The number of PLATELETS per unit volume in a sample of venous BLOOD.
Non-nucleated disk-shaped cells formed in the megakaryocyte and found in the blood of all mammals. They are mainly involved in blood coagulation.
The attachment of PLATELETS to one another. This clumping together can be induced by a number of agents (e.g., THROMBIN; COLLAGEN) and is part of the mechanism leading to the formation of a THROMBUS.
A subnormal level of BLOOD PLATELETS.
The process whereby PLATELETS adhere to something other than platelets, e.g., COLLAGEN; BASEMENT MEMBRANE; MICROFIBRILS; or other "foreign" surfaces.
The transfer of blood platelets from a donor to a recipient or reinfusion to the donor.
Surface glycoproteins on platelets which have a key role in hemostasis and thrombosis such as platelet adhesion and aggregation. Many of these are receptors.
Increased numbers of platelets in the peripheral blood. (Dorland, 27th ed)
The number of LEUKOCYTES and ERYTHROCYTES per unit volume in a sample of venous BLOOD. A complete blood count (CBC) also includes measurement of the HEMOGLOBIN; HEMATOCRIT; and ERYTHROCYTE INDICES.
A CXC chemokine that is found in the alpha granules of PLATELETS. The protein has a molecular size of 7800 kDa and can occur as a monomer, a dimer or a tetramer depending upon its concentration in solution. Platelet factor 4 has a high affinity for HEPARIN and is often found complexed with GLYCOPROTEINS such as PROTEIN C.
Thrombocytopenia occurring in the absence of toxic exposure or a disease associated with decreased platelets. It is mediated by immune mechanisms, in most cases IMMUNOGLOBULIN G autoantibodies which attach to platelets and subsequently undergo destruction by macrophages. The disease is seen in acute (affecting children) and chronic (adult) forms.
The number of WHITE BLOOD CELLS per unit volume in venous BLOOD. A differential leukocyte count measures the relative numbers of the different types of white cells.
Laboratory examination used to monitor and evaluate platelet function in a patient's blood.
Very large BONE MARROW CELLS which release mature BLOOD PLATELETS.
Platelet membrane glycoprotein complex important for platelet adhesion and aggregation. It is an integrin complex containing INTEGRIN ALPHAIIB and INTEGRIN BETA3 which recognizes the arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) sequence present on several adhesive proteins. As such, it is a receptor for FIBRINOGEN; VON WILLEBRAND FACTOR; FIBRONECTIN; VITRONECTIN; and THROMBOSPONDINS. A deficiency of GPIIb-IIIa results in GLANZMANN THROMBASTHENIA.
Platelet membrane glycoprotein complex essential for normal platelet adhesion and clot formation at sites of vascular injury. It is composed of three polypeptides, GPIb alpha, GPIb beta, and GPIX. Glycoprotein Ib functions as a receptor for von Willebrand factor and for thrombin. Congenital deficiency of the GPIb-IX complex results in Bernard-Soulier syndrome. The platelet glycoprotein GPV associates with GPIb-IX and is also absent in Bernard-Soulier syndrome.
Duration of blood flow after skin puncture. This test is used as a measure of capillary and platelet function.
A phospholipid derivative formed by PLATELETS; BASOPHILS; NEUTROPHILS; MONOCYTES; and MACROPHAGES. It is a potent platelet aggregating agent and inducer of systemic anaphylactic symptoms, including HYPOTENSION; THROMBOCYTOPENIA; NEUTROPENIA; and BRONCHOCONSTRICTION.
A humoral factor that stimulates the production of thrombocytes (BLOOD PLATELETS). Thrombopoietin stimulates the proliferation of bone marrow MEGAKARYOCYTES and their release of blood platelets. The process is called THROMBOPOIESIS.
Any form of purpura in which the PLATELET COUNT is decreased. Many forms are thought to be caused by immunological mechanisms.
An enzyme formed from PROTHROMBIN that converts FIBRINOGEN to FIBRIN.
Human alloantigens expressed only on platelets, specifically on platelet membrane glycoproteins. These platelet-specific antigens are immunogenic and can result in pathological reactions to transfusion therapy.
Plasma glycoprotein clotted by thrombin, composed of a dimer of three non-identical pairs of polypeptide chains (alpha, beta, gamma) held together by disulfide bonds. Fibrinogen clotting is a sol-gel change involving complex molecular arrangements: whereas fibrinogen is cleaved by thrombin to form polypeptides A and B, the proteolytic action of other enzymes yields different fibrinogen degradation products.
The process of generating thrombocytes (BLOOD PLATELETS) from the pluripotent HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELLS in the BONE MARROW via the MEGAKARYOCYTES. The humoral factor with thrombopoiesis-stimulating activity is designated THROMBOPOIETIN.
Surgical procedure involving either partial or entire removal of the spleen.
Adenosine 5'-(trihydrogen diphosphate). An adenine nucleotide containing two phosphate groups esterified to the sugar moiety at the 5'-position.
Formation and development of a thrombus or blood clot in the blood vessel.
Cell adhesion molecule and CD antigen that mediates the adhesion of neutrophils and monocytes to activated platelets and endothelial cells.
The process which spontaneously arrests the flow of BLOOD from vessels carrying blood under pressure. It is accomplished by contraction of the vessels, adhesion and aggregation of formed blood elements (eg. ERYTHROCYTE AGGREGATION), and the process of BLOOD COAGULATION.
The number of CD4-POSITIVE T-LYMPHOCYTES per unit volume of BLOOD. Determination requires the use of a fluorescence-activated flow cytometer.
The process of the interaction of BLOOD COAGULATION FACTORS that results in an insoluble FIBRIN clot.
The number of RED BLOOD CELLS per unit volume in a sample of venous BLOOD.
A disorder characterized by procoagulant substances entering the general circulation causing a systemic thrombotic process. The activation of the clotting mechanism may arise from any of a number of disorders. A majority of the patients manifest skin lesions, sometimes leading to PURPURA FULMINANS.
A high-molecular-weight plasma protein, produced by endothelial cells and megakaryocytes, that is part of the factor VIII/von Willebrand factor complex. The von Willebrand factor has receptors for collagen, platelets, and ristocetin activity as well as the immunologically distinct antigenic determinants. It functions in adhesion of platelets to collagen and hemostatic plug formation. The prolonged bleeding time in VON WILLEBRAND DISEASES is due to the deficiency of this factor.
A clinical syndrome characterized by repeated spontaneous hemorrhages and a remarkable increase in the number of circulating platelets.
Bleeding or escape of blood from a vessel.
A syndrome of HEMOLYSIS, elevated liver ENZYMES, and low blood platelets count (THROMBOCYTOPENIA). HELLP syndrome is observed in pregnant women with PRE-ECLAMPSIA or ECLAMPSIA who also exhibit LIVER damage and abnormalities in BLOOD COAGULATION.
Hemorrhagic and thrombotic disorders that occur as a consequence of abnormalities in blood coagulation due to a variety of factors such as COAGULATION PROTEIN DISORDERS; BLOOD PLATELET DISORDERS; BLOOD PROTEIN DISORDERS or nutritional conditions.
Clotting time of PLASMA recalcified in the presence of excess TISSUE THROMBOPLASTIN. Factors measured are FIBRINOGEN; PROTHROMBIN; FACTOR V; FACTOR VII; and FACTOR X. It is used for monitoring anticoagulant therapy with COUMARINS.
Cell surface receptors that are specific for THROMBOPOIETIN. They signal through interaction with JANUS KINASES such as JANUS KINASE 2.
Platelet membrane glycoprotein IIb is an integrin alpha subunit that heterodimerizes with INTEGRIN BETA3 to form PLATELET GLYCOPROTEIN GPIIB-IIIA COMPLEX. It is synthesized as a single polypeptide chain which is then postranslationally cleaved and processed into two disulfide-linked subunits of approximately 18 and 110 kDa in size.
Condition characterized by splenomegaly, some reduction in the number of circulating blood cells in the presence of a normal or hyperactive bone marrow, and the potential for reversal by splenectomy.
Tests used in the analysis of the hemic system.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
Laboratory tests for evaluating the individual's clotting mechanism.
The prototypical analgesic used in the treatment of mild to moderate pain. It has anti-inflammatory and antipyretic properties and acts as an inhibitor of cyclooxygenase which results in the inhibition of the biosynthesis of prostaglandins. Aspirin also inhibits platelet aggregation and is used in the prevention of arterial and venous thrombosis. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p5)
The volume of packed RED BLOOD CELLS in a blood specimen. The volume is measured by centrifugation in a tube with graduated markings, or with automated blood cell counters. It is an indicator of erythrocyte status in disease. For example, ANEMIA shows a low value; POLYCYTHEMIA, a high value.
The number of CELLS of a specific kind, usually measured per unit volume or area of sample.
An unstable intermediate between the prostaglandin endoperoxides and thromboxane B2. The compound has a bicyclic oxaneoxetane structure. It is a potent inducer of platelet aggregation and causes vasoconstriction. It is the principal component of rabbit aorta contracting substance (RCS).
The preparation of platelet concentrates with the return of red cells and platelet-poor plasma to the donor.
The time required for the appearance of FIBRIN strands following the mixing of PLASMA with phospholipid platelet substitute (e.g., crude cephalins, soybean phosphatides). It is a test of the intrinsic pathway (factors VIII, IX, XI, and XII) and the common pathway (fibrinogen, prothrombin, factors V and X) of BLOOD COAGULATION. It is used as a screening test and to monitor HEPARIN therapy.
A phospholipid from the platelet membrane that contributes to the blood clotting cascade by forming a phospholipid-protein complex (THROMBOPLASTIN) which serves as a cofactor with FACTOR VIIA to activate FACTOR X in the extrinsic pathway of BLOOD COAGULATION.
A polypeptide substance comprising about one third of the total protein in mammalian organisms. It is the main constituent of SKIN; CONNECTIVE TISSUE; and the organic substance of bones (BONE AND BONES) and teeth (TOOTH).
A highly acidic mucopolysaccharide formed of equal parts of sulfated D-glucosamine and D-glucuronic acid with sulfaminic bridges. The molecular weight ranges from six to twenty thousand. Heparin occurs in and is obtained from liver, lung, mast cells, etc., of vertebrates. Its function is unknown, but it is used to prevent blood clotting in vivo and vitro, in the form of many different salts.
A subspecialty of internal medicine concerned with morphology, physiology, and pathology of the blood and blood-forming tissues.
Endogenous substances, usually proteins, that are involved in the blood coagulation process.
The co-occurrence of pregnancy and a blood disease (HEMATOLOGIC DISEASES) which involves BLOOD CELLS or COAGULATION FACTORS. The hematologic disease may precede or follow FERTILIZATION and it may or may not have a deleterious effect on the pregnant woman or FETUS.
Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.
Disorder characterized by a decrease or lack of platelet dense bodies in which the releasable pool of adenine nucleotides and 5HT are normally stored.
A preparation consisting of PLATELETS concentrated in a limited volume of PLASMA. This is used in various surgical tissue regeneration procedures where the GROWTH FACTORS in the platelets enhance wound healing and regeneration.
A biochemical messenger and regulator, synthesized from the essential amino acid L-TRYPTOPHAN. In humans it is found primarily in the central nervous system, gastrointestinal tract, and blood platelets. Serotonin mediates several important physiological functions including neurotransmission, gastrointestinal motility, hemostasis, and cardiovascular integrity. Multiple receptor families (RECEPTORS, SEROTONIN) explain the broad physiological actions and distribution of this biochemical mediator.
Use of a thrombelastograph, which provides a continuous graphic record of the physical shape of a clot during fibrin formation and subsequent lysis.
Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.
A condition in newborns caused by immunity of the mother to PLATELET ALLOANTIGENS on the fetal platelets. The PLATELETS, coated with maternal ANTIBODIES, are destroyed and removed by the fetal MONONUCLEAR PHAGOCYTE SYSTEM. Affected infants may have INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES.
An antibiotic mixture of two components, A and B, obtained from Nocardia lurida (or the same substance produced by any other means). It is no longer used clinically because of its toxicity. It causes platelet agglutination and blood coagulation and is used to assay those functions in vitro.
The number of RETICULOCYTES per unit volume of BLOOD. The values are expressed as a percentage of the ERYTHROCYTE COUNT or in the form of an index ("corrected reticulocyte index"), which attempts to account for the number of circulating erythrocytes.
The soft tissue filling the cavities of bones. Bone marrow exists in two types, yellow and red. Yellow marrow is found in the large cavities of large bones and consists mostly of fat cells and a few primitive blood cells. Red marrow is a hematopoietic tissue and is the site of production of erythrocytes and granular leukocytes. Bone marrow is made up of a framework of connective tissue containing branching fibers with the frame being filled with marrow cells.
The process by which blood or its components are kept viable outside of the organism from which they are derived (i.e., kept from decay by means of a chemical agent, cooling, or a fluid substitute that mimics the natural state within the organism).
The development and formation of various types of BLOOD CELLS. Hematopoiesis can take place in the BONE MARROW (medullary) or outside the bone marrow (HEMATOPOIESIS, EXTRAMEDULLARY).
Spontaneous or near spontaneous bleeding caused by a defect in clotting mechanisms (BLOOD COAGULATION DISORDERS) or another abnormality causing a structural flaw in the blood vessels (HEMOSTATIC DISORDERS).
Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.
Proteins prepared by recombinant DNA technology.
A subclass of purinergic P2Y receptors that have a preference for ADP binding and are coupled to GTP-BINDING PROTEIN ALPHA SUBUNIT, GI. The P2Y12 purinergic receptors are found in PLATELETS where they play an important role regulating PLATELET ACTIVATION.
Immunoglobulin preparations used in intravenous infusion, containing primarily IMMUNOGLOBULIN G. They are used to treat a variety of diseases associated with decreased or abnormal immunoglobulin levels including pediatric AIDS; primary HYPERGAMMAGLOBULINEMIA; SCID; CYTOMEGALOVIRUS infections in transplant recipients, LYMPHOCYTIC LEUKEMIA, CHRONIC; Kawasaki syndrome, infection in neonates, and IDIOPATHIC THROMBOCYTOPENIC PURPURA.
The introduction of whole blood or blood component directly into the blood stream. (Dorland, 27th ed)
Antibodies produced by a single clone of cells.
The oxygen-carrying proteins of ERYTHROCYTES. They are found in all vertebrates and some invertebrates. The number of globin subunits in the hemoglobin quaternary structure differs between species. Structures range from monomeric to a variety of multimeric arrangements.
Agents that prevent clotting.
The number of LYMPHOCYTES per unit volume of BLOOD.
Technique using an instrument system for making, processing, and displaying one or more measurements on individual cells obtained from a cell suspension. Cells are usually stained with one or more fluorescent dyes specific to cell components of interest, e.g., DNA, and fluorescence of each cell is measured as it rapidly transverses the excitation beam (laser or mercury arc lamp). Fluorescence provides a quantitative measure of various biochemical and biophysical properties of the cell, as well as a basis for cell sorting. Other measurable optical parameters include light absorption and light scattering, the latter being applicable to the measurement of cell size, shape, density, granularity, and stain uptake.
Pipecolic acids are cyclic amino acids, specifically a derivative of L-lysine, that can function as an indicator of certain metabolic disorders such as lysinuric protein intolerance and maple syrup urine disease.
The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.
Liver disease in which the normal microcirculation, the gross vascular anatomy, and the hepatic architecture have been variably destroyed and altered with fibrous septa surrounding regenerated or regenerating parenchymal nodules.
A congenital bleeding disorder with prolonged bleeding time, absence of aggregation of platelets in response to most agents, especially ADP, and impaired or absent clot retraction. Platelet membranes are deficient in or have a defect in the glycoprotein IIb-IIIa complex (PLATELET GLYCOPROTEIN GPIIB-IIIA COMPLEX).
A de novo myeloproliferation arising from an abnormal stem cell. It is characterized by the replacement of bone marrow by fibrous tissue, a process that is mediated by CYTOKINES arising from the abnormal clone.
A familial coagulation disorder characterized by a prolonged bleeding time, unusually large platelets, and impaired prothrombin consumption.
A series of progressive, overlapping events, triggered by exposure of the PLATELETS to subendothelial tissue. These events include shape change, adhesiveness, aggregation, and release reactions. When carried through to completion, these events lead to the formation of a stable hemostatic plug.
A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.
White blood cells. These include granular leukocytes (BASOPHILS; EOSINOPHILS; and NEUTROPHILS) as well as non-granular leukocytes (LYMPHOCYTES and MONOCYTES).
Proteins that are present in blood serum, including SERUM ALBUMIN; BLOOD COAGULATION FACTORS; and many other types of proteins.
A transient increase in the number of leukocytes in a body fluid.
A measure of the size of PLATELETS.
Condensed areas of cellular material that may be bounded by a membrane.
The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.
The natural enzymatic dissolution of FIBRIN.
Enumeration by direct count of viable, isolated bacterial, archaeal, or fungal CELLS or SPORES capable of growth on solid CULTURE MEDIA. The method is used routinely by environmental microbiologists for quantifying organisms in AIR; FOOD; and WATER; by clinicians for measuring patients' microbial load; and in antimicrobial drug testing.
Measurable and quantifiable biological parameters (e.g., specific enzyme concentration, specific hormone concentration, specific gene phenotype distribution in a population, presence of biological substances) which serve as indices for health- and physiology-related assessments, such as disease risk, psychiatric disorders, environmental exposure and its effects, disease diagnosis, metabolic processes, substance abuse, pregnancy, cell line development, epidemiologic studies, etc.
Venoms from snakes of the subfamily Crotalinae or pit vipers, found mostly in the Americas. They include the rattlesnake, cottonmouth, fer-de-lance, bushmaster, and American copperhead. Their venoms contain nontoxic proteins, cardio-, hemo-, cyto-, and neurotoxins, and many enzymes, especially phospholipases A. Many of the toxins have been characterized.
An antiseptic with mild fungistatic, bacteriostatic, anthelmintic, and amebicidal action. It is also used as a reagent and metal chelator, as a carrier for radio-indium for diagnostic purposes, and its halogenated derivatives are used in addition as topical anti-infective agents and oral antiamebics.
A glycoprotein of MW 25 kDa containing internal disulfide bonds. It induces the survival, proliferation, and differentiation of neutrophilic granulocyte precursor cells and functionally activates mature blood neutrophils. Among the family of colony-stimulating factors, G-CSF is the most potent inducer of terminal differentiation to granulocytes and macrophages of leukemic myeloid cell lines.
A myeloproliferative disorder of unknown etiology, characterized by abnormal proliferation of all hematopoietic bone marrow elements and an absolute increase in red cell mass and total blood volume, associated frequently with splenomegaly, leukocytosis, and thrombocythemia. Hematopoiesis is also reactive in extramedullary sites (liver and spleen). In time myelofibrosis occurs.
A form of anemia in which the bone marrow fails to produce adequate numbers of peripheral blood elements.
Disorders caused by abnormalities in platelet count or function.
Hydrazines are organic compounds containing the functional group R-NH-NH2, where R represents an organic group, and are used in pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, and rocket fuels, but can be highly toxic and carcinogenic with potential for environmental damage.
Soluble protein fragments formed by the proteolytic action of plasmin on fibrin or fibrinogen. FDP and their complexes profoundly impair the hemostatic process and are a major cause of hemorrhage in intravascular coagulation and fibrinolysis.
A synthetic steroid with antigonadotropic and anti-estrogenic activities that acts as an anterior pituitary suppressant by inhibiting the pituitary output of gonadotropins. It possesses some androgenic properties. Danazol has been used in the treatment of endometriosis and some benign breast disorders.
Disorders of the blood and blood forming tissues.
Granular leukocytes having a nucleus with three to five lobes connected by slender threads of chromatin, and cytoplasm containing fine inconspicuous granules and stainable by neutral dyes.
A protein derived from FIBRINOGEN in the presence of THROMBIN, which forms part of the blood clot.
In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.
Physiologically active compounds found in many organs of the body. They are formed in vivo from the prostaglandin endoperoxides and cause platelet aggregation, contraction of arteries, and other biological effects. Thromboxanes are important mediators of the actions of polyunsaturated fatty acids transformed by cyclooxygenase.
Group of hemorrhagic disorders in which the VON WILLEBRAND FACTOR is either quantitatively or qualitatively abnormal. They are usually inherited as an autosomal dominant trait though rare kindreds are autosomal recessive. Symptoms vary depending on severity and disease type but may include prolonged bleeding time, deficiency of factor VIII, and impaired platelet adhesion.
Enlargement of the spleen.
A uricosuric drug that is used to reduce the serum urate levels in gout therapy. It lacks anti-inflammatory, analgesic, and diuretic properties.
A chelating agent that sequesters a variety of polyvalent cations such as CALCIUM. It is used in pharmaceutical manufacturing and as a food additive.
An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.
Synthetic compounds that are analogs of the naturally occurring prostaglandin endoperoxides and that mimic their pharmacologic and physiologic activities. They are usually more stable than the naturally occurring compounds.
The transfer of blood components such as erythrocytes, leukocytes, platelets, and plasma from a donor to a recipient or back to the donor. This process differs from the procedures undertaken in PLASMAPHERESIS and types of CYTAPHERESIS; (PLATELETPHERESIS and LEUKAPHERESIS) where, following the removal of plasma or the specific cell components, the remainder is transfused back to the donor.
A prostaglandin that is a powerful vasodilator and inhibits platelet aggregation. It is biosynthesized enzymatically from PROSTAGLANDIN ENDOPEROXIDES in human vascular tissue. The sodium salt has been also used to treat primary pulmonary hypertension (HYPERTENSION, PULMONARY).
The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.
Transfer of HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELLS from BONE MARROW or BLOOD between individuals within the same species (TRANSPLANTATION, HOMOLOGOUS) or transfer within the same individual (TRANSPLANTATION, AUTOLOGOUS). Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation has been used as an alternative to BONE MARROW TRANSPLANTATION in the treatment of a variety of neoplasms.
Blood-coagulation factor VIII. Antihemophilic factor that is part of the factor VIII/von Willebrand factor complex. Factor VIII is produced in the liver and acts in the intrinsic pathway of blood coagulation. It serves as a cofactor in factor X activation and this action is markedly enhanced by small amounts of thrombin.
A count of SPERM in the ejaculum, expressed as number per milliliter.
The residual portion of BLOOD that is left after removal of BLOOD CELLS by CENTRIFUGATION without prior BLOOD COAGULATION.
Polymers of ETHYLENE OXIDE and water, and their ethers. They vary in consistency from liquid to solid depending on the molecular weight indicated by a number following the name. They are used as SURFACTANTS, dispersing agents, solvents, ointment and suppository bases, vehicles, and tablet excipients. Some specific groups are NONOXYNOLS, OCTOXYNOLS, and POLOXAMERS.
Clonal hematopoietic stem cell disorders characterized by dysplasia in one or more hematopoietic cell lineages. They predominantly affect patients over 60, are considered preleukemic conditions, and have high probability of transformation into ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIA.
Disease having a short and relatively severe course.
Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.
The preparation of leukocyte concentrates with the return of red cells and leukocyte-poor plasma to the donor.
A genus of the subfamily CERCOPITHECINAE, family CERCOPITHECIDAE, consisting of five named species: PAPIO URSINUS (chacma baboon), PAPIO CYNOCEPHALUS (yellow baboon), PAPIO PAPIO (western baboon), PAPIO ANUBIS (or olive baboon), and PAPIO HAMADRYAS (hamadryas baboon). Members of the Papio genus inhabit open woodland, savannahs, grassland, and rocky hill country. Some authors consider MANDRILLUS a subgenus of Papio.
A basic element found in nearly all organized tissues. It is a member of the alkaline earth family of metals with the atomic symbol Ca, atomic number 20, and atomic weight 40. Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the body and combines with phosphorus to form calcium phosphate in the bones and teeth. It is essential for the normal functioning of nerves and muscles and plays a role in blood coagulation (as factor IV) and in many enzymatic processes.
Single-chain polypeptides of about 65 amino acids (7 kDa) from LEECHES that have a neutral hydrophobic N terminus, an acidic hydrophilic C terminus, and a compact, hydrophobic core region. Recombinant hirudins lack tyr-63 sulfation and are referred to as 'desulfato-hirudins'. They form a stable non-covalent complex with ALPHA-THROMBIN, thereby abolishing its ability to cleave FIBRINOGEN.
Pathological processes involving the integrity of blood circulation. Hemostasis depends on the integrity of BLOOD VESSELS, blood fluidity, and BLOOD COAGULATION. Majority of the hemostatic disorders are caused by disruption of the normal interaction between the VASCULAR ENDOTHELIUM, the plasma proteins (including BLOOD COAGULATION FACTORS), and PLATELETS.
Diversion of blood flow through a circuit located outside the body but continuous with the bodily circulation.
Any process by which toxicity, metabolism, absorption, elimination, preferred route of administration, safe dosage range, etc., for a drug or group of drugs is determined through clinical assessment in humans or veterinary animals.
The major immunoglobulin isotype class in normal human serum. There are several isotype subclasses of IgG, for example, IgG1, IgG2A, and IgG2B.
An acquired, congenital, or familial disorder caused by PLATELET AGGREGATION with THROMBOSIS in terminal arterioles and capillaries. Clinical features include THROMBOCYTOPENIA; HEMOLYTIC ANEMIA; AZOTEMIA; FEVER; and thrombotic microangiopathy. The classical form also includes neurological symptoms and end-organ damage, such as RENAL FAILURE.
Deficiency of all three cell elements of the blood, erythrocytes, leukocytes and platelets.
Transplantation of an individual's own tissue from one site to another site.
Dilated blood vessels in the ESOPHAGUS or GASTRIC FUNDUS that shunt blood from the portal circulation (PORTAL SYSTEM) to the systemic venous circulation. Often they are observed in individuals with portal hypertension (HYPERTENSION, PORTAL).
A family of proteinase-activated receptors that are specific for THROMBIN. They are found primarily on PLATELETS and on ENDOTHELIAL CELLS. Activation of thrombin receptors occurs through the proteolytic action of THROMBIN, which cleaves the N-terminal peptide from the receptor to reveal a new N-terminal peptide that is a cryptic ligand for the receptor. The receptors signal through HETEROTRIMERIC GTP-BINDING PROTEINS. Small synthetic peptides that contain the unmasked N-terminal peptide sequence can also activate the receptor in the absence of proteolytic activity.
An encapsulated lymphatic organ through which venous blood filters.
The active sympathomimetic hormone from the ADRENAL MEDULLA. It stimulates both the alpha- and beta- adrenergic systems, causes systemic VASOCONSTRICTION and gastrointestinal relaxation, stimulates the HEART, and dilates BRONCHI and cerebral vessels. It is used in ASTHMA and CARDIAC FAILURE and to delay absorption of local ANESTHETICS.
Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.
Univalent antigen-binding fragments composed of one entire IMMUNOGLOBULIN LIGHT CHAIN and the amino terminal end of one of the IMMUNOGLOBULIN HEAVY CHAINS from the hinge region, linked to each other by disulfide bonds. Fab contains the IMMUNOGLOBULIN VARIABLE REGIONS, which are part of the antigen-binding site, and the first IMMUNOGLOBULIN CONSTANT REGIONS. This fragment can be obtained by digestion of immunoglobulins with the proteolytic enzyme PAPAIN.
Leukopenia is a condition characterized by an abnormally low white blood cell count (less than 4,000 cells per microliter of blood) in peripheral blood, increasing the risk of infection due to decreased immune defense.
A calcium-activated enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of ATP to yield AMP and orthophosphate. It can also act on ADP and other nucleoside triphosphates and diphosphates. EC 3.6.1.5.
A lymphohematopoietic cytokine that plays a role in regulating the proliferation of ERYTHROID PRECURSOR CELLS. It induces maturation of MEGAKARYOCYTES which results in increased production of BLOOD PLATELETS. Interleukin-11 was also initially described as an inhibitor of ADIPOGENESIS of cultured preadipocytes.
A metallic element, atomic number 49, atomic weight 114.82, symbol In. It is named from its blue line in the spectrum. (From Dorland, 28th ed)
Antibodies from an individual that react with ISOANTIGENS of another individual of the same species.
Bone marrow diseases, also known as hematologic or blood disorders, refer to conditions that affect the production and function of blood cells within the bone marrow, such as leukemia, lymphoma, myeloma, and aplastic anemia, potentially leading to complications like anemia, neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, and increased susceptibility to infections or bleeding.
Therapy with two or more separate preparations given for a combined effect.
A stable prostaglandin endoperoxide analog which serves as a thromboxane mimetic. Its actions include mimicking the hydro-osmotic effect of VASOPRESSIN and activation of TYPE C PHOSPHOLIPASES. (From J Pharmacol Exp Ther 1983;224(1): 108-117; Biochem J 1984;222(1):103-110)
Time schedule for administration of a drug in order to achieve optimum effectiveness and convenience.
Immunoglobulin molecules having a specific amino acid sequence by virtue of which they interact only with the ANTIGEN (or a very similar shape) that induced their synthesis in cells of the lymphoid series (especially PLASMA CELLS).
A decrease in the number of NEUTROPHILS found in the blood.
The transference of BONE MARROW from one human or animal to another for a variety of purposes including HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION or MESENCHYMAL STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION.
The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)
Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.
The taking of a blood sample to determine its character as a whole, to identify levels of its component cells, chemicals, gases, or other constituents, to perform pathological examination, etc.
The cells found in the body fluid circulating throughout the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM.
Onset of HYPERREFLEXIA; SEIZURES; or COMA in a previously diagnosed pre-eclamptic patient (PRE-ECLAMPSIA).
The range or frequency distribution of a measurement in a population (of organisms, organs or things) that has not been selected for the presence of disease or abnormality.
Arachidonic acids are polyunsaturated fatty acids, specifically a type of omega-6 fatty acid, that are essential for human nutrition and play crucial roles in various biological processes, including inflammation, immunity, and cell signaling. They serve as precursors to eicosanoids, which are hormone-like substances that mediate a wide range of physiological responses.
Conditions which cause proliferation of hemopoietically active tissue or of tissue which has embryonic hemopoietic potential. They all involve dysregulation of multipotent MYELOID PROGENITOR CELLS, most often caused by a mutation in the JAK2 PROTEIN TYROSINE KINASE.
Fibrinolysin or agents that convert plasminogen to FIBRINOLYSIN.
Collagen receptors are cell surface receptors that modulate signal transduction between cells and the EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX. They are found in many cell types and are involved in the maintenance and regulation of cell shape and behavior, including PLATELET ACTIVATION and aggregation, through many different signaling pathways and differences in their affinities for collagen isoforms. Collagen receptors include discoidin domain receptors, INTEGRINS, and glycoprotein VI.
Cell surface proteins that bind THROMBOXANES with high affinity and trigger intracellular changes influencing the behavior of cells. Some thromboxane receptors act via the inositol phosphate and diacylglycerol second messenger systems.
The quantity of volume or surface area of CELLS.
The release of stem cells from the bone marrow into the peripheral blood circulation for the purpose of leukapheresis, prior to stem cell transplantation. Hematopoietic growth factors or chemotherapeutic agents often are used to stimulate the mobilization.
Drugs that act on blood and blood-forming organs and those that affect the hemostatic system.
Agents that cause clotting.
The parent cells that give rise to cells in the MEGAKARYOCYTE lineage, and ultimately BLOOD PLATELETS.
The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.
The deformation and flow behavior of BLOOD and its elements i.e., PLASMA; ERYTHROCYTES; WHITE BLOOD CELLS; and BLOOD PLATELETS.
Precursor of an alkylating nitrogen mustard antineoplastic and immunosuppressive agent that must be activated in the LIVER to form the active aldophosphamide. It has been used in the treatment of LYMPHOMA and LEUKEMIA. Its side effect, ALOPECIA, has been used for defleecing sheep. Cyclophosphamide may also cause sterility, birth defects, mutations, and cancer.
Inbred C57BL mice are a strain of laboratory mice that have been produced by many generations of brother-sister matings, resulting in a high degree of genetic uniformity and homozygosity, making them widely used for biomedical research, including studies on genetics, immunology, cancer, and neuroscience.
Includes the spectrum of human immunodeficiency virus infections that range from asymptomatic seropositivity, thru AIDS-related complex (ARC), to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).
ERYTHROCYTE size and HEMOGLOBIN content or concentration, usually derived from ERYTHROCYTE COUNT; BLOOD hemoglobin concentration; and HEMATOCRIT. The indices include the mean corpuscular volume (MCV), the mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH), and the mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC).
The internal resistance of the BLOOD to shear forces. The in vitro measure of whole blood viscosity is of limited clinical utility because it bears little relationship to the actual viscosity within the circulation, but an increase in the viscosity of circulating blood can contribute to morbidity in patients suffering from disorders such as SICKLE CELL ANEMIA and POLYCYTHEMIA.
Progenitor cells from which all blood cells derive.
Red blood cells. Mature erythrocytes are non-nucleated, biconcave disks containing HEMOGLOBIN whose function is to transport OXYGEN.
Any procedure in which blood is withdrawn from a donor, a portion is separated and retained and the remainder is returned to the donor.
A class of statistical procedures for estimating the survival function (function of time, starting with a population 100% well at a given time and providing the percentage of the population still well at later times). The survival analysis is then used for making inferences about the effects of treatments, prognostic factors, exposures, and other covariates on the function.
An autosomal recessive disorder caused by a deficiency of acid beta-glucosidase (GLUCOSYLCERAMIDASE) leading to intralysosomal accumulation of glycosylceramide mainly in cells of the MONONUCLEAR PHAGOCYTE SYSTEM. The characteristic Gaucher cells, glycosphingolipid-filled HISTIOCYTES, displace normal cells in BONE MARROW and visceral organs causing skeletal deterioration, hepatosplenomegaly, and organ dysfunction. There are several subtypes based on the presence and severity of neurological involvement.
An infant during the first month after birth.
Cells contained in the bone marrow including fat cells (see ADIPOCYTES); STROMAL CELLS; MEGAKARYOCYTES; and the immediate precursors of most blood cells.
Glycoproteins found on immature hematopoietic cells and endothelial cells. They are the only molecules to date whose expression within the blood system is restricted to a small number of progenitor cells in the bone marrow.
The degree of replication of the chromosome set in the karyotype.
Isotopes that exhibit radioactivity and undergo radioactive decay. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed & McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.
A progressive, malignant disease of the blood-forming organs, characterized by distorted proliferation and development of leukocytes and their precursors in the blood and bone marrow. Leukemias were originally termed acute or chronic based on life expectancy but now are classified according to cellular maturity. Acute leukemias consist of predominately immature cells; chronic leukemias are composed of more mature cells. (From The Merck Manual, 2006)
Single pavement layer of cells which line the luminal surface of the entire vascular system and regulate the transport of macromolecules and blood components.
An unsaturated, essential fatty acid. It is found in animal and human fat as well as in the liver, brain, and glandular organs, and is a constituent of animal phosphatides. It is formed by the synthesis from dietary linoleic acid and is a precursor in the biosynthesis of prostaglandins, thromboxanes, and leukotrienes.
A major protein in the BLOOD. It is important in maintaining the colloidal osmotic pressure and transporting large organic molecules.
The lipid- and protein-containing, selectively permeable membrane that surrounds the cytoplasm in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.
Glycoprotein hormone, secreted chiefly by the KIDNEY in the adult and the LIVER in the FETUS, that acts on erythroid stem cells of the BONE MARROW to stimulate proliferation and differentiation.
Enzymes of the transferase class that catalyze the conversion of L-aspartate and 2-ketoglutarate to oxaloacetate and L-glutamate. EC 2.6.1.1.
Diseases that result in THROMBOSIS in MICROVASCULATURE. The two most prominent diseases are PURPURA, THROMBOTIC THROMBOCYTOPENIC; and HEMOLYTIC-UREMIC SYNDROME. Multiple etiological factors include VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL CELL damage due to SHIGA TOXIN; FACTOR H deficiency; and aberrant VON WILLEBRAND FACTOR formation.
A family of related, adhesive glycoproteins which are synthesized, secreted, and incorporated into the extracellular matrix of a variety of cells, including alpha granules of platelets following thrombin activation and endothelial cells. They interact with a number of BLOOD COAGULATION FACTORS and anticoagulant factors. Five distinct forms have been identified, thrombospondin 1, -2, -3, -4, and cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP). They are involved in cell adhesion, platelet aggregation, cell proliferation, angiogenesis, tumor metastasis, VASCULAR SMOOTH MUSCLE growth, and tissue repair.
A rare, inherited platelet disorder characterized by a selective deficiency in the number and contents of platelet alpha-granules. It is associated with THROMBOCYTOPENIA, enlarged platelets, and prolonged bleeding time.
A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.

