Rhizobium leguminosarum: A species of gram-negative, aerobic bacteria that is found in soil and which causes formation of root nodules on some, but not all, types of field pea, lentil, kidney bean, and clover.Rhizobium: A genus of gram-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped bacteria that activate PLANT ROOT NODULATION in leguminous plants. Members of this genus are nitrogen-fixing and common soil inhabitants.Plasmids: Extrachromosomal, usually CIRCULAR DNA molecules that are self-replicating and transferable from one organism to another. They are found in a variety of bacterial, archaeal, fungal, algal, and plant species. They are used in GENETIC ENGINEERING as CLONING VECTORS.Fabaceae: The large family of plants characterized by pods. Some are edible and some cause LATHYRISM or FAVISM and other forms of poisoning. Other species yield useful materials like gums from ACACIA and various LECTINS like PHYTOHEMAGGLUTININS from PHASEOLUS. Many of them harbor NITROGEN FIXATION bacteria on their roots. Many but not all species of "beans" belong to this family.Nitrogen Fixation: The process in certain BACTERIA; FUNGI; and CYANOBACTERIA converting free atmospheric NITROGEN to biologically usable forms of nitrogen, such as AMMONIA; NITRATES; and amino compounds.Symbiosis: The relationship between two different species of organisms that are interdependent; each gains benefits from the other or a relationship between different species where both of the organisms in question benefit from the presence of the other.Peas: A variable annual leguminous vine (Pisum sativum) that is cultivated for its rounded smooth or wrinkled edible protein-rich seeds, the seed of the pea, and the immature pods with their included seeds. (From Webster's New Collegiate Dictionary, 1973)Plants, Medicinal: Plants whose roots, leaves, seeds, bark, or other constituent parts possess therapeutic, tonic, purgative, curative or other pharmacologic attributes, when administered to man or animals.Rhizobium etli: A species of gram-negative bacteria and nitrogen innoculant of PHASEOLUS VULGARIS.Vicia sativa: A plant species of the genus VICIA, family FABACEAE. The seed is used for food and contains THIOCYANATES such as prunasin, cyanoalanine, cyanogen, and vicine.Vicia: A plant genus of the family FABACEAE that is widely used as ground cover and forage and known for the edible beans, VICIA FABA.Genes, Bacterial: The functional hereditary units of BACTERIA.Trifolium: A plant genus of the family FABACEAE.Bacterial Proteins: Proteins found in any species of bacterium.Sinorhizobium meliloti: A species of gram-negative, aerobic bacteria that causes formation of root nodules on some, but not all, types of sweet clover, MEDICAGO SATIVA, and fenugreek.Root Nodules, Plant: Knobbed structures formed from and attached to plant roots, especially of LEGUMES, which result from symbiotic infection by nitrogen fixing bacteria such as RHIZOBIUM or FRANKIA. Root nodules are structures related to MYCORRHIZAE formed by symbiotic associations with fungi.Rhizobiaceae: A family of gram-negative bacteria which are saprophytes, symbionts, or plant pathogens.Medicago: A plant genus of the family FABACEAE. It is distinct from Sweet Clover (MELILOTUS), from Bush Clover (LESPEDEZA), and from Red Clover (TRIFOLIUM).Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Cosmids: Plasmids containing at least one cos (cohesive-end site) of PHAGE LAMBDA. They are used as cloning vehicles.DNA, Bacterial: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.Lens Plant: A plant genus of the FABACEAE family known for the seeds used as food.Rhizobium tropici: A species of gram-negative bacteria and an nitrogen inoculum that displays a high intrinsic tolerance to acidity.Plant Root Nodulation: The formation of a nitrogen-fixing cell mass on PLANT ROOTS following symbiotic infection by nitrogen-fixing bacteria such as RHIZOBIUM or FRANKIA.Gene Expression Regulation, Bacterial: Any of the processes by which cytoplasmic or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in bacteria.Hydrogenase: An enzyme found in bacteria. It catalyzes the reduction of FERREDOXIN and other substances in the presence of molecular hydrogen and is involved in the electron transport of bacterial photosynthesis.Lipid A: Lipid A is the biologically active component of lipopolysaccharides. It shows strong endotoxic activity and exhibits immunogenic properties.Plant Roots: The usually underground portions of a plant that serve as support, store food, and through which water and mineral nutrients enter the plant. (From American Heritage Dictionary, 1982; Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990)Polysaccharides, Bacterial: Polysaccharides found in bacteria and in capsules thereof.