes called coal worker pneumoconiosis, or CWP. (ahealthyme.com)
  • Symptoms of pneumoconiosis often depend on how severe the disease is. (ahealthyme.com)
  • Being exposed to dust that can cause pneumoconiosis, in an everyday setting, is not enough to cause the disease. (ahealthyme.com)
  • Pneumoconiosis is a common industrial disease that affects professionals in trade and construction industries. (farleys.com)
  • According to official figures, pneumoconiosis is the most serious and most common occupational disease in China . (clb.org.hk)
  • Pneumoconiosis is an irreversible, preventable disease caused by dust inhalation. (ersjournals.com)
  • Although in other countries, by precautions the incidence decreased to 0,3-5%, it is still 10-15% in our country in pneumoconiosis causing occupations.We aimed to describe the characteristics of our 208 pneumoconiosis workers admitted to Istanbul Occupational Disease Hospital. (ersjournals.com)
  • Pneumoconiosis is also known as coal miner's pneumoconiosis, coal miner's lung, coal miner's disease, welder's lung, and miner's lung. (edgarsnyder.com)
  • According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, in 2013, 260,000 deaths occurred due to pneumoconiosis. (medgadget.com)
  • We concluded that the mortality coefficients due to pneumoconioses do not reflect the problem properly, thus masking the transcendence and magnitude of the disease. (scielo.br)
  • There is an increased risk of connective-tissue disease, vasculitides, lung cancer, COPD, active TB, and chronic renal failure among patients with silicosis, and an increased risk of connective-tissue disease and COPD among patients with coal workers' pneumoconiosis. (bmj.com)
  • Pneumoconiosis is by far the most serious occupational disease in China, with an estimated six million victims, nearly all of whom are migrant workers. (china-labour.org.hk)
  • Every single case of pneumoconiosis in China should, by right, be classified as an occupational disease, yet according to a new survey by the charity organization Love Save Pneumoconiosis (大爱清尘) , only 25.7 percent of migrant workers with pneumoconiosis even bother to seek compensation from the government or their employer. (china-labour.org.hk)
  • Draft legislation that would remove all legal impediments for workers with pneumoconiosis and ensure they get the occupational disease benefits they are entitled to. (china-labour.org.hk)
  • A volunteer for the most active and most influential charity organization in China, Love Save Pneumoconiosis, described to News 1+1 the situation she found in many of the villages that have been devastated by the disease. (china-labour.org.hk)
  • Because pneumoconiosis is a progressive disease, early detection is key. (lunginstitute.com)
  • Workers who have pneumoconiosis may present no symptoms whatsoever - especially in the early stages of the disease. (safetyandhealthmagazine.com)
  • The rank of coal has an influence on the risk of disease (higher-rank coals entail higher risk than lower-rank coals) and the progression of pneumoconiosis. (enetmd.com)
  • This definition does not include the word of "disease" because it may add up to some degree of health impairment, which may not be the case with all pneumoconiosis, that is, the ones caused by non-fibrogenic dusts, and is less likely to develop fibrogenic reaction. (oxfordbibliographies.com)
  • Mortality from coal workers' pneumoconiosis in official health statistics and the prevalence of pneumoconiosis among miners screened in X-ray surveillance programs are also lower in Australia. (cdc.gov)
  • The U.S. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) was requested by both industry and labor stakeholders to examine this issue, with the ultimate aim of reducing the rate of pneumoconiosis among U.S. coal miners. (cdc.gov)
  • These results establish the need to generate an intervention strategy aimed at preventing the identified factors, as well as a timely identification and effective treatment of pneumoconiosis in coal miners, in which the commitment of the General Health and Social Security System and the workers compensation system is ensured. (hindawi.com)
  • Moreover, pneumoconiosis may progress after miners retire. (oxforddictionaries.com)
