Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors: Drugs or agents which antagonize or impair any mechanism leading to blood platelet aggregation, whether during the phases of activation and shape change or following the dense-granule release reaction and stimulation of the prostaglandin-thromboxane system.Platelet Aggregation: The attachment of PLATELETS to one another. This clumping together can be induced by a number of agents (e.g., THROMBIN; COLLAGEN) and is part of the mechanism leading to the formation of a THROMBUS.Crotalid Venoms: Venoms from snakes of the subfamily Crotalinae or pit vipers, found mostly in the Americas. They include the rattlesnake, cottonmouth, fer-de-lance, bushmaster, and American copperhead. Their venoms contain nontoxic proteins, cardio-, hemo-, cyto-, and neurotoxins, and many enzymes, especially phospholipases A. Many of the toxins have been characterized.Salivary Proteins and Peptides: Proteins and peptides found in SALIVA and the SALIVARY GLANDS. Some salivary proteins such as ALPHA-AMYLASES are enzymes, but their composition varies in different individuals.Disintegrins: A family of polypeptides purified from snake venoms, which contain the arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) sequence. The RGD tripeptide binds to integrin receptors and thus competitively inhibits normal integrin-ligand interactions. Disintegrins thus block adhesive functions and act as platelet aggregation inhibitors.Salivary Glands: Glands that secrete SALIVA in the MOUTH. There are three pairs of salivary glands (PAROTID GLAND; SUBLINGUAL GLAND; SUBMANDIBULAR GLAND).Blood Platelets: Non-nucleated disk-shaped cells formed in the megakaryocyte and found in the blood of all mammals. They are mainly involved in blood coagulation.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Congo Red: An acid dye used in testing for hydrochloric acid in gastric contents. It is also used histologically to test for AMYLOIDOSIS.Platelet Adhesiveness: The process whereby PLATELETS adhere to something other than platelets, e.g., COLLAGEN; BASEMENT MEMBRANE; MICROFIBRILS; or other "foreign" surfaces.Platelet Count: The number of PLATELETS per unit volume in a sample of venous BLOOD.Amyloid beta-Peptides: Peptides generated from AMYLOID BETA-PEPTIDES PRECURSOR. An amyloid fibrillar form of these peptides is the major component of amyloid plaques found in individuals with Alzheimer's disease and in aged individuals with trisomy 21 (DOWN SYNDROME). The peptide is found predominantly in the nervous system, but there have been reports of its presence in non-neural tissue.Platelet Membrane Glycoproteins: Surface glycoproteins on platelets which have a key role in hemostasis and thrombosis such as platelet adhesion and aggregation. Many of these are receptors.Adenosine Diphosphate: Adenosine 5'-(trihydrogen diphosphate). An adenine nucleotide containing two phosphate groups esterified to the sugar moiety at the 5'-position.Peptide Fragments: Partial proteins formed by partial hydrolysis of complete proteins or generated through PROTEIN ENGINEERING techniques.Platelet Function Tests: Laboratory examination used to monitor and evaluate platelet function in a patient's blood.Platelet Glycoprotein GPIIb-IIIa Complex: Platelet membrane glycoprotein complex important for platelet adhesion and aggregation. It is an integrin complex containing INTEGRIN ALPHAIIB and INTEGRIN BETA3 which recognizes the arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) sequence present on several adhesive proteins. As such, it is a receptor for FIBRINOGEN; VON WILLEBRAND FACTOR; FIBRONECTIN; VITRONECTIN; and THROMBOSPONDINS. A deficiency of GPIIb-IIIa results in GLANZMANN THROMBASTHENIA.Bleeding Time: Duration of blood flow after skin puncture. This test is used as a measure of capillary and platelet function.Thrombin: An enzyme formed from PROTHROMBIN that converts FIBRINOGEN to FIBRIN.Cell Aggregation: The phenomenon by which dissociated cells intermixed in vitro tend to group themselves with cells of their own type.Peptides: Members of the class of compounds composed of AMINO ACIDS joined together by peptide bonds between adjacent amino acids into linear, branched or cyclical structures. OLIGOPEPTIDES are composed of approximately 2-12 amino acids. Polypeptides are composed of approximately 13 or more amino acids. PROTEINS are linear polypeptides that are normally synthesized on RIBOSOMES.Fibrinogen: Plasma glycoprotein clotted by thrombin, composed of a dimer of three non-identical pairs of polypeptide chains (alpha, beta, gamma) held together by disulfide bonds. Fibrinogen clotting is a sol-gel change involving complex molecular arrangements: whereas fibrinogen is cleaved by thrombin to form polypeptides A and B, the proteolytic action of other enzymes yields different fibrinogen degradation products.Thromboxane A2: An unstable intermediate between the prostaglandin endoperoxides and thromboxane B2. The compound has a bicyclic oxaneoxetane structure. It is a potent inducer of platelet aggregation and causes vasoconstriction. It is the principal component of rabbit aorta contracting substance (RCS).Platelet Activation: A series of progressive, overlapping events, triggered by exposure of the PLATELETS to subendothelial tissue. These events include shape change, adhesiveness, aggregation, and release reactions. When carried through to completion, these events lead to the formation of a stable hemostatic plug.Platelet Factor 4: A CXC chemokine that is found in the alpha granules of PLATELETS. The protein has a molecular size of 7800 kDa and can occur as a monomer, a dimer or a tetramer depending upon its concentration in solution. Platelet factor 4 has a high affinity for HEPARIN and is often found complexed with GLYCOPROTEINS such as PROTEIN C.Platelet Activating Factor: A phospholipid derivative formed by PLATELETS; BASOPHILS; NEUTROPHILS; MONOCYTES; and MACROPHAGES. It is a potent platelet aggregating agent and inducer of systemic anaphylactic symptoms, including HYPOTENSION; THROMBOCYTOPENIA; NEUTROPENIA; and BRONCHOCONSTRICTION.Platelet Glycoprotein GPIb-IX Complex: Platelet membrane glycoprotein complex essential for normal platelet adhesion and clot formation at sites of vascular injury. It is composed of three polypeptides, GPIb alpha, GPIb beta, and GPIX. Glycoprotein Ib functions as a receptor for von Willebrand factor and for thrombin. Congenital deficiency of the GPIb-IX complex results in Bernard-Soulier syndrome. The platelet glycoprotein GPV associates with GPIb-IX and is also absent in Bernard-Soulier syndrome.Aspirin: The prototypical analgesic used in the treatment of mild to moderate pain. It has anti-inflammatory and antipyretic properties and acts as an inhibitor of cyclooxygenase which results in the inhibition of the biosynthesis of prostaglandins. Aspirin also inhibits platelet aggregation and is used in the prevention of arterial and venous thrombosis. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p5)Collagen: A polypeptide substance comprising about one third of the total protein in mammalian organisms. It is the main constituent of SKIN; CONNECTIVE TISSUE; and the organic substance of bones (BONE AND BONES) and teeth (TOOTH).Thrombosis: Formation and development of a thrombus or blood clot in the blood vessel.Receptors, Purinergic P2Y12: A subclass of purinergic P2Y receptors that have a preference for ADP binding and are coupled to GTP-BINDING PROTEIN ALPHA SUBUNIT, GI. The P2Y12 purinergic receptors are found in PLATELETS where they play an important role regulating PLATELET ACTIVATION.Thromboxane B2: A stable, physiologically active compound formed in vivo from the prostaglandin endoperoxides. It is important in the platelet-release reaction (release of ADP and serotonin).Platelet Transfusion: The transfer of blood platelets from a donor to a recipient or reinfusion to the donor.Ristocetin: An antibiotic mixture of two components, A and B, obtained from Nocardia lurida (or the same substance produced by any other means). It is no longer used clinically because of its toxicity. It causes platelet agglutination and blood coagulation and is used to assay those functions in vitro.Apyrase: A calcium-activated enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of ATP to yield AMP and orthophosphate. It can also act on ADP and other nucleoside triphosphates and diphosphates. EC 3.6.1.5.von Willebrand Factor: A high-molecular-weight plasma protein, produced by endothelial cells and megakaryocytes, that is part of the factor VIII/von Willebrand factor complex. The von Willebrand factor has receptors for collagen, platelets, and ristocetin activity as well as the immunologically distinct antigenic determinants. It functions in adhesion of platelets to collagen and hemostatic plug formation. The prolonged bleeding time in VON WILLEBRAND DISEASES is due to the deficiency of this factor.P-Selectin: Cell adhesion molecule and CD antigen that mediates the adhesion of neutrophils and monocytes to activated platelets and endothelial cells.Serotonin: A biochemical messenger and regulator, synthesized from the essential amino acid L-TRYPTOPHAN. In humans it is found primarily in the central nervous system, gastrointestinal tract, and blood platelets. Serotonin mediates several important physiological functions including neurotransmission, gastrointestinal motility, hemostasis, and cardiovascular integrity. Multiple receptor families (RECEPTORS, SEROTONIN) explain the broad physiological actions and distribution of this biochemical mediator.Blood Coagulation: The process of the interaction of BLOOD COAGULATION FACTORS that results in an insoluble FIBRIN clot.Epoprostenol: A prostaglandin that is a powerful vasodilator and inhibits platelet aggregation. It is biosynthesized enzymatically from PROSTAGLANDIN ENDOPEROXIDES in human vascular tissue. The sodium salt has been also used to treat primary pulmonary hypertension (HYPERTENSION, PULMONARY).Thromboxanes: Physiologically active compounds found in many organs of the body. They are formed in vivo from the prostaglandin endoperoxides and cause platelet aggregation, contraction of arteries, and other biological effects. Thromboxanes are important mediators of the actions of polyunsaturated fatty acids transformed by cyclooxygenase.Blood Platelet Disorders: Disorders caused by abnormalities in platelet count or function.Thrombocytopenia: A subnormal level of BLOOD PLATELETS.Antigens, Human Platelet: Human alloantigens expressed only on platelets, specifically on platelet membrane glycoproteins. These platelet-specific antigens are immunogenic and can result in pathological reactions to transfusion therapy.15-Hydroxy-11 alpha,9 alpha-(epoxymethano)prosta-5,13-dienoic Acid: A stable prostaglandin endoperoxide analog which serves as a thromboxane mimetic. Its actions include mimicking the hydro-osmotic effect of VASOPRESSIN and activation of TYPE C PHOSPHOLIPASES. (From J Pharmacol Exp Ther 1983;224(1): 108-117; Biochem J 1984;222(1):103-110)Erythrocyte Aggregation: The formation of clumps of RED BLOOD CELLS under low or non-flow conditions, resulting from the attraction forces between the red blood cells. The cells adhere to each other in rouleaux aggregates. Slight mechanical force, such as occurs in the circulation, is enough to disperse these aggregates. Stronger or weaker than normal aggregation may result from a variety of effects in the ERYTHROCYTE MEMBRANE or in BLOOD PLASMA. The degree of aggregation is affected by ERYTHROCYTE DEFORMABILITY, erythrocyte membrane sialylation, masking of negative surface charge by plasma proteins, etc. BLOOD VISCOSITY and the ERYTHROCYTE SEDIMENTATION RATE are affected by the amount of erythrocyte aggregation and are parameters used to measure the aggregation.Hemostasis: The process which spontaneously arrests the flow of BLOOD from vessels carrying blood under pressure. It is accomplished by contraction of the vessels, adhesion and aggregation of formed blood elements (eg. ERYTHROCYTE AGGREGATION), and the process of BLOOD COAGULATION.Prostaglandin Endoperoxides, Synthetic: Synthetic compounds that are analogs of the naturally occurring prostaglandin endoperoxides and that mimic their pharmacologic and physiologic activities. They are usually more stable than the naturally occurring compounds.Epinephrine: The