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Flavanones: A group of FLAVONOIDS characterized with a 4-ketone.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Sinorhizobium: A genus of gram-negative, aerobic, nonsporeforming rods which usually contain granules of poly-beta-hydroxybutyrate. (From Bergey's Manual of Determinative Bacteriology, 9th ed)Medicago sativa: A plant species of the family FABACEAE widely cultivated for ANIMAL FEED.Conjugation, Genetic: A parasexual process in BACTERIA; ALGAE; FUNGI; and ciliate EUKARYOTA for achieving exchange of chromosome material during fusion of two cells. In bacteria, this is a uni-directional transfer of genetic material; in protozoa it is a bi-directional exchange. In algae and fungi, it is a form of sexual reproduction, with the union of male and female gametes.Genetic Complementation Test: A test used to determine whether or not complementation (compensation in the form of dominance) will occur in a cell with a given mutant phenotype when another mutant genome, encoding the same mutant phenotype, is introduced into that cell.Dicarboxylic AcidsEscherichia coli: A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria (GRAM-NEGATIVE FACULTATIVELY ANAEROBIC RODS) commonly found in the lower part of the intestine of warm-blooded animals. It is usually nonpathogenic, but some strains are known to produce DIARRHEA and pyogenic infections. Pathogenic strains (virotypes) are classified by their specific pathogenic mechanisms such as toxins (ENTEROTOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI), etc.Cloning, Molecular: The insertion of recombinant DNA molecules from prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic sources into a replicating vehicle, such as a plasmid or virus vector, and the introduction of the resultant hybrid molecules into recipient cells without altering the viability of those cells.Mutagenesis, Insertional: Mutagenesis where the mutation is caused by the introduction of foreign DNA sequences into a gene or extragenic sequence. This may occur spontaneously in vivo or be experimentally induced in vivo or in vitro. Proviral DNA insertions into or adjacent to a cellular proto-oncogene can interrupt GENETIC TRANSLATION of the coding sequences or interfere with recognition of regulatory elements and cause unregulated expression of the proto-oncogene resulting in tumor formation.Operon: In bacteria, a group of metabolically related genes, with a common promoter, whose transcription into a single polycistronic MESSENGER RNA is under the control of an OPERATOR REGION.Dicarboxylic Acid Transporters: A family of organic anion transporters that specifically transport DICARBOXYLIC ACIDS such as alpha-ketoglutaric acid across cellular membranes.Bradyrhizobium: A genus of gram-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped bacteria usually containing granules of poly-beta-hydroxybutyrate. They characteristically invade the root hairs of leguminous plants and act as intracellular symbionts.Phaseolus: A plant genus in the family FABACEAE which is the source of edible beans and the lectin PHYTOHEMAGGLUTININS.Sugar AcidsAmino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Species Specificity: The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.Nitrogenase: An enzyme system that catalyzes the fixing of nitrogen in soil bacteria and blue-green algae (CYANOBACTERIA). EC 1.18.6.1.Carbohydrate Sequence: The sequence of carbohydrates within POLYSACCHARIDES; GLYCOPROTEINS; and GLYCOLIPIDS.DNA Transposable Elements: Discrete segments of DNA which can excise and reintegrate to another site in the genome. Most are inactive, i.e., have not been found to exist outside the integrated state. DNA transposable elements