Fractionated administration of irinotecan and cisplatin for treatment of lung cancer: a phase I study. (1/2217)

A combination chemotherapy of irinotecan (CPT-11) and cisplatin (CDDP) has been reported to be active for lung cancer. In the previous trial, however, diarrhoea and leucopenia became the major obstacle for sufficient dose escalation of CPT-11 to improve the treatment outcome. We conducted a phase I study to investigate whether the fractionated administration of CDDP and CPT-11 at escalated dose was feasible and could improve the treatment outcome. Twenty-four previously untreated patients with unresectable non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) or extensive disease of small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) were eligible. Both CDDP and CPT-11 were given on days 1 and 8, and repeated every 4 weeks. The dose of CDDP was fixed at 60 mg m(-2) and given by 1-h infusion before CPT-11 administration. The starting dose of CPT-11 was 40 mg m(-2), and the dose was escalated by an increase of 10 mg m(-2). The maximally tolerated dose of CPT-11 was determined as 60 mg m(-2) because grade 4 haematological or grade 3 or 4 non-haematological toxicities developed in six patients out of 11 patients evaluated. Diarrhoea became a dose-limiting toxicity. The objective response rates were 76% for NSCLC and 100% for SCLC. The recommended dose of CPT-11 and CDDP in a phase II study will be 50 mg m(-2) and 60 mg m(-2) respectively.  (+info)

Bronchoconstrictor effect of thrombin and thrombin receptor activating peptide in guinea-pigs in vivo. (2/2217)

1. Several thrombin cellular effects are dependent upon stimulation of proteinase activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) localized over the cellular surface. Following activation by thrombin, a new N-terminus peptide is unmasked on PAR-1 receptor, which functions as a tethered ligand for the receptor itself. Synthetic peptides called thrombin receptor activating peptides (TRAPs), corresponding to the N-terminus residue unmasked, reproduce several thrombin cellular effects, but are devoid of catalytic activity. We have evaluated the bronchial response to intravenous administration of human alpha-thrombin or a thrombin receptor activating peptide (TRAP-9) in anaesthetized, artificially ventilated guinea-pigs. 2. Intravenous injection of thrombin (100 microkg(-1)) caused bronchoconstriction that was recapitulated by injection of TRAP-9 (1 mg kg(-1)). Animal pretreatment with the thrombin inhibitor Hirulog (10 mg kg(-1) i.v.) prevented thrombin-induced bronchoconstriction, but did not affect bronchoconstriction induced by TRAP-9. Both agents did not induce bronchoconstriction when injected intravenously to rats. 3. The bronchoconstrictor effect of thrombin and TRAP-9 was subjected to tolerance; however, in animals desensitized to thrombin effect, TRAP-9 was still capable of inducing bronchoconstriction, but not vice versa. 4. Depleting animals of circulating platelets prevented bronchoconstriction induced by both thrombin and TRAP-9. 5. Bronchoconstriction was paralleled by a biphasic change in arterial blood pressure, characterized by a hypotensive phase followed by a hypertensive phase. Thrombin-induced hypotension was not subject to tolerance and was inhibited by Hirulog; conversely, hypertension was subject to tolerance and was not inhibited by Hirulog. Hypotension and hypertension induced by TRAP-9 were neither subject to tolerance nor inhibited by Hirulog. 6. Our results indicate that thrombin causes bronchoconstriction in guinea-pigs through a mechanism that requires proteolytic activation of its receptor and the exposure of the tethered ligand peptide. Platelet activation might be triggered by the thrombin effect.  (+info)

Primary percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty performed for acute myocardial infarction in a patient with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. (3/2217)

A 72-year-old female with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) complained of severe chest pain. Electrocardiography showed ST-segment depression and negative T wave in I, aVL and V4-6. Following a diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction (AMI), urgent coronary angiography revealed 99% organic stenosis with delayed flow in the proximal segment and 50% in the middle segment of the left anterior descending artery (LAD). Subsequently, percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) for the stenosis in the proximal LAD was performed. In the coronary care unit, her blood pressure dropped. Hematomas around the puncture sites were observed and the platelet count was 28,000/mm3. After transfusion, electrocardiography revealed ST-segment elevation in I, aVL and V1-6. Urgent recatheterization disclosed total occlusion in the middle segment of the LAD. Subsequently, PTCA was performed successfully. Then, intravenous immunoglobulin increased the platelet count and the bleeding tendency disappeared. A case of AMI with ITP is rare. The present case suggests that primary PTCA can be a useful therapeutic strategy, but careful attention must be paid to hemostasis and to managing the platelet count.  (+info)

Antithrombotic efficacy of thrombin inhibitor L-374,087: intravenous activity in a primate model of venous thrombus extension and oral activity in a canine model of primary venous and coronary artery thrombosis. (4/2217)

The small molecule direct thrombin inhibitor L-374,087 was characterized across species in an in vitro activated partial thromboplastin clotting time (aPTT) assay and in vivo in rhesus monkey and dog thrombosis models. In vitro in rhesus, dog, and human plasma, L-374,087 concentrations eliciting 2-fold increases in aPTT were 0.25, 1.9, and 0.28 microM, respectively. In anesthetized rhesus monkeys, 300 microgram/kg bolus plus 12 microgram/kg/min and 300 microgram/kg bolus plus 30 microgram/kg/min L-374,087 i.v. infusions significantly reduced jugular vein thrombus extension, with both regimens limiting venous thrombus extension to 2-fold that of baseline thrombus mass compared with a 5-fold extension observed in the vehicle control group. Antithrombotic efficacy in the rhesus with the lower-dose regimen was achieved with 2.3- to 2.4-fold increases in aPTT and prothrombin time. In a conscious instrumented dog model of electrolytic vessel injury, the oral administration of two 10 mg/kg L-374,087 doses 12 h apart significantly reduced jugular vein thrombus mass, reduced the incidence of and delayed time to occlusive coronary artery thrombosis, and significantly reduced coronary artery thrombus mass and ensuing posterolateral myocardial infarct size. Antithrombotic efficacy in the dog was achieved with 1.6- to 2.0-fold increases in aPTT at 1 to 6 h after oral dosing with L-374,087. These results indicate significant antithrombotic efficacy against both venous and coronary arterial thrombosis with L-374,087 with only moderate elevations in aPTT or prothrombin time. The oral efficacy of L-374,087 characterizes this compound as a prototype for the further development of orally active direct thrombin inhibitors.  (+info)

Prospective randomized multicenter study comparing cyclosporin alone versus the combination of antithymocyte globulin and cyclosporin for treatment of patients with nonsevere aplastic anemia: a report from the European Blood and Marrow Transplant (EBMT) Severe Aplastic Anaemia Working Party. (5/2217)

We report the results of the first prospective randomized multicenter study of immunosuppressive treatment in patients with previously untreated nonsevere aplastic anemia (AA) as defined by a neutrophil count of at least 0.5 x 10(9)/L and transfusion dependence. Patients were randomized to receive cyclosporin (CSA) alone or the combination of horse antithymocyte globulin ([ATG] Lymphoglobuline; Merieux, Lyon, France) and CSA. The endpoint of the study was the hematologic response at 6 months. One hundred fifteen patients were randomized and assessable with a median follow-up period of 36 months; 61 received CSA and 54 ATG and CSA. In the CSA group, the percentage of complete and partial responders was 23% and 23%, respectively, for an overall response rate of 46%. A significantly higher overall response rate of 74% was found in the ATG and CSA group, with 57% complete and 17% partial responders (P =. 02). Compared with CSA alone, the combination of ATG and CSA resulted in a significantly higher median hemoglobin level and platelet count at 6 months. Fewer patients required a second course of treatment before 6 months due to a nonresponse. In the CSA group, 15 of 61 (25%) patients required a course of ATG before 6 months because of disease progression, compared with only 3 of 54 (6%) in the ATG and CSA group. The survival probabilities for the two groups were comparable, 93% (CSA group) and 91% (ATG and CSA group), but at 180 days, the prevalence of patients surviving free of transfusions, which excluded patients requiring second treatment because of nonresponse, death, disease progression, or relapse, was 67% in the CSA group and 90% in the ATG and CSA group (P =.001). We conclude that the combination of ATG and CSA is superior to CSA alone in terms of the hematologic response, the quality of response, and early mortality, and a second course of immunosuppression is less frequently required.  (+info)

Thrombopoietin: its role from early hematopoiesis to platelet production. (6/2217)

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Thrombopoietin (TPO), also referred to as MpI ligand, is the most potent cytokine that physiologically regulates platelet production. With the availability of sufficient amounts of recombinant forms of the protein, the biological in vitro and in vivo activities of this cytokine have been extensively studied. The objective of this review is to summarize the published data focusing on TPO production and regulation and to discuss the pleiotropic biological action of this hormone. The review also highlights the results so far obtained in preclinical and clinical trials. EVIDENCE AND INFORMATION SOURCES: The material examined in this review includes data published by the author and articles or abstracts published in Journals covered by Medline. The author has contributed to the isolation of TPO, has been working in the field for several years and has contributed original papers on the TPO/MpI system in normal and pathologic situations. STATE OF THE ART: TPO is a hormone constitutively produced by the liver and kidneys. Plasma levels of TPO are regulated through receptor-mediated uptake, internalization and catabolism. First thought to be a lineage dominant factor promoting megakaryocytopoiesis, several lines of evidence indicate that TPO has pleiotropic effects on hematopoiesis. In vitro studies show that TPO alone, or in combination with early acting cytokines, stimulates the proliferation and enhances the expansion of primitive CD34+ CD38- hematopoietic progenitor cells. In vivo studies with c-mpl- and TPO-null mice reveal that the molecule sustains the survival and proliferation of early committed progenitor cells of various type. Preclinical and clinical trials indicate that recombinant TPO molecules increase platelet counts and megakaryocyte numbers in normal or mildly thrombocytopenic states. However, no significant effects of TPO administration on platelet recovery have so far been reported in patients subjected to intensive chemotherapy regimens. Recombinant molecules appear to be safe to administer and very little toxicity is reported. TPO augments the number of erythroid and myeloid committed progenitor cells in marrow, and mobilized stem cells in peripheral blood. PERSPECTIVES: The potential clinical use of TPO is still unclear. With the increased knowledge of the multiple effects of TPO on hematopoiesis, it is expected that future carefully monitored clinical trials will provide more information regarding the eventual benefits of this cytokine in the treatment of thrombocytopenia. At present, one successful application of TPO appears to be its addition in cytokine cocktails used to expand hematopoietic stem cells ex vivo.  (+info)

Patients with thrombocytosis have normal or slightly elevated thrombopoietin levels. (7/2217)

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: The distinction between clonal and reactive thrombocytoses is a frequent problem and implies different therapeutic options. As thrombopoietin (TPO) is the main regulator of megakaryocytopoiesis and thrombopoiesis, we measured TPO levels in patients with thrombocytosis in an attempt to understand the regulation and potential utility of distinguishing thrombocytoses. DESIGN AND METHODS: Serum TPO levels, platelet counts, mean platelet volume, hemoglobin, erythrocyte sedimentation rate and age were evaluated in 25 patients with clonal thrombocytosis (15 with essential thrombocythemia, 6 with polycythemia vera and 4 with chronic myeloid leukemia) and in 50 patients with reactive thrombocytosis distributed in three groups: 1) patients in post-surgical states; 2) patients with solid tumors; and 3) patients with inflammatory diseases. RESULTS: TPO levels were slightly increased in patients with clonal (135+/-50 pg/mL) and reactive (147+/-58 pg/mL) thrombocytosis compared with controls (121+/-58 pg/mL). Analyzing the different groups, patients with essential thrombocythemia had the lowest TPO levels (120+/-28 pg/mL) and patients with solid tumors the highest levels (162+/-59 pg/mL). Patients with clonal thrombocytosis were older, had higher platelet counts, mean platelet volume and hemoglobin, and lower erythrocyte sedimentation rate than patients with reactive thrombocytosis. INTERPRETATION AND CONCLUSIONS: Minor differences were observed in TPO levels between patients with primary and secondary thrombocytoses. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate, but not TPO levels, may be a useful tool for discriminating both types of thrombocytoses.  (+info)

Neutrophil activation and hemostatic changes in healthy donors receiving granulocyte colony-stimulating factor. (8/2217)

Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) enhances neutrophil functions in vitro and in vivo. It is known that neutrophil-derived products can alter the hemostatic balance. To understand whether polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) activation, measured as PMN degranulation and phenotypical change, may be associated to hemostatic alterations in vivo, we have studied the effect of recombinant human G-CSF (rHuG-CSF) administration on leukocyte parameters and hemostatic variables in healthy donors of hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs). Twenty-six consecutive healthy donors receiving 10 micrograms/kg/d rHuG-CSF subcutaneously for 5 to 7 days to mobilize HPCs for allogeneic transplants were included in the study. All of them responded to rHuG-CSF with a significant white blood cell count increase. Blood samples were drawn before therapy on days 2 and 5 and 1 week after stopping rHuG-CSF treatment. The following parameters were evaluated: (1) PMN activation parameters, ie, surface CD11b/CD18 antigen expression, plasma elastase antigen levels and cellular elastase activity; (2) plasma markers of endothelium activation, ie, thrombomodulin (TM) and von Willebrand factor (vWF) antigens; (3) plasma markers of blood coagulation activation, ie, F1+2, TAT complex, D-dimer; and (4) mononuclear cell (MNC) procoagulant activity (PCA) expression. The results show that, after starting rHuG-CSF, an in vivo PMN activation occurred, as demonstrated by the significant increment of surface CD11b/CD18 and plasma elastase antigen levels. Moreover, PMN cellular elastase activity, which was significantly increased at 1 day of treatment, returned to baseline at day 5 to 6, in correspondence with the elastase antigen peak in the circulation. This change was accompanied by a parallel significant increase in plasma levels of the two endothelial and the three coagulation markers. The PCA generated in vitro by unstimulated MNC isolated from rHuG-CSF-treated subjects was not different from that of control cells from untreated subjects. However, endotoxin-stimulated MNC isolated from on-treatment individuals produced significantly more PCA compared with both baseline and control samples. All of the parameters were decreased or normal 1 week after stopping treatment. These data show that rHuG-CSF induces PMN activation and transiently affects some hemostatic variables in healthy HPC donor subjects. The clinical significance of these findings remains to be established.  (+info)

A platelet count is a laboratory test that measures the number of platelets, also known as thrombocytes, in a sample of blood. Platelets are small, colorless cell fragments that circulate in the blood and play a crucial role in blood clotting. They help to stop bleeding by sticking together to form a plug at the site of an injured blood vessel.

A normal platelet count ranges from 150,000 to 450,000 platelets per microliter (µL) of blood. A lower than normal platelet count is called thrombocytopenia, while a higher than normal platelet count is known as thrombocytosis.

Abnormal platelet counts can be a sign of various medical conditions, including bleeding disorders, infections, certain medications, and some types of cancer. It is important to consult with a healthcare provider if you have any concerns about your platelet count or if you experience symptoms such as easy bruising, prolonged bleeding, or excessive menstrual flow.

Blood platelets, also known as thrombocytes, are small, colorless cell fragments in our blood that play an essential role in normal blood clotting. They are formed in the bone marrow from large cells called megakaryocytes and circulate in the blood in an inactive state until they are needed to help stop bleeding. When a blood vessel is damaged, platelets become activated and change shape, releasing chemicals that attract more platelets to the site of injury. These activated platelets then stick together to form a plug, or clot, that seals the wound and prevents further blood loss. In addition to their role in clotting, platelets also help to promote healing by releasing growth factors that stimulate the growth of new tissue.

Platelet aggregation is the clumping together of platelets (thrombocytes) in the blood, which is an essential step in the process of hemostasis (the stopping of bleeding) after injury to a blood vessel. When the inner lining of a blood vessel is damaged, exposure of subendothelial collagen and tissue factor triggers platelet activation. Activated platelets change shape, become sticky, and release the contents of their granules, which include ADP (adenosine diphosphate).

ADP then acts as a chemical mediator to attract and bind additional platelets to the site of injury, leading to platelet aggregation. This forms a plug that seals the damaged vessel and prevents further blood loss. Platelet aggregation is also a crucial component in the formation of blood clots (thrombosis) within blood vessels, which can have pathological consequences such as heart attacks and strokes if they obstruct blood flow to vital organs.

Thrombocytopenia is a medical condition characterized by an abnormally low platelet count (thrombocytes) in the blood. Platelets are small cell fragments that play a crucial role in blood clotting, helping to stop bleeding when a blood vessel is damaged. A healthy adult typically has a platelet count between 150,000 and 450,000 platelets per microliter of blood. Thrombocytopenia is usually diagnosed when the platelet count falls below 150,000 platelets/µL.

Thrombocytopenia can be classified into three main categories based on its underlying cause:

1. Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP): An autoimmune disorder where the immune system mistakenly attacks and destroys its own platelets, leading to a decreased platelet count. ITP can be further divided into primary or secondary forms, depending on whether it occurs alone or as a result of another medical condition or medication.
2. Decreased production: Thrombocytopenia can occur when there is insufficient production of platelets in the bone marrow due to various causes, such as viral infections, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, leukemia, aplastic anemia, or vitamin B12 or folate deficiency.
3. Increased destruction or consumption: Thrombocytopenia can also result from increased platelet destruction or consumption due to conditions like disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP), hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), or severe bacterial infections.

Symptoms of thrombocytopenia may include easy bruising, prolonged bleeding from cuts, spontaneous nosebleeds, bleeding gums, blood in urine or stools, and skin rashes like petechiae (small red or purple spots) or purpura (larger patches). The severity of symptoms can vary depending on the degree of thrombocytopenia and the presence of any underlying conditions. Treatment for thrombocytopenia depends on the cause and may include medications, transfusions, or addressing the underlying condition.

Platelet adhesiveness refers to the ability of platelets, which are small blood cells that help your body form clots to prevent excessive bleeding, to stick to other cells or surfaces. This process is crucial in hemostasis, the process of stopping bleeding after injury to a blood vessel.

When the endothelium (the lining of blood vessels) is damaged, subendothelial structures are exposed, which can trigger platelet adhesion. Platelets then change shape and release chemical signals that cause other platelets to clump together, forming a platelet plug. This plug helps to seal the damaged vessel and prevent further bleeding.

Platelet adhesiveness is influenced by several factors, including the presence of von Willebrand factor (vWF), a protein in the blood that helps platelets bind to damaged vessels, and the expression of glycoprotein receptors on the surface of platelets. Abnormalities in platelet adhesiveness can lead to bleeding disorders or thrombotic conditions.

A platelet transfusion is the process of medically administering platelets, which are small blood cells that help your body form clots to stop bleeding. Platelet transfusions are often given to patients with low platelet counts or dysfunctional platelets due to various reasons such as chemotherapy, bone marrow transplantation, disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), and other medical conditions leading to increased consumption or destruction of platelets. This procedure helps to prevent or treat bleeding complications in these patients. It's important to note that platelet transfusions should be given under the supervision of a healthcare professional, taking into account the patient's clinical condition, platelet count, and potential risks associated with transfusion reactions.

Platelet membrane glycoproteins are specialized proteins found on the surface of platelets, which are small blood cells responsible for clotting. These glycoproteins play crucial roles in various processes related to hemostasis and thrombosis, including platelet adhesion, activation, and aggregation.

There are several key platelet membrane glycoproteins, such as:

1. Glycoprotein (GP) Ia/IIa (also known as integrin α2β1): This glycoprotein mediates the binding of platelets to collagen fibers in the extracellular matrix, facilitating platelet adhesion and activation.
2. GP IIb/IIIa (also known as integrin αIIbβ3): This is the most abundant glycoprotein on the platelet surface and functions as a receptor for fibrinogen, von Willebrand factor, and other adhesive proteins. Upon activation, GP IIb/IIIa undergoes conformational changes that enable it to bind these ligands, leading to platelet aggregation and clot formation.
3. GPIb-IX-V: This glycoprotein complex is involved in the initial tethering and adhesion of platelets to von Willebrand factor (vWF) in damaged blood vessels. It consists of four subunits: GPIbα, GPIbβ, GPIX, and GPV.
4. GPVI: This glycoprotein is essential for platelet activation upon contact with collagen. It associates with the Fc receptor γ-chain (FcRγ) to form a signaling complex that triggers intracellular signaling pathways, leading to platelet activation and aggregation.

Abnormalities in these platelet membrane glycoproteins can lead to bleeding disorders or thrombotic conditions. For example, mutations in GPIIb/IIIa can result in Glanzmann's thrombasthenia, a severe bleeding disorder characterized by impaired platelet aggregation. On the other hand, increased expression or activation of these glycoproteins may contribute to the development of arterial thrombosis and cardiovascular diseases.

Thrombocytosis is a medical condition characterized by an abnormally high platelet count (also known as thrombocytes) in the blood. Platelets are small cell fragments that play a crucial role in blood clotting. A normal platelet count ranges from 150,000 to 450,000 platelets per microliter of blood. Thrombocytosis is typically defined as a platelet count exceeding 450,000-500,000 platelets/µL.

Thrombocytosis can be classified into two types: reactive (or secondary) thrombocytosis and primary (or essential) thrombocytosis. Reactive thrombocytosis is more common and occurs as a response to an underlying condition, such as infection, inflammation, surgery, or certain types of cancer. Primary thrombocytosis, on the other hand, is caused by intrinsic abnormalities in the bone marrow cells responsible for platelet production (megakaryocytes), and it is often associated with myeloproliferative neoplasms like essential thrombocythemia.

While mild thrombocytosis may not cause any symptoms, higher platelet counts can increase the risk of blood clots (thrombosis) and bleeding disorders due to excessive platelet aggregation. Symptoms of thrombocytosis may include headaches, dizziness, visual disturbances, or chest pain if a blood clot forms in the brain or heart. Bleeding symptoms can manifest as easy bruising, nosebleeds, or gastrointestinal bleeding.

Treatment for thrombocytosis depends on the underlying cause and the severity of the condition. In cases of reactive thrombocytosis, treating the underlying disorder often resolves the high platelet count. For primary thrombocytosis, medications like aspirin or cytoreductive therapy (such as hydroxyurea) may be used to reduce the risk of blood clots and control platelet production. Regular monitoring of platelet counts is essential for managing this condition and preventing potential complications.

A "Blood Cell Count" is a medical laboratory test that measures the number of red blood cells (RBCs), white blood cells (WBCs), and platelets in a sample of blood. This test is often used as a part of a routine check-up or to help diagnose various medical conditions, such as anemia, infection, inflammation, and many others.

The RBC count measures the number of oxygen-carrying cells in the blood, while the WBC count measures the number of immune cells that help fight infections. The platelet count measures the number of cells involved in clotting. Abnormal results in any of these counts may indicate an underlying medical condition and further testing may be required for diagnosis and treatment.

Platelet Factor 4 (PF4), also known as CXCL4, is a chemokine that is primarily secreted by activated platelets and involved in hemostasis and inflammation. It is a small protein with a molecular weight of approximately 8 kDa and is stored in the alpha granules of resting platelets. Upon activation, platelets release PF4 into the bloodstream, where it plays a role in attracting immune cells to sites of injury or infection.

PF4 can bind to various negatively charged molecules, including heparin, DNA, and RNA, which can lead to the formation of immune complexes. In some cases, these immune complexes can trigger an abnormal immune response, resulting in conditions such as heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) or vaccine-induced immune thrombotic thrombocytopenia (VITT).

In summary, Platelet Factor 4 is a chemokine released by activated platelets that plays a role in hemostasis and inflammation but can also contribute to the development of certain immune-related disorders.

Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura (ITP) is a medical condition characterized by a low platelet count (thrombocytopenia) in the blood without an identifiable cause. Platelets are small blood cells that help your body form clots to stop bleeding. When you don't have enough platelets, you may bleed excessively or spontaneously, causing purpura, which refers to purple-colored spots on the skin that result from bleeding under the skin.

In ITP, the immune system mistakenly attacks and destroys platelets, leading to their decreased levels in the blood. This condition can occur at any age but is more common in children following a viral infection, and in adults after the age of 30-40 years. Symptoms may include easy or excessive bruising, prolonged bleeding from cuts, spontaneous bleeding from the gums or nose, blood blisters, and small red or purple spots on the skin (petechiae).

Depending on the severity of thrombocytopenia and the presence of bleeding symptoms, ITP treatment may include observation, corticosteroids, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), or other medications that modify the immune system's response. In severe cases or when other treatments are ineffective, surgical removal of the spleen (splenectomy) might be considered.

A leukocyte count, also known as a white blood cell (WBC) count, is a laboratory test that measures the number of leukocytes in a sample of blood. Leukocytes are a vital part of the body's immune system and help fight infection and inflammation. A high or low leukocyte count may indicate an underlying medical condition, such as an infection, inflammation, or a bone marrow disorder. The normal range for a leukocyte count in adults is typically between 4,500 and 11,000 cells per microliter (mcL) of blood. However, the normal range can vary slightly depending on the laboratory and the individual's age and sex.

Platelet function tests are laboratory tests that measure how well platelets, which are small blood cells responsible for clotting, function in preventing or stopping bleeding. These tests are often used to investigate the cause of abnormal bleeding or bruising, or to monitor the effectiveness of antiplatelet therapy in patients with certain medical conditions such as heart disease or stroke.

There are several types of platelet function tests available, including:

1. Platelet count: This test measures the number of platelets present in a sample of blood. A low platelet count can increase the risk of bleeding.
2. Bleeding time: This test measures how long it takes for a small cut to stop bleeding. It is used less frequently than other tests due to its invasiveness and variability.
3. Platelet aggregation tests: These tests measure how well platelets clump together (aggregate) in response to various agents that promote platelet activation, such as adenosine diphosphate (ADP), collagen, or epinephrine.
4. Platelet function analyzer (PFA): This test measures the time it takes for a blood sample to clot under shear stress, simulating the conditions in an injured blood vessel. The PFA can provide information about the overall platelet function and the effectiveness of antiplatelet therapy.
5. Thromboelastography (TEG) or rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM): These tests measure the kinetics of clot formation, strength, and dissolution in whole blood samples. They provide information about both platelet function and coagulation factors.

These tests can help healthcare providers diagnose bleeding disorders, assess the risk of bleeding during surgery or other invasive procedures, monitor antiplatelet therapy, and guide treatment decisions for patients with abnormal platelet function.

Megakaryocytes are large, specialized bone marrow cells that are responsible for the production and release of platelets (also known as thrombocytes) into the bloodstream. Platelets play an essential role in blood clotting and hemostasis, helping to prevent excessive bleeding during injuries or trauma.

Megakaryocytes have a unique structure with multilobed nuclei and abundant cytoplasm rich in organelles called alpha-granules and dense granules, which store various proteins, growth factors, and enzymes necessary for platelet function. As megakaryocytes mature, they extend long cytoplasmic processes called proplatelets into the bone marrow sinuses, where these extensions fragment into individual platelets that are released into circulation.

Abnormalities in megakaryocyte number, size, or function can lead to various hematological disorders, such as thrombocytopenia (low platelet count), thrombocytosis (high platelet count), and certain types of leukemia.

The platelet glycoprotein GPIIb-IIIa complex, also known as integrin αIIbβ3 or CD41/CD61, is a heterodimeric transmembrane receptor found on the surface of platelets and megakaryocytes. It plays a crucial role in platelet aggregation and thrombus formation during hemostasis and pathological conditions such as arterial thrombosis.

The GPIIb-IIIa complex is composed of two non-covalently associated subunits, GPIIb (αIIb or CD41) and IIIa (β3 or CD61). Upon platelet activation by various agonists like ADP, thrombin, or collagen, the GPIIb-IIIa complex undergoes a conformational change that allows it to bind fibrinogen, von Willebrand factor, and other adhesive proteins. This binding event leads to platelet aggregation and the formation of a hemostatic plug or pathological thrombus.

Inhibition of the GPIIb-IIIa complex has been a target for antiplatelet therapy in the prevention and treatment of arterial thrombosis, such as myocardial infarction and stroke. Several pharmacological agents, including monoclonal antibodies and small molecule antagonists, have been developed to block this complex and reduce platelet aggregation.

The platelet glycoprotein GPIb-IX complex is a crucial receptor on the surface of platelets that plays a vital role in hemostasis and thrombosis. It is a heterotetrameric transmembrane protein complex composed of two disulfide-linked glycoprotein subunits, GPIbα, GPIbβ, GPV (Glycoprotein V), and GPIX (Glycoprotein IX).

The GPIb-IX complex is responsible for the initial interaction between platelets and von Willebrand factor (vWF) in the circulation. When blood vessels are damaged, exposed collagen recruits vWF to the site of injury, where it binds to the GPIbα subunit of the GPIb-IX complex, leading to platelet adhesion and activation. This interaction is critical for primary hemostasis, which helps prevent excessive blood loss from injured vessels.

Genetic mutations or deficiencies in the genes encoding these glycoproteins can lead to bleeding disorders such as Bernard-Soulier syndrome, a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by thrombocytopenia and large platelets with impaired vWF binding and platelet adhesion.

Bleeding time is a medical test that measures the time it takes for a small blood vessel to stop bleeding after being cut. It's used to evaluate platelet function and the effectiveness of blood clotting. The most common method used to measure bleeding time is the Ivy method, which involves making a standardized incision on the forearm and measuring the time it takes for the bleeding to stop. A normal bleeding time ranges from 2 to 9 minutes, but this can vary depending on the specific method used. Prolonged bleeding time may indicate an impairment in platelet function or clotting factor deficiency.

Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a potent phospholipid mediator that plays a significant role in various inflammatory and immune responses. It is a powerful lipid signaling molecule released mainly by activated platelets, neutrophils, monocytes, endothelial cells, and other cell types during inflammation or injury.

PAF has a molecular structure consisting of an alkyl chain linked to a glycerol moiety, a phosphate group, and an sn-2 acetyl group. This unique structure allows PAF to bind to its specific G protein-coupled receptor (PAF-R) on the surface of target cells, triggering various intracellular signaling cascades that result in cell activation, degranulation, and aggregation.