active sympathomimetic hormone from the ADRENAL MEDULLA. It stimulates both the alpha- and beta- adrenergic systems, causes systemic VASOCONSTRICTION and gastrointestinal relaxation, stimulates the HEART, and dilates BRONCHI and cerebral vessels. It is used in ASTHMA and CARDIAC FAILURE and to delay absorption of local ANESTHETICS.Ticlopidine: An effective inhibitor of platelet aggregation commonly used in the placement of STENTS in CORONARY ARTERIES.Thrombasthenia: A congenital bleeding disorder with prolonged bleeding time, absence of aggregation of platelets in response to most agents, especially ADP, and impaired or absent clot retraction. Platelet membranes are deficient in or have a defect in the glycoprotein IIb-IIIa complex (PLATELET GLYCOPROTEIN GPIIB-IIIA COMPLEX).Platelet Factor 3: A phospholipid from the platelet membrane that contributes to the blood clotting cascade by forming a phospholipid-protein complex (THROMBOPLASTIN) which serves as a cofactor with FACTOR VIIA to activate FACTOR X in the extrinsic pathway of BLOOD COAGULATION.Platelet Membrane Glycoprotein IIb: Platelet membrane glycoprotein IIb is an integrin alpha subunit that heterodimerizes with INTEGRIN BETA3 to form PLATELET GLYCOPROTEIN GPIIB-IIIA COMPLEX. It is synthesized as a single polypeptide chain which is then postranslationally cleaved and processed into two disulfide-linked subunits of approximately 18 and 110 kDa in size.Megakaryocytes: Very large BONE MARROW CELLS which release mature BLOOD PLATELETS.Immunoglobulin Fab Fragments: Univalent antigen-binding fragments composed of one entire IMMUNOGLOBULIN LIGHT CHAIN and the amino terminal end of one of the IMMUNOGLOBULIN HEAVY CHAINS from the hinge region, linked to each other by disulfide bonds. Fab contains the IMMUNOGLOBULIN VARIABLE REGIONS, which are part of the antigen-binding site, and the first IMMUNOGLOBULIN CONSTANT REGIONS. This fragment can be obtained by digestion of immunoglobulins with the proteolytic enzyme PAPAIN.Receptors, Thromboxane: Cell surface proteins that bind THROMBOXANES with high affinity and trigger intracellular changes influencing the behavior of cells. Some thromboxane receptors act via the inositol phosphate and diacylglycerol second messenger systems.Arachidonic Acid: An unsaturated, essential fatty acid. It is found in animal and human fat as well as in the liver, brain, and glandular organs, and is a constituent of animal phosphatides. It is formed by the synthesis from dietary linoleic acid and is a precursor in the biosynthesis of prostaglandins, thromboxanes, and leukotrienes.Dose-Response Relationship, Drug: The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.Rabbits: The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.Receptors, Thrombin: A family of proteinase-activated receptors that are specific for THROMBIN. They are found primarily on PLATELETS and on ENDOTHELIAL CELLS. Activation of thrombin receptors occurs through the proteolytic action of THROMBIN, which cleaves the N-terminal peptide from the receptor to reveal a new N-terminal peptide that is a cryptic ligand for the receptor. The receptors signal through HETEROTRIMERIC GTP-BINDING PROTEINS. Small synthetic peptides that contain the unmasked N-terminal peptide sequence can also activate the receptor in the absence of proteolytic activity.Arachidonic AcidsCalcium: A basic element found in nearly all organized tissues. It is a member of the alkaline earth family of metals with the atomic symbol Ca, atomic number 20, and atomic weight 40. Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the body and combines with phosphorus to form calcium phosphate in the bones and teeth. It is essential for the normal functioning of nerves and muscles and plays a role in blood coagulation (as factor IV) and in many enzymatic processes.Antibodies, Monoclonal: Antibodies produced by a single clone of cells.Blood Coagulation Factors: Endogenous substances, usually proteins, that are involved in the blood coagulation process.Receptors, Thromboxane A2, Prostaglandin H2: A subclass of eicosanoid receptors that have specificity for THROMBOXANE A2 and PROSTAGLANDIN H2.Hemorheology: The deformation and flow behavior of BLOOD and its elements i.e., PLASMA; ERYTHROCYTES; WHITE BLOOD CELLS; and BLOOD PLATELETS.Receptors, Purinergic P2Y1: A subclass of purinergic P2Y receptors that have a preference for ATP and ADP. The activated P2Y1 receptor signals through the G-PROTEIN-coupled activation of PHOSPHOLIPASE C and mobilization of intracellular CALCIUM.Kinetics: The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.Blood Coagulation Tests: Laboratory tests for evaluating the individual's clotting mechanism.Purinergic P2Y Receptor Antagonists: Compounds that bind to and block the stimulation of PURINERGIC P2Y RECEPTORS. Included under this heading are antagonists for specific P2Y receptor subtypes.Oligopeptides: Peptides composed of between two and twelve amino acids.Dual Specificity Phosphatase 2: A dual specificity phosphatase subtype that plays a role in intracellular signal transduction by inactivating MITOGEN-ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASES. It has specificity for EXTRACELLULAR SIGNAL-REGULATED MAP KINASES and is primarily localized to the CELL NUCLEUS.Protein Binding: The process in which substances, either endogenous or exogenous, bind to proteins, peptides, enzymes, protein precursors, or allied compounds. Specific protein-binding measures are often used as assays in diagnostic assessments.Thromboxane-A Synthase: An enzyme found predominantly in platelet microsomes. It catalyzes the conversion of PGG(2) and PGH(2) (prostaglandin endoperoxides) to thromboxane A2. EC 5.3.99.5.Platelet-Rich Plasma: A preparation consisting of PLATELETS concentrated in a limited volume of PLASMA. This is used in various surgical tissue regeneration procedures where the GROWTH FACTORS in the platelets enhance wound healing and regeneration.Carotid Artery Thrombosis: Blood clot formation in any part of the CAROTID ARTERIES. This may produce CAROTID STENOSIS or occlusion of the vessel, leading to TRANSIENT ISCHEMIC ATTACK; CEREBRAL INFARCTION; or AMAUROSIS FUGAX.Hydrazines