include bacterial IS (insertion sequence) elements, Tn elements, the maize controlling elements Ac and Ds, Drosophila P, gypsy, and pogo elements, the human Tigger elements and the Tc and mariner elements which are found throughout the animal kingdom.Plants: Multicellular, eukaryotic life forms of kingdom Plantae (sensu lato), comprising the VIRIDIPLANTAE; RHODOPHYTA; and GLAUCOPHYTA; all of which acquired chloroplasts by direct endosymbiosis of CYANOBACTERIA. They are characterized by a mainly photosynthetic mode of nutrition; essentially unlimited growth at localized regions of cell divisions (MERISTEMS); cellulose within cells providing rigidity; the absence of organs of locomotion; absence of nervous and sensory systems; and an alternation of haploid and diploid generations.Fructokinases: A class of enzymes that catalyzes the phosphorylation of fructose in the presence of ATP. EC 2.7.1.-.Plant Exudates: Substances released by PLANTS such as PLANT GUMS and PLANT RESINS.AcetyleneAgrobacterium tumefaciens: A species of gram-negative, aerobic bacteria isolated from soil and the stems, leafs, and roots of plants. Some biotypes are pathogenic and cause the formation of PLANT TUMORS in a wide variety of higher plants. The species is a major research tool in biotechnology.Lipopolysaccharides: Lipid-containing polysaccharides which are endotoxins and important group-specific antigens. They are often derived from the cell wall of gram-negative bacteria and induce immunoglobulin secretion. The lipopolysaccharide molecule consists of three parts: LIPID A, core polysaccharide, and O-specific chains (O ANTIGENS). When derived from Escherichia coli, lipopolysaccharides serve as polyclonal B-cell mitogens commonly used in laboratory immunology. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Sequence Analysis, DNA: A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.Hydroxy Acids: Organic compounds containing both the hydroxyl and carboxyl radicals.Artificial Gene Fusion: The in vitro fusion of GENES by RECOMBINANT DNA techniques to analyze protein behavior or GENE EXPRESSION REGULATION, or to merge protein functions for specific medical or industrial uses.Sequence Homology, Amino Acid: The degree of similarity between sequences of amino acids. This information is useful for the analyzing genetic relatedness of proteins and species.Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Guanosine Diphosphate Mannose: A nucleoside diphosphate sugar which can be converted to the deoxy sugar GDPfucose, which provides fucose for lipopolysaccharides of bacterial cell walls. Also acts as mannose donor for glycolipid synthesis.Restriction Mapping: Use of restriction endonucleases to analyze and generate a physical map of genomes, genes, or other segments of DNA.Soil Microbiology: The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in the soil. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms.4-Butyrolactone: One of the FURANS with a carbonyl thereby forming a cyclic lactone. It is an endogenous compound made from gamma-aminobutyrate and is the precursor of gamma-hydroxybutyrate. It is also used as a pharmacological agent and solvent.Rhamnose: A methylpentose whose L- isomer is found naturally in many plant glycosides and some gram-negative bacterial lipopolysaccharides.Nucleic Acid Hybridization: Widely used technique which exploits the ability of complementary sequences in single-stranded DNAs or RNAs to pair with each other to form a double helix. Hybridization can take place between two complimentary DNA sequences, between a single-stranded DNA and a complementary RNA, or between two RNA sequences. The technique is used to detect and isolate specific sequences, measure homology, or define other characteristics of one or both strands. (Kendrew, Encyclopedia of Molecular Biology, 1994, p503)Sequence Homology, Nucleic Acid: The sequential correspondence of nucleotides in one nucleic acid molecule with those of another nucleic acid molecule. Sequence homology is an indication of the genetic relatedness of different organisms and gene function.Succinic Acid: A water-soluble, colorless crystal with an acid taste that is used as a chemical intermediate, in medicine, the manufacture of lacquers, and to make