The primary functions of PAF include:

1. Platelet activation and aggregation: PAF stimulates platelets to aggregate, release their granules, and activate the coagulation cascade, which can lead to thrombus formation.
2. Neutrophil and monocyte activation: PAF activates these immune cells, leading to increased adhesion, degranulation, and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and pro-inflammatory cytokines.
3. Vasodilation and increased vascular permeability: PAF can cause vasodilation by acting on endothelial cells, leading to an increase in blood flow and facilitating the extravasation of immune cells into inflamed tissues.
4. Bronchoconstriction: In the respiratory system, PAF can induce bronchoconstriction and recruitment of inflammatory cells, contributing to asthma symptoms.
5. Neurotransmission modulation: PAF has been implicated in neuroinflammation and may play a role in neuronal excitability, synaptic plasticity, and cognitive functions.

Dysregulated PAF signaling has been associated with several pathological conditions, including atherosclerosis, sepsis, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), ischemia-reperfusion injury, and neuroinflammatory disorders. Therefore, targeting the PAF pathway may provide therapeutic benefits in these diseases.

Thrombopoietin (TPO) is a glycoprotein hormone that plays a crucial role in the regulation of platelet production, also known as thrombopoiesis. It is primarily produced by the liver and to some extent by megakaryocytes, which are the cells responsible for producing platelets.

TPO binds to its receptor, c-Mpl, on the surface of megakaryocytes and their precursor cells, stimulating their proliferation, differentiation, and maturation into platelets. By regulating the number of platelets in circulation, TPO helps maintain hemostasis, the process that prevents excessive bleeding after injury.

In addition to its role in thrombopoiesis, TPO has been shown to have potential effects on other cell types, including hematopoietic stem cells and certain immune cells. However, its primary function remains the regulation of platelet production.

Thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is a rare blood disorder characterized by the abnormal breakdown of platelets, leading to a low platelet count (thrombocytopenia). Platelets are small blood cells that help your body form clots to stop bleeding. A low platelet count can cause purple spots on the skin (purpura) and easy or excessive bruising or bleeding.

TTP is caused by the formation of blood clots in small blood vessels throughout the body, which can lead to serious complications such as damage to the heart, brain, and kidneys if left untreated. The condition can be acute (sudden onset) or chronic (long-term).

TTP is often caused by an autoimmune response where the body's immune system produces antibodies that attack and destroy a protein called ADAMTS13, which is necessary for breaking down large von Willebrand factor proteins in the blood. Without enough ADAMTS13, these proteins can form clots and deplete platelets, leading to thrombocytopenia and purpura.

Treatment typically involves plasma exchange therapy to replace the missing or nonfunctional ADAMTS13 protein and suppress the immune system's production of antibodies. Corticosteroids, immunosuppressive drugs, and rituximab may also be used in treatment.

Thrombin is a serine protease enzyme that plays a crucial role in the coagulation cascade, which is a complex series of biochemical reactions that leads to the formation of a blood clot (thrombus) to prevent excessive bleeding during an injury. Thrombin is formed from its precursor protein, prothrombin, through a process called activation, which involves cleavage by another enzyme called factor Xa.

Once activated, thrombin converts fibrinogen, a soluble plasma protein, into fibrin, an insoluble protein that forms the structural framework of a blood clot. Thrombin also activates other components of the coagulation cascade, such as factor XIII, which crosslinks and stabilizes the fibrin network, and platelets, which contribute to the formation and growth of the clot.

Thrombin has several regulatory mechanisms that control its activity, including feedback inhibition by antithrombin III, a plasma protein that inactivates thrombin and other serine proteases, and tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI), which inhibits the activation of factor Xa, thereby preventing further thrombin formation.

Overall, thrombin is an essential enzyme in hemostasis, the process that maintains the balance between bleeding and clotting in the body. However, excessive or uncontrolled thrombin activity can lead to pathological conditions such as thrombosis, atherosclerosis, and disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC).

Human platelet antigens (HPAs) are a group of cell surface proteins found on platelets and megakaryocytes, which are the precursor cells that produce platelets. These antigens can stimulate an immune response when they are recognized as foreign by the body's immune system, leading to the production of antibodies against them.

HPAs are classified into several different systems based on their genetic inheritance and immunological properties. The most well-known HPA systems are HPA-1, HPA-2, HPA-3, HPA-4, and HPA-5. Each system consists of a pair of alleles, one inherited from each parent, that code for different variants of the antigen.

HPAs can play a role in the development of certain bleeding disorders, such as neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (NAIT) and post-transfusion purpura (PTP). NAIT occurs when a pregnant woman develops antibodies against her fetus's HPAs, leading to low platelet counts and bleeding in the newborn. PTP can occur after a transfusion of blood products containing HPAs that are not compatible with the recipient's HPAs, leading to an immune response and destruction of the transfused platelets.

It is important for healthcare providers to consider HPA compatibility when performing platelet transfusions or managing pregnant women at risk of developing antibodies against HPAs.

Fibrinogen is a soluble protein present in plasma, synthesized by the liver. It plays an essential role in blood coagulation. When an injury occurs, fibrinogen gets converted into insoluble fibrin by the action of thrombin, forming a fibrin clot that helps to stop bleeding from the injured site. Therefore, fibrinogen is crucial for hemostasis, which is the process of stopping bleeding and starting the healing process after an injury.

Thrombopoiesis is the process of formation and development of thrombocytes or platelets, which are small, colorless cell fragments in our blood that play an essential role in clotting. Thrombopoiesis occurs inside the bone marrow, where stem cells differentiate into megakaryoblasts, then progressively develop into promegakaryocytes and megakaryocytes. These megakaryocytes subsequently undergo a process called cytoplasmic fragmentation to produce platelets.

The regulation of thrombopoiesis is primarily controlled by the hormone thrombopoietin (TPO), which is produced mainly in the liver and binds to the thrombopoietin receptor (c-Mpl) on megakaryocytes and their precursors. This binding stimulates the proliferation, differentiation, and maturation of megakaryocytes, leading to an increase in platelet production.

Abnormalities in thrombopoiesis can result in conditions such as thrombocytopenia (low platelet count) or thrombocytosis (high platelet count), which may be associated with bleeding disorders or increased risk of thrombosis, respectively.

A splenectomy is a surgical procedure in which the spleen is removed from the body. The spleen is an organ located in the upper left quadrant of the abdomen, near the stomach and behind the ribs. It plays several important roles in the body, including fighting certain types of infections, removing old or damaged red blood cells from the circulation, and storing platelets and white blood cells.

There are several reasons why a splenectomy may be necessary, including:

* Trauma to the spleen that cannot be repaired
* Certain types of cancer, such as Hodgkin's lymphoma or non-Hodgkin's lymphoma
* Sickle cell disease, which can cause the spleen to enlarge and become damaged
* A ruptured spleen, which can be life-threatening if not treated promptly
* Certain blood disorders, such as idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) or hemolytic anemia

A splenectomy is typically performed under general anesthesia and may be done using open surgery or laparoscopically. After the spleen is removed, the incision(s) are closed with sutures or staples. Recovery time varies depending on the individual and the type of surgery performed, but most people are able to return to their normal activities within a few weeks.

It's important to note that following a splenectomy, individuals may be at increased risk for certain types of infections, so it's recommended that they receive vaccinations to help protect against these infections. They should also seek medical attention promptly if they develop fever, chills, or other signs of infection.

Adenosine diphosphate (ADP) is a chemical compound that plays a crucial role in energy transfer within cells. It is a nucleotide, which consists of a adenosine molecule (a sugar molecule called ribose attached to a nitrogenous base called adenine) and two phosphate groups.

In the cell, ADP functions as an intermediate in the conversion of energy from one form to another. When a high-energy phosphate bond in ADP is broken, energy is released and ADP is converted to adenosine triphosphate (ATP), which serves as the main energy currency of the cell. Conversely, when ATP donates a phosphate group to another molecule, it is converted back to ADP, releasing energy for the cell to use.

ADP also plays a role in blood clotting and other physiological processes. In the coagulation cascade, ADP released from damaged red blood cells can help activate platelets and initiate the formation of a blood clot.

Thrombosis is the formation of a blood clot (thrombus) inside a blood vessel, obstructing the flow of blood through the circulatory system. When a clot forms in an artery, it can cut off the supply of oxygen and nutrients to the tissues served by that artery, leading to damage or tissue death. If a thrombus forms in the heart, it can cause a heart attack. If a thrombus breaks off and travels through the bloodstream, it can lodge in a smaller vessel, causing blockage and potentially leading to damage in the organ that the vessel supplies. This is known as an embolism.

Thrombosis can occur due to various factors such as injury to the blood vessel wall, abnormalities in blood flow, or changes in the composition of the blood. Certain medical conditions, medications, and lifestyle factors can increase the risk of thrombosis. Treatment typically involves anticoagulant or thrombolytic therapy to dissolve or prevent further growth of the clot, as well as addressing any underlying causes.

P-Selectin is a type of cell adhesion molecule, specifically a member of the selectin family, that is involved in the inflammatory response. It is primarily expressed on the surface of activated platelets and endothelial cells. P-Selectin plays a crucial role in the initial interaction between leukocytes (white blood cells) and the vascular endothelium, which is an essential step in the recruitment of leukocytes to sites of inflammation or injury. This process helps to mediate the rolling and adhesion of leukocytes to the endothelial surface, facilitating their extravasation into the surrounding tissue. P-Selectin's function is regulated by its interaction with specific ligands on the surface of leukocytes, such as PSGL-1 (P-Selectin Glycoprotein Ligand-1).

Hemostasis is the physiological process that occurs to stop bleeding (bleeding control) when a blood vessel is damaged. This involves the interaction of platelets, vasoconstriction, and blood clotting factors leading to the formation of a clot. The ultimate goal of hemostasis is to maintain the integrity of the vascular system while preventing excessive blood loss.

A CD4 lymphocyte count is a laboratory test that measures the number of CD4 T-cells (also known as CD4+ T-cells or helper T-cells) in a sample of blood. CD4 cells are a type of white blood cell that plays a crucial role in the body's immune response, particularly in fighting off infections caused by viruses and other pathogens.

CD4 cells express a protein on their surface called the CD4 receptor, which is used by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) to infect and destroy these cells. As a result, people with HIV infection or AIDS often have low CD4 lymphocyte counts, which can make them more susceptible to opportunistic infections and other complications.

A normal CD4 lymphocyte count ranges from 500 to 1,200 cells per cubic millimeter of blood (cells/mm3) in healthy adults. A lower than normal CD4 count is often used as a marker for the progression of HIV infection and the development of AIDS. CD4 counts are typically monitored over time to assess the effectiveness of antiretroviral therapy (ART) and to guide clinical decision-making regarding the need for additional interventions, such as prophylaxis against opportunistic infections.

Blood coagulation, also known as blood clotting, is a complex process that occurs in the body to prevent excessive bleeding when a blood vessel is damaged. This process involves several different proteins and chemical reactions that ultimately lead to the formation of a clot.

The coagulation cascade is initiated when blood comes into contact with tissue factor, which is exposed after damage to the blood vessel wall. This triggers a series of enzymatic reactions that activate clotting factors, leading to the formation of a fibrin clot. Fibrin is a protein that forms a mesh-like structure that traps platelets and red blood cells to form a stable clot.

Once the bleeding has stopped, the coagulation process is regulated and inhibited to prevent excessive clotting. The fibrinolytic system degrades the clot over time, allowing for the restoration of normal blood flow.

Abnormalities in the blood coagulation process can lead to bleeding disorders or thrombotic disorders such as deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism.

Erythrocyte count, also known as red blood cell (RBC) count, is a laboratory test that measures the number of red blood cells in a sample of blood. Red blood cells are important because they carry oxygen from the lungs to the rest of the body. A low erythrocyte count may indicate anemia, while a high count may be a sign of certain medical conditions such as polycythemia. The normal range for erythrocyte count varies depending on a person's age, sex, and other factors.

Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation (DIC) is a complex medical condition characterized by the abnormal activation of the coagulation cascade, leading to the formation of blood clots in small blood vessels throughout the body. This process can result in the consumption of clotting factors and platelets, which can then lead to bleeding complications. DIC can be caused by a variety of underlying conditions, including sepsis, trauma, cancer, and obstetric emergencies.

The term "disseminated" refers to the widespread nature of the clotting activation, while "intravascular" indicates that the clotting is occurring within the blood vessels. The condition can manifest as both bleeding and clotting complications, which can make it challenging to diagnose and manage.

The diagnosis of DIC typically involves laboratory tests that evaluate coagulation factors, platelet count, fibrin degradation products, and other markers of coagulation activation. Treatment is focused on addressing the underlying cause of the condition while also managing any bleeding or clotting complications that may arise.

Von Willebrand factor (vWF) is a large multimeric glycoprotein that plays a crucial role in hemostasis, the process which leads to the cessation of bleeding and the formation of a blood clot. It was named after Erik Adolf von Willebrand, a Finnish physician who first described the disorder associated with its deficiency, known as von Willebrand disease (vWD).

The primary functions of vWF include:

1. Platelet adhesion and aggregation: vWF mediates the initial attachment of platelets to damaged blood vessel walls by binding to exposed collagen fibers and then interacting with glycoprotein Ib (GPIb) receptors on the surface of platelets, facilitating platelet adhesion. Subsequently, vWF also promotes platelet-platelet interactions (aggregation) through its interaction with platelet glycoprotein IIb/IIIa (GPIIb/IIIa) receptors under high shear stress conditions found in areas of turbulent blood flow, such as arterioles and the capillary bed.

2. Transport and stabilization of coagulation factor VIII: vWF serves as a carrier protein for coagulation factor VIII (FVIII), protecting it from proteolytic degradation and maintaining its stability in circulation. This interaction between vWF and FVIII is essential for the proper functioning of the coagulation cascade, particularly in the context of vWD, where impaired FVIII function can lead to bleeding disorders.

3. Wound healing: vWF contributes to wound healing by promoting platelet adhesion and aggregation at the site of injury, which facilitates the formation of a provisional fibrin-based clot that serves as a scaffold for tissue repair and regeneration.

In summary, von Willebrand factor is a vital hemostatic protein involved in platelet adhesion, aggregation, coagulation factor VIII stabilization, and wound healing. Deficiencies or dysfunctions in vWF can lead to bleeding disorders such as von Willebrand disease.

Essential thrombocythemia (ET) is a myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN), a type of blood cancer characterized by the overproduction of platelets (thrombocytosis) in the bone marrow. In ET, there is an excessive proliferation of megakaryocytes, the precursor cells that produce platelets. This leads to increased platelet counts in the peripheral blood, which can increase the risk of blood clots (thrombosis) and bleeding episodes (hemorrhage).

The term "essential" is used to indicate that the cause of this condition is not known or idiopathic. ET is primarily a disease of older adults, but it can also occur in younger individuals. The diagnosis of essential thrombocythemia requires careful evaluation and exclusion of secondary causes of thrombocytosis, such as reactive conditions, inflammation, or other myeloproliferative neoplasms.

The clinical presentation of ET can vary widely among patients. Some individuals may be asymptomatic and discovered only during routine blood tests, while others may experience symptoms related to thrombosis or bleeding. Common symptoms include headaches, visual disturbances, dizziness, weakness, numbness, or tingling in the extremities, if there are complications due to blood clots in the brain or other parts of the body. Excessive bruising, nosebleeds, or blood in the stool can indicate bleeding complications.

Treatment for essential thrombocythemia is aimed at reducing the risk of thrombosis and managing symptoms. Hydroxyurea is a commonly used medication to lower platelet counts, while aspirin may be prescribed to decrease the risk of blood clots. In some cases, interferon-alpha or ruxolitinib might be considered as treatment options. Regular follow-up with a hematologist and monitoring of blood counts are essential for managing this condition and detecting potential complications early.

Hemorrhage is defined in the medical context as an excessive loss of blood from the circulatory system, which can occur due to various reasons such as injury, surgery, or underlying health conditions that affect blood clotting or the integrity of blood vessels. The bleeding may be internal, external, visible, or concealed, and it can vary in severity from minor to life-threatening, depending on the location and extent of the bleeding. Hemorrhage is a serious medical emergency that requires immediate attention and treatment to prevent further blood loss, organ damage, and potential death.

HELLP syndrome is a serious complication in pregnancy, characterized by Hemolysis (the breakdown of red blood cells), Elevated Liver enzymes, and Low Platelet count. It is often considered a variant of severe preeclampsia or eclampsia, although it can also occur without these conditions.

The symptoms of HELLP syndrome include headache, nausea and vomiting, upper right abdominal pain, and visual disturbances. It can lead to serious complications for both the mother and the baby, such as liver failure, placental abruption, disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), and even death if not promptly diagnosed and treated.

The exact cause of HELLP syndrome is not known, but it is thought to be related to problems with the blood vessels that supply the placenta. Treatment typically involves delivering the baby as soon as possible, even if the baby is premature. Women who have had HELLP syndrome are at increased risk for complications in future pregnancies.

Blood coagulation disorders, also known as bleeding disorders or clotting disorders, refer to a group of medical conditions that affect the body's ability to form blood clots properly. Normally, when a blood vessel is injured, the body's coagulation system works to form a clot to stop the bleeding and promote healing.

In blood coagulation disorders, there can be either an increased tendency to bleed due to problems with the formation of clots (hemorrhagic disorder), or an increased tendency for clots to form inappropriately even without injury, leading to blockages in the blood vessels (thrombotic disorder).

Examples of hemorrhagic disorders include:

1. Hemophilia - a genetic disorder that affects the ability to form clots due to deficiencies in clotting factors VIII or IX.
2. Von Willebrand disease - another genetic disorder caused by a deficiency or abnormality of the von Willebrand factor, which helps platelets stick together to form a clot.
3. Liver diseases - can lead to decreased production of coagulation factors, increasing the risk of bleeding.
4. Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) - a serious condition where clotting and bleeding occur simultaneously due to widespread activation of the coagulation system.

Examples of thrombotic disorders include:

1. Factor V Leiden mutation - a genetic disorder that increases the risk of inappropriate blood clot formation.
2. Antithrombin III deficiency - a genetic disorder that impairs the body's ability to break down clots, increasing the risk of thrombosis.
3. Protein C or S deficiencies - genetic disorders that lead to an increased risk of thrombosis due to impaired regulation of the coagulation system.
4. Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) - an autoimmune disorder where the body produces antibodies against its own clotting factors, increasing the risk of thrombosis.

Treatment for blood coagulation disorders depends on the specific diagnosis and may include medications to manage bleeding or prevent clots, as well as lifestyle changes and monitoring to reduce the risk of complications.

Prothrombin time (PT) is a medical laboratory test that measures the time it takes for blood to clot. It's often used to evaluate the functioning of the extrinsic and common pathways of the coagulation system, which is responsible for blood clotting. Specifically, PT measures how long it takes for prothrombin (a protein produced by the liver) to be converted into thrombin, an enzyme that converts fibrinogen into fibrin and helps form a clot.

Prolonged PT may indicate a bleeding disorder or a deficiency in coagulation factors, such as vitamin K deficiency or the use of anticoagulant medications like warfarin. It's important to note that PT is often reported with an international normalized ratio (INR), which allows for standardization and comparison of results across different laboratories and reagent types.

Thrombopoietin receptors are a type of cell surface receptor found on megakaryocytes and platelets. They are also known as MPL (myeloproliferative leukemia virus) receptors. Thrombopoietin is a hormone that regulates the production of platelets in the body, and it binds to these receptors to stimulate the proliferation and differentiation of megakaryocytes, which are large bone marrow cells that produce platelets.

The thrombopoietin receptor is a type I transmembrane protein with an extracellular domain that contains the thrombopoietin-binding site, a single transmembrane domain, and an intracellular domain that contains several tyrosine residues that become phosphorylated upon thrombopoietin binding. This triggers a signaling cascade that leads to the activation of various downstream pathways involved in cell proliferation, differentiation, and survival.

Mutations in the thrombopoietin receptor gene have been associated with certain myeloproliferative neoplasms, such as essential thrombocythemia and primary myelofibrosis, which are characterized by excessive platelet production and bone marrow fibrosis.

Glycoprotein IIb (also known as integrin αIIbβ3 or CD41/CD61) is a type of protein found on the surface of platelets, which are small cell fragments involved in blood clotting. This glycoprotein plays a crucial role in the final pathway of platelet activation and aggregation, which ultimately leads to the formation of a clot to stop bleeding.

More specifically, Glycoprotein IIb is responsible for binding fibrinogen, von Willebrand factor, and other adhesive proteins in the blood, allowing platelets to bind together and form a clot. Mutations or defects in this glycoprotein can lead to bleeding disorders such as Glanzmann thrombasthenia, which is characterized by abnormal platelet function and excessive bleeding.

Hypersplenism is a condition characterized by an enlarged spleen (splenomegaly) that results in the abnormal removal or destruction of various blood components, such as red blood cells (RBCs), white blood cells (WBCs), and platelets. This leads to peripheral blood cytopenias, which means there is a decrease in one or more types of blood cells in the circulation.

The spleen becomes overactive in hypersplenism, and its increased removal of blood cells can be secondary to various underlying disorders, such as:

1. Infections: e.g., bacterial endocarditis, malaria, or EBV (Epstein-Barr virus) infection
2. Hematologic diseases: e.g., hemolytic anemias, thalassemia, leukemias, lymphomas, or myeloproliferative neoplasms
3. Cirrhosis and portal hypertension
4. Vascular disorders: e.g., splenic vein thrombosis or congestive splenomegaly
5. Storage diseases: e.g., Gaucher's disease, Niemann-Pick disease, or Hurler syndrome

Symptoms of hypersplenism may include fatigue, weakness, pallor (in case of anemia), infections (due to neutropenia), and easy bruising or bleeding (due to thrombocytopenia). Treatment for hypersplenism involves addressing the underlying cause. In some cases, splenectomy (surgical removal of the spleen) may be considered if the benefits outweigh the risks.

Hematologic tests, also known as hematology tests, are a group of diagnostic exams that evaluate the health and function of different components of blood, such as red and white blood cells, platelets, and clotting factors. These tests can detect various disorders, including anemia, infection, bleeding problems, and several types of cancer. Common hematologic tests include complete blood count (CBC), coagulation studies, peripheral smear examination, and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR). The specific test or combination of tests ordered will depend on the patient's symptoms, medical history, and physical examination findings.

In the field of medicine, "time factors" refer to the duration of symptoms or time elapsed since the onset of a medical condition, which can have significant implications for diagnosis and treatment. Understanding time factors is crucial in determining the progression of a disease, evaluating the effectiveness of treatments, and making critical decisions regarding patient care.

For example, in stroke management, "time is brain," meaning that rapid intervention within a specific time frame (usually within 4.5 hours) is essential to administering tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a clot-busting drug that can minimize brain damage and improve patient outcomes. Similarly, in trauma care, the "golden hour" concept emphasizes the importance of providing definitive care within the first 60 minutes after injury to increase survival rates and reduce morbidity.

Time factors also play a role in monitoring the progression of chronic conditions like diabetes or heart disease, where regular follow-ups and assessments help determine appropriate treatment adjustments and prevent complications. In infectious diseases, time factors are crucial for initiating antibiotic therapy and identifying potential outbreaks to control their spread.

Overall, "time factors" encompass the significance of recognizing and acting promptly in various medical scenarios to optimize patient outcomes and provide effective care.

Blood coagulation tests, also known as coagulation studies or clotting tests, are a series of medical tests used to evaluate the blood's ability to clot. These tests measure the functioning of various clotting factors and regulatory proteins involved in the coagulation cascade, which is a complex process that leads to the formation of a blood clot to prevent excessive bleeding.

The most commonly performed coagulation tests include:

1. Prothrombin Time (PT): Measures the time it takes for a sample of plasma to clot after the addition of calcium and tissue factor, which activates the extrinsic pathway of coagulation. The PT is reported in seconds and can be converted to an International Normalized Ratio (INR) to monitor anticoagulant therapy.
2. Activated Partial Thromboplastin Time (aPTT): Measures the time it takes for a sample of plasma to clot after the addition of calcium, phospholipid, and a contact activator, which activates the intrinsic pathway of coagulation. The aPTT is reported in seconds and is used to monitor heparin therapy.
3. Thrombin Time (TT): Measures the time it takes for a sample of plasma to clot after the addition of thrombin, which directly converts fibrinogen to fibrin. The TT is reported in seconds and can be used to detect the presence of fibrin degradation products or abnormalities in fibrinogen function.
4. Fibrinogen Level: Measures the amount of fibrinogen, a protein involved in clot formation, present in the blood. The level is reported in grams per liter (g/L) and can be used to assess bleeding risk or the effectiveness of fibrinogen replacement therapy.
5. D-dimer Level: Measures the amount of D-dimer, a protein fragment produced during the breakdown of a blood clot, present in the blood. The level is reported in micrograms per milliliter (µg/mL) and can be used to diagnose or exclude venous thromboembolism (VTE), such as deep vein thrombosis (DVT) or pulmonary embolism (PE).

These tests are important for the diagnosis, management, and monitoring of various bleeding and clotting disorders. They can help identify the underlying cause of abnormal bleeding or clotting, guide appropriate treatment decisions, and monitor the effectiveness of therapy. It is essential to interpret these test results in conjunction with a patient's clinical presentation and medical history.

Aspirin is the common name for acetylsalicylic acid, which is a medication used to relieve pain, reduce inflammation, and lower fever. It works by inhibiting the activity of an enzyme called cyclooxygenase (COX), which is involved in the production of prostaglandins, hormone-like substances that cause inflammation and pain. Aspirin also has an antiplatelet effect, which means it can help prevent blood clots from forming. This makes it useful for preventing heart attacks and strokes.

Aspirin is available over-the-counter in various forms, including tablets, capsules, and chewable tablets. It is also available in prescription strengths for certain medical conditions. As with any medication, aspirin should be taken as directed by a healthcare provider, and its use should be avoided in children and teenagers with viral infections due to the risk of Reye's syndrome, a rare but serious condition that can affect the liver and brain.

Hematocrit is a medical term that refers to the percentage of total blood volume that is made up of red blood cells. It is typically measured as part of a complete blood count (CBC) test. A high hematocrit may indicate conditions such as dehydration, polycythemia, or living at high altitudes, while a low hematocrit may be a sign of anemia, bleeding, or overhydration. It is important to note that hematocrit values can vary depending on factors such as age, gender, and pregnancy status.

"Cell count" is a medical term that refers to the process of determining the number of cells present in a given volume or sample of fluid or tissue. This can be done through various laboratory methods, such as counting individual cells under a microscope using a specialized grid called a hemocytometer, or using automated cell counters that use light scattering and electrical impedance techniques to count and classify different types of cells.

Cell counts are used in a variety of medical contexts, including hematology (the study of blood and blood-forming tissues), microbiology (the study of microscopic organisms), and pathology (the study of diseases and their causes). For example, a complete blood count (CBC) is a routine laboratory test that includes a white blood cell (WBC) count, red blood cell (RBC) count, hemoglobin level, hematocrit value, and platelet count. Abnormal cell counts can indicate the presence of various medical conditions, such as infections, anemia, or leukemia.

Thromboxane A2 (TXA2) is a potent prostanoid, a type of lipid compound derived from arachidonic acid. It is primarily produced and released by platelets upon activation during the process of hemostasis (the body's response to stop bleeding). TXA2 acts as a powerful vasoconstrictor, causing blood vessels to narrow, which helps limit blood loss at the site of injury. Additionally, it promotes platelet aggregation, contributing to the formation of a stable clot and preventing further bleeding. However, uncontrolled or excessive production of TXA2 can lead to thrombotic events such as heart attacks and strokes. Its effects are balanced by prostacyclin (PGI2), which is produced by endothelial cells and has opposing actions, acting as a vasodilator and inhibiting platelet aggregation. The balance between TXA2 and PGI2 helps maintain vascular homeostasis.

Plateletpheresis is a medical procedure that involves the collection of platelets from a donor's blood through a process called apheresis. In this process, whole blood is withdrawn from the donor, and the platelets are separated from other blood components using a specialized machine. The separated platelets are then collected in a sterile bag, while the remaining blood components (red blood cells, white blood cells, and plasma) are returned to the donor's body.

Plateletpheresis is often used to collect platelets for transfusion purposes, particularly for patients who require large volumes of platelets due to conditions such as leukemia, aplastic anemia, or other forms of cancer. It is also used in the treatment of thrombocytopenia, a condition characterized by abnormally low levels of platelets in the blood.

The procedure typically takes between one to two hours and requires the use of a specialized machine and trained medical staff. Donors may experience mild side effects such as fatigue, bruising, or discomfort at the site where the needle was inserted, but serious complications are rare.

Partial Thromboplastin Time (PTT) is a medical laboratory test that measures the time it takes for blood to clot. It's more specifically a measure of the intrinsic and common pathways of the coagulation cascade, which are the series of chemical reactions that lead to the formation of a clot.

The test involves adding a partial thromboplastin reagent (an activator of the intrinsic pathway) and calcium to plasma, and then measuring the time it takes for a fibrin clot to form. This is compared to a control sample, and the ratio of the two times is calculated.

The PTT test is often used to help diagnose bleeding disorders or abnormal blood clotting, such as hemophilia or disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). It can also be used to monitor the effectiveness of anticoagulant therapy, such as heparin. Prolonged PTT results may indicate a bleeding disorder or an increased risk of bleeding, while shortened PTT results may indicate a hypercoagulable state and an increased risk of thrombosis.

Platelet Factor 3 (PF3) is not a separate protein entity but rather refers to the complex formed when platelets are activated and expose their inner membrane, specifically a phospholipid-rich granule called the granule membrane particle, to the outside. This complex of platelet membrane with coagulation factors then serves as a catalytic surface for the acceleration of thrombin formation in the coagulation cascade.

In other words, PF3 is a part of the activated platelet's surface that plays an important role in blood clotting by promoting the conversion of prothrombin to thrombin and the subsequent fibrin formation, which helps to strengthen the clot.

Collagen is the most abundant protein in the human body, and it is a major component of connective tissues such as tendons, ligaments, skin, and bones. Collagen provides structure and strength to these tissues and helps them to withstand stretching and tension. It is made up of long chains of amino acids, primarily glycine, proline, and hydroxyproline, which are arranged in a triple helix structure. There are at least 16 different types of collagen found in the body, each with slightly different structures and functions. Collagen is important for maintaining the integrity and health of tissues throughout the body, and it has been studied for its potential therapeutic uses in various medical conditions.

Heparin is defined as a highly sulfated glycosaminoglycan (a type of polysaccharide) that is widely present in many tissues, but is most commonly derived from the mucosal tissues of mammalian lungs or intestinal mucosa. It is an anticoagulant that acts as an inhibitor of several enzymes involved in the blood coagulation cascade, primarily by activating antithrombin III which then neutralizes thrombin and other clotting factors.

Heparin is used medically to prevent and treat thromboembolic disorders such as deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, and certain types of heart attacks. It can also be used during hemodialysis, cardiac bypass surgery, and other medical procedures to prevent the formation of blood clots.

It's important to note that while heparin is a powerful anticoagulant, it does not have any fibrinolytic activity, meaning it cannot dissolve existing blood clots. Instead, it prevents new clots from forming and stops existing clots from growing larger.

Hematology is a branch of medicine that deals with the study of blood, its physiology, and pathophysiology. It involves the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of diseases related to the blood and blood-forming organs such as the bone marrow, spleen, and lymphatic system. This includes disorders of red and white blood cells, platelets, hemoglobin, blood vessels, and coagulation (blood clotting). Some common hematological diseases include anemia, leukemia, lymphoma, sickle cell disease, and bleeding disorders like hemophilia.

Blood coagulation factors, also known as clotting factors, are a group of proteins that play a crucial role in the blood coagulation process. They are essential for maintaining hemostasis, which is the body's ability to stop bleeding after injury.

There are 13 known blood coagulation factors, and they are designated by Roman numerals I through XIII. These factors are produced in the liver and are normally present in an inactive form in the blood. When there is an injury to a blood vessel, the coagulation process is initiated, leading to the activation of these factors in a specific order.

The coagulation cascade involves two pathways: the intrinsic and extrinsic pathways. The intrinsic pathway is activated when there is damage to the blood vessel itself, while the extrinsic pathway is activated by tissue factor released from damaged tissues. Both pathways converge at the common pathway, leading to the formation of a fibrin clot.

Blood coagulation factors work together in a complex series of reactions that involve activation, binding, and proteolysis. When one factor is activated, it activates the next factor in the cascade, and so on. This process continues until a stable fibrin clot is formed.

Deficiencies or abnormalities in blood coagulation factors can lead to bleeding disorders such as hemophilia or thrombosis. Hemophilia is a genetic disorder that affects one or more of the coagulation factors, leading to excessive bleeding and difficulty forming clots. Thrombosis, on the other hand, occurs when there is an abnormal formation of blood clots in the blood vessels, which can lead to serious complications such as stroke or pulmonary embolism.

