Galectins: A class of animal lectins that bind specifically to beta-galactoside in a calcium-independent manner. Members of this class are distiguished from other lectins by the presence of a conserved carbohydrate recognition domain. The majority of proteins in this class bind to sugar molecules in a sulfhydryl-dependent manner and are often referred to as S-type lectins, however this property is not required for membership in this class.Galectin 1: A galectin found abundantly in smooth muscle (MUSCLE, SMOOTH) and SKELETAL MUSCLE and many other tissues. It occurs as a homodimer with two 14-kDa subunits.Galectin 2: A galectin found preferentially expressed in the gastrointestinal tract. The protein occurs as a homodimer with two 14-kDa subunits.Galectin 4: A galectin found in the small and large intestine and the stomach. It occurs as a homodimer with two 36-kDa subunits and is localized to sites of cell adhesion where it may play role in assembly of ADHERENS JUNCTIONS.Hemagglutinins: Agents that cause agglutination of red blood cells. They include antibodies, blood group antigens, lectins, autoimmune factors, bacterial, viral, or parasitic blood agglutinins, etc.Fetuins: A family of calcium-binding alpha-globulins that are synthesized in the LIVER and play an essential role in maintaining the solubility of CALCIUM in the BLOOD. In addition the fetuins contain aminoterminal cystatin domains and are classified as type 3 cystatins.Galactosides: Glycosides formed by the reaction of the hydroxyl group on the anomeric carbon atom of galactose with an alcohol to form an acetal. They include both alpha- and beta-galactosides.Lectins: Proteins that share the common characteristic of binding to carbohydrates. Some ANTIBODIES and carbohydrate-metabolizing proteins (ENZYMES) also bind to carbohydrates, however they are not considered lectins. PLANT LECTINS are carbohydrate-binding proteins that have been primarily identified by their hemagglutinating activity (HEMAGGLUTININS). However, a variety of lectins occur in animal species where they serve diverse array of functions through specific carbohydrate recognition.Suberites: A genus of velvety smooth SPONGES in the family Suberitidae, characterized by the ectosomal and choanosomal skeletons dominated by tylostyles (pin-like spicules with a pinched bulbous end).Bufonidae: The family of true toads belonging to the order Anura. The genera include Bufo, Ansonia, Nectophrynoides, and Atelopus.Leg Bones: The bones of the free part of the lower extremity in humans and of any of the four extremities in animals. It includes the FEMUR; PATELLA; TIBIA; and FIBULA.Adenoviruses, Porcine: Species of the genus MASTADENOVIRUS, causing neurological disease in pigs.Porifera: The phylum of sponges which are sessile, suspension-feeding, multicellular animals that utilize flagellated cells called choanocytes to circulate water. Most are hermaphroditic. They are probably an early evolutionary side branch that gave rise to no other group of animals. Except for about 150 freshwater species, sponges are marine animals. They are a source of ALKALOIDS; STEROLS; and other complex molecules useful in medicine and biological research.Lactose: A disaccharide of GLUCOSE and GALACTOSE in human and cow milk. It is used in pharmacy for tablets, in medicine as a nutrient, and in industry.Asialoglycoproteins: Endogenous glycoproteins from which SIALIC ACID has been removed by the action of sialidases. They bind tightly to the ASIALOGLYCOPROTEIN RECEPTOR which is located on hepatocyte plasma membranes. After internalization by adsorptive ENDOCYTOSIS they are delivered to LYSOSOMES for degradation. Therefore receptor-mediated clearance of asialoglycoproteins is an important aspect of the turnover of plasma glycoproteins. They are elevated in serum of patients with HEPATIC CIRRHOSIS or HEPATITIS.Agrocybe: A genus of saprobic mushrooms in the family Bolbitiaceae that grow in grass, dung, garden mulch, or in woods.Eels: Common name for an order (Anguilliformes) of voracious, elongate, snakelike teleost fishes.Stifle: In horses, cattle, and other quadrupeds, the joint between the femur and the tibia, corresponding to the human knee.