  • Miners diagnosed with pneumoconiosis were informed of their condition, but, for socioeconomic reasons, they were not requested to leave their jobs. (oxforddictionaries.com)
  • Coal workers' pneumoconiosis was first recognized in Scottish miners in 1830. (enetmd.com)
  • The prevalence of P.M.F. was found to increase with increasing simple pneumoconiosis prevalence. (bmj.com)
  • A slight correlation between rheumatoid pneumoconiosis and simple pneumoconiosis prevalence was also found, but the bulk of the increase in P.M.F. was due to non-rheumatoid cases. (bmj.com)
  • In Colombia, coal miner pneumoconiosis is considered a public health problem due to its irreversibility, high cost on diagnosis, and lack of data related to its prevalence in the country. (hindawi.com)
  • Therefore, a cross-sectional study was carried out in order to determine the prevalence of pneumoconiosis in underground coal mining workers in two regions of Colombia. (hindawi.com)
  • The results showed a 35.9% prevalence of pneumoconiosis in the study group (42.3% in region 1 and 29.9% in region 2). (hindawi.com)
  • A study of pneumoconiosis and massive pulmonary fibrosis in 6,658 mine workers from 416 mines in 15 states in the United States, between 2005 and 2009, determined that the prevalence of pneumoconiosis in underground coal mine workers varied between 4.8 and 9% [ 16 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • Increasing prevalence of pneumoconiosis, increasing smoking population, and rising air pollution have driven the growth of the market. (medgadget.com)
  • Global pneumoconiosis market is majorly driven by the increasing prevalence of pneumoconiosis. (medgadget.com)
  • The epidemiological investigation on pneumoconiosis was carried out nation widely power industry in 1989.The result showed that the prevalence,cumulative incidence and mortality from pneumoconiosis were 2.41%, 3.05% and 21.64% respectively. (cnki.com.cn)
  • Little is known about the prevalence of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) among coal workers' pneumoconiosis (CWP) patients. (springer.com)
  • Mining has the two highest mortality ratios of pneumoconiosis (three of the five highest, overall ). (everything2.com)
  • To gain a clear picture of pneumoconiosis trends over time, a 24-yr retrospective analysis of national mortality data was performed for the period 1979 to 2002. (go.jp)
  • The results showed an increase in the mortality coefficient due to pneumoconioses per 1 million inhabitants per year along the studied period of time. (scielo.br)
  • Results: The IL-1RA (+2018) TC or CC variant genotypes were associated with coal workers' pneumoconiosis and silicosis risk (OR=1. (readbyqxmd.com)
  • Also see Silicosis and Coal Worker Pneumoconiosis . (medscape.com)
  • Despite mandated dust controls, silicosis and coal workers' pneumoconiosis remain significant public health care burdens. (thecardiologyadvisor.com)
  • While smoking makes symptoms worse, it hasn't been shown to increase the possibility of getting a form of pneumoconiosis. (everything2.com)
  • In contrast, Australia's underground coal mining industry has reported few new cases of pneumoconiosis for more than 20 years. (cdc.gov)
  • However, if you adopt the most effective and best treatment for pneumoconiosis, a lung lavage, you'd have to spend 10,000 yuan each time. (china-labour.org.hk)
  • There are many methods of treatment for pneumoconiosis. (lunginstitute.com)
  • There is no specific treatment for pneumoconiosis other than the treatment of the complications that the disorder might cause. (pneumoconiosis.org.uk)
  • [ 10 ] It has also been suggested that macrophages play a significant role in the development of pneumoconiosis. (medscape.com)
  • During the development of pneumoconiosis produced by the intratracheal administration of coal-mine dust to rats, the adrenal catecholamine levels of the animals undergo phased changes. (ilo.org)
  • Pneumoconiosis is the general term for a class of interstitial lung diseases where inhalation of dust has caused interstitial fibrosis. (wikipedia.org)
  • The pneumoconioses are a group of interstitial lung diseases, mostly of occupational origin, caused by the inhalation of mineral or metal dusts. (bmj.com)