perfume esters. It is also used in foods as a sequestrant, buffer, and a neutralizing agent. (Hawley's Condensed Chemical Dictionary, 12th ed, p1099; McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed, p1851)Acyltransferases: Enzymes from the transferase class that catalyze the transfer of acyl groups from donor to acceptor, forming either esters or amides. (From Enzyme Nomenclature 1992) EC 2.3.R Factors: A class of plasmids that transfer antibiotic resistance from one bacterium to another by conjugation.Genes, Regulator: Genes which regulate or circumscribe the activity of other genes; specifically, genes which code for PROTEINS or RNAs which have GENE EXPRESSION REGULATION functions.RNA, Ribosomal, 16S: Constituent of 30S subunit prokaryotic ribosomes containing 1600 nucleotides and 21 proteins. 16S rRNA is involved in initiation of polypeptide synthesis.Acyl Carrier Protein: Consists of a polypeptide chain and 4'-phosphopantetheine linked to a serine residue by a phosphodiester bond. Acyl groups are bound as thiol esters to the pantothenyl group. Acyl carrier protein is involved in every step of fatty acid synthesis by the cytoplasmic system.Multigene Family: A set of genes descended by duplication and variation from some ancestral gene. Such genes may be clustered together on the same chromosome or dispersed on different chromosomes. Examples of multigene families include those that encode the hemoglobins, immunoglobulins, histocompatibility antigens, actins, tubulins, keratins, collagens, heat shock proteins, salivary glue proteins, chorion proteins, cuticle proteins, yolk proteins, and phaseolins, as well as histones, ribosomal RNA, and transfer RNA genes. The latter three are examples of reiterated genes, where hundreds of identical genes are present in a tandem array. (King & Stanfield, A Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)
... two copies in Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae (chromosome and plasmid pRL11), two copies in Rhizobium leguminosarumbv. ... trifolii WSM1325 (plasmid pR132504 and plasmid pR132502), in Rhizobium etli CFN 42 plasmid p42f and in the chromosomes of ... Rhizobium leguminosarum bv.viciae, R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii and R. etli), as well as in the human and plant pathogens ... Exceptions are SmrB35 homologs of R. leguminosarum bv. viciae (Rlvr35C),and R. etli CFN 42 plasmid p42f (ReCFNr35f), which are ...
... population genomics of Rhizobium leguminosarum". Open Biology. 5 (1): 140133. doi:10.1098/rsob.140133. ISSN 2046-2441. PMC ... The genomes of the two isolates have similar plasmids seen in Borrelia burgdorferi. The MN14-1420 isolate have a vls locus, a ... It has a linear chromosome with an additional 15 plasmids, 8 linear and 7 circular. ...
... fredii Rhizobium species: two R. leguminosarum trifolii strains (WSM304 and WSM35), two R. etli strains CFN 42 and CIAT 652, ... A very different genomic context, not even partially conserved in most cases, was present in all plasmid-borne αr15 loci ( ... leguminosarum bv. viciae, R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii, R. etli, and several Mesorhizobium species), in the plant pathogens ... Additional Files: Genomic context graph of the αr15 family plasmid copies Image:Smbr15 1.png Genomic context graph of the ...
Conserved Plasmid Hydrogen-Uptake (hup)-Specific Sequences within Hup+Rhizobium leguminosarum Strains. Antonio Leyva, José M. ... Conserved Plasmid Hydrogen-Uptake (hup)-Specific Sequences within Hup+Rhizobium leguminosarum Strains ... Conserved Plasmid Hydrogen-Uptake (hup)-Specific Sequences within Hup+Rhizobium leguminosarum Strains ... Conserved Plasmid Hydrogen-Uptake (hup)-Specific Sequences within Hup+Rhizobium leguminosarum Strains ...
We hypothesize that the sequence groups correspond to incompatibility groups of Rhizobium plasmids. ... Specific pairs of PCR primers were designed for each of the four groups; 29 out of 41 R. leguminosarum strains gave a PCR ... PCR products from 24 field isolates of R. leguminosarum from France, Germany and the UK were cloned and partially sequenced ... Published Agrobacterium repC sequences fall within the phylogeny of R. leguminosarum sequences, though not within any of the ...