Hematologic pregnancy complications refer to disorders related to the blood and blood-forming tissues that occur during pregnancy. These complications can have serious consequences for both the mother and the fetus if not properly managed. Some common hematologic pregnancy complications include:

1. Anemia: A condition characterized by a decrease in the number of red blood cells or hemoglobin in the blood, which can lead to fatigue, weakness, and shortness of breath. Iron-deficiency anemia is the most common type of anemia during pregnancy.
2. Thrombocytopenia: A condition characterized by a decrease in the number of platelets (cells that help blood clot) in the blood. Mild thrombocytopenia is relatively common during pregnancy, but severe thrombocytopenia can increase the risk of bleeding during delivery.
3. Gestational thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (GTTP): A rare but serious disorder that can cause blood clots to form in small blood vessels throughout the body, leading to a decrease in the number of platelets and red blood cells. GTTP can cause serious complications such as stroke, kidney failure, and even death if not promptly diagnosed and treated.
4. Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC): A condition characterized by abnormal clotting and bleeding throughout the body. DIC can be triggered by various conditions such as severe infections, pregnancy complications, or cancer.
5. Hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelets (HELLP) syndrome: A serious complication of pregnancy that can cause damage to the liver and lead to bleeding. HELLP syndrome is often associated with preeclampsia, a condition characterized by high blood pressure and damage to organs such as the liver and kidneys.

It's important for pregnant women to receive regular prenatal care to monitor for these and other potential complications, and to seek prompt medical attention if any concerning symptoms arise.

Treatment outcome is a term used to describe the result or effect of medical treatment on a patient's health status. It can be measured in various ways, such as through symptoms improvement, disease remission, reduced disability, improved quality of life, or survival rates. The treatment outcome helps healthcare providers evaluate the effectiveness of a particular treatment plan and make informed decisions about future care. It is also used in clinical research to compare the efficacy of different treatments and improve patient care.

Platelet Storage Pool Deficiency (PSPD) is a group of bleeding disorders characterized by a decrease in the number or function of secretory granules (storage pools) in platelets, which are small blood cells that play a crucial role in clotting. These granules contain various substances such as ADP (adenosine diphosphate), ATP (adenosine triphosphate), calcium ions, and serotonin, which are released during platelet activation to help promote clot formation.

In PSPD, the quantitative or qualitative deficiency of these granules leads to impaired platelet function and increased bleeding tendency. The condition can be inherited or acquired, and it is often classified based on the type of granule affected: dense granules (delta granules) or alpha granules.

Delta granule deficiency, also known as Dense Granule Deficiency (DGD), results in decreased levels of ADP, ATP, and calcium ions, while alpha granule deficiency leads to reduced levels of von Willebrand factor, fibrinogen, and other clotting factors.

Symptoms of PSPD can vary from mild to severe and may include easy bruising, prolonged bleeding after injury or surgery, nosebleeds, and gum bleeding. The diagnosis typically involves platelet function tests, electron microscopy, and genetic testing. Treatment options depend on the severity of the condition and may include desmopressin (DDAVP), platelet transfusions, or other medications to manage bleeding symptoms.

Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP) is a portion of the plasma fraction of autologous blood that has a platelet concentration above baseline. It is often used in the medical field for its growth factor content, which can help to stimulate healing and tissue regeneration in various types of injuries and degenerative conditions. The preparation process involves drawing a patient's own blood, centrifuging it to separate the platelets and plasma from the red and white blood cells, and then extracting the platelet-rich portion of the plasma. This concentrated solution is then injected back into the site of injury or damage to promote healing.

Serotonin, also known as 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), is a monoamine neurotransmitter that is found primarily in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, blood platelets, and the central nervous system (CNS) of humans and other animals. It is produced by the conversion of the amino acid tryptophan to 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP), and then to serotonin.

In the CNS, serotonin plays a role in regulating mood, appetite, sleep, memory, learning, and behavior, among other functions. It also acts as a vasoconstrictor, helping to regulate blood flow and blood pressure. In the GI tract, it is involved in peristalsis, the contraction and relaxation of muscles that moves food through the digestive system.

Serotonin is synthesized and stored in serotonergic neurons, which are nerve cells that use serotonin as their primary neurotransmitter. These neurons are found throughout the brain and spinal cord, and they communicate with other neurons by releasing serotonin into the synapse, the small gap between two neurons.

Abnormal levels of serotonin have been linked to a variety of disorders, including depression, anxiety, schizophrenia, and migraines. Medications that affect serotonin levels, such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), are commonly used to treat these conditions.

Thromboelastography (TEG) is a viscoelastic method used to assess the kinetics of clot formation, clot strength, and fibrinolysis in whole blood. It provides a global assessment of hemostasis by measuring the mechanical properties of a clot as it forms and dissolves over time. The TEG graph displays several parameters that reflect the different stages of clotting, including reaction time (R), clot formation time (K), angle of clot formation (α), maximum amplitude (MA), and percentage lysis at 30 minutes (LY30). These parameters can help guide transfusion therapy and inform decisions regarding the management of coagulopathy in various clinical settings, such as trauma, cardiac surgery, liver transplantation, and obstetrics.

Retrospective studies, also known as retrospective research or looking back studies, are a type of observational study that examines data from the past to draw conclusions about possible causal relationships between risk factors and outcomes. In these studies, researchers analyze existing records, medical charts, or previously collected data to test a hypothesis or answer a specific research question.

Retrospective studies can be useful for generating hypotheses and identifying trends, but they have limitations compared to prospective studies, which follow participants forward in time from exposure to outcome. Retrospective studies are subject to biases such as recall bias, selection bias, and information bias, which can affect the validity of the results. Therefore, retrospective studies should be interpreted with caution and used primarily to generate hypotheses for further testing in prospective studies.

Neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (NAIT) is a medical condition that occurs in newborns when the mother's immune system produces antibodies against the baby's platelets. This happens because the baby inherits platelet antigens from the father that are different from those of the mother, causing an immune response that destroys the baby's platelets.

NAIT is a rare but serious condition that can lead to severe bleeding in newborns, particularly in the brain, which can result in long-term neurological damage or even death. Symptoms of NAIT may include petechiae (small red spots on the skin caused by bleeding under the skin), bruising, and excessive bleeding during delivery or after circumcision.

Diagnosis of NAIT is typically made through blood tests that measure platelet counts and identify the specific platelet antigens involved. Treatment may include transfusions of platelets or plasma, corticosteroids to suppress the mother's immune response, or intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) therapy to help prevent further destruction of the baby's platelets. In severe cases, exchange transfusion may be necessary to remove the antibodies from the baby's bloodstream.

Prevention of NAIT involves identifying mothers at risk and administering prophylactic treatment during pregnancy or before delivery. This is typically done through testing for platelet antigens in both parents and providing immunoglobulin therapy to the mother if there is a mismatch.

Ristocetin is not a medical condition but a type of antibiotic used to treat infections caused by certain Gram-positive bacteria that are resistant to other antibiotics. Ristocetin is an glycopeptide antibiotic, which works by binding to the bacterial cell wall and inhibiting its synthesis, leading to bacterial death. It is not commonly used due to its potential to cause blood disorders, such as thrombocytopenia (low platelet count) and platelet aggregation.

In medical literature, ristocetin is also known for its use in the laboratory setting as a reagent for the platelet function test, called the ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation (RIPA) assay. This test is used to evaluate the ability of platelets to aggregate and form clots in response to ristocetin, which can help diagnose certain bleeding disorders such as Bernard-Soulier syndrome and von Willebrand disease.

A reticulocyte count is a laboratory test that measures the percentage of reticulocytes in the peripheral blood. Reticulocytes are immature red blood cells produced in the bone marrow and released into the bloodstream. They contain residual ribosomal RNA, which gives them a reticular or net-like appearance under a microscope when stained with certain dyes.

The reticulocyte count is often used as an indicator of the rate of red blood cell production in the bone marrow. A higher than normal reticulocyte count may indicate an increased production of red blood cells, which can be seen in conditions such as hemolysis, blood loss, or response to treatment of anemia. A lower than normal reticulocyte count may suggest a decreased production of red blood cells, which can be seen in conditions such as bone marrow suppression, aplastic anemia, or vitamin deficiencies.

The reticulocyte count is usually expressed as a percentage of the total number of red blood cells, but it can also be reported as an absolute reticulocyte count (the actual number of reticulocytes per microliter of blood). The normal range for the reticulocyte count varies depending on the laboratory and the population studied.

Bone marrow is the spongy tissue found inside certain bones in the body, such as the hips, thighs, and vertebrae. It is responsible for producing blood-forming cells, including red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. There are two types of bone marrow: red marrow, which is involved in blood cell production, and yellow marrow, which contains fatty tissue.

Red bone marrow contains hematopoietic stem cells, which can differentiate into various types of blood cells. These stem cells continuously divide and mature to produce new blood cells that are released into the circulation. Red blood cells carry oxygen throughout the body, white blood cells help fight infections, and platelets play a crucial role in blood clotting.

Bone marrow also serves as a site for immune cell development and maturation. It contains various types of immune cells, such as lymphocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells, which help protect the body against infections and diseases.

Abnormalities in bone marrow function can lead to several medical conditions, including anemia, leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, and various types of cancer, such as leukemia and multiple myeloma. Bone marrow aspiration and biopsy are common diagnostic procedures used to evaluate bone marrow health and function.

Blood preservation refers to the process of keeping blood viable and functional outside of the body for transfusion purposes. This is typically achieved through the addition of various chemical additives, such as anticoagulants and nutrients, to a storage solution in which the blood is contained. The preserved blood is then refrigerated or frozen until it is needed for transfusion.

The goal of blood preservation is to maintain the structural integrity and functional capacity of the red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets, as well as the coagulation factors, in order to ensure that the transfused blood is safe and effective. Different storage conditions and additives are used for the preservation of different components of blood, depending on their specific requirements.

It's important to note that while blood preservation extends the shelf life of donated blood, it does not last indefinitely. The length of time that blood can be stored depends on several factors, including the type of blood component and the storage conditions. Regular testing is performed to ensure that the preserved blood remains safe and effective for transfusion.

Hematopoiesis is the process of forming and developing blood cells. It occurs in the bone marrow and includes the production of red blood cells (erythropoiesis), white blood cells (leukopoiesis), and platelets (thrombopoiesis). This process is regulated by various growth factors, hormones, and cytokines. Hematopoiesis begins early in fetal development and continues throughout a person's life. Disorders of hematopoiesis can result in conditions such as anemia, leukopenia, leukocytosis, thrombocytopenia, or thrombocytosis.

Hemorrhagic disorders are medical conditions characterized by abnormal bleeding due to impaired blood clotting. This can result from deficiencies in coagulation factors, platelet dysfunction, or the use of medications that interfere with normal clotting processes. Examples include hemophilia, von Willebrand disease, and disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). Treatment often involves replacing the missing clotting factor or administering medications to help control bleeding.

Prospective studies, also known as longitudinal studies, are a type of cohort study in which data is collected forward in time, following a group of individuals who share a common characteristic or exposure over a period of time. The researchers clearly define the study population and exposure of interest at the beginning of the study and follow up with the participants to determine the outcomes that develop over time. This type of study design allows for the investigation of causal relationships between exposures and outcomes, as well as the identification of risk factors and the estimation of disease incidence rates. Prospective studies are particularly useful in epidemiology and medical research when studying diseases with long latency periods or rare outcomes.

Recombinant proteins are artificially created proteins produced through the use of recombinant DNA technology. This process involves combining DNA molecules from different sources to create a new set of genes that encode for a specific protein. The resulting recombinant protein can then be expressed, purified, and used for various applications in research, medicine, and industry.

Recombinant proteins are widely used in biomedical research to study protein function, structure, and interactions. They are also used in the development of diagnostic tests, vaccines, and therapeutic drugs. For example, recombinant insulin is a common treatment for diabetes, while recombinant human growth hormone is used to treat growth disorders.

The production of recombinant proteins typically involves the use of host cells, such as bacteria, yeast, or mammalian cells, which are engineered to express the desired protein. The host cells are transformed with a plasmid vector containing the gene of interest, along with regulatory elements that control its expression. Once the host cells are cultured and the protein is expressed, it can be purified using various chromatography techniques.

Overall, recombinant proteins have revolutionized many areas of biology and medicine, enabling researchers to study and manipulate proteins in ways that were previously impossible.

Purinergic P2Y12 receptors are a type of G protein-coupled receptor that bind to and are activated by adenosine diphosphate (ADP). These receptors play an important role in regulating platelet activation and aggregation, which is crucial for the normal hemostatic response to vascular injury.

The P2Y12 receptor is a key component of the platelet signaling pathway that leads to the activation of integrin αIIbβ3, which mediates platelet aggregation. Inhibition of the P2Y12 receptor with drugs such as clopidogrel or ticagrelor is a standard treatment for preventing thrombosis in patients at risk of arterial occlusion, such as those with acute coronary syndrome or following percutaneous coronary intervention.

P2Y12 receptors are also expressed on other cell types, including immune cells and neurons, where they play roles in inflammation, neurotransmission, and other physiological processes.

Intravenous Immunoglobulins (IVIG) are a preparation of antibodies, specifically immunoglobulins, that are derived from the plasma of healthy donors. They are administered intravenously to provide passive immunity and help boost the immune system's response in individuals with weakened or compromised immune systems. IVIG can be used for various medical conditions such as primary immunodeficiency disorders, secondary immunodeficiencies, autoimmune diseases, and some infectious diseases. The administration of IVIG can help prevent infections, reduce the severity and frequency of infections, and manage the symptoms of certain autoimmune disorders. It is important to note that while IVIG provides temporary immunity, it does not replace a person's own immune system.

A blood transfusion is a medical procedure in which blood or its components are transferred from one individual (donor) to another (recipient) through a vein. The donated blood can be fresh whole blood, packed red blood cells, platelets, plasma, or cryoprecipitate, depending on the recipient's needs. Blood transfusions are performed to replace lost blood due to severe bleeding, treat anemia, support patients undergoing major surgeries, or manage various medical conditions such as hemophilia, thalassemia, and leukemia. The donated blood must be carefully cross-matched with the recipient's blood type to minimize the risk of transfusion reactions.

Monoclonal antibodies are a type of antibody that are identical because they are produced by a single clone of cells. They are laboratory-produced molecules that act like human antibodies in the immune system. They can be designed to attach to specific proteins found on the surface of cancer cells, making them useful for targeting and treating cancer. Monoclonal antibodies can also be used as a therapy for other diseases, such as autoimmune disorders and inflammatory conditions.

Monoclonal antibodies are produced by fusing a single type of immune cell, called a B cell, with a tumor cell to create a hybrid cell, or hybridoma. This hybrid cell is then able to replicate indefinitely, producing a large number of identical copies of the original antibody. These antibodies can be further modified and engineered to enhance their ability to bind to specific targets, increase their stability, and improve their effectiveness as therapeutic agents.

Monoclonal antibodies have several mechanisms of action in cancer therapy. They can directly kill cancer cells by binding to them and triggering an immune response. They can also block the signals that promote cancer growth and survival. Additionally, monoclonal antibodies can be used to deliver drugs or radiation directly to cancer cells, increasing the effectiveness of these treatments while minimizing their side effects on healthy tissues.

Monoclonal antibodies have become an important tool in modern medicine, with several approved for use in cancer therapy and other diseases. They are continuing to be studied and developed as a promising approach to treating a wide range of medical conditions.

Hemoglobin (Hb or Hgb) is the main oxygen-carrying protein in the red blood cells, which are responsible for delivering oxygen throughout the body. It is a complex molecule made up of four globin proteins and four heme groups. Each heme group contains an iron atom that binds to one molecule of oxygen. Hemoglobin plays a crucial role in the transport of oxygen from the lungs to the body's tissues, and also helps to carry carbon dioxide back to the lungs for exhalation.

There are several types of hemoglobin present in the human body, including:

* Hemoglobin A (HbA): This is the most common type of hemoglobin, making up about 95-98% of total hemoglobin in adults. It consists of two alpha and two beta globin chains.
* Hemoglobin A2 (HbA2): This makes up about 1.5-3.5% of total hemoglobin in adults. It consists of two alpha and two delta globin chains.
* Hemoglobin F (HbF): This is the main type of hemoglobin present in fetal life, but it persists at low levels in adults. It consists of two alpha and two gamma globin chains.
* Hemoglobin S (HbS): This is an abnormal form of hemoglobin that can cause sickle cell disease when it occurs in the homozygous state (i.e., both copies of the gene are affected). It results from a single amino acid substitution in the beta globin chain.
* Hemoglobin C (HbC): This is another abnormal form of hemoglobin that can cause mild to moderate hemolytic anemia when it occurs in the homozygous state. It results from a different single amino acid substitution in the beta globin chain than HbS.

Abnormal forms of hemoglobin, such as HbS and HbC, can lead to various clinical disorders, including sickle cell disease, thalassemia, and other hemoglobinopathies.

Anticoagulants are a class of medications that work to prevent the formation of blood clots in the body. They do this by inhibiting the coagulation cascade, which is a series of chemical reactions that lead to the formation of a clot. Anticoagulants can be given orally, intravenously, or subcutaneously, depending on the specific drug and the individual patient's needs.

There are several different types of anticoagulants, including:

1. Heparin: This is a naturally occurring anticoagulant that is often used in hospitalized patients who require immediate anticoagulation. It works by activating an enzyme called antithrombin III, which inhibits the formation of clots.
2. Low molecular weight heparin (LMWH): LMWH is a form of heparin that has been broken down into smaller molecules. It has a longer half-life than standard heparin and can be given once or twice daily by subcutaneous injection.
3. Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs): These are newer oral anticoagulants that work by directly inhibiting specific clotting factors in the coagulation cascade. Examples include apixaban, rivaroxaban, and dabigatran.
4. Vitamin K antagonists: These are older oral anticoagulants that work by inhibiting the action of vitamin K, which is necessary for the formation of clotting factors. Warfarin is an example of a vitamin K antagonist.

Anticoagulants are used to prevent and treat a variety of conditions, including deep vein thrombosis (DVT), pulmonary embolism (PE), atrial fibrillation, and prosthetic heart valve thrombosis. It is important to note that anticoagulants can increase the risk of bleeding, so they must be used with caution and regular monitoring of blood clotting times may be required.

A lymphocyte count is a laboratory test that measures the number of white blood cells called lymphocytes in a sample of blood. Lymphocytes are a vital part of the immune system and help fight off infections and diseases. A normal lymphocyte count ranges from 1,000 to 4,800 cells per microliter (µL) of blood for adults.

An abnormal lymphocyte count can indicate an infection, immune disorder, or blood cancer. A low lymphocyte count is called lymphopenia, while a high lymphocyte count is called lymphocytosis. The cause of an abnormal lymphocyte count should be investigated through further testing and clinical evaluation.

Flow cytometry is a medical and research technique used to measure physical and chemical characteristics of cells or particles, one cell at a time, as they flow in a fluid stream through a beam of light. The properties measured include:

* Cell size (light scatter)
* Cell internal complexity (granularity, also light scatter)
* Presence or absence of specific proteins or other molecules on the cell surface or inside the cell (using fluorescent antibodies or other fluorescent probes)

The technique is widely used in cell counting, cell sorting, protein engineering, biomarker discovery and monitoring disease progression, particularly in hematology, immunology, and cancer research.

Pipicolic acid is not a term that refers to a specific medical condition or disease. Instead, it is a metabolite that is involved in the body's metabolic processes.

Pipicolic acid is a type of organic compound called a cyclic amino acid, which is derived from the amino acid lysine. It is produced in the liver and is excreted in urine. Pipicolic acid has been found to have various functions in the body, including regulating the metabolism of lipids and bile acids.

Abnormal levels of pipicolic acid in the body may be associated with certain medical conditions, such as liver disease or genetic disorders that affect amino acid metabolism. However, pipicolic acid is not typically used as a diagnostic marker for these conditions.

In summary, pipicolic acid is a cyclic amino acid produced in the liver and involved in various metabolic processes in the body. Abnormal levels of pipicolic acid may be associated with certain medical conditions but are not typically used as diagnostic markers.

A dose-response relationship in the context of drugs refers to the changes in the effects or symptoms that occur as the dose of a drug is increased or decreased. Generally, as the dose of a drug is increased, the severity or intensity of its effects also increases. Conversely, as the dose is decreased, the effects of the drug become less severe or may disappear altogether.

The dose-response relationship is an important concept in pharmacology and toxicology because it helps to establish the safe and effective dosage range for a drug. By understanding how changes in the dose of a drug affect its therapeutic and adverse effects, healthcare providers can optimize treatment plans for their patients while minimizing the risk of harm.

The dose-response relationship is typically depicted as a curve that shows the relationship between the dose of a drug and its effect. The shape of the curve may vary depending on the drug and the specific effect being measured. Some drugs may have a steep dose-response curve, meaning that small changes in the dose can result in large differences in the effect. Other drugs may have a more gradual dose-response curve, where larger changes in the dose are needed to produce significant effects.

In addition to helping establish safe and effective dosages, the dose-response relationship is also used to evaluate the potential therapeutic benefits and risks of new drugs during clinical trials. By systematically testing different doses of a drug in controlled studies, researchers can identify the optimal dosage range for the drug and assess its safety and efficacy.

Liver cirrhosis is a chronic, progressive disease characterized by the replacement of normal liver tissue with scarred (fibrotic) tissue, leading to loss of function. The scarring is caused by long-term damage from various sources such as hepatitis, alcohol abuse, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and other causes. As the disease advances, it can lead to complications like portal hypertension, fluid accumulation in the abdomen (ascites), impaired brain function (hepatic encephalopathy), and increased risk of liver cancer. It is generally irreversible, but early detection and treatment of underlying causes may help slow down its progression.

Thrombasthenia is a rare bleeding disorder that is inherited and caused by a deficiency or dysfunction of the platelet glycoprotein IIb/IIIa complex. This complex plays a crucial role in platelet aggregation, which is necessary for blood clotting. When it's defective or absent, platelets are unable to aggregate properly, leading to prolonged bleeding times and symptoms such as easy bruising, nosebleeds, and excessive bleeding following injury or surgery. There are two main types of thrombasthenia: Glanzmann's thrombasthenia and pseudo-thrombasthenia.

Primary myelofibrosis (PMF) is a rare, chronic bone marrow disorder characterized by the replacement of normal bone marrow tissue with fibrous scar tissue, leading to impaired production of blood cells. This results in cytopenias (anemia, leukopenia, thrombocytopenia), which can cause fatigue, infection susceptibility, and bleeding tendencies. Additionally, PMF is often accompanied by the proliferation of abnormal megakaryocytes (large, atypical bone marrow cells that produce platelets) and extramedullary hematopoiesis (blood cell formation outside the bone marrow, typically in the spleen and liver).

PMF is a type of myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN), which is a group of clonal stem cell disorders characterized by excessive proliferation of one or more types of blood cells. PMF can present with various symptoms such as fatigue, weight loss, night sweats, abdominal discomfort due to splenomegaly (enlarged spleen), and bone pain. In some cases, PMF may progress to acute myeloid leukemia (AML).

The exact cause of PMF remains unclear; however, genetic mutations are known to play a significant role in its development. The Janus kinase 2 (JAK2), calreticulin (CALR), and MPL genes have been identified as commonly mutated in PMF patients. These genetic alterations contribute to the dysregulated production of blood cells and the activation of signaling pathways that promote fibrosis.

Diagnosis of PMF typically involves a combination of clinical evaluation, complete blood count (CBC), bone marrow aspiration and biopsy, cytogenetic analysis, and molecular testing to identify genetic mutations. Treatment options depend on the individual patient's symptoms, risk stratification, and disease progression. They may include observation, supportive care, medications to manage symptoms and control the disease (such as JAK inhibitors), and stem cell transplantation for eligible patients.

Bernard-Soulier Syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive bleeding disorder characterized by a deficiency or dysfunction of the glycoprotein Ib-IX-V complex, which is a crucial component of platelet function. This complex plays a role in the initial adhesion of platelets to the damaged endothelium at the site of blood vessel injury.

The deficiency or dysfunction of this complex leads to abnormalities in platelet aggregation and results in prolonged bleeding times, increased bruising, and excessive blood loss during menstruation, surgery, or trauma. Additionally, individuals with Bernard-Soulier Syndrome often have giant platelets and a decreased platelet count (thrombocytopenia).

The syndrome is named after Jean J. Bernard and Jean-Pierre Soulier, who first described the disorder in 1948. It has an estimated prevalence of about 1 in one million individuals worldwide.

Platelet activation is the process by which platelets (also known as thrombocytes) become biologically active and change from their inactive discoid shape to a spherical shape with pseudopodia, resulting in the release of chemical mediators that are involved in hemostasis and thrombosis. This process is initiated by various stimuli such as exposure to subendothelial collagen, von Willebrand factor, or thrombin during vascular injury, leading to platelet aggregation and the formation of a platelet plug to stop bleeding. Platelet activation also plays a role in inflammation, immune response, and wound healing.

Prognosis is a medical term that refers to the prediction of the likely outcome or course of a disease, including the chances of recovery or recurrence, based on the patient's symptoms, medical history, physical examination, and diagnostic tests. It is an important aspect of clinical decision-making and patient communication, as it helps doctors and patients make informed decisions about treatment options, set realistic expectations, and plan for future care.

Prognosis can be expressed in various ways, such as percentages, categories (e.g., good, fair, poor), or survival rates, depending on the nature of the disease and the available evidence. However, it is important to note that prognosis is not an exact science and may vary depending on individual factors, such as age, overall health status, and response to treatment. Therefore, it should be used as a guide rather than a definitive forecast.

Leukocytes, also known as white blood cells (WBCs), are a crucial component of the human immune system. They are responsible for protecting the body against infections and foreign substances. Leukocytes are produced in the bone marrow and circulate throughout the body in the bloodstream and lymphatic system.

There are several types of leukocytes, including:

1. Neutrophils - These are the most abundant type of leukocyte and are primarily responsible for fighting bacterial infections. They contain enzymes that can destroy bacteria.
2. Lymphocytes - These are responsible for producing antibodies and destroying virus-infected cells, as well as cancer cells. There are two main types of lymphocytes: B-lymphocytes and T-lymphocytes.
3. Monocytes - These are the largest type of leukocyte and help to break down and remove dead or damaged tissues, as well as microorganisms.
4. Eosinophils - These play a role in fighting parasitic infections and are also involved in allergic reactions and inflammation.
5. Basophils - These release histamine and other chemicals that cause inflammation in response to allergens or irritants.

An abnormal increase or decrease in the number of leukocytes can indicate an underlying medical condition, such as an infection, inflammation, or a blood disorder.

Blood proteins, also known as serum proteins, are a group of complex molecules present in the blood that are essential for various physiological functions. These proteins include albumin, globulins (alpha, beta, and gamma), and fibrinogen. They play crucial roles in maintaining oncotic pressure, transporting hormones, enzymes, vitamins, and minerals, providing immune defense, and contributing to blood clotting.

Albumin is the most abundant protein in the blood, accounting for about 60% of the total protein mass. It functions as a transporter of various substances, such as hormones, fatty acids, and drugs, and helps maintain oncotic pressure, which is essential for fluid balance between the blood vessels and surrounding tissues.

Globulins are divided into three main categories: alpha, beta, and gamma globulins. Alpha and beta globulins consist of transport proteins like lipoproteins, hormone-binding proteins, and enzymes. Gamma globulins, also known as immunoglobulins or antibodies, are essential for the immune system's defense against pathogens.

Fibrinogen is a protein involved in blood clotting. When an injury occurs, fibrinogen is converted into fibrin, which forms a mesh to trap platelets and form a clot, preventing excessive bleeding.

Abnormal levels of these proteins can indicate various medical conditions, such as liver or kidney disease, malnutrition, infections, inflammation, or autoimmune disorders. Blood protein levels are typically measured through laboratory tests like serum protein electrophoresis (SPE) and immunoelectrophoresis (IEP).

Leukocytosis is a condition characterized by an increased number of leukocytes (white blood cells) in the peripheral blood. A normal white blood cell count ranges from 4,500 to 11,000 cells per microliter of blood in adults. Leukocytosis is typically considered present when the white blood cell count exceeds 11,000 cells/µL. However, the definition might vary slightly depending on the laboratory and clinical context.

Leukocytosis can be a response to various underlying conditions, including bacterial or viral infections, inflammation, tissue damage, leukemia, and other hematological disorders. It is essential to investigate the cause of leukocytosis through further diagnostic tests, such as blood smears, differential counts, and additional laboratory and imaging studies, to guide appropriate treatment.

Mean Platelet Volume (MPV) is a measurement of the average size of platelets, also known as thrombocytes, in a sample of blood. It is often reported as part of a complete blood count (CBC) test. The normal range for MPV varies slightly among laboratories, but it's generally between 7.5 and 11.5 femtoliters (fL).

An increased MPV may indicate the presence of larger, younger platelets, which could suggest an increased rate of platelet production in the bone marrow. This can be seen in conditions such as certain types of anemia, bone marrow disorders, and some inflammatory diseases. A decreased MPV may indicate smaller, older platelets, which could suggest a decreased rate of platelet production or an increased rate of platelet destruction.

It's important to note that while MPV can provide additional information about the size and age of platelets, it should not be used as a standalone test for diagnosing medical conditions. It is typically interpreted in conjunction with other laboratory results and clinical findings.

Cytoplasmic granules are small, membrane-bound organelles or inclusions found within the cytoplasm of cells. They contain various substances such as proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, and genetic material. Cytoplasmic granules have diverse functions depending on their specific composition and cellular location. Some examples include:

1. Secretory granules: These are found in secretory cells and store hormones, neurotransmitters, or enzymes before they are released by exocytosis.
2. Lysosomes: These are membrane-bound organelles that contain hydrolytic enzymes for intracellular digestion of waste materials, foreign substances, and damaged organelles.
3. Melanosomes: Found in melanocytes, these granules produce and store the pigment melanin, which is responsible for skin, hair, and eye color.
4. Weibel-Palade bodies: These are found in endothelial cells and store von Willebrand factor and P-selectin, which play roles in hemostasis and inflammation.
5. Peroxisomes: These are single-membrane organelles that contain enzymes for various metabolic processes, such as β-oxidation of fatty acids and detoxification of harmful substances.
6. Lipid bodies (also called lipid droplets): These are cytoplasmic granules that store neutral lipids, such as triglycerides and cholesteryl esters. They play a role in energy metabolism and intracellular signaling.
7. Glycogen granules: These are cytoplasmic inclusions that store glycogen, a polysaccharide used for energy storage in animals.
8. Protein bodies: Found in plants, these granules store excess proteins and help regulate protein homeostasis within the cell.
9. Electron-dense granules: These are found in certain immune cells, such as mast cells and basophils, and release mediators like histamine during an allergic response.
10. Granules of unknown composition or function may also be present in various cell types.

I believe there may be some confusion in your question. "Rabbits" is a common name used to refer to the Lagomorpha species, particularly members of the family Leporidae. They are small mammals known for their long ears, strong legs, and quick reproduction.

However, if you're referring to "rabbits" in a medical context, there is a term called "rabbit syndrome," which is a rare movement disorder characterized by repetitive, involuntary movements of the fingers, resembling those of a rabbit chewing. It is also known as "finger-chewing chorea." This condition is usually associated with certain medications, particularly antipsychotics, and typically resolves when the medication is stopped or adjusted.

Fibrinolysis is the natural process in the body that leads to the dissolution of blood clots. It is a vital part of hemostasis, the process that regulates bleeding and wound healing. Fibrinolysis occurs when plasminogen activators convert plasminogen to plasmin, an enzyme that breaks down fibrin, the insoluble protein mesh that forms the structure of a blood clot. This process helps to prevent excessive clotting and maintains the fluidity of the blood. In medical settings, fibrinolysis can also refer to the therapeutic use of drugs that stimulate this process to dissolve unwanted or harmful blood clots, such as those that cause deep vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolism.

A "colony count" is a method used to estimate the number of viable microorganisms, such as bacteria or fungi, in a sample. In this technique, a known volume of the sample is spread onto the surface of a solid nutrient medium in a petri dish and then incubated under conditions that allow the microorganisms to grow and form visible colonies. Each colony that grows on the plate represents an individual cell (or small cluster of cells) from the original sample that was able to divide and grow under the given conditions. By counting the number of colonies that form, researchers can make a rough estimate of the concentration of microorganisms in the original sample.

The term "microbial" simply refers to microscopic organisms, such as bacteria, fungi, or viruses. Therefore, a "colony count, microbial" is a general term that encompasses the use of colony counting techniques to estimate the number of any type of microorganism in a sample.

Colony counts are used in various fields, including medical research, food safety testing, and environmental monitoring, to assess the levels of contamination or the effectiveness of disinfection procedures. However, it is important to note that colony counts may not always provide an accurate measure of the total number of microorganisms present in a sample, as some cells may be injured or unable to grow under the conditions used for counting. Additionally, some microorganisms may form clusters or chains that can appear as single colonies, leading to an overestimation of the true cell count.

A biological marker, often referred to as a biomarker, is a measurable indicator that reflects the presence or severity of a disease state, or a response to a therapeutic intervention. Biomarkers can be found in various materials such as blood, tissues, or bodily fluids, and they can take many forms, including molecular, histologic, radiographic, or physiological measurements.

In the context of medical research and clinical practice, biomarkers are used for a variety of purposes, such as:

1. Diagnosis: Biomarkers can help diagnose a disease by indicating the presence or absence of a particular condition. For example, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is a biomarker used to detect prostate cancer.
2. Monitoring: Biomarkers can be used to monitor the progression or regression of a disease over time. For instance, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels are monitored in diabetes patients to assess long-term blood glucose control.
3. Predicting: Biomarkers can help predict the likelihood of developing a particular disease or the risk of a negative outcome. For example, the presence of certain genetic mutations can indicate an increased risk for breast cancer.
4. Response to treatment: Biomarkers can be used to evaluate the effectiveness of a specific treatment by measuring changes in the biomarker levels before and after the intervention. This is particularly useful in personalized medicine, where treatments are tailored to individual patients based on their unique biomarker profiles.