Interleukin-12 is synthesized by mesangial cells and stimulates platelet-activating factor synthesis, cytoskeletal reorganization, and cell shape change. (1/4442)

Preliminary studies indicate the involvement of interleukin (IL)-12 in experimental renal pathology. In the present study, we evaluated whether cultured glomerular mesangial cells are able to produce IL-12 and whether IL-12 may regulate some of their functions, including the cytoskeletal reorganization, the change in cell shape, and the production of platelet-activating factor (PAF). The results obtained indicate that pro-inflammatory stimuli, such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha and bacterial polysaccharides, induce the expression of IL-12 mRNA and the synthesis of the protein by cultured mesangial cells. Moreover, cultured mesangial cells were shown to bind IL-12 and to express the human low-affinity IL-12 beta1-chain receptor. When challenged with IL-12, mesangial cells produced PAF in a dose- and time-dependent manner and superoxide anions. No production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and IL-8 was observed. Moreover, we demonstrate that IL-12 induced a delayed and sustained shape change of mesangial cells that reached its maximum between 90 and 120 minutes of incubation. The changes in cell shape occurred concomitantly with cytoskeletal rearrangements and may be consistent with cell contraction. As IL-12-dependent shape change of mesangial cells was concomitant with the synthesis of PAF, which is known to promote mesangial cell contraction, we investigated the role of PAF using two chemically different PAF receptor antagonists. Both antagonists inhibited almost completely the cell shape change induced by IL-12, whereas they were ineffective on angiotensin-II-induced cell shape change. In conclusion, our results suggest that mesangial cells can either produce IL-12 or be stimulated by this cytokine to synthesize PAF and to undergo shape changes compatible with cell contraction.  (+info)