... leguminosarum. Mutations in lpcAB result in a rough LPS phenotype with a requirement for elevated calcium concentrations to ... with similarity to calcium proton antiporters has been identified adjacent to lpcAB in Rhizobium leguminosarum. LpcA is a ... Plasmids, Rhizobium leguminosarum, Sequence Alignment, Sequence Analysis, DNA, Sugar Acids, Transferases ... Identification of a putative LPS-associated cation exporter from Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae. ...
... unexpected plasmid stability of indigenous Rhizobium leguminosarum.. Rhizobium gone native: unexpected plasmid stability of ... Rhizobium gone native: unexpected plasmid stability of indigenous Rhizobium leguminosarum.. *Role of bacteriocins in mediating ... Rhizobium leguminosarum strains nodulating sympatric species of native Trifolium were characterized genetically at plasmid- ... A survey of Col plasmids in natural isolates of Escherichia coli and an investigation into the stability of Col-plasmid ...
Recent advances in Rhizobium genetics have led to increased optimism regarding the possibility of enhancing symbiotic N2 ... Field Isolate Rhizobium Strain Bacteriocin Production Rhizobium Leguminosarum Plasmid Transfer These keywords were added by ... Plasmid control of effectiveness in Rhizobium: transfer of nitrogen-fixing genes on a plasmid from Rhizobium trifolii to ... Hirsch, P. R., 1979, Plasmid-determined bacteriocin production by Rhizobium leguminosarum, J. Gen. Microbiol., 113:219.Google ...
Plasmid-Encoded Catabolic Genes in Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii: Evidence for a Plant-Inducible Rhamnose Locus Involved ... Plasmid-Encoded Catabolic Genes in Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii: Evidence for a Plant-Inducible Rhamnose Locus Involved ... and adonitol were isolated from a genomic library of Rhizobium leguminosarum by complementation of plasmid-cured derivatives of ... and adonitol catabolic loci demonstrated that these genes are plasmid encoded in virtually all R. leguminosarum strains, ...
A Rhizobium leguminosarum Biovar trifolii Locus Not Localized on the Sym Plasmid Hinders Effective Nodulation on Plants of the ... Introduction of the Sym plasmid pRL1JI into the cured Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii strain RCR5 resulted in a strain, ... Additional keywords: host specificity, N2 fixation, R. leguminosarum bv. viciae, transposon. ...
Genetic determinants for the 24K protein were found to be closely linked to plasmid-borne nodulation genes for all strains of R ... The sites of the Tn5 insertions were found to map between the nitrogenase and nodulation genes on symbiotic plasmid pRL1JI , ca ... The protein could also be induced during growth of R. leguminosarum on nutrient medium and was purified from the cytoplasmic ... Antiserum raised against the purified protein was used to screen transposon-induced mutants of R. leguminosarum, and four ...
... Ulrich A, ... Ulrich A, Pühler A. The new class II transposon Tn163 is plasmid-borne in two unrelated Rhizobium leguminosarum biovar viciae ... A. Ulrich and A. Pühler, "The new class II transposon Tn163 is plasmid-borne in two unrelated Rhizobium leguminosarum biovar ... Ulrich, A., and Pühler, A. (1994). The new class II transposon Tn163 is plasmid-borne in two unrelated Rhizobium leguminosarum ...
The other two plasmids, pRL3JI and pRL4JI, also mediated the transfer of nodulation ability but at much lower frequency (10-3 ... Nodulation ability was co-transferred at high frequency (, 95%) with bacteriocin production by the plasmid pRL1JI. ... leguminosarum resulted in suppression of the mutant phenotype in four cases. These included non-infective, ineffective and ... transconjugants that had acquired nodulation ability after the transfer of derivatives of plasmids pRL3JI or pRL4JI acted ...
Plasmid pRL11Imported. ,p>Information which has been imported from another database using automatic procedures.,/p> ,p>,a href ... Rhizobium sp. OK665. Rhizobium sp. CF258. Rhizobium leguminosarum. Rhizobium sp. CF122. Rhizobium sp. AP16. Rhizobium ... Rhizobium sp. CF122. Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae. Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae USDA 2370. Rhizobium leguminosarum ... Rhizobium etli bv. mimosae str. Mim1. Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii WSM1689. Rhizobium anhuiense bv. trifolii. And more ...