It's important to note that for a biomarker to be considered clinically valid and useful, it must undergo rigorous validation through well-designed studies, including demonstrating sensitivity, specificity, reproducibility, and clinical relevance.

Crotalid venoms are the toxic secretions produced by the members of the Crotalinae subfamily, also known as pit vipers. This group includes rattlesnakes, cottonmouths (or water moccasins), and copperheads, which are native to the Americas, as well as Old World vipers found in Asia and Europe, such as gaboon vipers and saw-scaled vipers.

Crotalid venoms are complex mixtures of various bioactive molecules, including enzymes, proteins, peptides, and other low molecular weight components. They typically contain a variety of pharmacologically active components, such as hemotoxic and neurotoxic agents, which can cause extensive local tissue damage, coagulopathy, cardiovascular dysfunction, and neuromuscular disorders in the victim.

The composition of crotalid venoms can vary significantly between different species and even among individual specimens within the same species. This variability is influenced by factors such as geographic location, age, sex, diet, and environmental conditions. As a result, the clinical manifestations of crotalid envenomation can be highly variable, ranging from mild local reactions to severe systemic effects that may require intensive medical treatment and supportive care.

Crotalid venoms have been the subject of extensive research in recent years due to their potential therapeutic applications. For example, certain components of crotalid venoms have shown promise as drugs for treating various medical conditions, such as cardiovascular diseases, pain, and inflammation. However, further studies are needed to fully understand the mechanisms of action of these venom components and to develop safe and effective therapies based on them.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Oxyquinoline" does not have a specific medical definition as it is not a widely recognized medical term or a medication used in human healthcare. Oxyquinoline is an organic compound that contains a quinoline ring substituted with an alcohol group (hydroxyl) at position 8. It has been used in the past as a disinfectant and antiseptic, but it's not common in modern medical practice.

If you have any questions about medical terminology or concepts, please provide more context so I can offer a more accurate and helpful response.

Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor (G-CSF) is a type of growth factor that specifically stimulates the production and survival of granulocytes, a type of white blood cell crucial for fighting off infections. G-CSF works by promoting the proliferation and differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells into mature granulocytes, primarily neutrophils, in the bone marrow.

Recombinant forms of G-CSF are used clinically as a medication to boost white blood cell production in patients undergoing chemotherapy or radiation therapy for cancer, those with congenital neutropenia, and those who have had a bone marrow transplant. By increasing the number of circulating neutrophils, G-CSF helps reduce the risk of severe infections during periods of intense immune suppression.

Examples of recombinant G-CSF medications include filgrastim (Neupogen), pegfilgrastim (Neulasta), and lipegfilgrastim (Lonquex).

Polycythemia Vera is a type of myeloproliferative neoplasm, a group of rare blood cancers. In Polycythemia Vera, the body produces too many red blood cells, leading to an increased risk of blood clots and thickening of the blood, which can cause various symptoms such as fatigue, headache, dizziness, and itching. It can also lead to enlargement of the spleen. The exact cause of Polycythemia Vera is not known, but it is associated with genetic mutations in the JAK2 gene in most cases. It is a progressive disease that can lead to complications such as bleeding, thrombosis, and transformation into acute leukemia if left untreated.

Aplastic anemia is a medical condition characterized by pancytopenia (a decrease in all three types of blood cells: red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets) due to the failure of bone marrow to produce new cells. It is called "aplastic" because the bone marrow becomes hypocellular or "aplastic," meaning it contains few or no blood-forming stem cells.

The condition can be acquired or inherited, with acquired aplastic anemia being more common. Acquired aplastic anemia can result from exposure to toxic chemicals, radiation, drugs, viral infections, or autoimmune disorders. Inherited forms of the disease include Fanconi anemia and dyskeratosis congenita.

Symptoms of aplastic anemia may include fatigue, weakness, shortness of breath, pale skin, easy bruising or bleeding, frequent infections, and fever. Treatment options for aplastic anemia depend on the severity of the condition and its underlying cause. They may include blood transfusions, immunosuppressive therapy, and stem cell transplantation.

Blood platelet disorders are conditions that affect the number and/or function of platelets, which are small blood cells that help your body form clots to stop bleeding. Normal platelet count ranges from 150,000 to 450,000 platelets per microliter of blood. A lower-than-normal platelet count is called thrombocytopenia, while a higher-than-normal platelet count is called thrombocytosis.

There are several types of platelet disorders, including:

1. Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP): A condition in which the immune system mistakenly attacks and destroys platelets, leading to a low platelet count. ITP can be acute (lasting less than six months) or chronic (lasting longer than six months).
2. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP): A rare but serious condition that causes blood clots to form in small blood vessels throughout the body, leading to a low platelet count, anemia, and other symptoms.
3. Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS): A condition that is often caused by a bacterial infection, which can lead to the formation of blood clots in the small blood vessels of the kidneys, resulting in kidney damage and a low platelet count.
4. Hereditary platelet disorders: Some people inherit genetic mutations that can affect the number or function of their platelets, leading to bleeding disorders such as von Willebrand disease or Bernard-Soulier syndrome.
5. Medication-induced thrombocytopenia: Certain medications can cause a decrease in platelet count as a side effect.
6. Platelet dysfunction disorders: Some conditions can affect the ability of platelets to function properly, leading to bleeding disorders such as von Willebrand disease or storage pool deficiency.

Symptoms of platelet disorders may include easy bruising, prolonged bleeding from cuts or injuries, nosebleeds, blood in urine or stools, and in severe cases, internal bleeding. Treatment for platelet disorders depends on the underlying cause and may include medications, surgery, or other therapies.

Hydrazines are not a medical term, but rather a class of organic compounds containing the functional group N-NH2. They are used in various industrial and chemical applications, including the production of polymers, pharmaceuticals, and agrochemicals. However, some hydrazines have been studied for their potential therapeutic uses, such as in the treatment of cancer and cardiovascular diseases. Exposure to high levels of hydrazines can be toxic and may cause damage to the liver, kidneys, and central nervous system. Therefore, medical professionals should be aware of the potential health hazards associated with hydrazine exposure.

Fibrin(ogen) degradation products (FDPs) are a group of proteins that result from the breakdown of fibrinogen and fibrin, which are key components of blood clots. This process occurs during the normal physiological process of fibrinolysis, where clots are dissolved to maintain blood flow.

FDPs can be measured in the blood as a marker for the activation of the coagulation and fibrinolytic systems. Elevated levels of FDPs may indicate the presence of a disorder that causes abnormal clotting or bleeding, such as disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), deep vein thrombosis (DVT), pulmonary embolism (PE), or certain types of cancer.

It is important to note that FDPs are not specific to any particular disorder and their measurement should be interpreted in conjunction with other clinical and laboratory findings.

Danazol is a synthetic, orally active androgenic steroid with antigonadotropic properties. It is used primarily in the treatment of endometriosis, fibrocystic breast disease, and hereditary angioedema. Danazol works by suppressing the release of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) from the pituitary gland, which in turn inhibits the growth of ovarian tissue and reduces the production of estrogen and progesterone. This leads to a decrease in the symptoms associated with endometriosis and fibrocystic breast disease. In the case of hereditary angioedema, danazol helps prevent attacks by increasing the levels of a protein called C1 esterase inhibitor, which is necessary for regulating the immune system and preventing inflammation.

The common side effects of danazol include weight gain, acne, oily skin, increased hair growth, changes in menstrual cycle, decreased breast size, deepening of the voice, and emotional lability. Rare but serious side effects may include liver damage, blood clots, and adrenal gland problems. Danazol is contraindicated in pregnancy due to its potential virilizing effects on the fetus. It should be used with caution in individuals with a history of liver disease, heart disease, or seizure disorders.

The medical definition of danazol can be summarized as follows:

Danazol (dan-a-zole)

A synthetic androgenic steroid with antigonadotropic properties, used primarily in the treatment of endometriosis, fibrocystic breast disease, and hereditary angioedema. Danazol suppresses the release of FSH and LH from the pituitary gland, inhibiting ovarian tissue growth and reducing estrogen and progesterone production. In hereditary angioedema, danazol increases C1 esterase inhibitor levels to prevent attacks. Common side effects include weight gain, acne, increased hair growth, menstrual changes, decreased breast size, deepened voice, and emotional lability. Rare but serious side effects may involve liver damage, blood clots, or adrenal gland problems. Danazol is contraindicated in pregnancy due to potential virilizing effects on the fetus and should be used with caution in individuals with a history of liver disease, heart disease, or seizure disorders.

Hematologic diseases, also known as hematological disorders, refer to a group of conditions that affect the production, function, or destruction of blood cells or blood-related components, such as plasma. These diseases can affect erythrocytes (red blood cells), leukocytes (white blood cells), and platelets (thrombocytes), as well as clotting factors and hemoglobin.

Hematologic diseases can be broadly categorized into three main types:

1. Anemia: A condition characterized by a decrease in the total red blood cell count, hemoglobin, or hematocrit, leading to insufficient oxygen transport to tissues and organs. Examples include iron deficiency anemia, sickle cell anemia, and aplastic anemia.
2. Leukemia and other disorders of white blood cells: These conditions involve the abnormal production or function of leukocytes, which can lead to impaired immunity and increased susceptibility to infections. Examples include leukemias (acute lymphoblastic leukemia, chronic myeloid leukemia), lymphomas, and myelodysplastic syndromes.
3. Platelet and clotting disorders: These diseases affect the production or function of platelets and clotting factors, leading to abnormal bleeding or clotting tendencies. Examples include hemophilia, von Willebrand disease, thrombocytopenia, and disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC).

Hematologic diseases can have various causes, including genetic defects, infections, autoimmune processes, environmental factors, or malignancies. Proper diagnosis and management of these conditions often require the expertise of hematologists, who specialize in diagnosing and treating disorders related to blood and its components.

Neutrophils are a type of white blood cell that are part of the immune system's response to infection. They are produced in the bone marrow and released into the bloodstream where they circulate and are able to move quickly to sites of infection or inflammation in the body. Neutrophils are capable of engulfing and destroying bacteria, viruses, and other foreign substances through a process called phagocytosis. They are also involved in the release of inflammatory mediators, which can contribute to tissue damage in some cases. Neutrophils are characterized by the presence of granules in their cytoplasm, which contain enzymes and other proteins that help them carry out their immune functions.

Fibrin is defined as a protein that is formed from fibrinogen during the clotting of blood. It plays an essential role in the formation of blood clots, also known as a clotting or coagulation cascade. When an injury occurs and bleeding starts, fibrin threads form a net-like structure that entraps platelets and red blood cells to create a stable clot, preventing further loss of blood.

The process of forming fibrin from fibrinogen is initiated by thrombin, another protein involved in the coagulation cascade. Thrombin cleaves fibrinogen into fibrin monomers, which then polymerize to form long strands of fibrin. These strands cross-link with each other through a process catalyzed by factor XIIIa, forming a stable clot that protects the wound and promotes healing.

It is important to note that abnormalities in fibrin formation or breakdown can lead to bleeding disorders or thrombotic conditions, respectively. Proper regulation of fibrin production and degradation is crucial for maintaining healthy hemostasis and preventing excessive clotting or bleeding.

The Predictive Value of Tests, specifically the Positive Predictive Value (PPV) and Negative Predictive Value (NPV), are measures used in diagnostic tests to determine the probability that a positive or negative test result is correct.

Positive Predictive Value (PPV) is the proportion of patients with a positive test result who actually have the disease. It is calculated as the number of true positives divided by the total number of positive results (true positives + false positives). A higher PPV indicates that a positive test result is more likely to be a true positive, and therefore the disease is more likely to be present.

Negative Predictive Value (NPV) is the proportion of patients with a negative test result who do not have the disease. It is calculated as the number of true negatives divided by the total number of negative results (true negatives + false negatives). A higher NPV indicates that a negative test result is more likely to be a true negative, and therefore the disease is less likely to be present.

The predictive value of tests depends on the prevalence of the disease in the population being tested, as well as the sensitivity and specificity of the test. A test with high sensitivity and specificity will generally have higher predictive values than a test with low sensitivity and specificity. However, even a highly sensitive and specific test can have low predictive values if the prevalence of the disease is low in the population being tested.

Thromboxanes are a type of lipid compound that is derived from arachidonic acid, a type of fatty acid found in the cell membranes of many organisms. They are synthesized in the body through the action of an enzyme called cyclooxygenase (COX).

Thromboxanes are primarily produced by platelets, a type of blood cell that plays a key role in clotting. Once formed, thromboxanes act as powerful vasoconstrictors, causing blood vessels to narrow and blood flow to decrease. They also promote the aggregation of platelets, which can lead to the formation of blood clots.

Thromboxanes are involved in many physiological processes, including hemostasis (the process by which bleeding is stopped) and inflammation. However, excessive production of thromboxanes has been implicated in a number of pathological conditions, such as heart attacks, strokes, and pulmonary hypertension.

There are several different types of thromboxanes, including thromboxane A2 (TXA2) and thromboxane B2 (TXB2). TXA2 is the most biologically active form and has a very short half-life, while TXB2 is a more stable metabolite that can be measured in the blood to assess thromboxane production.

Von Willebrand disease (vWD) is a genetic bleeding disorder caused by deficiency or dysfunction of the von Willebrand factor (VWF), a protein involved in blood clotting. The VWF plays a crucial role in the formation of a stable platelet plug during the process of hemostasis, which helps to stop bleeding.

There are three main types of vWD:

1. Type 1: This is the most common form, characterized by a partial quantitative deficiency of functional VWF. Bleeding symptoms are usually mild.
2. Type 2: In this type, there is a qualitative defect in the VWF protein leading to various subtypes (2A, 2B, 2M, and 2N) with different bleeding patterns. Symptoms can range from mild to severe.
3. Type 3: This is the most severe form of vWD, characterized by a near or complete absence of functional VWF and Factor VIII. Affected individuals have a high risk of spontaneous and severe bleeding episodes.

The clinical manifestations of vWD include easy bruising, prolonged nosebleeds (epistaxis), heavy menstrual periods in women, and excessive bleeding after dental procedures, surgeries, or trauma. The diagnosis is made based on laboratory tests that assess VWF antigen levels, VWF activity, and Factor VIII coagulant activity. Treatment options include desmopressin (DDAVP) to stimulate the release of VWF from endothelial cells, recombinant VWF, or plasma-derived VWF concentrates, and antifibrinolytic agents like tranexamic acid to reduce bleeding.

Splenomegaly is a medical term that refers to an enlargement or expansion of the spleen beyond its normal size. The spleen is a vital organ located in the upper left quadrant of the abdomen, behind the stomach and below the diaphragm. It plays a crucial role in filtering the blood, fighting infections, and storing red and white blood cells and platelets.

Splenomegaly can occur due to various underlying medical conditions, including infections, liver diseases, blood disorders, cancer, and inflammatory diseases. The enlarged spleen may put pressure on surrounding organs, causing discomfort or pain in the abdomen, and it may also lead to a decrease in red and white blood cells and platelets, increasing the risk of anemia, infections, and bleeding.

The diagnosis of splenomegaly typically involves a physical examination, medical history, and imaging tests such as ultrasound, CT scan, or MRI. Treatment depends on the underlying cause and may include medications, surgery, or other interventions to manage the underlying condition.

Sulfinpyrazone is a medication that belongs to the class of drugs known as uricosurics. It works by increasing the amount of uric acid that is removed from the body through urine, which helps to lower the levels of uric acid in the blood. This makes it useful for the treatment of conditions such as gout and kidney stones that are caused by high levels of uric acid.

In addition to its uricosuric effects, sulfinpyrazone also has antiplatelet properties, which means that it can help to prevent blood clots from forming. This makes it useful for the prevention of heart attacks and strokes in people who are at risk.

Sulfinpyrazone is available by prescription and is typically taken by mouth in the form of tablets. It may be used alone or in combination with other medications, depending on the individual patient's needs and medical condition. As with any medication, sulfinpyrazone should be used under the supervision of a healthcare provider, and patients should follow their provider's instructions carefully to ensure safe and effective use.

Edetic acid, also known as ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), is not a medical term per se, but a chemical compound with various applications in medicine. EDTA is a synthetic amino acid that acts as a chelating agent, which means it can bind to metallic ions and form stable complexes.

In medicine, EDTA is primarily used in the treatment of heavy metal poisoning, such as lead or mercury toxicity. It works by binding to the toxic metal ions in the body, forming a stable compound that can be excreted through urine. This helps reduce the levels of harmful metals in the body and alleviate their toxic effects.

EDTA is also used in some diagnostic tests, such as the determination of calcium levels in blood. Additionally, it has been explored as a potential therapy for conditions like atherosclerosis and Alzheimer's disease, although its efficacy in these areas remains controversial and unproven.

It is important to note that EDTA should only be administered under medical supervision due to its potential side effects and the need for careful monitoring of its use.

Medical Definition:

"Risk factors" are any attribute, characteristic or exposure of an individual that increases the likelihood of developing a disease or injury. They can be divided into modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors. Modifiable risk factors are those that can be changed through lifestyle choices or medical treatment, while non-modifiable risk factors are inherent traits such as age, gender, or genetic predisposition. Examples of modifiable risk factors include smoking, alcohol consumption, physical inactivity, and unhealthy diet, while non-modifiable risk factors include age, sex, and family history. It is important to note that having a risk factor does not guarantee that a person will develop the disease, but rather indicates an increased susceptibility.

Prostaglandin endoperoxides are naturally occurring lipid compounds that play important roles as mediators in the body's inflammatory and physiological responses. They are intermediate products in the conversion of arachidonic acid to prostaglandins and thromboxanes, which are synthesized by the action of enzymes called cyclooxygenases (COX-1 and COX-2).

Synthetic prostaglandin endoperoxides, on the other hand, are chemically synthesized versions of these compounds. They are used in medical research and therapeutic applications to mimic or inhibit the effects of naturally occurring prostaglandin endoperoxides. These synthetic compounds can be used to study the mechanisms of prostaglandin action, develop new drugs, or as stand-in agents for the natural compounds in experimental settings.

It's important to note that while synthetic prostaglandin endoperoxides can serve as useful tools in research and medicine, they also carry potential risks and side effects, much like their naturally occurring counterparts. Therefore, their use should be carefully monitored and regulated to ensure safety and efficacy.

A blood component transfusion is the process of transferring a specific component of donated blood into a recipient's bloodstream. Blood components include red blood cells, plasma, platelets, and cryoprecipitate (a fraction of plasma that contains clotting factors). These components can be separated from whole blood and stored separately to allow for targeted transfusions based on the individual needs of the patient.

For example, a patient who is anemic may only require a red blood cell transfusion, while a patient with severe bleeding may need both red blood cells and plasma to replace lost volume and clotting factors. Platelet transfusions are often used for patients with low platelet counts or platelet dysfunction, and cryoprecipitate is used for patients with factor VIII or fibrinogen deficiencies.

Blood component transfusions must be performed under strict medical supervision to ensure compatibility between the donor and recipient blood types and to monitor for any adverse reactions. Proper handling, storage, and administration of blood components are also critical to ensure their safety and efficacy.

Epoprostenol is a medication that belongs to a class of drugs called prostaglandins. It is a synthetic analog of a natural substance in the body called prostacyclin, which widens blood vessels and has anti-platelet effects. Epoprostenol is used to treat pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), a condition characterized by high blood pressure in the arteries that supply blood to the lungs.

Epoprostenol works by relaxing the smooth muscle in the walls of the pulmonary arteries, which reduces the resistance to blood flow and lowers the pressure within these vessels. This helps improve symptoms such as shortness of breath, fatigue, and chest pain, and can also prolong survival in people with PAH.

Epoprostenol is administered continuously through a small pump that delivers the medication directly into the bloodstream. It is a potent vasodilator, which means it can cause a sudden drop in blood pressure if not given carefully. Therefore, it is usually started in a hospital setting under close medical supervision.

Common side effects of epoprostenol include headache, flushing, jaw pain, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and muscle or joint pain. More serious side effects can include bleeding, infection at the site of the catheter, and an allergic reaction to the medication.

In the context of medicine and pharmacology, "kinetics" refers to the study of how a drug moves throughout the body, including its absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (often abbreviated as ADME). This field is called "pharmacokinetics."

1. Absorption: This is the process of a drug moving from its site of administration into the bloodstream. Factors such as the route of administration (e.g., oral, intravenous, etc.), formulation, and individual physiological differences can affect absorption.

2. Distribution: Once a drug is in the bloodstream, it gets distributed throughout the body to various tissues and organs. This process is influenced by factors like blood flow, protein binding, and lipid solubility of the drug.

3. Metabolism: Drugs are often chemically modified in the body, typically in the liver, through processes known as metabolism. These changes can lead to the formation of active or inactive metabolites, which may then be further distributed, excreted, or undergo additional metabolic transformations.

4. Excretion: This is the process by which drugs and their metabolites are eliminated from the body, primarily through the kidneys (urine) and the liver (bile).

Understanding the kinetics of a drug is crucial for determining its optimal dosing regimen, potential interactions with other medications or foods, and any necessary adjustments for special populations like pediatric or geriatric patients, or those with impaired renal or hepatic function.

Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation (HSCT) is a medical procedure where hematopoietic stem cells (immature cells that give rise to all blood cell types) are transplanted into a patient. This procedure is often used to treat various malignant and non-malignant disorders affecting the hematopoietic system, such as leukemias, lymphomas, multiple myeloma, aplastic anemia, inherited immune deficiency diseases, and certain genetic metabolic disorders.

The transplantation can be autologous (using the patient's own stem cells), allogeneic (using stem cells from a genetically matched donor, usually a sibling or unrelated volunteer), or syngeneic (using stem cells from an identical twin).

The process involves collecting hematopoietic stem cells, most commonly from the peripheral blood or bone marrow. The collected cells are then infused into the patient after the recipient's own hematopoietic system has been ablated (or destroyed) using high-dose chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy. This allows the donor's stem cells to engraft, reconstitute, and restore the patient's hematopoietic system.

HSCT is a complex and potentially risky procedure with various complications, including graft-versus-host disease, infections, and organ damage. However, it offers the potential for cure or long-term remission in many patients with otherwise fatal diseases.

Factor VIII is a protein in the blood that is essential for normal blood clotting. It is also known as antihemophilic factor (AHF). Deficiency or dysfunction of this protein results in hemophilia A, a genetic disorder characterized by prolonged bleeding and easy bruising. Factor VIII works together with other proteins to help form a clot and stop bleeding at the site of an injury. It acts as a cofactor for another clotting factor, IX, in the so-called intrinsic pathway of blood coagulation. Intravenous infusions of Factor VIII concentrate are used to treat and prevent bleeding episodes in people with hemophilia A.

Sperm count, also known as sperm concentration, is the number of sperm present in a given volume of semen. The World Health Organization (WHO) previously defined a normal sperm count as at least 20 million sperm per milliliter of semen. However, more recent studies suggest that fertility may be affected even when sperm counts are slightly lower than this threshold. It's important to note that sperm count is just one factor among many that can influence male fertility. Other factors, such as sperm motility (the ability of sperm to move properly) and morphology (the shape of the sperm), also play crucial roles in successful conception.

In the context of medicine, plasma refers to the clear, yellowish fluid that is the liquid component of blood. It's composed of water, enzymes, hormones, antibodies, clotting factors, and other proteins. Plasma serves as a transport medium for cells, nutrients, waste products, gases, and other substances throughout the body. Additionally, it plays a crucial role in the immune response and helps regulate various bodily functions.

Plasma can be collected from blood donors and processed into various therapeutic products, such as clotting factors for people with hemophilia or immunoglobulins for patients with immune deficiencies. This process is called plasma fractionation.

Polyethylene glycols (PEGs) are a family of synthetic, water-soluble polymers with a wide range of molecular weights. They are commonly used in the medical field as excipients in pharmaceutical formulations due to their ability to improve drug solubility, stability, and bioavailability. PEGs can also be used as laxatives to treat constipation or as bowel cleansing agents prior to colonoscopy examinations. Additionally, some PEG-conjugated drugs have been developed for use in targeted cancer therapies.

In a medical context, PEGs are often referred to by their average molecular weight, such as PEG 300, PEG 400, PEG 1500, and so on. Higher molecular weight PEGs tend to be more viscous and have longer-lasting effects in the body.

It's worth noting that while PEGs are generally considered safe for use in medical applications, some people may experience allergic reactions or hypersensitivity to these compounds. Prolonged exposure to high molecular weight PEGs has also been linked to potential adverse effects, such as decreased fertility and developmental toxicity in animal studies. However, more research is needed to fully understand the long-term safety of PEGs in humans.

Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a group of diverse bone marrow disorders characterized by dysplasia (abnormal development or maturation) of one or more types of blood cells or by ineffective hematopoiesis, resulting in cytopenias (lower than normal levels of one or more types of blood cells). MDS can be classified into various subtypes based on the number and type of cytopenias, the degree of dysplasia, the presence of ring sideroblasts, and cytogenetic abnormalities.

The condition primarily affects older adults, with a median age at diagnosis of around 70 years. MDS can evolve into acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in approximately 30-40% of cases. The pathophysiology of MDS involves genetic mutations and chromosomal abnormalities that lead to impaired differentiation and increased apoptosis of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, ultimately resulting in cytopenias and an increased risk of developing AML.

The diagnosis of MDS typically requires a bone marrow aspiration and biopsy, along with cytogenetic and molecular analyses to identify specific genetic mutations and chromosomal abnormalities. Treatment options for MDS depend on the subtype, severity of cytopenias, and individual patient factors. These may include supportive care measures, such as transfusions and growth factor therapy, or more aggressive treatments, such as chemotherapy and stem cell transplantation.

An acute disease is a medical condition that has a rapid onset, develops quickly, and tends to be short in duration. Acute diseases can range from minor illnesses such as a common cold or flu, to more severe conditions such as pneumonia, meningitis, or a heart attack. These types of diseases often have clear symptoms that are easy to identify, and they may require immediate medical attention or treatment.

Acute diseases are typically caused by an external agent or factor, such as a bacterial or viral infection, a toxin, or an injury. They can also be the result of a sudden worsening of an existing chronic condition. In general, acute diseases are distinct from chronic diseases, which are long-term medical conditions that develop slowly over time and may require ongoing management and treatment.

Examples of acute diseases include:

* Acute bronchitis: a sudden inflammation of the airways in the lungs, often caused by a viral infection.
* Appendicitis: an inflammation of the appendix that can cause severe pain and requires surgical removal.
* Gastroenteritis: an inflammation of the stomach and intestines, often caused by a viral or bacterial infection.
* Migraine headaches: intense headaches that can last for hours or days, and are often accompanied by nausea, vomiting, and sensitivity to light and sound.
* Myocardial infarction (heart attack): a sudden blockage of blood flow to the heart muscle, often caused by a buildup of plaque in the coronary arteries.
* Pneumonia: an infection of the lungs that can cause coughing, chest pain, and difficulty breathing.
* Sinusitis: an inflammation of the sinuses, often caused by a viral or bacterial infection.

It's important to note that while some acute diseases may resolve on their own with rest and supportive care, others may require medical intervention or treatment to prevent complications and promote recovery. If you are experiencing symptoms of an acute disease, it is always best to seek medical attention to ensure proper diagnosis and treatment.

Follow-up studies are a type of longitudinal research that involve repeated observations or measurements of the same variables over a period of time, in order to understand their long-term effects or outcomes. In medical context, follow-up studies are often used to evaluate the safety and efficacy of medical treatments, interventions, or procedures.

In a typical follow-up study, a group of individuals (called a cohort) who have received a particular treatment or intervention are identified and then followed over time through periodic assessments or data collection. The data collected may include information on clinical outcomes, adverse events, changes in symptoms or functional status, and other relevant measures.

The results of follow-up studies can provide important insights into the long-term benefits and risks of medical interventions, as well as help to identify factors that may influence treatment effectiveness or patient outcomes. However, it is important to note that follow-up studies can be subject to various biases and limitations, such as loss to follow-up, recall bias, and changes in clinical practice over time, which must be carefully considered when interpreting the results.

Leukapheresis is a medical procedure that involves the separation and removal of white blood cells (leukocytes) from the blood. It is performed using a specialized machine called an apheresis instrument, which removes the desired component (in this case, leukocytes) and returns the remaining components (red blood cells, platelets, and plasma) back to the donor or patient. This procedure is often used in the treatment of certain blood disorders, such as leukemia and lymphoma, where high white blood cell counts can cause complications. It may also be used to collect stem cells for transplantation purposes. Leukapheresis is generally a safe procedure with minimal side effects, although it may cause temporary discomfort or bruising at the site of needle insertion.

"Papio" is a term used in the field of primatology, specifically for a genus of Old World monkeys known as baboons. It's not typically used in human or medical contexts. Baboons are large monkeys with robust bodies and distinctive dog-like faces. They are native to various parts of Africa and are known for their complex social structures and behaviors.

Calcium is an essential mineral that is vital for various physiological processes in the human body. The medical definition of calcium is as follows:

Calcium (Ca2+) is a crucial cation and the most abundant mineral in the human body, with approximately 99% of it found in bones and teeth. It plays a vital role in maintaining structural integrity, nerve impulse transmission, muscle contraction, hormonal secretion, blood coagulation, and enzyme activation.

Calcium homeostasis is tightly regulated through the interplay of several hormones, including parathyroid hormone (PTH), calcitonin, and vitamin D. Dietary calcium intake, absorption, and excretion are also critical factors in maintaining optimal calcium levels in the body.

Hypocalcemia refers to low serum calcium levels, while hypercalcemia indicates high serum calcium levels. Both conditions can have detrimental effects on various organ systems and require medical intervention to correct.

Hirudin is not a medical term itself, but it is a specific substance with medical relevance. Hirudin is a naturally occurring anticoagulant that is found in the saliva of certain species of leeches (such as Hirudo medicinalis). This compound works by inhibiting the activity of thrombin, a key enzyme in the coagulation cascade, which ultimately results in preventing blood clot formation.

Medically, hirudin has been used in some research and therapeutic settings for its anticoagulant properties. For instance, recombinant hirudin (also known as lepirudin) is available for clinical use as an injectable anticoagulant to treat or prevent blood clots in specific medical conditions, such as heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT).

In summary, Hirudins are a group of anticoagulant substances, primarily derived from leeches, that inhibit the activity of thrombin and have potential medical applications in preventing or treating blood clots.

Hemostatic disorders are medical conditions that affect the body's ability to stop bleeding (hemorrhage) after an injury or surgery. The hemostatic system includes blood vessels, platelets, and clotting factors that work together to form a clot and prevent further blood loss.

Disorders of hemostasis can be broadly classified into three categories:

1. Bleeding disorders: These are conditions in which the body is unable to form a clot or forms clots that are too weak, leading to excessive bleeding. Examples include hemophilia, von Willebrand disease, and platelet function disorders.
2. Thrombotic disorders: These are conditions in which the body forms clots that are too large or inappropriately located, leading to obstruction of blood flow. Examples include deep vein thrombosis (DVT), pulmonary embolism (PE), and disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC).
3. Combined disorders: These are conditions in which both bleeding and thrombotic tendencies may be present, depending on the specific circumstances. Examples include antiphospholipid syndrome and thrombotic microangiopathies.

Hemostatic disorders can be inherited or acquired, and their diagnosis and management require a thorough understanding of the underlying pathophysiology and clinical context.

Extracorporeal circulation (ECC) is a term used in medicine to describe the process of temporarily taking over the functions of the heart and lungs by using a machine. This allows the surgeon to perform certain types of surgery, such as open-heart surgery, on a still and bloodless operating field.

During ECC, the patient's blood is circulated outside the body through a pump and oxygenator. The pump helps to maintain blood flow and pressure, while the oxygenator adds oxygen to the blood and removes carbon dioxide. This allows the surgeon to stop the heart and arrest its motion, making it easier to perform delicate procedures on the heart and surrounding structures.

Extracorporeal circulation is a complex and high-risk procedure that requires careful monitoring and management by a team of healthcare professionals. It carries risks such as bleeding, infection, and injury to blood vessels or organs. However, when performed correctly, it can be a life-saving measure for patients undergoing certain types of surgery.

"Drug evaluation" is a medical term that refers to the systematic process of assessing the pharmacological, therapeutic, and safety profile of a drug or medication. This process typically involves several stages, including preclinical testing in the laboratory, clinical trials in human subjects, and post-marketing surveillance.

The goal of drug evaluation is to determine the efficacy, safety, and optimal dosage range of a drug, as well as any potential interactions with other medications or medical conditions. The evaluation process also includes an assessment of the drug's pharmacokinetics, or how it is absorbed, distributed, metabolized, and eliminated by the body.

The findings from drug evaluations are used to inform regulatory decisions about whether a drug should be approved for use in clinical practice, as well as to provide guidance to healthcare providers about how to use the drug safely and effectively.

Immunoglobulin G (IgG) is a type of antibody, which is a protective protein produced by the immune system in response to foreign substances like bacteria or viruses. IgG is the most abundant type of antibody in human blood, making up about 75-80% of all antibodies. It is found in all body fluids and plays a crucial role in fighting infections caused by bacteria, viruses, and toxins.