  • Although pneumoconiosis changes are amenable to treatment, however, the pulmonary fibrosis proceeds relentlessly as is the case with advancing Rheumatoid Arthritis. (scepticemia.com)
  • Pneumoconiosis in combination with multiple pulmonary rheumatoid nodules in rheumatoid arthritis patients is known as Caplan's syndrome. (wikipedia.org)
  • Grouped results showed that rheumatoid pneumoconiosis occurred in between 2·3% and 6·2% of all men affected by pneumoconiosis. (bmj.com)
  • More popularly known as Caplan's Syndrome, after Dr. Anthony Caplan of the Cardiff Pneumoconiosis Panel, who was the first to describe this condition, this is, as the name suggests, a combination of Rheumatoid Arthritis and Pneumoconiosis. (scepticemia.com)
  • Cough and dyspnea due to the Pneumoconiosis and joint features (like arthralgia, morning stiffness, tender/swollen metacarpophalangeal joints, rheumatoid nodules, etc. (scepticemia.com)
  • Pathologically, simple CWP is associated with the macular and nodular lesions, whereas complicated CWP is associated with PMF (opacity lesion of 1 cm in diameter or more) and the lesions of rheumatoid pneumoconiosis. (enetmd.com)
  • We collected and analyzed the data of pneumoconiosis cases reported annually from 2006 to 2017. (mdpi.com)
  • The most common symptoms of these forms of pneumoconiosis include difficulty breathing, shortness of breath, a dry cough and a dry crackling sound when inhaling. (gerardmaloufpartners.com.au)
  • The signs and symptoms of Pneumoconiosis include either a wet or dry cough, difficulty breathing, shortness of breath, and chest tightness. (edgarsnyder.com)
  • If inflammation or fibrosis are severe, they may cause symptoms of pneumoconiosis. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Pneumoconiosis describes the pathological reaction of the lung to inhaled dust, which is most frequently, but not necessarily, one of fibrosis, and most often, but not exclusively, related to exposures occurring at work. (oxfordmedicine.com)
  • Pneumoconiosis may be classified as either fibrotic or nonfibrotic, according to the presence or absence of fibrosis. (semanticscholar.org)
  • The most common symptoms of pneumoconiosis are coughing, wheezing and shortness of breath. (lunginstitute.com)
  • In addition, the ILO has issued the Guidelines for the use of the ILO International Classification of Radiographs of Pneumoconiosis and a number of other tools and instruments to guide member States in their preventive work. (ilo.org)
  • The prediction accuracy was calculated and validated using the International Classification of Radiographs of the Pneumoconiosis criteria combined with an abnormal pulmonary function test as a reference standard. (biomedcentral.com)
  • pathology of pneumoconiosis: pneumoconiosis research (physical, chemical, biological and medical). (srce.hr)
  • When these particles are introduced into the respiratory tract, they can cause a reactive process in the lung tissue known as pneumoconiosis. (medscape.com)
  • To help prevent pneumoconiosis, workers should wear personal protective equipment, including respiratory protection, whenever needed. (safetyandhealthmagazine.com)
  • In order to cause pneumoconiosis, particles must be small enough (0.5-5 mm) to reach the respiratory bronchioles and be deposited there. (enetmd.com)
  • No specific treatment affects the course of coal workers' pneumoconiosis, though treatment options are available for complications such as tuberculosis and chronic hypoxemia. (enetmd.com)
  • The prolonged inhalation of coal-mine dust may result in the development of coal workers' pneumoconiosis (CWP), silicosis, and industrial chronic bronchitis and emphysema, either singly or in various combinations. (enetmd.com)
  • Pneumoconiosis refers to fibrotic (scarring) disorder of the lung tissue caused by inhalation of respirable-sized mineral dusts. (alissaadress.com)
  • Dusts, causing pneumoconiosis, have a spectrum that fibrogenic ones are on one side and non-fibrogenic, or inert ones, are on the other side. (oxfordbibliographies.com)