... different plastids or a plasmid. The absence of this section means that the gene is located in one of the main chromosomal ... RhizobiumRhizobium leguminosarumRhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii ... Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii (strain WSM1325)Imported. Automatic assertion inferred from database entriesi ... tr,C6B6E9,C6B6E9_RHILS Alcohol dehydrogenase zinc-binding domain protein OS=Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii (strain ...
... leguminosarum strains carry panCB genes in plasmids. The panCB phylogeny attested a common origin for chromosomal and plasmid- ... This study shows experimental evidence that core panCB genes located in plasmids of R. etli and R. leguminosarum are ... Plasmid p42f encodes other functions required for growth in minimal medium. Our results support the hypothesis of cooperation ... The genome sequence of R. etli CFN42 predicts the presence of panC and panB genes clustered together on the 642 kb plasmid p42f ...
CC Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii WSM2304 plasmid pRLG202, complete CC sequence. CC -!- ANNOTATIONS ORIGIN:B6A3B8_RHILW ... OC Bacteria; Proteobacteria; Alphaproteobacteria; Rhizobiales; Rhizobiaceae; OC Rhizobium/Agrobacterium group; Rhizobium. OX ... 3, Last annotation update) DE SubName: Full=Amidohydrolase 2; (RHILW_1.PE112). GN OrderedLocusNames=Rleg2_5726; OS RHIZOBIUM ... Plasmid. SQ SEQUENCE 326 AA; UNKNOWN MW; UNKNOWN CRC64; MQGKIALEEH FAIPETLQDS AGFVPGDYWT ELSARLLDIQ DKRLRLMDTH GIEKMILSLN ...
... unexpected plasmid stability of indigenous Rhizobium leguminosarum." Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A, 94(10), 5483-5488. ... Ichiyanagi, K., Beauregard, A., and Belfort, M. (2003). "A bacterial group II intron favors retrotransposition into plasmid ... Wernegreen, J.J., and Moran, N.A. (2001). "Vertical transmission of biosynthetic plasmids in aphid endosymbionts (Buchnera)." J ... Wernegreen, J.J., Harding, E.E., and Riley, M.A. (1997). "Rhizobium gone native: ...
Plasmid pAL618 contains the genetic determinants for H2 uptake (hup) from Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae, including a ... The hydrogenase gene cluster of Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae contains an additional gene (hypX), which encodes a protein ... thus completing the sequence of the 20441-bp insert DNA in plasmid pAL618. An open reading frame (designated hypX) encoding a ...
We uncovered evidence of a Rhizobium pangenome that was greatly expanded, both in its chromosomes and plasmids. Despite the ... The clades corresponding to R. etli and R. leguminosarum species show several genomic clusters with average genomic nucleotide ... We uncovered evidence of a Rhizobium pangenome that was greatly expanded, both in its chromosomes and plasmids. Despite the ... We distinguished some types of symbiotic plasmids within Rhizobium that displayed different rates of synonymous nucle... ...
... two copies in Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae (chromosome and plasmid pRL11), two copies in Rhizobium leguminosarumbv. ... trifolii WSM1325 (plasmid pR132504 and plasmid pR132502), in Rhizobium etli CFN 42 plasmid p42f and in the chromosomes of ... Rhizobium leguminosarum bv.viciae, R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii and R. etli), as well as in the human and plant pathogens ... Exceptions are SmrB35 homologs of R. leguminosarum bv. viciae (Rlvr35C),and R. etli CFN 42 plasmid p42f (ReCFNr35f), which are ...