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Carbohydrate Metabolism: Cellular processes in biosynthesis (anabolism) and degradation (catabolism) of CARBOHYDRATES.Carbohydrate Sequence: The sequence of carbohydrates within POLYSACCHARIDES; GLYCOPROTEINS; and GLYCOLIPIDS.Laccaria: A genus of white-spored mushrooms in the family Tricholomataceae. They form symbiotic partnerships (MYCORRHIZAE) with trees.Oligosaccharides: Carbohydrates consisting of between two (DISACCHARIDES) and ten MONOSACCHARIDES connected by either an alpha- or beta-glycosidic link. They are found throughout nature in both the free and bound form.Antigens, Differentiation: Antigens expressed primarily on the membranes of living cells during sequential stages of maturation and differentiation. As immunologic markers they have high organ and tissue specificity and are useful as probes in studies of normal cell development as well as neoplastic transformation.Sequence Homology, Amino Acid: The degree of similarity between sequences of amino acids. This information is useful for the analyzing genetic relatedness of proteins and species.Disaccharides: Oligosaccharides containing two monosaccharide units linked by a glycosidic bond.Amino Sugars: SUGARS containing an amino group. GLYCOSYLATION of other compounds with these amino sugars results in AMINOGLYCOSIDES.Tandem Repeat Sequences: Copies of DNA sequences which lie adjacent to each other in the same orientation (direct tandem repeats) or in the opposite direction to each other (INVERTED TANDEM REPEATS).Glycoconjugates: Carbohydrates covalently linked to a nonsugar moiety (lipids or proteins). The major glycoconjugates are glycoproteins, glycopeptides, peptidoglycans, glycolipids, and lipopolysaccharides. (From Biochemical Nomenclature and Related Documents, 2d ed; From Principles of Biochemistry, 2d ed)Chordata: Phylum in the domain Eukarya, comprised of animals either with fully developed backbones (VERTEBRATES), or those with notochords only during some developmental stage (CHORDATA, NONVERTEBRATE).Carbohydrates: The largest class of organic compounds, including STARCH; GLYCOGEN; CELLULOSE; POLYSACCHARIDES; and simple MONOSACCHARIDES. Carbohydrates are composed of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen in a ratio of Cn(H2O)n.Caenorhabditis elegans: A species of nematode that is widely used in biological, biochemical, and genetic studies.Hemocytes: Any blood or formed element especially in invertebrates.Protein Binding: The process in which substances, either endogenous or exogenous, bind to proteins, peptides, enzymes, protein precursors, or allied compounds. Specific protein-binding measures are often used as assays in diagnostic assessments.DNA, Complementary: Single-stranded complementary DNA synthesized from an RNA template by the action of RNA-dependent DNA polymerase. cDNA (i.e., complementary DNA, not circular DNA, not C-DNA) is used in a variety of molecular cloning experiments as well as serving as a specific hybridization probe.Cartilage Oligomeric Matrix Protein: Major component of chondrocyte EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX of various tissues including bone, tendon, ligament, SYNOVIUM and blood vessels. It binds MATRILIN PROTEINS and is associated with development of cartilage and bone.N-Acetylglucosaminyltransferases: Enzymes that catalyze the transfer of N-acetylglucosamine from a nucleoside diphosphate N-acetylglucosamine to an acceptor molecule which is frequently another carbohydrate. EC 2.4.1.-.Recombinant Proteins: Proteins prepared by recombinant DNA technology.Matrilin Proteins: PROTEOGLYCANS-associated proteins that are major components of EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX of various tissues including CARTILAGE; and INTERVERTEBRAL DISC structures. They bind COLLAGEN fibers and contain protein domains that enable oligomer formation and interaction with other extracellular matrix proteins such as CARTILAGE OLIGOMERIC MATRIX PROTEIN.PolysaccharidesLigands: A molecule that binds to another molecule, used especially to refer to a small molecule that binds specifically to a larger molecule, e.g., an antigen binding to an antibody, a hormone or neurotransmitter binding to a receptor, or a substrate or allosteric effector binding to an enzyme. Ligands are also molecules that donate or accept a pair of electrons to form a coordinate covalent bond with the central metal atom of a coordination complex. (From Dorland, 27th ed)alpha-Fetoproteins: The first alpha-globulins to appear in mammalian sera during FETAL DEVELOPMENT and the dominant serum proteins in early embryonic life.Fibrillar Collagens: A family of structurally related collagens that form the characteristic collagen fibril bundles seen in CONNECTIVE TISSUE.Epiphyses: The head of a long bone that is separated from the shaft by the epiphyseal plate until bone growth stops. At that time, the plate disappears and the head and shaft are united.Glycoproteins: Conjugated protein-carbohydrate compounds including mucins, mucoid, and amyloid glycoproteins.