IgG has several important functions:

1. Neutralization: IgG can bind to the surface of bacteria or viruses, preventing them from attaching to and infecting human cells.
2. Opsonization: IgG coats the surface of pathogens, making them more recognizable and easier for immune cells like neutrophils and macrophages to phagocytose (engulf and destroy) them.
3. Complement activation: IgG can activate the complement system, a group of proteins that work together to help eliminate pathogens from the body. Activation of the complement system leads to the formation of the membrane attack complex, which creates holes in the cell membranes of bacteria, leading to their lysis (destruction).
4. Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC): IgG can bind to immune cells like natural killer (NK) cells and trigger them to release substances that cause target cells (such as virus-infected or cancerous cells) to undergo apoptosis (programmed cell death).
5. Immune complex formation: IgG can form immune complexes with antigens, which can then be removed from the body through various mechanisms, such as phagocytosis by immune cells or excretion in urine.

IgG is a critical component of adaptive immunity and provides long-lasting protection against reinfection with many pathogens. It has four subclasses (IgG1, IgG2, IgG3, and IgG4) that differ in their structure, function, and distribution in the body.

Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is a rare but serious blood disorder. It's characterized by the formation of small blood clots throughout the body, which can lead to serious complications such as low platelet count (thrombocytopenia), hemolytic anemia, neurological symptoms, and kidney damage.

The term "purpura" refers to the purple-colored spots on the skin that result from bleeding under the skin. In TTP, these spots are caused by the rupture of red blood cells that have been damaged by the abnormal clotting process.

TTP is often caused by a deficiency or inhibitor of ADAMTS13, a protein in the blood that helps to regulate the formation of blood clots. This deficiency or inhibitor can lead to the formation of large clots called microthrombi, which can block small blood vessels throughout the body and cause tissue damage.

TTP is a medical emergency that requires prompt treatment with plasma exchange therapy, which involves removing and replacing the patient's plasma to restore normal levels of ADAMTS13 and prevent further clotting. Other treatments may include corticosteroids, immunosuppressive drugs, and rituximab.

Pancytopenia is a medical condition characterized by a reduction in the number of all three types of blood cells in the peripheral blood: red blood cells (anemia), white blood cells (leukopenia), and platelets (thrombocytopenia). This condition can be caused by various underlying diseases, including bone marrow disorders, viral infections, exposure to toxic substances or radiation, vitamin deficiencies, and certain medications. Symptoms of pancytopenia may include fatigue, weakness, increased susceptibility to infections, and easy bruising or bleeding.

Autologous transplantation is a medical procedure where cells, tissues, or organs are removed from a person, stored and then returned back to the same individual at a later time. This is different from allogeneic transplantation where the tissue or organ is obtained from another donor. The term "autologous" is derived from the Greek words "auto" meaning self and "logos" meaning study.

In autologous transplantation, the patient's own cells or tissues are used to replace or repair damaged or diseased ones. This reduces the risk of rejection and eliminates the need for immunosuppressive drugs, which are required in allogeneic transplants to prevent the body from attacking the foreign tissue.

Examples of autologous transplantation include:

* Autologous bone marrow or stem cell transplantation, where stem cells are removed from the patient's blood or bone marrow, stored and then reinfused back into the same individual after high-dose chemotherapy or radiation therapy to treat cancer.
* Autologous skin grafting, where a piece of skin is taken from one part of the body and transplanted to another area on the same person.
* Autologous chondrocyte implantation, where cartilage cells are harvested from the patient's own knee, cultured in a laboratory and then implanted back into the knee to repair damaged cartilage.

Esophageal varices and gastric varices are abnormal, enlarged veins in the lower part of the esophagus (the tube that connects the throat to the stomach) and in the stomach lining, respectively. They occur as a result of increased pressure in the portal vein, which is the large blood vessel that carries blood from the digestive organs to the liver. This condition is known as portal hypertension.

Esophageal varices are more common than gastric varices and tend to be more symptomatic. They can cause bleeding, which can be life-threatening if not treated promptly. Gastric varices may also bleed, but they are often asymptomatic until they rupture.

The most common causes of esophageal and gastric varices are cirrhosis (scarring of the liver) and portal hypertension due to other liver diseases such as schistosomiasis or Budd-Chiari syndrome. Treatment options for esophageal and gastric varices include medications to reduce bleeding, endoscopic therapies to treat active bleeding or prevent recurrent bleeding, and surgical procedures to relieve portal hypertension.

Thrombin receptors are a type of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that play a crucial role in hemostasis and thrombosis. They are activated by the protease thrombin, which is generated during the coagulation cascade. There are two main types of thrombin receptors: protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR-1) and PAR-4.

PAR-1 is expressed on various cell types including platelets, endothelial cells, and smooth muscle cells, while PAR-4 is primarily expressed on platelets. Activation of these receptors triggers a variety of intracellular signaling pathways that lead to diverse cellular responses such as platelet activation, aggregation, and secretion; vasoconstriction; and inflammation.

Dysregulation of thrombin receptor signaling has been implicated in several pathological conditions, including arterial and venous thrombosis, atherosclerosis, and cancer. Therefore, thrombin receptors are considered important therapeutic targets for the treatment of these disorders.

The spleen is an organ in the upper left side of the abdomen, next to the stomach and behind the ribs. It plays multiple supporting roles in the body:

1. It fights infection by acting as a filter for the blood. Old red blood cells are recycled in the spleen, and platelets and white blood cells are stored there.
2. The spleen also helps to control the amount of blood in the body by removing excess red blood cells and storing platelets.
3. It has an important role in immune function, producing antibodies and removing microorganisms and damaged red blood cells from the bloodstream.

The spleen can be removed without causing any significant problems, as other organs take over its functions. This is known as a splenectomy and may be necessary if the spleen is damaged or diseased.

Epinephrine, also known as adrenaline, is a hormone and a neurotransmitter that is produced in the body. It is released by the adrenal glands in response to stress or excitement, and it prepares the body for the "fight or flight" response. Epinephrine works by binding to specific receptors in the body, which causes a variety of physiological effects, including increased heart rate and blood pressure, improved muscle strength and alertness, and narrowing of the blood vessels in the skin and intestines. It is also used as a medication to treat various medical conditions, such as anaphylaxis (a severe allergic reaction), cardiac arrest, and low blood pressure.

A cohort study is a type of observational study in which a group of individuals who share a common characteristic or exposure are followed up over time to determine the incidence of a specific outcome or outcomes. The cohort, or group, is defined based on the exposure status (e.g., exposed vs. unexposed) and then monitored prospectively to assess for the development of new health events or conditions.

Cohort studies can be either prospective or retrospective in design. In a prospective cohort study, participants are enrolled and followed forward in time from the beginning of the study. In contrast, in a retrospective cohort study, researchers identify a cohort that has already been assembled through medical records, insurance claims, or other sources and then look back in time to assess exposure status and health outcomes.

Cohort studies are useful for establishing causality between an exposure and an outcome because they allow researchers to observe the temporal relationship between the two. They can also provide information on the incidence of a disease or condition in different populations, which can be used to inform public health policy and interventions. However, cohort studies can be expensive and time-consuming to conduct, and they may be subject to bias if participants are not representative of the population or if there is loss to follow-up.

Immunoglobulin (Ig) Fab fragments are the antigen-binding portions of an antibody that result from the digestion of the whole antibody molecule by enzymes such as papain. An antibody, also known as an immunoglobulin, is a Y-shaped protein produced by the immune system to identify and neutralize foreign substances like bacteria, viruses, or toxins. The antibody has two identical antigen-binding sites, located at the tips of the two shorter arms, which can bind specifically to a target antigen.

Fab fragments are formed when an antibody is cleaved by papain, resulting in two Fab fragments and one Fc fragment. Each Fab fragment contains one antigen-binding site, composed of a variable region (Fv) and a constant region (C). The Fv region is responsible for the specificity and affinity of the antigen binding, while the C region contributes to the effector functions of the antibody.

Fab fragments are often used in various medical applications, such as immunodiagnostics and targeted therapies, due to their ability to bind specifically to target antigens without triggering an immune response or other effector functions associated with the Fc region.

Leukopenia is a medical term used to describe an abnormally low white blood cell (WBC) count in the blood. White blood cells are crucial components of the body's immune system, helping to fight infections and diseases. A normal WBC count ranges from 4,500 to 11,000 cells per microliter (μL) of blood in most laboratories. Leukopenia is typically diagnosed when the WBC count falls below 4,500 cells/μL.

There are several types of white blood cells, including neutrophils, lymphocytes, monocytes, eosinophils, and basophils. Neutropenia, a specific type of leukopenia, refers to an abnormally low neutrophil count (less than 1,500 cells/μL). Neutropenia increases the risk of bacterial and fungal infections since neutrophils play a significant role in combating these types of pathogens.

Leukopenia can result from various factors, such as viral infections, certain medications (like chemotherapy or radiation therapy), bone marrow disorders, autoimmune diseases, or congenital conditions affecting white blood cell production. It is essential to identify the underlying cause of leukopenia to provide appropriate treatment and prevent complications.

Apyrase is an enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of nucleoside triphosphates (like ATP or GTP) to nucleoside diphosphates (like ADP or GDP), releasing inorganic phosphate in the process. It can also hydrolyze nucleoside diphosphates to nucleoside monophosphates, releasing inorganic pyrophosphate.

This enzyme is widely distributed in nature and has been found in various organisms, including bacteria, plants, and animals. In humans, apyrases are present in different tissues, such as the brain, platelets, and red blood cells. They play essential roles in several biological processes, including signal transduction, metabolism regulation, and inflammatory response modulation.

There are two major classes of apyrases: type I (also known as nucleoside diphosphate kinase) and type II (also known as NTPDase). Type II apyrases have higher substrate specificity for nucleoside triphosphates, while type I apyrases can hydrolyze both nucleoside tri- and diphosphates.

In the medical field, apyrases are sometimes used in research to study platelet function or neurotransmission, as they can help regulate purinergic signaling by controlling extracellular levels of ATP and ADP. Additionally, some studies suggest that apyrase activity might be involved in certain pathological conditions, such as atherosclerosis, thrombosis, and neurological disorders.

Interleukin-11 (IL-11) is a type of cytokine, which is a small signaling protein involved in the immune response and hematopoiesis (the formation of blood cells). IL-11 is primarily produced by bone marrow stromal cells and is involved in regulating the production and function of platelets, which are cell fragments necessary for blood clotting.

IL-11 has a number of biological activities, including promoting the growth and differentiation of megakaryocytes (the precursor cells to platelets), stimulating the production of acute phase proteins during inflammation, and regulating the function of certain immune cells. In addition, IL-11 has been shown to have effects on other tissues, including promoting the growth and survival of some cancer cells.

Dysregulation of IL-11 signaling has been implicated in a number of diseases, including thrombocytopenia (low platelet count), certain types of anemia, and various cancers.

Indium is not a medical term, but it is a chemical element with the symbol In and atomic number 49. It is a soft, silvery-white, post-transition metal that is rarely found in its pure form in nature. It is primarily used in the production of electronics, such as flat panel displays, and in nuclear medicine as a radiation source for medical imaging.

In nuclear medicine, indium-111 is used in the labeling of white blood cells to diagnose and locate abscesses, inflammation, and infection. The indium-111 labeled white blood cells are injected into the patient's body, and then a gamma camera is used to track their movement and identify areas of infection or inflammation.

Therefore, while indium itself is not a medical term, it does have important medical applications in diagnostic imaging.

Isoantibodies are antibodies produced by the immune system that recognize and react to antigens (markers) found on the cells or tissues of another individual of the same species. These antigens are typically proteins or carbohydrates present on the surface of red blood cells, but they can also be found on other cell types.

Isoantibodies are formed when an individual is exposed to foreign antigens, usually through blood transfusions, pregnancy, or tissue transplantation. The exposure triggers the immune system to produce specific antibodies against these antigens, which can cause a harmful immune response if the individual receives another transfusion or transplant from the same donor in the future.

There are two main types of isoantibodies:

1. Agglutinins: These are IgM antibodies that cause red blood cells to clump together (agglutinate) when mixed with the corresponding antigen. They develop rapidly after exposure and can cause immediate transfusion reactions or hemolytic disease of the newborn in pregnant women.
2. Hemolysins: These are IgG antibodies that destroy red blood cells by causing their membranes to become more permeable, leading to lysis (bursting) of the cells and release of hemoglobin into the plasma. They take longer to develop but can cause delayed transfusion reactions or hemolytic disease of the newborn in pregnant women.

Isoantibodies are detected through blood tests, such as the crossmatch test, which determines compatibility between a donor's and recipient's blood before transfusions or transplants.

Bone marrow diseases, also known as hematologic disorders, are conditions that affect the production and function of blood cells in the bone marrow. The bone marrow is the spongy tissue inside bones where all blood cells are produced. There are various types of bone marrow diseases, including:

1. Leukemia: A cancer of the blood-forming tissues, including the bone marrow. Leukemia causes the body to produce large numbers of abnormal white blood cells, which can crowd out healthy blood cells and impair their function.
2. Lymphoma: A cancer that starts in the lymphatic system, which is part of the immune system. Lymphoma can affect the bone marrow and cause an overproduction of abnormal white blood cells.
3. Multiple myeloma: A cancer of the plasma cells, a type of white blood cell found in the bone marrow. Multiple myeloma causes an overproduction of abnormal plasma cells, which can lead to bone pain, fractures, and other complications.
4. Aplastic anemia: A condition in which the bone marrow does not produce enough new blood cells. This can lead to symptoms such as fatigue, weakness, and an increased risk of infection.
5. Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS): A group of disorders in which the bone marrow does not produce enough healthy blood cells. MDS can lead to anemia, infections, and bleeding.
6. Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs): A group of disorders in which the bone marrow produces too many abnormal white or red blood cells, or platelets. MPNs can lead to symptoms such as fatigue, itching, and an increased risk of blood clots.

Treatment for bone marrow diseases depends on the specific condition and its severity. Treatment options may include chemotherapy, radiation therapy, stem cell transplantation, or targeted therapies that target specific genetic mutations.

Combination drug therapy is a treatment approach that involves the use of multiple medications with different mechanisms of action to achieve better therapeutic outcomes. This approach is often used in the management of complex medical conditions such as cancer, HIV/AIDS, and cardiovascular diseases. The goal of combination drug therapy is to improve efficacy, reduce the risk of drug resistance, decrease the likelihood of adverse effects, and enhance the overall quality of life for patients.

In combining drugs, healthcare providers aim to target various pathways involved in the disease process, which may help to:

1. Increase the effectiveness of treatment by attacking the disease from multiple angles.
2. Decrease the dosage of individual medications, reducing the risk and severity of side effects.
3. Slow down or prevent the development of drug resistance, a common problem in chronic diseases like HIV/AIDS and cancer.
4. Improve patient compliance by simplifying dosing schedules and reducing pill burden.

Examples of combination drug therapy include:

1. Antiretroviral therapy (ART) for HIV treatment, which typically involves three or more drugs from different classes to suppress viral replication and prevent the development of drug resistance.
2. Chemotherapy regimens for cancer treatment, where multiple cytotoxic agents are used to target various stages of the cell cycle and reduce the likelihood of tumor cells developing resistance.
3. Cardiovascular disease management, which may involve combining medications such as angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, beta-blockers, diuretics, and statins to control blood pressure, heart rate, fluid balance, and cholesterol levels.
4. Treatment of tuberculosis, which often involves a combination of several antibiotics to target different aspects of the bacterial life cycle and prevent the development of drug-resistant strains.

When prescribing combination drug therapy, healthcare providers must carefully consider factors such as potential drug interactions, dosing schedules, adverse effects, and contraindications to ensure safe and effective treatment. Regular monitoring of patients is essential to assess treatment response, manage side effects, and adjust the treatment plan as needed.

A "Drug Administration Schedule" refers to the plan for when and how a medication should be given to a patient. It includes details such as the dose, frequency (how often it should be taken), route (how it should be administered, such as orally, intravenously, etc.), and duration (how long it should be taken) of the medication. This schedule is often created and prescribed by healthcare professionals, such as doctors or pharmacists, to ensure that the medication is taken safely and effectively. It may also include instructions for missed doses or changes in the dosage.

Antibodies are proteins produced by the immune system in response to the presence of a foreign substance, such as a bacterium or virus. They are capable of identifying and binding to specific antigens (foreign substances) on the surface of these invaders, marking them for destruction by other immune cells. Antibodies are also known as immunoglobulins and come in several different types, including IgA, IgD, IgE, IgG, and IgM, each with a unique function in the immune response. They are composed of four polypeptide chains, two heavy chains and two light chains, that are held together by disulfide bonds. The variable regions of the heavy and light chains form the antigen-binding site, which is specific to a particular antigen.

Neutropenia is a condition characterized by an abnormally low concentration (less than 1500 cells/mm3) of neutrophils, a type of white blood cell that plays a crucial role in fighting off bacterial and fungal infections. Neutrophils are essential components of the innate immune system, and their main function is to engulf and destroy microorganisms that can cause harm to the body.

Neutropenia can be classified as mild, moderate, or severe based on the severity of the neutrophil count reduction:

* Mild neutropenia: Neutrophil count between 1000-1500 cells/mm3
* Moderate neutropenia: Neutrophil count between 500-1000 cells/mm3
* Severe neutropenia: Neutrophil count below 500 cells/mm3

Severe neutropenia significantly increases the risk of developing infections, as the body's ability to fight off microorganisms is severely compromised. Common causes of neutropenia include viral infections, certain medications (such as chemotherapy or antibiotics), autoimmune disorders, and congenital conditions affecting bone marrow function. Treatment for neutropenia typically involves addressing the underlying cause, administering granulocyte-colony stimulating factors to boost neutrophil production, and providing appropriate antimicrobial therapy to prevent or treat infections.

Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) is a medical procedure in which damaged or destroyed bone marrow is replaced with healthy bone marrow from a donor. Bone marrow is the spongy tissue inside bones that produces blood cells. The main types of BMT are autologous, allogeneic, and umbilical cord blood transplantation.

In autologous BMT, the patient's own bone marrow is used for the transplant. This type of BMT is often used in patients with lymphoma or multiple myeloma who have undergone high-dose chemotherapy or radiation therapy to destroy their cancerous bone marrow.

In allogeneic BMT, bone marrow from a genetically matched donor is used for the transplant. This type of BMT is often used in patients with leukemia, lymphoma, or other blood disorders who have failed other treatments.

Umbilical cord blood transplantation involves using stem cells from umbilical cord blood as a source of healthy bone marrow. This type of BMT is often used in children and adults who do not have a matched donor for allogeneic BMT.

The process of BMT typically involves several steps, including harvesting the bone marrow or stem cells from the donor, conditioning the patient's body to receive the new bone marrow or stem cells, transplanting the new bone marrow or stem cells into the patient's body, and monitoring the patient for signs of engraftment and complications.

BMT is a complex and potentially risky procedure that requires careful planning, preparation, and follow-up care. However, it can be a life-saving treatment for many patients with blood disorders or cancer.

I believe there might be a misunderstanding in your question. "Dogs" is not a medical term or condition. It is the common name for a domesticated carnivore of the family Canidae, specifically the genus Canis, which includes wolves, foxes, and other extant and extinct species of mammals. Dogs are often kept as pets and companions, and they have been bred in a wide variety of forms and sizes for different purposes, such as hunting, herding, guarding, assisting police and military forces, and providing companionship and emotional support.

If you meant to ask about a specific medical condition or term related to dogs, please provide more context so I can give you an accurate answer.

A Severity of Illness Index is a measurement tool used in healthcare to assess the severity of a patient's condition and the risk of mortality or other adverse outcomes. These indices typically take into account various physiological and clinical variables, such as vital signs, laboratory values, and co-morbidities, to generate a score that reflects the patient's overall illness severity.

Examples of Severity of Illness Indices include the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) system, the Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS), and the Mortality Probability Model (MPM). These indices are often used in critical care settings to guide clinical decision-making, inform prognosis, and compare outcomes across different patient populations.

It is important to note that while these indices can provide valuable information about a patient's condition, they should not be used as the sole basis for clinical decision-making. Rather, they should be considered in conjunction with other factors, such as the patient's overall clinical presentation, treatment preferences, and goals of care.

Blood specimen collection is the process of obtaining a sample of blood from a patient for laboratory testing and analysis. This procedure is performed by trained healthcare professionals, such as nurses or phlebotomists, using sterile equipment to minimize the risk of infection and ensure accurate test results. The collected blood sample may be used to diagnose and monitor various medical conditions, assess overall health and organ function, and check for the presence of drugs, alcohol, or other substances. Proper handling, storage, and transportation of the specimen are crucial to maintain its integrity and prevent contamination.

Blood cells are the formed elements in the blood, including red blood cells (erythrocytes), white blood cells (leukocytes), and platelets (thrombocytes). These cells are produced in the bone marrow and play crucial roles in the body's functions. Red blood cells are responsible for carrying oxygen to tissues and carbon dioxide away from them, while white blood cells are part of the immune system and help defend against infection and disease. Platelets are cell fragments that are essential for normal blood clotting.

Eclampsia is a serious pregnancy complication characterized by the onset of seizures or convulsions in a woman who has already developed preeclampsia, which is a condition marked by high blood pressure and damage to organs such as the liver and kidneys. Eclampsia can occur before, during, or after delivery and is considered a medical emergency that requires immediate treatment. It can pose significant risks to both the mother and the baby, including premature birth, fetal growth restriction, and even maternal and fetal death.

The exact causes of eclampsia are not fully understood, but it is thought to be related to problems with the placenta and abnormal blood vessel development in the uterus. Risk factors for developing eclampsia include preexisting medical conditions such as chronic hypertension or diabetes, a history of preeclampsia or eclampsia in previous pregnancies, multiple gestation (carrying more than one baby), and certain genetic factors.

Treatment for eclampsia typically involves delivering the baby as soon as possible to prevent further complications. In some cases, medication may be given to manage seizures and prevent their recurrence. Close monitoring of both the mother and the baby is essential to ensure the best possible outcomes.

Reference values, also known as reference ranges or reference intervals, are the set of values that are considered normal or typical for a particular population or group of people. These values are often used in laboratory tests to help interpret test results and determine whether a patient's value falls within the expected range.

The process of establishing reference values typically involves measuring a particular biomarker or parameter in a large, healthy population and then calculating the mean and standard deviation of the measurements. Based on these statistics, a range is established that includes a certain percentage of the population (often 95%) and excludes extreme outliers.

It's important to note that reference values can vary depending on factors such as age, sex, race, and other demographic characteristics. Therefore, it's essential to use reference values that are specific to the relevant population when interpreting laboratory test results. Additionally, reference values may change over time due to advances in measurement technology or changes in the population being studied.

Arachidonic acids are a type of polyunsaturated fatty acid that is primarily found in the phospholipids of cell membranes. They contain 20 carbon atoms and four double bonds (20:4n-6), with the first double bond located at the sixth carbon atom from the methyl end.

Arachidonic acids are derived from linoleic acid, an essential fatty acid that cannot be synthesized by the human body and must be obtained through dietary sources such as meat, fish, and eggs. Once ingested, linoleic acid is converted to arachidonic acid in a series of enzymatic reactions.

Arachidonic acids play an important role in various physiological processes, including inflammation, immune response, and cell signaling. They serve as precursors for the synthesis of eicosanoids, which are signaling molecules that include prostaglandins, thromboxanes, and leukotrienes. These eicosanoids have diverse biological activities, such as modulating blood flow, platelet aggregation, and pain perception, among others.

However, excessive production of arachidonic acid-derived eicosanoids has been implicated in various pathological conditions, including inflammation, atherosclerosis, and cancer. Therefore, the regulation of arachidonic acid metabolism is an important area of research for the development of new therapeutic strategies.

Myeloproliferative disorders (MPDs) are a group of rare, chronic blood cancers that originate from the abnormal proliferation or growth of one or more types of blood-forming cells in the bone marrow. These disorders result in an overproduction of mature but dysfunctional blood cells, which can lead to serious complications such as blood clots, bleeding, and organ damage.

There are several subtypes of MPDs, including:

1. Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML): A disorder characterized by the overproduction of mature granulocytes (a type of white blood cell) in the bone marrow, leading to an increased number of these cells in the blood. CML is caused by a genetic mutation that results in the formation of the BCR-ABL fusion protein, which drives uncontrolled cell growth and division.
2. Polycythemia Vera (PV): A disorder characterized by the overproduction of all three types of blood cells - red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets - in the bone marrow. This can lead to an increased risk of blood clots, bleeding, and enlargement of the spleen.
3. Essential Thrombocythemia (ET): A disorder characterized by the overproduction of platelets in the bone marrow, leading to an increased risk of blood clots and bleeding.
4. Primary Myelofibrosis (PMF): A disorder characterized by the replacement of normal bone marrow tissue with scar tissue, leading to impaired blood cell production and anemia, enlargement of the spleen, and increased risk of infections and bleeding.
5. Chronic Neutrophilic Leukemia (CNL): A rare disorder characterized by the overproduction of neutrophils (a type of white blood cell) in the bone marrow, leading to an increased number of these cells in the blood. CNL can lead to an increased risk of infections and organ damage.

MPDs are typically treated with a combination of therapies, including chemotherapy, targeted therapy, immunotherapy, and stem cell transplantation. The choice of treatment depends on several factors, including the subtype of MPD, the patient's age and overall health, and the presence of any comorbidities.

Fibrinolytic agents are medications that dissolve or break down blood clots by activating plasminogen, which is converted into plasmin. Plasmin is a proteolytic enzyme that degrades fibrin, the structural protein in blood clots. Fibrinolytic agents are used medically to treat conditions such as acute ischemic stroke, deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, and myocardial infarction (heart attack) by restoring blood flow in occluded vessels. Examples of fibrinolytic agents include alteplase, reteplase, and tenecteplase. It is important to note that these medications carry a risk of bleeding complications and should be administered with caution.

Collagen receptors are a type of cell surface receptor that bind to collagen molecules, which are the most abundant proteins in the extracellular matrix (ECM) of connective tissues. These receptors play important roles in various biological processes, including cell adhesion, migration, differentiation, and survival.

Collagen receptors can be classified into two major groups: integrins and discoidin domain receptors (DDRs). Integrins are heterodimeric transmembrane proteins that consist of an alpha and a beta subunit. They bind to collagens via their arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) motif, which is located in the triple-helical domain of collagen molecules. Integrins mediate cell-collagen interactions by clustering and forming focal adhesions, which are large protein complexes that connect the ECM to the cytoskeleton.

DDRs are receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) that contain a discoidin domain in their extracellular region, which is responsible for collagen binding. DDRs bind to collagens via their non-RGD motifs and induce intracellular signaling pathways that regulate cell behavior.

Abnormalities in collagen receptor function have been implicated in various diseases, including fibrosis, cancer, and inflammation. Therefore, understanding the structure and function of collagen receptors is crucial for developing novel therapeutic strategies to treat these conditions.

Thromboxane receptors are a type of G protein-coupled receptor that binds thromboxane A2 (TXA2), a powerful inflammatory mediator and vasoconstrictor synthesized in the body from arachidonic acid. These receptors play a crucial role in various physiological processes, including platelet aggregation, smooth muscle contraction, and modulation of immune responses.

There are two main types of thromboxane receptors: TPα and TPβ. The TPα receptor is primarily found on platelets and vascular smooth muscle cells, while the TPβ receptor is expressed in various tissues such as the kidney, lung, and brain. Activation of these receptors by thromboxane A2 leads to a variety of cellular responses, including platelet activation and aggregation, vasoconstriction, and inflammation.

Abnormalities in thromboxane receptor function have been implicated in several pathological conditions, such as cardiovascular diseases, asthma, and cancer. Therefore, thromboxane receptors are an important target for the development of therapeutic agents to treat these disorders.

Cell size refers to the volume or spatial dimensions of a cell, which can vary widely depending on the type and function of the cell. In general, eukaryotic cells (cells with a true nucleus) tend to be larger than prokaryotic cells (cells without a true nucleus). The size of a cell is determined by various factors such as genetic makeup, the cell's role in the organism, and its environment.

The study of cell size and its relationship to cell function is an active area of research in biology, with implications for our understanding of cellular processes, evolution, and disease. For example, changes in cell size have been linked to various pathological conditions, including cancer and neurodegenerative disorders. Therefore, measuring and analyzing cell size can provide valuable insights into the health and function of cells and tissues.

Hematopoietic Stem Cell Mobilization is the process of mobilizing hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) from the bone marrow into the peripheral blood. HSCs are immature cells that have the ability to differentiate into all types of blood cells, including red and white blood cells and platelets.

Mobilization is often achieved through the use of medications such as granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) or plerixafor, which stimulate the release of HSCs from the bone marrow into the peripheral blood. This allows for the collection of HSCs from the peripheral blood through a procedure called apheresis.

Mobilized HSCs can be used in stem cell transplantation procedures to reconstitute a patient's hematopoietic system after high-dose chemotherapy or radiation therapy. It is an important process in the field of regenerative medicine and has been used to treat various diseases such as leukemia, lymphoma, and sickle cell disease.

Hematologic agents are a class of drugs that affect the formation, function, or destruction of blood cells and related proteins. They include:

1. Hematopoietic growth factors: These are substances that stimulate the production of blood cells in the bone marrow. Examples include erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) like epoetin alfa and darbepoetin alfa, which stimulate red blood cell production, and granulocyte colony-stimulating factors (G-CSFs) like filgrastim and pegfilgrastim, which stimulate white blood cell production.
2. Anticoagulants: These are drugs that prevent blood clots from forming or growing larger. Examples include heparin, warfarin, direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) like apixaban and rivaroxaban, and antiplatelet agents like aspirin and clopidogrel.
3. Hemostatic agents: These are drugs that promote blood clotting to stop bleeding. Examples include fibrin glue, thrombin, and factor VIIa.
4. Hematological malignancy therapies: These are drugs used to treat cancers of the blood and bone marrow, such as leukemia, lymphoma, and multiple myeloma. They include chemotherapeutic agents, targeted therapies like monoclonal antibodies, immunomodulatory drugs, and proteasome inhibitors.
5. Iron chelators: These are drugs used to remove excess iron from the body in patients with conditions that cause iron overload, such as thalassemia and sickle cell disease. Examples include deferoxamine, deferasirox, and deferiprone.
6. Hemophilia therapies: These are drugs used to treat hemophilia, a genetic disorder that affects blood clotting. They include factor VIII replacement therapy for hemophilia A and factor IX replacement therapy for hemophilia B.

Coagulants are substances that promote the process of coagulation or clotting. They are often used in medical settings to help control bleeding and promote healing. Coagulants work by encouraging the formation of a clot, which helps to stop the flow of blood from a wound or cut.

There are several different types of coagulants that may be used in medical treatments. Some coagulants are naturally occurring substances, such as vitamin K, which is essential for the production of certain clotting factors in the body. Other coagulants may be synthetic or semi-synthetic compounds, such as recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa), which is used to treat bleeding disorders and prevent excessive bleeding during surgery.

Coagulants are often administered through injection or infusion, but they can also be applied topically to wounds or cuts. In some cases, coagulants may be used in combination with other treatments, such as compression or cauterization, to help control bleeding and promote healing.

It is important to note that while coagulants can be helpful in controlling bleeding and promoting healing, they can also increase the risk of blood clots and other complications. As a result, they should only be used under the guidance and supervision of a qualified healthcare professional.

Megakaryocyte progenitor cells are a type of hematopoietic (blood-forming) stem or progenitor cell that give rise to megakaryocytes, which are large cells found in the bone marrow. Megakaryocytes are responsible for producing platelets, also known as thrombocytes, which are small cell fragments that play a crucial role in blood clotting and hemostasis.

Megakaryocyte progenitor cells are characterized by their ability to differentiate into megakaryocytes and express specific surface markers, such as CD34, CD41, and CD61. They can be found in the bone marrow and peripheral blood and can be expanded and differentiated in vitro for therapeutic purposes, such as in platelet production for transfusion therapy.

Abnormalities in megakaryocyte progenitor cells can lead to various hematological disorders, including thrombocytopenia (low platelet count) and myeloproliferative neoplasms (abnormal blood cell growth). Therefore, understanding the biology and regulation of megakaryocyte progenitor cells is essential for developing new diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for these conditions.

Pregnancy is a physiological state or condition where a fertilized egg (zygote) successfully implants and grows in the uterus of a woman, leading to the development of an embryo and finally a fetus. This process typically spans approximately 40 weeks, divided into three trimesters, and culminates in childbirth. Throughout this period, numerous hormonal and physical changes occur to support the growing offspring, including uterine enlargement, breast development, and various maternal adaptations to ensure the fetus's optimal growth and well-being.

Hemorheology is the study of the flow properties of blood and its components, including red blood cells, white blood cells, platelets, and plasma. Specifically, it examines how these components interact with each other and with the walls of blood vessels to affect the flow characteristics of blood under different conditions. Hemorheological factors can influence blood viscosity, which is a major determinant of peripheral vascular resistance and cardiac workload. Abnormalities in hemorheology have been implicated in various diseases such as atherosclerosis, hypertension, diabetes, and sickle cell disease.

Cyclophosphamide is an alkylating agent, which is a type of chemotherapy medication. It works by interfering with the DNA of cancer cells, preventing them from dividing and growing. This helps to stop the spread of cancer in the body. Cyclophosphamide is used to treat various types of cancer, including lymphoma, leukemia, multiple myeloma, and breast cancer. It can be given orally as a tablet or intravenously as an injection.