Promoters in the nodulation region of the Rhizobium leguminosarum Syn plasmid pRL1JI. Plant Mol. Biol. 9, 27-39. doi: 10.1007/ ... Plasmids Construction and Molecular Biology. Plasmids used are described in Table 1 and primers listed in Table S1. PCR ... His-tagged PhoB and σVreI proteins were produced in E. coli BL21 from the pET-phoB and pET-vreI plasmids, respectively, and ... Importantly, PpdtA and PphdA are not active in strains bearing the pMUM3 plasmid in absence of IPTG in high Pi-a condition in ...
Changes in structural organization of bacterial Sym-plasmid during Pisum sativum-Rhizobium leguminosarum bv viciae symbiosis. ...
1987) Promoters in the nodulation region of the Rhizobium leguminosarum Sym plasmid pRL1J1. Plant Mol. Biol. 9:27-39. ... on plasmid pRSP56; data not shown) reduced expression of a plasmid-borne mexA-lacZ fusion (pMXR5) in E. coli (from 782 ± 28 ... on plasmid pRSP58) and K1456 (on plasmid pRSP60) had no effect on the mexA-lacZ expression (pRSP58, 794 ± 66 Miller units; ... Plasmid DNA was isolated with the aid of a plasmid Maxi Kit (Qiagen). DNA fragments used in cloning were purified from agarose ...
1987) Promoters in the nodulation region of the Rhizobium leguminosarum Sym plasmid pRL1JI. Plant Mol. Biol. 9:27-39. ... 1979) Replication of an origin-containing derivative of plasmid RK2 dependent on a plasmid function provided in trans. Proc. ... We therefore introducedlacZ fusions carried on plasmids to the lasR,lasI, rhlR, and rhlI genes into PT5 and PT149 in order to ... Strain and plasmid constructions.Mutations in the cell-to-cell signaling regulator genes were transferred into the PAO1 wild- ...
Symbiotic plasmid is required for NolR to fully repress nodulation genes in Rhizobium leguminosarum A34 (pages 901-907). ...
Selbitshka, W.; Lotz, W. Instability of cryptic plasmids affect the symbiotic effectivity of Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae ... 1. Obtention of isolated colonies from original Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. phaseoli (SLP 1.3 and BR 10.026) and Rhizobium ... Palavras-chave: Rhizobium tropici, Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. phaseoli, feijoeiro, solos de cerrado, temperatura elevada. ... Key words: Rhizobium tropici, Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. phaseoli, bean plants, high temperature, cerrado soils ...
"Structural complexity of the symbiotic plasmid of Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. phaseoli". Journal Of Bacteriology. 173(8):2411- ... "High-frequency rearrangements in Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. phaseoli plasmids". Journal Of Bacteriology. 173(3):1344-1346. [ ... "The conjugative plasmid of a bean-nodulating Sinorhizobium fredii strain is assembled from sequences of two Rhizobium plasmids ... from Rhizobium leguminosarum biovar phaseoli". PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. ...
  • Multiple genomic clusters defined by whole genome comparisons occur within Rhizobium , but their equivalence to species is controversial. (frontiersin.org)
  • Despite the variability of extra-chromosomal elements, our genomic comparisons revealed only a few chromid and plasmid families. (frontiersin.org)
  • In summary, the results indicate that Rhizobium genomic clusters, as defined by whole genomic identities, might be part of a continuous process of evolutionary divergence that includes the core and the extrachromosomal elements leading to species formation. (frontiersin.org)
  • This genetic instability caused by high rates of genomic rearrangements and/or plasmid deletions can be accentuated by high temperatures. (scielo.br)
  • This evaluation involved plant dry matter analysis of inoculated plants and genotypic (plasmid profile and genomic patterns via RAPD) analysis of the Rhizobium strains. (scielo.br)
  • The genomic patterns generated by AP-PCR showed more alterations and genetic variation in isolated colonies from R. leguminosarum bv. (scielo.br)
  • High temperatures can accentuate this instability enabling genomic rearrangements and plasmid deletions (9,22), thus jeopardizing the utilization of these strains as inoculants, especially in tropical soils. (scielo.br)
  • This program is dedicated to the understanding of the forces and mechanisms that have forged the genomic architecture of proteobacteria associated with plants (specifically Rhizobium sp. (unam.mx)