The mechanism of the increasing action of TA-993, a new 1,5- benzothiazepine derivative, on limb blood flow in anesthetized dogs: selective suppression of sympathetic nerve activity. (2/4442)

TA-993, (-)-cis-3-acetoxy-5-(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl)-2, 3-di-hydro-8-methyl-2-(4-methylphenyl)-1,5-benzothiazepin-4(5H)one maleate, a new 1,5-benzothiazepine derivative with l-cis configuration, has a unique and selective increasing action on limb blood flow with little influence on arterial pressure besides an antiplatelet action. We studied the mechanism of increasing action of TA-993 on limb blood flow in anesthetized dogs. In a canine blood-perfused hindlimb preparation with a donor dog, TA-993 (100 microg/kg i.v.) did not increase femoral blood flow when administered to the donor dog, but did when administered to a recipient dog. TA-993 did not show the increasing action on femoral blood flow in the presence of hexamethonium or phentolamine, whereas it did in the presence of propranolol or atropine. TA-993 also showed a weak increasing effect on heart rate, which was inhibited by any one of these blockers. TA-993 (300 microg/kg i.v.) did not alter the phenylephrine (1-100 ng/kg i.a.)- or the talipexole (3-100 ng/kg i.a.)-induced increase in perfusion pressure in an autoperfused hindlimb. These results suggest that the increasing action of TA-993 on limb blood flow is mediated by the sympathetic nervous system but that the adrenergic receptors are not likely to be the central point of action of this new agent. There is a possibility that the mechanism of the increasing action on heart rate is different from that of its increasing action on limb blood flow.  (+info)

Labeling of the internal pool of GP IIb-IIIa in platelets by c7E3 Fab fragments (abciximab): flow and endocytic mechanisms contribute to the transport. (3/4442)