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Sequence Alignment: The arrangement of two or more amino acid or base sequences from an organism or organisms in such a way as to align areas of the sequences sharing common properties. The degree of relatedness or homology between the sequences is predicted computationally or statistically based on weights assigned to the elements aligned between the sequences. This in turn can serve as a potential indicator of the genetic relatedness between the organisms.Cloning, Molecular: The insertion of recombinant DNA molecules from prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic sources into a replicating vehicle, such as a plasmid or virus vector, and the introduction of the resultant hybrid molecules into recipient cells without altering the viability of those cells.Hemagglutination: The aggregation of ERYTHROCYTES by AGGLUTININS, including antibodies, lectins, and viral proteins (HEMAGGLUTINATION, VIRAL).Cell Aggregation: The phenomenon by which dissociated cells intermixed in vitro tend to group themselves with cells of their own type.Caenorhabditis elegans Proteins: Proteins from the nematode species CAENORHABDITIS ELEGANS. The proteins from this species are the subject of scientific interest in the area of multicellular organism MORPHOGENESIS.DNA, Helminth: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of helminths.RNA, Messenger: RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.Chromatography, Affinity: A chromatographic technique that utilizes the ability of biological molecules to bind to certain ligands specifically and reversibly. It is used in protein biochemistry. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Synovitis: Inflammation of a synovial membrane. It is usually painful, particularly on motion, and is characterized by a fluctuating swelling due to effusion within a synovial sac. (Dorland, 27th ed)Protein Structure, Tertiary: The level of protein structure in which combinations of secondary protein structures (alpha helices, beta sheets, loop regions, and motifs) pack together to form folded shapes called domains. Disulfide bridges between cysteines in two different parts of the polypeptide chain along with other interactions between the chains play a role in the formation and stabilization of tertiary structure. Small proteins usually consist of only one domain but larger proteins may contain a number of domains connected by segments of polypeptide chain which lack regular secondary structure.DNA Primers: Short sequences (generally about 10 base pairs) of DNA that are complementary to sequences of messenger RNA and allow reverse transcriptases to start copying the adjacent sequences of mRNA. Primers are used extensively in genetic and molecular biology techniques.Cell Adhesion: Adherence of cells to surfaces or to other cells.Synovial Membrane: The inner membrane of a joint capsule surrounding a freely movable joint. It is loosely attached to the external fibrous capsule and secretes SYNOVIAL FLUID.Blotting, Western: Identification of proteins or peptides that have been electrophoretically separated by blot transferring from the electrophoresis gel to strips of nitrocellulose paper, followed by labeling with antibody probes.Crystallography, X-Ray: The study of crystal structure using X-RAY DIFFRACTION techniques. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Extracellular Matrix Proteins: Macromolecular organic compounds that contain carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, and usually, sulfur. These macromolecules (proteins) form an intricate meshwork in which cells are embedded to construct tissues. Variations in the relative types of macromolecules and their organization determine the type of extracellular matrix, each adapted to the functional requirements of the tissue. The two main classes of macromolecules that form the extracellular matrix are: glycosaminoglycans, usually linked to proteins (proteoglycans), and fibrous proteins (e.g., COLLAGEN; ELASTIN; FIBRONECTINS; and LAMININ).Synovial Fluid: The clear, viscous fluid secreted by the SYNOVIAL MEMBRANE. It contains mucin, albumin, fat, and mineral salts and serves to lubricate joints.Binding Sites: The parts of a macromolecule that directly participate in its specific combination with another molecule.Galectin 3: A multifunctional galactin initially discovered as a macrophage antigen that binds to IMMUNOGLOBULIN E, and as 29-35-kDa lectin that binds LAMININ. It is involved in a variety of biological events including interactions with galactose-containing glycoconjugates, cell proliferation, CELL DIFFERENTIATION, and APOPTOSIS.Acylation: The addition of an organic acid radical into a molecule.Evolution, Molecular: The process of cumulative change at the level of DNA; RNA; and PROTEINS, over successive generations.Immunohistochemistry: Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.Carrier Proteins: Transport proteins that carry specific substances in the blood or across cell membranes.Gene Expression: The phenotypic manifestation of a gene or genes by the processes of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION and GENETIC TRANSLATION.Protein Structure, Quaternary: The characteristic 3-dimensional shape and arrangement of multimeric proteins (aggregates of more than one polypeptide chain).Mammals: Warm-blooded vertebrate animals belonging to the class Mammalia, including all that possess hair and suckle their young.Osteoarthritis: A progressive, degenerative joint disease, the most common form of arthritis, especially in older persons. The disease is thought to result not from the aging process but from biochemical changes and biomechanical stresses affecting articular cartilage. In the foreign literature it is often called osteoarthrosis deformans.Embryo Implantation: Endometrial implantation of EMBRYO, MAMMALIAN at the BLASTOCYST stage.Cytoplasm: The part of a cell that contains the CYTOSOL and small structures excluding the CELL NUCLEUS; MITOCHONDRIA; and large VACUOLES. (Glick, Glossary of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 1990)
  • article{66997671-59e6-464f-9184-d56f66d8ae3f, abstract = {Sera from 25 metastatic breast cancer patients and 25 healthy controls were subjected to affinity chromatography using immobilized galectin-1. (lu.se)
  • Galectin-1 induces the differentiation of Dendritic cells towards a phenotype which dampens T helper 1 cells and T helper 17 cells and dampens inflammation via interleukin-10 and interleukin-27. (wikipedia.org)
  • Galectin-1 deactivates classically activated microglia and protects from inflammation-induced neurodegeneration. (nih.gov)
  • The focus is to understand how galectin expression within the vasculature is regulated during inflammation and how this altered expression regulates leukocyte trafficking in the microcirculation. (qmul.ac.uk)
  • To date my research has identified an inhibitory role for Galectin-1 in neutrophil and lymphocyte recruitment during acute inflammation. (qmul.ac.uk)
  • This research is now being expanded to include more complex models of inflammation in order to understand the function of galectins in pathologies such as rheumatoid arthritis. (qmul.ac.uk)
  • Role of Galectin-3 in leukocyte trafficking This project forms the basis of a British Heart Foundation funded PhD studentship and aims to address the role of Gal-3 in the trafficking of different leukocyte subsets during acute inflammation. (qmul.ac.uk)
  • Iqbal AJ, Sampaio AL, Maione F, Greco KV, Niki T, Hirashima M, Perretti M, Cooper D . Endogenous galectin-1 and acute inflammation: emerging notion of a galectin-9 pro-resolving effect. (qmul.ac.uk)
  • Galectin-3 has an important role in the regulation of various inflammatory conditions including endotoxemia, and airway inflammation. (bioscirep.org)
  • Simvastatin attenuates LPS-induced oxidative acute lung inflammation, oxidative stress, and suppresses LPS-induced Galectin-3 expression in the lung tissue. (bioscirep.org)
  • Galectin-3 is constitutively expressed in epithelial and myeloid cells, and regulated by processes that include cell proliferation, inflammation, and tumor initiation and progression[cite]. (functionalglycomics.org)