  • The proportion of cases with combined pneumoconiosis and tuberculosis was 6.6%, and the incidence of tuberculosis was highest in workers with silicosis. (mdpi.com)
  • Diseases that may result in an x-ray like this include: simple coal workers pneumoconiosis (CWP) - stage I, simple silicosis, miliary tuberculosis, histiocytosis X (eosinophilic granuloma), and other diffuse infiltrate pulmonary diseases. (stlukes-stl.com)
  • The 77 year old recipient was bed bound with severe emphysema and pneumoconiosis. (oxforddictionaries.com)
  • People who have pneumoconiosis might also develop other related conditions as a result of existing lung damage or inflammation, such as bronchitis, pulmonary hypertension or emphysema. (lunginstitute.com)
  • Pneumoconiosis, coming from the Greek pneuma ( air or wind ) and konis ( dust ), is a condition caused by the inhalation (usually over long periods of time) of organic or inorganic "dust" (sometimes chemical irritants). (everything2.com)
  • Our previous study found that these stone workers had an increased risk of pneumoconiosis [ 7 ]. (biomedcentral.com)
  • While there are many factors that can lead to the development of this condition, the most common cause of pneumoconiosis is occupational hazard. (lunginstitute.com)
  • Occupations that require their workers to breathe dust and chemicals daily is the leading cause of pneumoconiosis. (lunginstitute.com)
  • Such apparent apathy can perhaps be explained by that fact that, according to the survey, only 17.3 percent of those migrant workers with pneumoconiosis who sought compensation actually got any compensation. (china-labour.org.hk)
  • One of the key issues for migrant workers with pneumoconiosis is that, in many cases, they cannot work or can only get very low-paid jobs. (china-labour.org.hk)
  • The survey found that the average income of migrant workers with pneumoconiosis was just 10,080 yuan per year compared with 22,509 yuan for the migrant workers without pneumoconiosis who were interviewed. (china-labour.org.hk)
  • Average expenditure for migrant workers with pneumoconiosis on the other hand was 24,804 yuan a year, with half of that (12,364 yuan) taken up by medical expenses. (china-labour.org.hk)
  • Establish a special compensation fund that can guarantee the medical and living expenses of all workers with pneumoconiosis. (china-labour.org.hk)
  • However, there are many treatment options available that can help reduce the symptoms and, in some cases, even slow the progression of pneumoconiosis altogether. (lunginstitute.com)
  • The oxidative stress theory is one of the possible mechanisms to help describe the pathogenesis of pneumoconiosis. (medscape.com)
  • Lipid peroxidation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of pneumoconiosis. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Because most pneumoconiotic nodules are small-sized and irregular-shape, only few nodules can be detected by conventional nodule extraction methods, which would affect the classification of pneumoconiosis. (nii.ac.jp)
  • The classification of pneumoconiosis is performed in the following steps: Firstly the large-sized nodules were extracted and cases of type 3-b were recognized. (nii.ac.jp)
  • The dust, in this definition, infers "an aerosol composed of solid inanimate particles" ( Pneumoconioses: Defintion . (oxfordbibliographies.com)
  • This cross-sectional study was conducted from October to December, 2016, as part of a pneumoconiosis screening program at the Hospital of Occupational Diseases in Beijing. (springer.com)
  • According to national statistics, pneumoconiosis accounts for nearly 90% of all reported occupational diseases in China. (ilo.org)
  • This study aims to describe the characteristics and trends of pneumoconiosis in the Jiangsu Province, China, and provide information for the occupational diseases control. (mdpi.com)
  • Two hundred and eighty-seven patients referred to the National Research Institute for Occupational Diseases with suspected pneumoconiosis are recorded. (journals.co.za)
  • As suggested by their names, Coal Dust Pneumoconiosis is caused by the inhalation of coal dust, whereas Hard Metal Pneumoconiosis is caused by the inhalation of dust from hard metals such as cobalt or tungsten. (gerardmaloufpartners.com.au)