Abciximab is a new antiplatelet therapeutic in ischemic cardiovascular disease. The drug, chimeric Fab fragments of a murine monoclonal antibody (MoAb) (c7E3), blocks GP IIb-IIIa function. However, its capacity to reach all receptor pools in platelets is unknown. Electron microscopy and immunogold labeling were used to localize abciximab in platelets of patients receiving the drug for up to 24 hours. Studies on frozen-thin sections showed that c7E3 Fab, in addition to the surface pool, also labeled the surface-connected canalicular system (SCCS) and alpha-granules. Analysis of gold particle distribution showed that intraplatelet labeling was not accumulative and in equilibrium with the surface pool. After short-term incubations of platelets with c7E3 Fab in vitro, gold particles were often seen in lines within thin elements of the SCCS, some of which appeared in contact with alpha-granules. Little labeling was associated with Glanzmann's thrombasthenia platelets, confirming that the channels contained bound and not free c7E3 Fab. Endocytosis of abciximab in clathrin-containing vesicles was visualized by double staining and constitutes an alternative mechanism of transport. The remaining free pool of GP IIb-IIIa was evaluated with the MoAb AP-2; flow cytometry showed it to be about 9% on the surface of nonstimulated platelets but 33% on thrombin-activated platelets. The ability of drugs to block all pools of GP IIb-IIIa and then to be associated with secretion-dependent residual aggregation must be considered when evaluating their efficiency in a clinical context.  (+info)

Glutamate receptor signaling interplay modulates stress-sensitive mitogen-activated protein kinases and neuronal cell death. (4/4442)

Glutamate receptors modulate multiple signaling pathways, several of which involve mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases, with subsequent physiological or pathological consequences. Here we report that stimulation of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor, using platelet-activating factor (PAF) as a messenger, activates MAP kinases, including c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase, p38, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase, in primary cultures of hippocampal neurons. Activation of the metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) blocks this NMDA-signaling through PAF and MAP kinases, and the resultant cell death. Recombinant PAF-acetylhydrolase degrades PAF generated by NMDA-receptor activation; the hetrazepine BN50730 (an intracellular PAF receptor antagonist) also inhibits both NMDA-stimulated MAP kinases and neuronal cell death. The finding that the NMDA receptor-PAF-MAP kinase signaling pathway is attenuated by mGluR activation highlights the exquisite interplay between glutamate receptors in the decision making process between neuronal survival and death.  (+info)

Effects of docosahexaenoic and eicosapentaenoic acid on lipid metabolism, eicosanoid production, platelet aggregation and atherosclerosis in hypercholesterolemic rats. (5/4442)

Exogenously hypercholesterolemic (ExHC) rats were fed on an atherogenic diet supplemented with 1% each of either ethyl ester docosahexaenoic acid [EE-DHA, 22:6(n-3)], ethyl ester eicosapentaenoic acid [EE-EPA, 20:5(n-3)] or safflower oil (SO) for 6 months. The rats fed on the diets containing EE-EPA or EE-DHA, compared with those fed on SO, had lower serum cholesterol and triacylglycerol levels, less aggregation of platelets and slower progress of intimal thickening in the ascending aorta. Relative to the SO-fed rats, both of the (n-3) fatty acid-fed rats had a significantly reduced proportion of arachidonic acid in the platelet and aortic phospholipids, and lower production of thromboxane A2 by platelets and of prostacyclin by the aorta. These results suggest that EPA and DHA are similarly involved in preventing atherosclerosis development by reducing hypercholesterolemia and modifying the platelet functions.  (+info)

Predominant inhibition of ganodermic acid S on the thromboxane A2-dependent pathway in human platelets response to collagen. (6/4442)

Ganodermic acid S (GAS), a membrane acting agent, exerts multiple effects on human platelet function (C.N. Wang et al. (1991) Biochem. J. 277, 189-197). The study reported how GAS affected the response of human gel-filtered platelets (GFP) to collagen. The agent inhibited cell aggregation by prolonging lag and shape change periods and decreasing the initial cell aggregation rate. However, the inhibitory efficiency was less than its inhibition on GFP response to U46619, a thromboxane (TX) A2 mimetic. In the agent-effect on biochemical events, GAS effectively inhibited Ca2+ mobilization, phosphorylation of myosin light chain, dense granule secretion and TXB2 generation. The inhibitions might originate from blocking Ca2+ mobilization of the TXA2-dependent pathway. GAS partially decreased the phosphorylation of most phosphotyrosine proteins from early activation to the integrin alphaIIbbeta3-regulated steps. The agent did not affect the phosphorylation of three proteins at the steps regulated by integrin alphaIIbbeta3. The results suggest that GAS inhibits the collagen response predominantly on the TXA2-dependent signaling, and the tyrosine kinase-dependent pathway in collagen response plays a major role in aggregation.  (+info)