  • Background - Galectin-3 is a biomarker associated with inflammation and fibrosis that predicts adverse outcome and relates to biomarkers of extracellular matrix turnover in patients with heart failure, particularly when left ventricular (LV) systolic function is preserved. (gla.ac.uk)
  • Galectin-3 (Gal3) contributes to insulin resistance, inflammation, and obesity, the three risk factors for mild cognitive impairment (MCI) in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients. (meta.org)
  • My laboratory works to understand how autophagy, a fundamental process for cellular waste management, regulates inflammation and pathogenesis caused by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1). (unm.edu)
  • Metabolic inflammation, "metaflammation," is a chronic, low-grade adipose tissue inflammation triggered by various metabolic "danger" signals during obesity that precedes the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes ( 1 ). (diabetesjournals.org)
  • Adipose tissue-associated regulatory T cells (Tregs), type 2 T helper cells, and alternatively activated M2 macrophages protect from the instigation of nutrient excess-induced inflammation ( 2 ), whereas the recruitment of type 1 T helper lymphocytes and M1 macrophages and decreased Tregs in adipose tissue precede metabolic disorders ( 3 , 4 ). (diabetesjournals.org)
  • Proinflammatory interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-α impair insulin sensitivity, but molecular pathways that associate inflammation, diet, and type 2 diabetes are not fully understood ( 5 ). (diabetesjournals.org)
  • Critical role for galectin-3 in airway inflammation and bronchial hyperresponsiveness in a murine model of asthma. (functionalglycomics.org)
  • Gene therapy with galectin-3 inhibits bronchial obstruction and inflammation in antigen challenged rats through interleukin-5 gene downregulation. (functionalglycomics.org)
  • Together, our data implicate gal-1 in PSC activation and suggest further studies to analyse the role of endogenous lectins in the development of pancreatic fibrosis in vivo. (nih.gov)
  • Iqbal A*, Cooper D *, Vugler A, Moore A, Perretti M. Endogenous galectin-1 exerts tonic inhibition on experimental arthritis. (qmul.ac.uk)
  • 2 1] State Key Laboratory of Emerging Infectious Diseases Department of Microbiology Research Centre of Infection and Immunology. (cdc.gov)
  • Transfer of the chemokine receptor CCR5 between cells by membrane-derived microparticles: A mechanism for cellular human immunodeficiency virus 1 infection. (ac.ir)
  • HIV-1 infection leads to immunodeficiency by massively killing a key immune cell type known as CD4 + T cells. (unm.edu)
  • To address this question, we have established an ex vivo primary cell organoid HIV-1 infection model in which we can modulate autophagy through genetic or pharmacological means. (unm.edu)
  • 10: Uluca Ü, en V, Ece A , Tan , Karabel D, Aktar F, Karabel M, Bal k H, Güne A. Serum galectin-3 levels in children with chronic hepatitis B infection andinactive hepatitis B carriers. (100yilhastanesi.com.tr)
  • 14: en V, Uluca Ü, Ece A , Kaplan , Bozkurt F, Aktar F, Ba l S, Tekin R. Serum prolidase activity and oxidant-antioxidant status in children with chronichepatitis B virus infection. (100yilhastanesi.com.tr)
  • 1X10^6 HeLa cells were stained with 0.2ug Vimentin antibody (10366-1-AP, red) and control antibody (blue). (ptgcn.com)
  • Simple Western lane view shows detection of Goat Anti-Human/Mouse/Rat TC-PTP Polyclonal Antibody (Catalog #AF1930) using a 1:50 dilution of HRP-conjugated Anti-Goat IgG Secondary Antibody (Catalog # HAF109). (novusbio.com)
  • Western blot shows detection of Goat Anti-Human/Mouse/Rat GRP75/HSPA9BPolyclonal Antibody (Catalog # AF3584)using a 1:1000 dilution of HRP-conjugated Anti-Goat IgG Secondary Antibody(Catalog # HAF109). (novusbio.com)
  • Interestingly, we found that FTY720 significantly attenuates infarct volumes and reduces neuronal apoptosis on days 1 and 3 post stroke, accompanied by amelioration of functional deficits. (paperity.org)
  • 80% of Pancreatic Cancer Cells: In this new lab study, an extract of pumpkin known as cucurmosin inhibited the growth of human pancreatic cancer cells CFPAC-1 by over 80% after 72 hours of treatment, and killed 55% of them outright (by inducing cell cycle arrest in the G0/G1 phase and inducing apoptosis). (thefreeenergyparty.com)
  • doi: 10.1007/s00394-017-1601-1. (btk.fi)
  • Galectins are a family of animal lectins defined by shared characteristic amino-acid sequences and affinity for β-galactose-containing oligosac-charides (PMID: 8063692). (ptglab.com)