Cyclophosphamide can also have immunosuppressive effects, which means it can suppress the activity of the immune system. This makes it useful in treating certain autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and lupus. However, this immunosuppression can also increase the risk of infections and other side effects.

Like all chemotherapy medications, cyclophosphamide can cause a range of side effects, including nausea, vomiting, hair loss, fatigue, and increased susceptibility to infections. It is important for patients receiving cyclophosphamide to be closely monitored by their healthcare team to manage these side effects and ensure the medication is working effectively.

C57BL/6 (C57 Black 6) is an inbred strain of laboratory mouse that is widely used in biomedical research. The term "inbred" refers to a strain of animals where matings have been carried out between siblings or other closely related individuals for many generations, resulting in a population that is highly homozygous at most genetic loci.

The C57BL/6 strain was established in 1920 by crossing a female mouse from the dilute brown (DBA) strain with a male mouse from the black strain. The resulting offspring were then interbred for many generations to create the inbred C57BL/6 strain.

C57BL/6 mice are known for their robust health, longevity, and ease of handling, making them a popular choice for researchers. They have been used in a wide range of biomedical research areas, including studies of cancer, immunology, neuroscience, cardiovascular disease, and metabolism.

One of the most notable features of the C57BL/6 strain is its sensitivity to certain genetic modifications, such as the introduction of mutations that lead to obesity or impaired glucose tolerance. This has made it a valuable tool for studying the genetic basis of complex diseases and traits.

Overall, the C57BL/6 inbred mouse strain is an important model organism in biomedical research, providing a valuable resource for understanding the genetic and molecular mechanisms underlying human health and disease.

HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) infection is a viral illness that progressively attacks and weakens the immune system, making individuals more susceptible to other infections and diseases. The virus primarily infects CD4+ T cells, a type of white blood cell essential for fighting off infections. Over time, as the number of these immune cells declines, the body becomes increasingly vulnerable to opportunistic infections and cancers.

HIV infection has three stages:

1. Acute HIV infection: This is the initial stage that occurs within 2-4 weeks after exposure to the virus. During this period, individuals may experience flu-like symptoms such as fever, fatigue, rash, swollen glands, and muscle aches. The virus replicates rapidly, and the viral load in the body is very high.
2. Chronic HIV infection (Clinical latency): This stage follows the acute infection and can last several years if left untreated. Although individuals may not show any symptoms during this phase, the virus continues to replicate at low levels, and the immune system gradually weakens. The viral load remains relatively stable, but the number of CD4+ T cells declines over time.
3. AIDS (Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome): This is the most advanced stage of HIV infection, characterized by a severely damaged immune system and numerous opportunistic infections or cancers. At this stage, the CD4+ T cell count drops below 200 cells/mm3 of blood.

It's important to note that with proper antiretroviral therapy (ART), individuals with HIV infection can effectively manage the virus, maintain a healthy immune system, and significantly reduce the risk of transmission to others. Early diagnosis and treatment are crucial for improving long-term health outcomes and reducing the spread of HIV.

Erythrocyte indices are a set of calculated values that provide information about the size and hemoglobin content of red blood cells (erythrocytes). These indices are commonly used in the complete blood count (CBC) test to help diagnose various types of anemia and other conditions affecting the red blood cells.

The three main erythrocyte indices are:

1. Mean Corpuscular Volume (MCV): This is the average volume of a single red blood cell, measured in femtoliters (fL). MCV helps to differentiate between microcytic, normocytic, and macrocytic anemia. Microcytic anemia is characterized by low MCV values (100 fL).
2. Mean Corpuscular Hemoglobin (MCH): This is the average amount of hemoglobin present in a single red blood cell, measured in picograms (pg). MCH helps to assess the oxygen-carrying capacity of red blood cells. Low MCH values may indicate hypochromic anemia, where the red blood cells have reduced hemoglobin content.
3. Mean Corpuscular Hemoglobin Concentration (MCHC): This is the average concentration of hemoglobin in a single red blood cell, measured as a percentage. MCHC reflects the hemoglobin concentration relative to the size of the red blood cells. Low MCHC values may indicate hypochromic anemia, while high MCHC values could suggest spherocytosis or other conditions affecting red blood cell shape and integrity.

These erythrocyte indices are calculated based on the red blood cell count, hemoglobin concentration, and hematocrit results obtained from a CBC test. They provide valuable information for healthcare professionals to diagnose and manage various hematological conditions.

Blood viscosity is a measure of the thickness or flow resistance of blood. It is defined as the ratio of shear stress to shear rate within the flowing blood, which reflects the internal friction or resistance to flow. Blood viscosity is primarily determined by the concentration and size of red blood cells (hematocrit), plasma proteins, and other blood constituents. An increase in any of these components can raise blood viscosity, leading to impaired blood flow, reduced oxygen delivery to tissues, and potential cardiovascular complications if not managed appropriately.

Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are immature, self-renewing cells that give rise to all the mature blood and immune cells in the body. They are capable of both producing more hematopoietic stem cells (self-renewal) and differentiating into early progenitor cells that eventually develop into red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. HSCs are found in the bone marrow, umbilical cord blood, and peripheral blood. They have the ability to repair damaged tissues and offer significant therapeutic potential for treating various diseases, including hematological disorders, genetic diseases, and cancer.

Erythrocytes, also known as red blood cells (RBCs), are the most common type of blood cell in circulating blood in mammals. They are responsible for transporting oxygen from the lungs to the body's tissues and carbon dioxide from the tissues to the lungs.

Erythrocytes are formed in the bone marrow and have a biconcave shape, which allows them to fold and bend easily as they pass through narrow blood vessels. They do not have a nucleus or mitochondria, which makes them more flexible but also limits their ability to reproduce or repair themselves.

In humans, erythrocytes are typically disc-shaped and measure about 7 micrometers in diameter. They contain the protein hemoglobin, which binds to oxygen and gives blood its red color. The lifespan of an erythrocyte is approximately 120 days, after which it is broken down in the liver and spleen.

Abnormalities in erythrocyte count or function can lead to various medical conditions, such as anemia, polycythemia, and sickle cell disease.

Blood component removal, also known as blood component therapy or apheresis, is a medical procedure that involves separating and removing specific components of the blood, such as red blood cells, white blood cells, platelets, or plasma, while returning the remaining components back to the donor or patient. This process can be used for therapeutic purposes, such as in the treatment of certain diseases and conditions, or for donation, such as in the collection of blood products for transfusion. The specific method and equipment used to perform blood component removal may vary depending on the intended application and the particular component being removed.

Survival analysis is a branch of statistics that deals with the analysis of time to event data. It is used to estimate the time it takes for a certain event of interest to occur, such as death, disease recurrence, or treatment failure. The event of interest is called the "failure" event, and survival analysis estimates the probability of not experiencing the failure event until a certain point in time, also known as the "survival" probability.

Survival analysis can provide important information about the effectiveness of treatments, the prognosis of patients, and the identification of risk factors associated with the event of interest. It can handle censored data, which is common in medical research where some participants may drop out or be lost to follow-up before the event of interest occurs.

Survival analysis typically involves estimating the survival function, which describes the probability of surviving beyond a certain time point, as well as hazard functions, which describe the instantaneous rate of failure at a given time point. Other important concepts in survival analysis include median survival times, restricted mean survival times, and various statistical tests to compare survival curves between groups.

Gaucher disease is an inherited metabolic disorder caused by the deficiency of the enzyme glucocerebrosidase. This enzyme is responsible for breaking down a complex fatty substance called glucocerebroside, found in the cells of various tissues throughout the body. When the enzyme is not present in sufficient quantities or is entirely absent, glucocerebroside accumulates inside the lysosomes (cellular organelles responsible for waste material breakdown) of certain cell types, particularly within white blood cells called macrophages. This buildup of lipids leads to the formation of characteristic lipid-laden cells known as Gaucher cells.

There are three main types of Gaucher disease, classified based on the absence or presence and severity of neurological symptoms:

1. Type 1 (non-neuronopathic) - This is the most common form of Gaucher disease, accounting for approximately 95% of cases. It primarily affects the spleen, liver, and bone marrow but does not typically involve the central nervous system. Symptoms may include an enlarged spleen and/or liver, low red blood cell counts (anemia), low platelet counts (thrombocytopenia), bone pain and fractures, and fatigue.
2. Type 2 (acute neuronopathic) - This rare and severe form of Gaucher disease affects both visceral organs and the central nervous system. Symptoms usually appear within the first six months of life and progress rapidly, often leading to death before two years of age due to neurological complications.
3. Type 3 (subacute neuronopathic) - This form of Gaucher disease affects both visceral organs and the central nervous system but has a slower progression compared to type 2. Symptoms may include those seen in type 1, as well as neurological issues such as seizures, eye movement abnormalities, and cognitive decline.

Gaucher disease is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner, meaning that an individual must inherit two defective copies of the gene (one from each parent) to develop the condition. Treatment options for Gaucher disease include enzyme replacement therapy (ERT), substrate reduction therapy (SRT), and chaperone therapy, depending on the type and severity of the disease.

A newborn infant is a baby who is within the first 28 days of life. This period is also referred to as the neonatal period. Newborns require specialized care and attention due to their immature bodily systems and increased vulnerability to various health issues. They are closely monitored for signs of well-being, growth, and development during this critical time.

Bone marrow cells are the types of cells found within the bone marrow, which is the spongy tissue inside certain bones in the body. The main function of bone marrow is to produce blood cells. There are two types of bone marrow: red and yellow. Red bone marrow is where most blood cell production takes place, while yellow bone marrow serves as a fat storage site.

The three main types of bone marrow cells are:

1. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs): These are immature cells that can differentiate into any type of blood cell, including red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. They have the ability to self-renew, meaning they can divide and create more hematopoietic stem cells.
2. Red blood cell progenitors: These are immature cells that will develop into mature red blood cells, also known as erythrocytes. Red blood cells carry oxygen from the lungs to the body's tissues and carbon dioxide back to the lungs.
3. Myeloid and lymphoid white blood cell progenitors: These are immature cells that will develop into various types of white blood cells, which play a crucial role in the body's immune system by fighting infections and diseases. Myeloid progenitors give rise to granulocytes (neutrophils, eosinophils, and basophils), monocytes, and megakaryocytes (which eventually become platelets). Lymphoid progenitors differentiate into B cells, T cells, and natural killer (NK) cells.

Bone marrow cells are essential for maintaining a healthy blood cell count and immune system function. Abnormalities in bone marrow cells can lead to various medical conditions, such as anemia, leukopenia, leukocytosis, thrombocytopenia, or thrombocytosis, depending on the specific type of blood cell affected. Additionally, bone marrow cells are often used in transplantation procedures to treat patients with certain types of cancer, such as leukemia and lymphoma, or other hematologic disorders.

CD34 is a type of antigen that is found on the surface of certain cells in the human body. Specifically, CD34 antigens are present on hematopoietic stem cells, which are immature cells that can develop into different types of blood cells. These stem cells are found in the bone marrow and are responsible for producing red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets.

CD34 antigens are a type of cell surface marker that is used in medical research and clinical settings to identify and isolate hematopoietic stem cells. They are also used in the development of stem cell therapies and transplantation procedures. CD34 antigens can be detected using various laboratory techniques, such as flow cytometry or immunohistochemistry.

It's important to note that while CD34 is a useful marker for identifying hematopoietic stem cells, it is not exclusive to these cells and can also be found on other cell types, such as endothelial cells that line blood vessels. Therefore, additional markers are often used in combination with CD34 to more specifically identify and isolate hematopoietic stem cells.

Ploidy is a term used in genetics to describe the number of sets of chromosomes in a cell or an organism. The ploidy level can have important implications for genetic inheritance and expression, as well as for evolutionary processes such as speciation and hybridization.

In most animals, including humans, the normal ploidy level is diploid, meaning that each cell contains two sets of chromosomes - one set inherited from each parent. However, there are also many examples of polyploidy, in which an organism has more than two sets of chromosomes.

Polyploidy can arise through various mechanisms, such as genome duplication or hybridization between different species. In some cases, polyploidy may confer evolutionary advantages, such as increased genetic diversity and adaptability to new environments. However, it can also lead to reproductive isolation and the formation of new species.

In plants, polyploidy is relatively common and has played a significant role in their evolution and diversification. Many crop plants are polyploids, including wheat, cotton, and tobacco. In some cases, artificial induction of polyploidy has been used to create new varieties with desirable traits for agriculture and horticulture.

Overall, ploidy is an important concept in genetics and evolution, with implications for a wide range of biological processes and phenomena.

Radioisotopes, also known as radioactive isotopes or radionuclides, are variants of chemical elements that have unstable nuclei and emit radiation in the form of alpha particles, beta particles, gamma rays, or conversion electrons. These isotopes are formed when an element's nucleus undergoes natural or artificial radioactive decay.

Radioisotopes can be produced through various processes, including nuclear fission, nuclear fusion, and particle bombardment in a cyclotron or other types of particle accelerators. They have a wide range of applications in medicine, industry, agriculture, research, and energy production. In the medical field, radioisotopes are used for diagnostic imaging, radiation therapy, and in the labeling of molecules for research purposes.

It is important to note that handling and using radioisotopes requires proper training, safety measures, and regulatory compliance due to their ionizing radiation properties, which can pose potential health risks if not handled correctly.

Animal disease models are specialized animals, typically rodents such as mice or rats, that have been genetically engineered or exposed to certain conditions to develop symptoms and physiological changes similar to those seen in human diseases. These models are used in medical research to study the pathophysiology of diseases, identify potential therapeutic targets, test drug efficacy and safety, and understand disease mechanisms.

The genetic modifications can include knockout or knock-in mutations, transgenic expression of specific genes, or RNA interference techniques. The animals may also be exposed to environmental factors such as chemicals, radiation, or infectious agents to induce the disease state.

Examples of animal disease models include:

1. Mouse models of cancer: Genetically engineered mice that develop various types of tumors, allowing researchers to study cancer initiation, progression, and metastasis.
2. Alzheimer's disease models: Transgenic mice expressing mutant human genes associated with Alzheimer's disease, which exhibit amyloid plaque formation and cognitive decline.
3. Diabetes models: Obese and diabetic mouse strains like the NOD (non-obese diabetic) or db/db mice, used to study the development of type 1 and type 2 diabetes, respectively.
4. Cardiovascular disease models: Atherosclerosis-prone mice, such as ApoE-deficient or LDLR-deficient mice, that develop plaque buildup in their arteries when fed a high-fat diet.
5. Inflammatory bowel disease models: Mice with genetic mutations affecting intestinal barrier function and immune response, such as IL-10 knockout or SAMP1/YitFc mice, which develop colitis.

Animal disease models are essential tools in preclinical research, but it is important to recognize their limitations. Differences between species can affect the translatability of results from animal studies to human patients. Therefore, researchers must carefully consider the choice of model and interpret findings cautiously when applying them to human diseases.

Leukemia is a type of cancer that originates from the bone marrow - the soft, inner part of certain bones where new blood cells are made. It is characterized by an abnormal production of white blood cells, known as leukocytes or blasts. These abnormal cells accumulate in the bone marrow and interfere with the production of normal blood cells, leading to a decrease in red blood cells (anemia), platelets (thrombocytopenia), and healthy white blood cells (leukopenia).

There are several types of leukemia, classified based on the specific type of white blood cell affected and the speed at which the disease progresses:

1. Acute Leukemias - These types of leukemia progress rapidly, with symptoms developing over a few weeks or months. They involve the rapid growth and accumulation of immature, nonfunctional white blood cells (blasts) in the bone marrow and peripheral blood. The two main categories are:
- Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) - Originates from lymphoid progenitor cells, primarily affecting children but can also occur in adults.
- Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) - Develops from myeloid progenitor cells and is more common in older adults.

2. Chronic Leukemias - These types of leukemia progress slowly, with symptoms developing over a period of months to years. They involve the production of relatively mature, but still abnormal, white blood cells that can accumulate in large numbers in the bone marrow and peripheral blood. The two main categories are:
- Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL) - Affects B-lymphocytes and is more common in older adults.
- Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) - Originates from myeloid progenitor cells, characterized by the presence of a specific genetic abnormality called the Philadelphia chromosome. It can occur at any age but is more common in middle-aged and older adults.

Treatment options for leukemia depend on the type, stage, and individual patient factors. Treatments may include chemotherapy, targeted therapy, immunotherapy, stem cell transplantation, or a combination of these approaches.

The endothelium is a thin layer of simple squamous epithelial cells that lines the interior surface of blood vessels, lymphatic vessels, and heart chambers. The vascular endothelium, specifically, refers to the endothelial cells that line the blood vessels. These cells play a crucial role in maintaining vascular homeostasis by regulating vasomotor tone, coagulation, platelet activation, inflammation, and permeability of the vessel wall. They also contribute to the growth and repair of the vascular system and are involved in various pathological processes such as atherosclerosis, hypertension, and diabetes.

Arachidonic acid is a type of polyunsaturated fatty acid that is found naturally in the body and in certain foods. It is an essential fatty acid, meaning that it cannot be produced by the human body and must be obtained through the diet. Arachidonic acid is a key component of cell membranes and plays a role in various physiological processes, including inflammation and blood clotting.

In the body, arachidonic acid is released from cell membranes in response to various stimuli, such as injury or infection. Once released, it can be converted into a variety of bioactive compounds, including prostaglandins, thromboxanes, and leukotrienes, which mediate various physiological responses, including inflammation, pain, fever, and blood clotting.

Arachidonic acid is found in high concentrations in animal products such as meat, poultry, fish, and eggs, as well as in some plant sources such as certain nuts and seeds. It is also available as a dietary supplement. However, it is important to note that excessive intake of arachidonic acid can contribute to the development of inflammation and other health problems, so it is recommended to consume this fatty acid in moderation as part of a balanced diet.

Serum albumin is the most abundant protein in human blood plasma, synthesized by the liver. It plays a crucial role in maintaining the oncotic pressure or colloid osmotic pressure of blood, which helps to regulate the fluid balance between the intravascular and extravascular spaces.

Serum albumin has a molecular weight of around 66 kDa and is composed of a single polypeptide chain. It contains several binding sites for various endogenous and exogenous substances, such as bilirubin, fatty acids, hormones, and drugs, facilitating their transport throughout the body. Additionally, albumin possesses antioxidant properties, protecting against oxidative damage.

Albumin levels in the blood are often used as a clinical indicator of liver function, nutritional status, and overall health. Low serum albumin levels may suggest liver disease, malnutrition, inflammation, or kidney dysfunction.

A cell membrane, also known as the plasma membrane, is a thin semi-permeable phospholipid bilayer that surrounds all cells in animals, plants, and microorganisms. It functions as a barrier to control the movement of substances in and out of the cell, allowing necessary molecules such as nutrients, oxygen, and signaling molecules to enter while keeping out harmful substances and waste products. The cell membrane is composed mainly of phospholipids, which have hydrophilic (water-loving) heads and hydrophobic (water-fearing) tails. This unique structure allows the membrane to be flexible and fluid, yet selectively permeable. Additionally, various proteins are embedded in the membrane that serve as channels, pumps, receptors, and enzymes, contributing to the cell's overall functionality and communication with its environment.

Erythropoietin (EPO) is a hormone that is primarily produced by the kidneys and plays a crucial role in the production of red blood cells in the body. It works by stimulating the bone marrow to produce more red blood cells, which are essential for carrying oxygen to various tissues and organs.

EPO is a glycoprotein that is released into the bloodstream in response to low oxygen levels in the body. When the kidneys detect low oxygen levels, they release EPO, which then travels to the bone marrow and binds to specific receptors on immature red blood cells called erythroblasts. This binding triggers a series of events that promote the maturation and proliferation of erythroblasts, leading to an increase in the production of red blood cells.

In addition to its role in regulating red blood cell production, EPO has also been shown to have neuroprotective effects and may play a role in modulating the immune system. Abnormal levels of EPO have been associated with various medical conditions, including anemia, kidney disease, and certain types of cancer.

EPO is also used as a therapeutic agent for the treatment of anemia caused by chronic kidney disease, chemotherapy, or other conditions that affect red blood cell production. Recombinant human EPO (rhEPO) is a synthetic form of the hormone that is produced using genetic engineering techniques and is commonly used in clinical practice to treat anemia. However, misuse of rhEPO for performance enhancement in sports has been a subject of concern due to its potential to enhance oxygen-carrying capacity and improve endurance.

Aspartate aminotransferases (ASTs) are a group of enzymes found in various tissues throughout the body, including the heart, liver, and muscles. They play a crucial role in the metabolic process of transferring amino groups between different molecules.

In medical terms, AST is often used as a blood test to measure the level of this enzyme in the serum. Elevated levels of AST can indicate damage or injury to tissues that contain this enzyme, such as the liver or heart. For example, liver disease, including hepatitis and cirrhosis, can cause elevated AST levels due to damage to liver cells. Similarly, heart attacks can also result in increased AST levels due to damage to heart muscle tissue.

It is important to note that an AST test alone cannot diagnose a specific medical condition, but it can provide valuable information when used in conjunction with other diagnostic tests and clinical evaluation.

Thrombotic microangiopathies (TMAs) are a group of disorders characterized by the formation of blood clots in small blood vessels, causing damage to the end organs. This process leads to a constellation of clinical symptoms including thrombocytopenia (low platelet count), microangiopathic hemolytic anemia (breakdown of red blood cells leading to anemia), and organ dysfunction such as renal failure, neurological impairment, or cardiac involvement.

TMAs can be primary or secondary. Primary TMAs are caused by genetic mutations affecting the complement system, coagulation cascade, or other regulatory proteins involved in vascular homeostasis. Examples of primary TMAs include atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS), thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP), and complement-mediated TMA.

Secondary TMAs are caused by various underlying conditions or exposures, such as infections, autoimmune diseases, malignancies, drugs, pregnancy-related complications, or other systemic disorders. The pathogenesis of secondary TMAs is often multifactorial and may involve endothelial injury, complement activation, and platelet aggregation.

The diagnosis of TMAs requires a combination of clinical, laboratory, and sometimes histopathological findings. Treatment depends on the underlying cause and may include supportive care, plasma exchange, immunosuppressive therapy, or targeted therapies such as complement inhibitors.

Thrombospondins (TSPs) are a family of multifunctional glycoproteins that are involved in various biological processes, including cell adhesion, migration, proliferation, differentiation, and angiogenesis. They were initially identified as calcium-binding proteins that are secreted by platelets during blood clotting (thrombosis), hence the name thrombospondin.

There are five members in the TSP family, designated as TSP-1 to TSP-5, and they share a common structure consisting of several domains, including an N-terminal domain, a series of type 1 repeats, a type 2 (von Willebrand factor C) repeat, a type 3 repeat, and a C-terminal domain.

TSP-1 and TSP-2 are secreted proteins that have been extensively studied for their roles in the regulation of angiogenesis, the process of new blood vessel formation. They bind to various extracellular matrix components, growth factors, and cell surface receptors, and can either promote or inhibit angiogenesis depending on the context.

TSP-3 to TSP-5 are expressed in a variety of tissues and play roles in cell adhesion, migration, and differentiation. They have been implicated in various pathological conditions, including cancer, fibrosis, and neurodegenerative diseases.

Overall, thrombospondins are important regulators of extracellular matrix dynamics and cell-matrix interactions, and their dysregulation has been associated with a variety of diseases.

Gray Platelet Syndrome (GPS) is a rare inherited platelet disorder, characterized by the presence of large, gray-blue or purple staining platelets in blood smears due to the absence or decreased amount of alpha granules, which are normally present in platelets. This condition was first described in 1971.

The main features of GPS include:

1. Thrombocytopenia (low platelet count) - Platelet counts can range from normal to very low levels.
2. Bleeding tendency - Patients with GPS usually have a bleeding diathesis, which varies in severity from mild to severe. The bleeding tendency is due to the impaired function of platelets caused by the absence of alpha granules.
3. Bone abnormalities - GPS can also be associated with bone abnormalities such as osteopenia (low bone density) and/or skeletal dysplasia (abnormal bone growth).
4. Neurological symptoms - Some patients may develop neurological symptoms, including ataxia (lack of muscle coordination), hearing loss, and intellectual disability.

GPS is caused by mutations in the NBEAL2 gene, which encodes a protein involved in the transport and secretion of alpha granules in megakaryocytes, the precursor cells of platelets. The disorder is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner, meaning that affected individuals have inherited two defective copies of the gene, one from each parent.

Diagnosis of GPS typically involves a combination of clinical evaluation, blood tests (including complete blood count and peripheral blood smear), and genetic testing to confirm the presence of pathogenic NBEAL2 mutations. Management of GPS primarily focuses on addressing bleeding symptoms through platelet transfusions, antifibrinolytic agents, or other hemostatic therapies as needed.

Multivariate analysis is a statistical method used to examine the relationship between multiple independent variables and a dependent variable. It allows for the simultaneous examination of the effects of two or more independent variables on an outcome, while controlling for the effects of other variables in the model. This technique can be used to identify patterns, associations, and interactions among multiple variables, and is commonly used in medical research to understand complex health outcomes and disease processes. Examples of multivariate analysis methods include multiple regression, factor analysis, cluster analysis, and discriminant analysis.

The double-blind method is a study design commonly used in research, including clinical trials, to minimize bias and ensure the objectivity of results. In this approach, both the participants and the researchers are unaware of which group the participants are assigned to, whether it be the experimental group or the control group. This means that neither the participants nor the researchers know who is receiving a particular treatment or placebo, thus reducing the potential for bias in the evaluation of outcomes. The assignment of participants to groups is typically done by a third party not involved in the study, and the codes are only revealed after all data have been collected and analyzed.

Indium radioisotopes refer to specific types of radioactive indium atoms, which are unstable and emit radiation as they decay. Indium is a chemical element with the symbol In and atomic number 49. Its radioisotopes are often used in medical imaging and therapy due to their unique properties.

For instance, one commonly used indium radioisotope is Indium-111 (^111In), which has a half-life of approximately 2.8 days. It emits gamma rays, making it useful for diagnostic imaging techniques such as single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). In clinical applications, indium-111 is often attached to specific molecules or antibodies that target particular cells or tissues in the body, allowing medical professionals to monitor biological processes and identify diseases like cancer.

Another example is Indium-113m (^113mIn), which has a half-life of about 99 minutes. It emits low-energy gamma rays and is used as a source for in vivo counting, typically in the form of indium chloride (InCl3) solution. This radioisotope can be used to measure blood flow, ventilation, and other physiological parameters.

It's important to note that handling and using radioisotopes require proper training and safety measures due to their ionizing radiation properties.

Purpura is a medical term that refers to the appearance of purple-colored spots on the skin or mucous membranes, caused by bleeding underneath the skin due to various factors such as blood clotting disorders, vasculitis (inflammation of the blood vessels), severe thrombocytopenia (low platelet count), or use of certain medications. These spots can vary in size and shape, ranging from small pinpoint hemorrhages (petechiae) to larger, irregularly shaped patches (ecchymoses). The bleeding is usually not caused by trauma or injury to the area. It's important to consult a healthcare professional if you notice any unexplained purpuric spots on your skin or mucous membranes, as they can indicate an underlying medical condition that requires further evaluation and treatment.

Prothrombin is a protein present in blood plasma, and it's also known as coagulation factor II. It plays a crucial role in the coagulation cascade, which is a complex series of reactions that leads to the formation of a blood clot.

When an injury occurs, the coagulation cascade is initiated to prevent excessive blood loss. Prothrombin is converted into its active form, thrombin, by another factor called factor Xa in the presence of calcium ions, phospholipids, and factor Va. Thrombin then catalyzes the conversion of fibrinogen into fibrin, forming a stable clot.

Prothrombin levels can be measured through a blood test, which is often used to diagnose or monitor conditions related to bleeding or coagulation disorders, such as liver disease or vitamin K deficiency.

Antineoplastic combined chemotherapy protocols refer to a treatment plan for cancer that involves the use of more than one antineoplastic (chemotherapy) drug given in a specific sequence and schedule. The combination of drugs is used because they may work better together to destroy cancer cells compared to using a single agent alone. This approach can also help to reduce the likelihood of cancer cells becoming resistant to the treatment.

The choice of drugs, dose, duration, and frequency are determined by various factors such as the type and stage of cancer, patient's overall health, and potential side effects. Combination chemotherapy protocols can be used in various settings, including as a primary treatment, adjuvant therapy (given after surgery or radiation to kill any remaining cancer cells), neoadjuvant therapy (given before surgery or radiation to shrink the tumor), or palliative care (to alleviate symptoms and prolong survival).

It is important to note that while combined chemotherapy protocols can be effective in treating certain types of cancer, they can also cause significant side effects, including nausea, vomiting, hair loss, fatigue, and an increased risk of infection. Therefore, patients undergoing such treatment should be closely monitored and managed by a healthcare team experienced in administering chemotherapy.

Granulocytes are a type of white blood cell that plays a crucial role in the body's immune system. They are called granulocytes because they contain small granules in their cytoplasm, which are filled with various enzymes and proteins that help them fight off infections and destroy foreign substances.

There are three types of granulocytes: neutrophils, eosinophils, and basophils. Neutrophils are the most abundant type and are primarily responsible for fighting bacterial infections. Eosinophils play a role in defending against parasitic infections and regulating immune responses. Basophils are involved in inflammatory reactions and allergic responses.

Granulocytes are produced in the bone marrow and released into the bloodstream, where they circulate and patrol for any signs of infection or foreign substances. When they encounter a threat, they quickly move to the site of infection or injury and release their granules to destroy the invading organisms or substances.

Abnormal levels of granulocytes in the blood can indicate an underlying medical condition, such as an infection, inflammation, or a bone marrow disorder.

"Cells, cultured" is a medical term that refers to cells that have been removed from an organism and grown in controlled laboratory conditions outside of the body. This process is called cell culture and it allows scientists to study cells in a more controlled and accessible environment than they would have inside the body. Cultured cells can be derived from a variety of sources, including tissues, organs, or fluids from humans, animals, or cell lines that have been previously established in the laboratory.

Cell culture involves several steps, including isolation of the cells from the tissue, purification and characterization of the cells, and maintenance of the cells in appropriate growth conditions. The cells are typically grown in specialized media that contain nutrients, growth factors, and other components necessary for their survival and proliferation. Cultured cells can be used for a variety of purposes, including basic research, drug development and testing, and production of biological products such as vaccines and gene therapies.

It is important to note that cultured cells may behave differently than they do in the body, and results obtained from cell culture studies may not always translate directly to human physiology or disease. Therefore, it is essential to validate findings from cell culture experiments using additional models and ultimately in clinical trials involving human subjects.

Antithrombin III is a protein that inhibits the formation of blood clots (thrombi) in the body. It does this by inactivating several enzymes involved in coagulation, including thrombin and factor Xa. Antithrombin III is produced naturally by the liver and is also available as a medication for the prevention and treatment of thromboembolic disorders, such as deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. It works by binding to and neutralizing excess clotting factors in the bloodstream, thereby reducing the risk of clot formation.

Remission induction is a treatment approach in medicine, particularly in the field of oncology and hematology. It refers to the initial phase of therapy aimed at reducing or eliminating the signs and symptoms of active disease, such as cancer or autoimmune disorders. The primary goal of remission induction is to achieve a complete response (disappearance of all detectable signs of the disease) or a partial response (a decrease in the measurable extent of the disease). This phase of treatment is often intensive and may involve the use of multiple drugs or therapies, including chemotherapy, immunotherapy, or targeted therapy. After remission induction, patients may receive additional treatments to maintain the remission and prevent relapse, known as consolidation or maintenance therapy.

A case-control study is an observational research design used to identify risk factors or causes of a disease or health outcome. In this type of study, individuals with the disease or condition (cases) are compared with similar individuals who do not have the disease or condition (controls). The exposure history or other characteristics of interest are then compared between the two groups to determine if there is an association between the exposure and the disease.

Case-control studies are often used when it is not feasible or ethical to conduct a randomized controlled trial, as they can provide valuable insights into potential causes of diseases or health outcomes in a relatively short period of time and at a lower cost than other study designs. However, because case-control studies rely on retrospective data collection, they are subject to biases such as recall bias and selection bias, which can affect the validity of the results. Therefore, it is important to carefully design and conduct case-control studies to minimize these potential sources of bias.

Medical survival rate is a statistical measure used to determine the percentage of patients who are still alive for a specific period of time after their diagnosis or treatment for a certain condition or disease. It is often expressed as a five-year survival rate, which refers to the proportion of people who are alive five years after their diagnosis. Survival rates can be affected by many factors, including the stage of the disease at diagnosis, the patient's age and overall health, the effectiveness of treatment, and other health conditions that the patient may have. It is important to note that survival rates are statistical estimates and do not necessarily predict an individual patient's prognosis.

Thromboplastin is a substance that activates the coagulation cascade, leading to the formation of a clot (thrombus). It's primarily found in damaged or injured tissues and blood vessels, as well as in platelets (thrombocytes). There are two types of thromboplastin:

1. Extrinsic thromboplastin (also known as tissue factor): This is a transmembrane glycoprotein that is primarily found in subendothelial cells and released upon injury to the blood vessels. It initiates the extrinsic pathway of coagulation by binding to and activating Factor VII, ultimately leading to the formation of thrombin and fibrin clots.
2. Intrinsic thromboplastin (also known as plasma thromboplastin or factor III): This term is used less frequently and refers to a labile phospholipid component present in platelet membranes, which plays a role in the intrinsic pathway of coagulation.