PAF binding to a single receptor in corneal epithelium plasma membrane. (7/4442)

PURPOSE: To study the binding characteristics and the expression of platelet-activating factor receptors (PAF-R) in corneal epithelium to elucidate the site of action of PAF. METHODS: Binding of [3H]PAF was investigated in subcellular fractions of the epithelia of bovine corneas and in membranes from cultured rabbit corneal epithelial cells. Dose-response inhibition curves of [3H]PAF-specific binding were generated using increasing concentrations of several PAF-R antagonists. RNA from rabbit corneal epithelial cells was probed for PAF-R expression by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with specifically designed degenerated primers. RESULTS: Scatchard analysis showed a high-affinity binding site in bovine and rabbit corneal epithelium. The dissociation constant (Kd) and the maximum binding sites (Bmax) in a bovine membrane preparation and similar rabbit fraction were 0.77+/-0.03 nM and 180+/-21 femtomoles/mg protein and 4.3 nM and 1.3 picomoles/mg protein, respectively. Specific PAF-binding sites were found in bovine preparations enriched in plasma membranes with a Kd = 69.6 pM and Bmax = 80 femtomoles/mg protein; no specific binding was found in nuclei or microsomal fractions. RT-PCR of rabbit corneal epithelium generated a single product of the predicted size (478 bp). The deduced amino acid sequence of the purified PCR product was 87% homologous to human PAF-R. The hetrazepines BN 50727 and BN 50730 and the PAF structural analogues CV 3988 and CV 6209 competitively inhibited [3H]PAF binding to corneal epithelium with similar potency. WEB 2086 BS was two orders of magnitude less active in antagonizing PAF binding. CONCLUSIONS: Corneal epithelium contains a single population of receptors localized in the plasma membrane. PAF antagonists exert their actions by blocking this PAF-R. The partial sequence deduced in rabbit corneal PAF-R show a higher homology to the human PAF-R.  (+info)

Conformational changes in the A3 domain of von Willebrand factor modulate the interaction of the A1 domain with platelet glycoprotein Ib. (8/4442)

Bitiscetin has recently been shown to induce von Willebrand factor (vWF)-dependent aggregation of fixed platelets (Hamako J, et al, Biochem Biophys Res Commun 226:273, 1996). We have purified bitiscetin from Bitis arietans venom and investigated the mechanism whereby it promotes a form of vWF that is reactive with platelets. In the presence of bitiscetin, vWF binds to platelets in a dose-dependent and saturable manner. The binding of vWF to platelets involves glycoprotein (GP) Ib because it was totally blocked by monoclonal antibody (MoAb) 6D1 directed towards the vWF-binding site of GPIb. The binding also involves the GPIb-binding site of vWF located on the A1 domain because it was inhibited by MoAb to vWF whose epitopes are within this domain and that block binding of vWF to platelets induced by ristocetin or botrocetin. However, in contrast to ristocetin or botrocetin, the binding site of bitiscetin does not reside within the A1 domain but within the A3 domain of vWF. Thus, among a series of vWF fragments, 125I-bitiscetin only binds to those that overlap the A3 domain, ie, SpIII (amino acid [aa] 1-1365), SpI (aa 911-1365), and rvWF-A3 domain (aa 920-1111). It does not bind to SpII corresponding to the C-terminal part of vWF subunit (aa 1366-2050) nor to the 39/34/kD dispase species (aa 480-718) or T116 (aa 449-728) overlapping the A1 domain. In addition, bitiscetin that does not bind to DeltaA3-rvWF (deleted between aa 910-1113) has no binding site ouside the A3 domain. The localization of the binding site of bitiscetin within the A3 domain was further supported by showing that MoAb to vWF, which are specific for this domain and block the interaction between vWF and collagen, are potent inhibitors of the binding of bitiscetin to vWF and consequently of the bitiscetin-induced binding of vWF to platelets. Thus, our data support the hypothesis that an interaction between the A1 and A3 domains exists that may play a role in the function of vWF by regulating the ability of the A1 domain to bind to platelet GPIb.  (+info)