  • The plasmid contains 12 reiterated DNA families that are likely to participate in genomic rearrangements. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Thirteen Rhizobium leguminosarum strains previously reported as H 2 -uptake hydrogenase positive (Hup + ) or negative (Hup − ) were analyzed for the presence and conservation of DNA sequences homologous to cloned Bradyrhizobium japonicum hup -specific DNA from cosmid pHU1 (M. A. Cantrell, R. A. Haugland, and H. J. Evans, Proc. (asm.org)
  • Lipo-chitooligosaccharide (LCO) Nod factors are produced and secreted by rhizobia and trigger nodule development in leguminous host plants. (ugent.be)
  • Nodule development is induced by lipochitooligosaccharide signals of rhizobia, called Nod factors. (pnas.org)
  • Several research laboratories have reported genetic instability of Rhizobium strains as one of the causes that compromise relevant characteristics of these organisms in the nitrogen fixation, both in wild-type strains obtained by conventional selection procedures (13,14,17,25,26) and in genetically improved strains (3,29). (scielo.br)
  • Every method used for demonstrating nitrogen fixation in rhizobia have been used to demonstrate nitrogen fixation in G. diazotrophicus both in vitro and in planta, and field trials demonstrate yield increases and the potential to reduce nitrogen fertilizer use, meeting both food security and climate smart agriculture needs. (intechopen.com)
  • In addition, the MLSA approach has proved to represent a rapid and reliable method to be employed in phylogenetic and taxonomic studies, speeding the identification of the still poorly known diversity of nitrogen-fixing rhizobia in the tropics. (bvsalud.org)
  • Pseudomonas putida NCIB 9869 carries a transmissible plasmid pRA500 of approximately 500 kb which encodes the degradation of 3,5-xylenol via a gentisate pathway. (microbiologyresearch.org)
  • El establecimiento del mapa físico del plásmido simbiótico de R. etli CFN42 así como el análisis de su actividad transcripcional son trabajos pioneros en el campo de la Rhizobiología en cuanto a la caracterización estructural y funcional de un replicón completo antes de la era genómica. (unam.mx)
  • Here we report the complete DNA sequence of the pSym (p42d) of Rhizobium etli CFN42 and its comparative analysis with other rhizobial SGCs. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Plasmid molecules which contain an interposon insertion can be identified by expression of its drug resistance. (nih.gov)
  • Partition determinants, in the first category, direct the active segregation of plasmid molecules during cell division. (biomedcentral.com)
  • While the general features of this signal exchange are common to all rhizobia-plant symbioses, differences in the signalling molecules allow only certain bacterium-plant combinations to lead to a successful symbiosis. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Plant-made flavonoids released into the rhizosphere [ 1 , 2 ] induce rhizobia to make specific signalling molecules known as Nod factors, which are four or five β -1,4 linked N -acetyl-glucosamine residues with a fatty acid residue replacing the N -acetyl group at the non-reducing end. (biomedcentral.com)
  • These molecules act as diffusible chemical communication signals (bacterial pheromones) which regulate diverse physiological processes including bioluminescence, antibiotic production, plasmid conjugal transfer and synthesis of exoenzyme virulence factors in plant and animal pathogens. (nih.gov)
  • These data indicate that previous observations of sym plasmid transfer in agricultural settings may seriously overestimate the rates of successful conjugation in systems not impacted by human activities. (umass.edu)
  • Individual projects involve plasmid transfer by conjugation, catabolism of compounds produced by plants, chemotaxis and motility, and the genomics of phages that infect rhizobia. (ucalgary.ca)
  • Computational simulations and theoretical analysis indicated that this architecture would show a transcriptional burst after plasmid conjugation, linking the magnitude of the feedback gain with the intensity of the transcriptional burst. (prolekare.cz)
  • Lateral transfer of bacterial plasmids is thought to play an important role in microbial evolution and population dynamics. (umass.edu)