  • Dalli J, Norling LV, Renshaw D, Cooper D , Leung KY, Perretti M. Annexin 1 mediates the rapid anti-inflammatory effects of neutrophil-derived microparticles. (qmul.ac.uk)
  • TLR4 mediates the host response to LPS by promoting the activation of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and IL-6 genes in inflammatory cells. (bioscirep.org)
  • Hypoxia inducible factor-1 mediates expression of galectin-1: the potential role in migration/invasion of colorectal cancer cells. (ptgcn.com)
  • By using immuno-electron microscopy analysis we identified galectin-3 in membranes localized in the phagosome and in tubules and vesicles that derive from the endocytic pathway. (pasteur.fr)
  • November Fingolimod suppresses neuronal autophagy through the mTOR/p70S6K pathway and alleviates ischemic brain damage in mice Xiao Li 1 2 Ming-Huan Wang 1 2 Chuan Qin 1 2 Wen-Hui Fan 1 2 Dai-Shi Tian 1 2 Jun-Li Liu 0 2 ☯ These authors contributed equally to this work. (paperity.org)
  • Serum from the healthy subjects contained on average 1.2 mg per ml (range 0.7-2.2) galectin-1 binding glycoproteins, whereas serum from the breast cancer patients contained on average 2.2 mg/ml (range 0.8-3.9), with a higher average for large primary tumours. (lu.se)
  • In conclusion, galectin-1 detects a new type of functional biomarker for cancer: a specific type of glycoform of haptoglobin, and possibly other serum glycoproteins, with a different function after uptake into tissue cells. (lu.se)
  • Stimulation of TNFRSF25 in humans may lead to similar, but more controllable, effects as costimulatory blockade targeting molecules such as CTLA-4 and PD-1 . (wikidoc.org)
  • CONCLUSION: These findings intimate that galectin-3 may represent a new tool for monitoring the degree of cell differentiation in carcinomas originating from the transformation of squamous cell epithelia. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Relationships among galectin-3, biomarkers, and LV remodeling were analyzed across the entire cohort, then according to median baseline LV ejection fraction. (gla.ac.uk)
  • Conclusions - Galectin-3 correlated significantly with certain biomarkers involved in extracellular matrix turnover, although no definite relationship was identified with LV remodeling. (gla.ac.uk)
  • This study demonstrates the potential of plasma proteomics as a liquid biopsy method and in discovery of putative predictive biomarkers for anti-PD-1 treatment in metastatic CM. (bmj.com)
  • Furthermore, galectin-3 silencing inhibited the interaction between glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3beta, beta-catenin, and T-cell factor (TCF) 4, and the binding of beta-catenin/TCF-4 to the fascin-1 promoter. (nih.gov)
  • Wu KL, Huang EY, Yeh WL, Hsiao CC, Kuo CM. Synergistic interaction between galectin-3 and carcinoembryonic antigen promotes colorectal cancer metastasis. (uthsc.edu)
  • Gal-1-dependent collagen synthesis was blocked by lactose but not by cellobiose, suggesting that gal-1 acts on PSCs through targeting beta-galactoside-containing glycoconjugates. (nih.gov)
  • Using cDNA microchip, we recently identified the thrombin receptor PAR-1 to be a target for regulation by AP-2. (mdanderson.org)
  • In the early 1900s, Paul Ehrlich was perhaps the first to reason that cancer would be quite common in long-lived organisms if not for the protective effects of immunity ( 1 ). (sciencemag.org)
  • Galectin-3 overexpression reversed these effects. (nih.gov)
  • Overexpression of mutated galectin-3 (with mutations in the GSK-3beta binding and phosphorylation motifs) did not increase fascin-1 levels, in contrast to overexpression of wild-type galectin-3. (nih.gov)
  • 1 Overexpression of α Klotho reverses defects resulting from α Klotho deficiency and extends lifespan in mice. (asnjournals.org)
  • Our results show that GDM is associated with a failure to increase circulating gal-1 levels during the second and third trimester, as well as overexpression of gal-1 in placental tissue. (cdc.gov)
  • We found that loss of AP-2 resulted in overexpression of PAR-1 in metastatic melanoma cells, which in turn contributes, to invasion and metastasis. (mdanderson.org)
  • Overexpression of PAR-1 contributes to the metastatic phenotype by regulating connexin-43, Maspin, and MCAM/MUC18. (mdanderson.org)