In clinical settings, the term "thromboplastin" often refers to reagents used in laboratory tests like the prothrombin time (PT) and activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT). These reagents contain a source of tissue factor and calcium ions to initiate and monitor the coagulation process.

Calcimycin is a ionophore compound that is produced by the bacterium Streptomyces chartreusensis. It is also known as Calcineurin A inhibitor because it can bind to and inhibit the activity of calcineurin, a protein phosphatase. In medical research, calcimycin is often used to study calcium signaling in cells.
It has been also used in laboratory studies for its antiproliferative and pro-apoptotic effects on certain types of cancer cells. However, it is not approved for use as a drug in humans.

Fc receptors (FcRs) are specialized proteins found on the surface of various immune cells, including neutrophils, monocytes, macrophages, eosinophils, basophils, mast cells, and B lymphocytes. They play a crucial role in the immune response by recognizing and binding to the Fc region of antibodies (IgG, IgA, and IgE) after they have interacted with their specific antigens.

FcRs can be classified into several types based on the class of antibody they bind:

1. FcγRs - bind to the Fc region of IgG antibodies
2. FcαRs - bind to the Fc region of IgA antibodies
3. FcεRs - bind to the Fc region of IgE antibodies

The binding of antibodies to Fc receptors triggers various cellular responses, such as phagocytosis, degranulation, and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), which contribute to the elimination of pathogens, immune complexes, and other foreign substances. Dysregulation of Fc receptor function has been implicated in several diseases, including autoimmune disorders and allergies.

Thromboembolism is a medical condition that refers to the obstruction of a blood vessel by a thrombus (blood clot) that has formed elsewhere in the body and then been transported by the bloodstream to a narrower vessel, where it becomes lodged. This process can occur in various parts of the body, leading to different types of thromboembolisms:

1. Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT): A thrombus forms in the deep veins, usually in the legs or pelvis, and then breaks off and travels to the lungs, causing a pulmonary embolism.
2. Pulmonary Embolism (PE): A thrombus formed elsewhere, often in the deep veins of the legs, dislodges and travels to the lungs, blocking one or more pulmonary arteries. This can lead to shortness of breath, chest pain, and potentially life-threatening complications if not treated promptly.
3. Cerebral Embolism: A thrombus formed in another part of the body, such as the heart or carotid artery, dislodges and travels to the brain, causing a stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA).
4. Arterial Thromboembolism: A thrombus forms in an artery and breaks off, traveling to another part of the body and blocking blood flow to an organ or tissue, leading to potential damage or loss of function. Examples include mesenteric ischemia (intestinal damage due to blocked blood flow) and retinal artery occlusion (vision loss due to blocked blood flow in the eye).

Prevention, early detection, and appropriate treatment are crucial for managing thromboembolism and reducing the risk of severe complications.

Recurrence, in a medical context, refers to the return of symptoms or signs of a disease after a period of improvement or remission. It indicates that the condition has not been fully eradicated and may require further treatment. Recurrence is often used to describe situations where a disease such as cancer comes back after initial treatment, but it can also apply to other medical conditions. The likelihood of recurrence varies depending on the type of disease and individual patient factors.

Molecular sequence data refers to the specific arrangement of molecules, most commonly nucleotides in DNA or RNA, or amino acids in proteins, that make up a biological macromolecule. This data is generated through laboratory techniques such as sequencing, and provides information about the exact order of the constituent molecules. This data is crucial in various fields of biology, including genetics, evolution, and molecular biology, allowing for comparisons between different organisms, identification of genetic variations, and studies of gene function and regulation.

Dengue is a mosquito-borne viral infection that is primarily transmitted by the Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus species of mosquitoes. It is caused by one of four closely related dengue viruses (DENV 1, DENV 2, DENV 3, or DENV 4). The infection can cause a wide range of symptoms, ranging from mild fever and headache to severe flu-like illness, which is often characterized by the sudden onset of high fever, severe headache, muscle and joint pain, nausea, vomiting, and skin rash. In some cases, dengue can progress to more severe forms, such as dengue hemorrhagic fever or dengue shock syndrome, which can be life-threatening if not treated promptly and appropriately.

Dengue is prevalent in many tropical and subtropical regions around the world, particularly in urban and semi-urban areas with poor sanitation and inadequate mosquito control. There is no specific treatment for dengue, and prevention efforts focus on reducing mosquito populations and avoiding mosquito bites. Vaccines are available in some countries to prevent dengue infection, but they are not widely used due to limitations in their effectiveness and safety.

Cell adhesion refers to the binding of cells to extracellular matrices or to other cells, a process that is fundamental to the development, function, and maintenance of multicellular organisms. Cell adhesion is mediated by various cell surface receptors, such as integrins, cadherins, and immunoglobulin-like cell adhesion molecules (Ig-CAMs), which interact with specific ligands in the extracellular environment. These interactions lead to the formation of specialized junctions, such as tight junctions, adherens junctions, and desmosomes, that help to maintain tissue architecture and regulate various cellular processes, including proliferation, differentiation, migration, and survival. Disruptions in cell adhesion can contribute to a variety of diseases, including cancer, inflammation, and degenerative disorders.

Sensitivity and specificity are statistical measures used to describe the performance of a diagnostic test or screening tool in identifying true positive and true negative results.

* Sensitivity refers to the proportion of people who have a particular condition (true positives) who are correctly identified by the test. It is also known as the "true positive rate" or "recall." A highly sensitive test will identify most or all of the people with the condition, but may also produce more false positives.
* Specificity refers to the proportion of people who do not have a particular condition (true negatives) who are correctly identified by the test. It is also known as the "true negative rate." A highly specific test will identify most or all of the people without the condition, but may also produce more false negatives.

In medical testing, both sensitivity and specificity are important considerations when evaluating a diagnostic test. High sensitivity is desirable for screening tests that aim to identify as many cases of a condition as possible, while high specificity is desirable for confirmatory tests that aim to rule out the condition in people who do not have it.

It's worth noting that sensitivity and specificity are often influenced by factors such as the prevalence of the condition in the population being tested, the threshold used to define a positive result, and the reliability and validity of the test itself. Therefore, it's important to consider these factors when interpreting the results of a diagnostic test.

Refractory anemia is a type of anemia that does not respond to typical treatments, such as iron supplements or hormonal therapy. It is often associated with various bone marrow disorders, including myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), a group of conditions characterized by abnormal blood cell production in the bone marrow.

In refractory anemia, the bone marrow fails to produce enough healthy red blood cells, leading to symptoms such as fatigue, weakness, shortness of breath, and pale skin. The condition can be difficult to treat, and treatment options may include more aggressive therapies such as immunosuppressive drugs, chemotherapy, or stem cell transplantation.

It is important to note that the term "refractory" in this context refers specifically to the lack of response to initial treatments, rather than a specific severity or type of anemia.

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Indicators of a good prognosis: Younger age; normal or moderately reduced neutrophil or platelet counts; low blast counts in ... low neutrophil count) - increased susceptibility to infection Thrombocytopenia (low platelet count) - increased susceptibility ... Problems with blood cell formation result in some combination of low red blood cell, platelet, and white blood cell counts. ... The two most serious complications in MDS patients resulting from their cytopenias are bleeding (due to lack of platelets) or ...
Thrombocytosis, or an elevated platelet count, can also result. A lack of sufficient iron levels in the blood is one reason ... A complete blood count can reveal microcytic anemia, although this is not always present - even when iron deficiency progresses ...
An increased platelet count occurs when inflammation is Uncontrolled. The role of the circadian clock in rheumatoid arthritis ... "Role of Platelets in Osteoarthritis-Updated Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis on the Role of Platelet-Rich Plasma in ... This may result in a low red blood cell count, inflammation around the lungs, and inflammation around the heart. Fever and low ... The red cells are of normal size and color (normocytic and Normochromic). A low white blood cell count usually only occurs in ...
Eltrombopag is used to address low blood platelet count. Pyrazolone groups are present in several important dyes. They are ...
First accurate counts of blood platelets. Traitement du choléra, G. Masson, Paris, 1885 - Treatment of cholera. Du sang et ses ... He performed the first accurate count of blood platelets, and is credited with developing a solution of mercury bichloride, ... sodium chloride and sodium sulfate for dilution of blood prior to counting erythrocytes with a hemocytometer. In 1874 he ...
In the blood donors with HPS authors found a statistically higher MPV, RDW and a lower platelet count and platelet biomass. At ... platelets rarely < 50 × 109/L) with giant platelets (Mean platelet volume 10fL) and normal platelet aggregation studies with ... Naina HV, Harris S (2010). "Platelet and red blood cell indices in Harris platelet syndrome". Platelets. 21 (4): 303-6. doi: ... Harris platelet syndrome (HPS) is the most common inherited giant platelet disorder. HPS was identified among healthy blood ...
Platelets may also be transfused when the platelet count is normal but the platelets are dysfunctional, such as when an ... Platelets also secrete platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF). Platelets modulate neutrophils by forming platelet-leukocyte ... and is calculated by subtracting the pre-transfusion platelet count from the post-transfusion platelet count. Many factors ... Platelet concentration in the blood (i.e. platelet count), is measured either manually using a hemocytometer, or by placing ...
... or serotonin from platelets. Platelet counts and survival time remain normal during ancrod therapy. Ancrod was originally ... Platelet counts of less than 100,000 (even if asymptomatic), exemption : HIT (Heparin- induced thrombocytopenia). Planned ... nor does it produce platelet aggregation nor cause the release of ADP, ATP, potassium, ...
... platelet sequestering in the spleen, and decreased thrombopoietin. However, this rarely results in a platelet count < 50,000/mL ... For patients with stable cirrhosis and low platelet count undergoing common low-risk procedures, the AGA does not recommend the ... The AGA does not recommend for extensive pre-procedural testing, including repeated measurements of PT/INR or platelet count ... The best predictors of cirrhosis are ascites, platelet count < 160,000/mm3, spider angiomata, and a Bonacini cirrhosis ...
Common side effects include diarrhea, constipation and low platelet count. Like the older bortezomib (which can only be given ... low platelet count; 28% versus 14%), peripheral neuropathy (28% versus 21%), nausea (26% versus 21%), peripheral oedema ( ...
Professional guidelines recommend that people receiving heparin have a complete blood count (which includes a platelet count) ... In HIT, the platelet count in the blood falls below the normal range, a condition called thrombocytopenia. However, it is ... Typically, the platelet count falls 5-14 days after heparin is first given; if someone has received heparin in the previous ... This has been referred to as an "iceberg phenomenon". HIT may be suspected if blood tests show a falling platelet count in ...
... a complete blood count may show a high white cell count and a low platelet count. When a low haemoglobin count is present ... However, low platelet count is not associated with severe bleeding. Pulmonary haemorrhage is alveolar haemorrhage (bleeding ... If infected, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination shows lymphocytic predominance with a cell count of about 500/mm3, protein ... together with a low white cell count and thrombocytopenia, bone marrow suppression should be considered. Erythrocyte ...
Platelet count and mean platelet volume in the Spanish population]". Med Clin (Barc) (in Spanish). 110 (20): 774-77. PMID ... white blood cells Platelet count (Plt) A few values are for inside red blood cells only: Vitamin B9 (folic acid/folate) in red ... "Determination of monocyte count by hematological analyzers, manual method and flow cytometry in Polish population" Central ... Normal Values: RBC, Hgb, Hct, Indices, RDW, Platelets, and MPV (Conventional Units) Archived 2011-07-27 at the Wayback Machine ...
Platelets can be stored at room temperature for up to 5-7 days. Single donor platelets, which have a more platelet count but it ... Platelet transfusion is transfused to those with low platelet count. ... Transfusions of platelets are comparatively far less numerous, but they present unique storage/management issues. Platelets may ... Platelets are typically pooled before transfusion and have a shelf life of 5 to 7 days, or 3 days once the facility that ...
An impact on platelet count has been observed. In the 1980s, HTLV-2 was identified in a patient with an unidentified T cell ... November 2008). "Long-term increases in lymphocytes and platelets in human T-lymphotropic virus type II infection". Blood. 112 ...
Extremely low platelet counts may be temporarily boosted through platelet transfusions and new drugs to increase platelet ... "Comparison of different platelet count thresholds to guide administration of prophylactic platelet transfusion for preventing ... Sometimes, chemotherapy treatments are postponed to allow platelet counts to recover. Fatigue may be a consequence of the ... The survivors were later found to have very low white blood cell counts. After WWII was over and the reports declassified, the ...
Platelets are particles in the blood that help the blood clot. They are smaller than red or white blood cells. ... Platelets are particles in the blood that help the blood clot. They are smaller than red or white blood cells. ... A platelet count is a lab test to measure how many platelets you have in your blood. ... A platelet count is a lab test to measure how many platelets you have in your blood. ...
Background: Transfusion of platelets is a life-saving medical strategy used worldwide to treat patients with thrombocytopenia ... Platelet function testing at low platelet counts: when can you trust your analysis ... Refrigeration of apheresis platelets in platelet additive solution (pas-e) supports in vitro platelet quality to maximize the ... Pooled platelet concentrates provide a small benefit over single-donor platelets for patients with platelet refractoriness of ...
LBXPLTSI - Platelet count (%) SI. Variable Name: LBXPLTSI. SAS Label: Platelet count (%) SI. English Text: Platelet count (%) ... LBXRBCSI - Red cell count SI. Variable Name: LBXRBCSI. SAS Label: Red cell count SI. English Text: Red cell count SI. Target: ... LBXMPSI - Mean platelet volume (fL). Variable Name: LBXMPSI. SAS Label: Mean platelet volume (fL). English Text: Mean platelet ... White blood cell count (SI). English Text: White blood cell count: SI. Target: Both males and females 1 YEARS - 150 YEARS. Code ...
Platelet count and bleeding times are the most frequently used tests that reflect platelet function. Typically, platelet counts ... Spontaneous bleeding is usually observed when the platelet count is close to 10,000/mm3. Platelet transfusion may be given to ... Prothrombin time (PT), platelet count, and activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) are not routinely indicated unless a ... The diagnosis of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia is based on a platelet count of less than 50% of the pretreatment level or a ...
High Platelet Count - Learn about the causes, symptoms, diagnosis & treatment from the MSD Manuals - Medical Consumer Version. ... Platelets Platelets The main components of blood include Plasma Red blood cells White blood cells Platelets read more are tiny ... What are the symptoms of a high platelet count? A high platelet count itself often doesnt cause any symptoms. But you may feel ... How do doctors treat a high platelet count? Doctors will treat any medical problem that has caused your high platelet count. ...
Davis PD, Nabili SN (27 August 2020). Shiel Jr WC (ed.). "What Is Thrombocytopenia (Low Platelet Count)?". Medicinenet.com. ... Since the average platelet size is larger when the body is producing increased numbers of platelets, the MPV test results can ... Mean platelet volume (MPV) is a machine-calculated measurement of the average size of platelets found in blood and is typically ... Bessman JD, Gilmer PR, Gardner FH (1985). "Use of mean platelet volume improves detection of platelet disorders". Blood Cells. ...
The platelets arise from the fragmentation of the cytoplasm of megakaryocytes in the bone marrow and circulate in blood as disc ... The hemostatic system consists of platelets, coagulation factors, and the endothelial cells lining the blood vessels. ... Even if the platelet count normalizes, many patients can maintain platelet counts of more than 20,000-30,000/µL with lower ... The platelet GP IIb/IIIa complex mediates platelet-to-platelet interactions (platelet aggregation). On resting platelets, GP ...
Effect of Baseline Platelet Count on Healing after Platelet Rich Plasma Injection ... Music Counts: A Specialized Treatment Program for Children with Autism This Presidents Faculty Research and Development Grant ...
If the platelet count falls below 100,000/mm3 or if recurrent thrombosis develops, promptly discontinue heparin, evaluate for ... Periodic platelet counts and hematocrits are recommended during the entire course of heparin therapy, regardless of the route ... Obtain platelet counts before and periodically during heparin therapy. Monitor thrombocytopenia of any degree closely. If the ... Monitor platelet count and hematocrit in all patients receiving heparin (5.5, 5.6) ...
Complete Blood Count With Platelet and Differential Leukocyte Counts. If the cold agglutinin is operative at room temperature, ... Repeating the complete blood count (CBC) after warming the blood to 37°C avoids this problem. Thus, the clinical laboratory is ... The results of the reticulocyte count are usually increased in patients with cold agglutinin disease, with polychromasia in the ... with a low RBC count are obtained due to agglutination of RBCs in the cold automated counter. ...
Platelet count *Interrupt dosing until platelet count ≥50 x 10^9/L, then resume at 50 mg BID; if tolerated, increase to 100 mg ... Discontinue if low platelet count persists for >21 days and is suspected to be related to midostaurin ... Discontinue if low platelet count persists for >21 days and is suspected to be related to midostaurin ...
MMS lowered platelet count D Bergy. Alternative Therapies. 11. 07-21-2010 06:17 AM. ... how to boost platelet count scorpiotiger. Nutrition. 5. 11-17-2008 09:39 AM. ... Blood platelette count too high? just me. General Discussions. 1. 02-20-2008 10:33 PM. ... Soy May Affect Sperm Count Harry Hirsute. Mens Health. 1. 07-24-2008 03:56 AM. ...
Manual reticulocyte counts *Manual cell counts *Manual platelet counts *Bone marrow evaluation *Flow cytometry *Hemoglobin ... If a person examines a combination of slides that count as half and as one, the absolute workload limit could be any number ... For calculating workload, each slide counts as one, except for those slides made by using liquid-based preparation techniques ... Urine culture and colony count kits *Microscopic evaluation of direct wet-mount preparations *Isolation and identification ( ...
Complete Blood Count, CBC with Diff and Platelet, Hemogram More Info QD: $35 ...
Dysfunction of coagulation was defined as prolonged prothrombin time, prolonged partial thromboplastin time, or platelet count ...
... platelet (Plt) count, 53.6 × 1010/L. A bone marrow smear showed 6.4% blasts and marked dysplasia of neutrophils and erythroid ... The normal range of basophils in the bone marrow was below 1% [15]. Our patient showed a slightly elevated basophil count in ... One week before his death, a laboratory examination showed the following: WBC count, 5.9 × 109/L with 3% myeloblasts and 49% ... Laboratory examinations revealed the following: white blood cell (WBC) count, 4.2 × 109/L with no abnormal cells; hemoglobin ( ...
Categories: Platelet Count Image Types: Photo, Illustrations, Video, Color, Black&White, PublicDomain, CopyrightRestricted 9 ...
Platelet Adhesiveness/drug effects, Platelet Count, Prospective Studies, Thyrotropin/blood, Thyroxine/blood, Time Factors, ... Platelet Adhesiveness/drug effects; Platelet Count; Prospective Studies; Thyrotropin/blood; Thyroxine/blood; Time Factors; ... Desmopressin virtually immediately reduced bleeding time, enhanced platelet adhesiveness, and significantly increased plasma ... Desmopressin virtually immediately reduced bleeding time, enhanced platelet adhesiveness, and significantly increased plasma ...
Glutamate Receptor Interacting Protein 1 Mediates Platelet Adhesion and Thrombus Formation. by Kristina L Modjeski, Sara K Ture ... Platelet-specific GRIP1-/- mice were used to determine the role of GRIP1 in platelets. GRIP1-/- mice had normal platelet counts ... Because platelets are necessary for hemostasis and thrombosis, platelet directed therapies must balance inhibiting platelet ... platelets compared to WT platelets, indicating a potential platelet adhesion defect. Mass spectrometry analysis of GRIP1 ...
... mean platelet and neutrophil counts followed a cyclical pattern, and improved over the treatment course. Grade 3/4 ... Preliminary data suggest bortezomib may reduce the thrombogenic potential of combination regimens via inhibition of platelet ...
Anemia and low platelet counts were more common among patients who received ruxolitinib, but only one patient had to ...
... or platelet count, should not routinely be performed in patients with stable cirrhosis undergoing common GI procedures. ... Blood products, including fresh frozen plasma (FFP) or platelet transfusion, should not routinely be used for bleeding ...
This plant has amazing antipyretic properties that help improve the platelet count, thus reducing the fever. It also lowers the ... plate count increment, and healthy skin maintenance. It is known to provide multiple nutritional benefits and has a large ...
  • Platelets are small anucleated blood cell fragments (2-4 µm), produced from polyploid cells, called megakaryocytes, which reside in the bone marrow [ 1 ]. (karger.com)
  • Since the average platelet size is larger when the body is producing increased numbers of platelets, the MPV test results can be used to make inferences about platelet production in bone marrow or platelet destruction problems. (wikipedia.org)
  • The platelets arise from the fragmentation of the cytoplasm of megakaryocytes in the bone marrow and circulate in blood as disc-shaped anucleate particles for 7-10 days. (medscape.com)
  • and hematopoietic cellularity of 80% with megakaryocytic hyperplasia demonstrating normal bone marrow function with Clinical Presentations increased platelet precursor cells. (cdc.gov)
  • platelet (Plt) count, 53.6 × 10 10 /L. A bone marrow smear showed 6.4% blasts and marked dysplasia of neutrophils and erythroid precursor cells. (hindawi.com)
  • A lower-than-normal platelet count is called thrombocytopenia . (medlineplus.gov)
  • Transfusion of platelets is a life-saving medical strategy used worldwide to treat patients with thrombocytopenia as well as platelet function disorders. (karger.com)
  • What Is Thrombocytopenia (Low Platelet Count)? (wikipedia.org)
  • In these cases, a type of blood clot called cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) was seen in combination with low levels of blood platelets (thrombocytopenia). (cdc.gov)
  • Based on studies conducted among the patients diagnosed with immune thrombotic thrombocytopenia after the AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine in Europe, the pathogenesis of these rare and unusual adverse events after vaccination may be associated with platelet-activating antibodies against platelet factor-4 (PF4), a type of protein. (cdc.gov)
  • 150,000 platelets per microliter of blood), consistent with a condition known as thrombotic thrombocytopenia, with platelet nadir counts ranging from 10,000 to 127,000 during their hospitalizations. (cdc.gov)
  • 10,000/ µ L) persisted despite a collaboration among multiple agencies was required to identify platelet transfusion and administration of intravenous immune the extent of mercury contamination, evaluate and treat the globulin (IVIG). (cdc.gov)
  • Blood products, including fresh frozen plasma (FFP) or platelet transfusion, should not routinely be used for bleeding prophylaxis in patients with stable cirrhosis undergoing common GI procedures. (eurekalert.org)
  • The primary role of platelets is maintaining the hemostasis in order to stop blood loss [ 4 ]. (karger.com)
  • Platelet disorders lead to defects in primary hemostasis and produce signs and symptoms different from coagulation factor deficiencies (disorders of secondary hemostasis). (medscape.com)
  • The initial hemostatic plug, composed primarily of platelets, is stabilized further by a fibrin mesh generated in secondary hemostasis. (medscape.com)
  • Because platelets are necessary for hemostasis and thrombosis, platelet directed therapies must balance inhibiting platelet function with bleeding risk. (sigmaaldrich.com)
  • The platelet GP IIb/IIIa complex mediates platelet-to-platelet interactions (platelet aggregation). (medscape.com)
  • The hemostatic system consists of platelets, coagulation factors, and the endothelial cells lining the blood vessels. (medscape.com)
  • Under physiological circumstances, the resistance of the endothelial cell lining to interactions with platelets and coagulation factors prevents thrombosis. (medscape.com)
  • Preliminary data suggest bortezomib may reduce the thrombogenic potential of combination regimens via inhibition of platelet function or other mechanism-specific effects on coagulation. (eur.nl)
  • This initial interaction (platelet adhesion) sets the stage for other adhesive reactions that allow the platelets to interact with other agonists in the vicinity of vessel injury, such as adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP), subendothelial collagen, and thrombin. (medscape.com)
  • In vitro stimulation of WT and GRIP1-/- platelets with multiple agonists showed no difference in platelet activation. (sigmaaldrich.com)
  • The normal number of platelets in the blood is 150,000 to 400,000 platelets per microliter (mcL) or 150 to 400 × 10 9 /L. (medlineplus.gov)
  • A low platelet count is below 150,000 (150 × 10 9 /L). If your platelet count is below 50,000 (50 × 10 9 /L), your risk for bleeding is higher. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Until the end of 1960s, platelets were stored in the cold because of their superior hemostatic functionality. (karger.com)
  • The alpha granules contain hemostatic proteins such as fibrinogen, vWf, and growth factors (eg, platelet-derived growth factor and transforming growth factors). (medscape.com)
  • Once activated, platelets have two major mechanisms to recruit additional platelets to the growing hemostatic plug. (medscape.com)
  • Thus, the release reaction and prostaglandin synthesis act to consolidate the initial hemostatic plug by promoting the participation of other platelets in the growing hemostatic plug. (medscape.com)
  • However, in vivo platelet rolling velocity after endothelial stimulation was significantly greater in GRIP1-/- platelets compared to WT platelets, indicating a potential platelet adhesion defect. (sigmaaldrich.com)
  • Desmopressin virtually immediately reduced bleeding time, enhanced platelet adhesiveness, and significantly increased plasma concentrations of FVIII and vWF. (lu.se)
  • PRP samples showed higher significantly platelet concentrations than peripheral blood samples (2,677,583 and 683,680 respectively). (bvsalud.org)
  • When your platelet count is extremely high, the extra platelets actually interfere with blood clotting. (msdmanuals.com)
  • In this review, we will focus on the impact of cold storage on the in vitro platelet functions as promising alternative storage temperature for future medical applications. (karger.com)
  • The body's reaction to vessel wall injury is rapid adhesion of platelets to the subendothelium. (medscape.com)
  • Glutamate Receptor Interacting Protein 1 Mediates Platelet Adhesion and Thrombus Formation. (sigmaaldrich.com)
  • GRIP1 interactions with the GPIb-IX binding complex are necessary for normal platelet adhesion to a stimulated endothelium. (sigmaaldrich.com)
  • Platelets are characterized by short half-life, 7-10 days in humans, after which they are cleared from the circulation through the spleen or liver [ 2, 3 ]. (karger.com)
  • He had a platelet count of 96,000/mm3 and a positive dengue serology for IgM during admission. (webmedcentral.com)
  • Other conditions that a low WBCs count might lead to are influenza, typhoid, malaria, dengue and tuberculosis. (ndtv.com)
  • These interactions further activate platelets. (medscape.com)
  • If the cold agglutinin is operative at room temperature, then a falsely high mean corpuscular volume (MCV), mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH), and mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC) with a low RBC count are obtained due to agglutination of RBCs in the cold automated counter. (medscape.com)
  • A blood test report comprises numerous results about our range of complete blood count (CBC), haemoglobin (Hb), platelets, red blood cells (RBCs) and white blood cells (WBCs) to name a few. (ndtv.com)
  • An increased mean platelet volume (MPV) increases the risk to suffer a heart disease MPV may be higher when there is destruction of platelets. (wikipedia.org)
  • It also increases CD4 cell counts. (who.int)
  • Laboratory findings include low white blood cell and platelet counts and elevated liver enzymes. (who.int)
  • Based on these findings, RT became the standard condition to store platelets for clinical applications. (karger.com)
  • Abdominal ultrasound treated with platelet transfusions, intravenous immune globu- findings demonstrated splenomegaly. (cdc.gov)
  • After injury, platelets are captured from the circulation to adhere to the damaged area (extracellular matrix) and become activated. (karger.com)
  • GRIP1-/- mice had normal platelet counts, but a prolonged bleeding time and delayed thrombus formation in a FeCl3-induced vessel injury model. (sigmaaldrich.com)
  • Often, a high platelet count is a reaction to a disease such as certain cancers, infections, or immune system problems. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Additionally, in resting GRIP1-/- platelets, GPIbα and 14-3-3 have increased interaction compared to WT platelets. (sigmaaldrich.com)
  • A typical range of platelet volumes is 9.4-12.3 fL (femtolitre), equivalent to spheres 2.65 to 2.9 µm in diameter. (wikipedia.org)
  • Morphologically, the platelets change dramatically from discs to spiny spheres in a process called shape change. (medscape.com)
  • The methods used to derive complete blood count (CBC) parameters are based on the Beckman Coulter method of counting and sizing, in combination with an automatic diluting and mixing device for sample processing, and a single-beam photometer for hemoglobinometry. (cdc.gov)
  • b Complete TMA response was defined as normalization of hematological parameters (platelet count and LDH) and ≥25% improvement in serum creatinine from baseline during the 26-week initial evaluation period. (ultomirishcp.com)
  • Has a very low red blood cell count (severe anaemia) or very low white blood cell count (neutropenia). (who.int)
  • Anaemia (low red blood cell count) and neutropenia/leukopenia (low white blood cell count) may occur within 4-6 weeks after starting treatment with [HA483 trade name]. (who.int)
  • The white blood count (WBC) differential uses VCS technology. (cdc.gov)
  • Among these, a TLC (total leukocyte (white blood cells) count), DLC (Differential Leukocyte Count) tests are some of the most common kind of blood tests that are suggested by doctors. (ndtv.com)
  • The results of the reticulocyte count are usually increased in patients with cold agglutinin disease, with polychromasia in the peripheral blood smear. (medscape.com)
  • Extensive preprocedural testing, including measurements of prothrombin time/international normalized ratio (PT/INR) or platelet count, should not routinely be performed in patients with stable cirrhosis undergoing common GI procedures. (eurekalert.org)
  • We have investigated the role of GRIP1 in platelet function to determine its role as a molecular scaffold in thrombus formation. (sigmaaldrich.com)
  • A higher-than-normal number of platelets is called thrombocytosis. (medlineplus.gov)
  • however, the D-dimer level (0.8 μg/mL) and platelet count (169,000 /μL) were normal. (surgicalneurologyint.com)
  • In addition, low MPV may correlate with abnormally small platelet size, sometimes a symptom of a spectrum referred to as Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS), caused by a genetic mutation of the WAS gene. (wikipedia.org)
  • A high platelet count is 400,000 (400 × 10 9 /L) or above. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Some people with high platelet counts may be at risk for forming blood clots or even bleeding too much. (medlineplus.gov)
  • A high platelet count can cause problems with blood clotting. (msdmanuals.com)
  • What are the complications of a high platelet count? (msdmanuals.com)
  • What are the symptoms of a high platelet count? (msdmanuals.com)
  • A high platelet count itself often doesn't cause any symptoms. (msdmanuals.com)
  • How can doctors tell if I have a high platelet count? (msdmanuals.com)
  • To see why your platelets are high, doctors may do other blood tests, including special genetic tests. (msdmanuals.com)
  • How do doctors treat a high platelet count? (msdmanuals.com)
  • Blood platelette count too high? (natmedtalk.com)
  • Platelets play a primary role in this process, interacting with subendothelium-bound von Willebrand factor (vWf) via the membrane glycoprotein (GP) Ib complex. (medscape.com)
  • Mean platelet volume (MPV) is a machine-calculated measurement of the average size of platelets found in blood and is typically included in blood tests as part of the CBC. (wikipedia.org)
  • Platelet-specific GRIP1-/- mice were used to determine the role of GRIP1 in platelets. (sigmaaldrich.com)
  • Objective: The purpose of this study was to standardize a methodology for autologous Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP) preparation in rats. (bvsalud.org)
  • Despite the enormous efforts made to optimize storage conditions of platelets, the quality and efficacy of platelets still decrease during the short storage time at RT. (karger.com)
  • The platelet count was dropping to 70,000/mm3 and his potassium level was 2.8mmol/l. (webmedcentral.com)
  • In fact, under physiological conditions, platelets remain in a quiescent status, while after vessel damage cell activation is triggered by several blood and vessel components. (karger.com)
  • Platelet activation allows binding of these proteins, which bridges adjacent platelets. (medscape.com)
  • Platelet activation pathways. (medscape.com)
  • Platelets may be counted to monitor or diagnose diseases, or to look for the cause of too much bleeding or clotting. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Cold storage of platelets was then abandoned due to better posttransfusion recovery and survival of room temperature (RT)-stored platelets, demonstrated by radioactive labeling studies. (karger.com)
  • In addition, when platelets are activated, negatively charged phospholipids move from the inner to the outer leaflet of the membrane bilayer. (medscape.com)
  • In addition, PRP and peripheral blood smears were stained to see platelets' morphology. (bvsalud.org)
  • Platelets come from the same blood-forming cells that make other blood cells. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Sometimes blood-forming cells just make too many platelets. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Mass spectrometry analysis of GRIP1 platelet immunoprecipitation revealed enrichment of GRIP1 binding to GPIb-IX complex proteins. (sigmaaldrich.com)
  • Conclusion: Within the limits of this study, it can be concluded that the method used produced autologous PRP with appropriated platelet quantity and quality, in rats. (bvsalud.org)
  • The Beckman Coulter MAXM instrument in the Mobile Examination Center (MEC) produces a complete blood count on blood specimens and provides a distribution of blood cells for all participants. (cdc.gov)
  • Platelets are measured as part of a standard test called a complete blood count (CBC). (msdmanuals.com)
  • Repeating the complete blood count (CBC) after warming the blood to 37°C avoids this problem. (medscape.com)
  • The evaluation was requested by the county health department to investigate employee reports of respiratory disorder s, eye and skin irrita tion, and a low platelet count in one employee. (cdc.gov)
  • The Giloy papaya Juice is one of the most fruitful drinks that comes with a slew of benefits, such as immunity-boosting, plate count increment, and healthy skin maintenance. (sevenarticle.com)