  • The results were presented by Dominick J. Angiolillo, MD, PhD, medical director, cardiovascular research program at the University of Florida College of Medicine Jacksonville, "BRIDGE results support the hypothesis that intravenous cangrelor may be a feasible and well tolerated management strategy in patients who require prolonged platelet P2Y12 inhibition after thienopyridine discontinuation prior to cardiac surgery. (medlatest.com)
  • Treatment guidelines in the United States and Europe recommend stent patients receive oral P2Y12 inhibitors for up to 12 months following percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). (medlatest.com)
  • The three dimensional platelet plugs under pathophysiological conditions can obstruct circulatory system patency leading to ischemic heart disease (myocardial infarction, unstable angina), ischemic stroke, and related conditions [ 8 ]. (omicsonline.org)
  • Antagonists of fibrinogen at the GPIIb/IIIa receptor, which is the most abundant membrane protein on the platelet surface, are under active investigation as potential antithrombotics. (openarchives.gr)
  • New antiplatelet agents that provide greater, more consistent inhibition of the platelet ADP receptor P2Y12 may be used in combination with glycoprotein (GP) IIb-IIIa antagonists, but their combined effect on platelet function and procoagulant activity is not well studied. (nih.gov)
  • Healthy donor blood was treated with the active metabolite of prasugrel (R-138727 5 μmol/L), GPIIb-IIIa antagonists (abciximab 3 μg/mL or eptifibatide 0.9 μg/mL), and combinations thereof, exposed to physiologically relevant agonists (collagen and ADP) and then evaluated for markers of platelet activation and procoagulant activity. (nih.gov)
  • R-138727 and the GPIIb-IIIa antagonists had additive inhibitory effects on collagen-stimulated platelet aggregation and on the collagen plus ADP-stimulated level of activated platelet surface GPIIb-IIIa. (nih.gov)
  • In order to evaluate the involvement of monoaminergic system, rats were pretreated with the inhibitor of brain serotonin stores p-chlorophenylalanin (PCPA), dopamine (SCH23390 and sulpiride), and adrenoceptor (prazosin and propranolol) antagonists. (bireme.br)
  • Apr 24, 2018· Compare platelet aggregation inhibitors. (leerwinkelkortrijk.be)
  • In Sierra Leone during 2015-2018, we assessed LF patients' day-of-admission plasma samples for levels of proteins necessary for coagulation, fibrinolysis, and platelet function. (cdc.gov)
  • The present double-blind controlled clinical pharmacology study was performed on 45 patients with cerebral infarction, who were given 75, 150, or 300 mg three times daily of sarpogrelate for 7 days in order to evaluate the dose-response relationship in terms of the precisely measured inhibition of platelet aggregation. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the independent and complementary effects of P2Y12 and GPIIb-IIIa inhibition on platelet function and procoagulant activity. (nih.gov)
  • The drug is the third inhibitor of GPIIb/IIIa that has found broad acceptance after the specific antibody abciximab and the non-peptide tirofiban entered the global market. (bionity.com)
  • RGD peptide products under development include a cell adhesive coating designed to improve the performance of implantable devices and their acceptance by the body, and a platelet aggregation inhibitor designed to prevent unwanted blood clotting without causing bleeding at therapeutic doses, unlike certain therapies now existing or under development by others. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • We aimed to measure platelet function and its relationship with β2-GPI in prolonged isolated thrombocytopenia (PT) after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). (bioportfolio.com)
  • Light intensities of small (9-25μ n), medium (25-50μ m), and large (50-70μ m) platelet aggregates were measured by the laser light scattering aggregometer (PA-200C) with or without adenosine diphosphate (ADP, 2μ M) or collagen (1μ g/ml). (ahajournals.org)
  • However, you should tell your doctor about all the medicines you take including adenosine and cholinesterase inhibitors, prescription and non-prescription medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. (rxwiki.com)
  • The modified annexin decreases the binding of leukocytes and platelets during post-ischemic reperfusion, thereby restoring microvascular blood flow and decreasing organ damage. (google.com)
  • Post-2006 data were also available outlining the altered pharmacokinetics of protease inhibitors with concomitant PPI exposure. (springer.com)