The parts of plants, including SEEDS.
Animal searching behavior. The variable introductory phase of an instinctive behavior pattern or sequence, e.g., looking for food, or sequential courtship patterns prior to mating.
A large order of insects comprising the butterflies and moths.
Multicellular, eukaryotic life forms of kingdom Plantae (sensu lato), comprising the VIRIDIPLANTAE; RHODOPHYTA; and GLAUCOPHYTA; all of which acquired chloroplasts by direct endosymbiosis of CYANOBACTERIA. They are characterized by a mainly photosynthetic mode of nutrition; essentially unlimited growth at localized regions of cell divisions (MERISTEMS); cellulose within cells providing rigidity; the absence of organs of locomotion; absence of nervous and sensory systems; and an alternation of haploid and diploid generations.
PLANTS, or their progeny, whose GENOME has been altered by GENETIC ENGINEERING.
Expanded structures, usually green, of vascular plants, characteristically consisting of a bladelike expansion attached to a stem, and functioning as the principal organ of photosynthesis and transpiration. (American Heritage Dictionary, 2d ed)
Proteins found in plants (flowers, herbs, shrubs, trees, etc.). The concept does not include proteins found in vegetables for which VEGETABLE PROTEINS is available.
The usually underground portions of a plant that serve as support, store food, and through which water and mineral nutrients enter the plant. (From American Heritage Dictionary, 1982; Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990)
The functional hereditary units of PLANTS.
Concentrated pharmaceutical preparations of plants obtained by removing active constituents with a suitable solvent, which is evaporated away, and adjusting the residue to a prescribed standard.
New immature growth of a plant including stem, leaves, tips of branches, and SEEDLINGS.
Plants whose roots, leaves, seeds, bark, or other constituent parts possess therapeutic, tonic, purgative, curative or other pharmacologic attributes, when administered to man or animals.
Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of plants.
Processes orchestrated or driven by a plethora of genes, plant hormones, and inherent biological timing mechanisms facilitated by secondary molecules, which result in the systematic transformation of plants and plant parts, from one stage of maturity to another.
Plants or plant parts which are harmful to man or other animals.
Basic functional unit of plants.
Parts of plants that usually grow vertically upwards towards the light and support the leaves, buds, and reproductive structures. (From Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990)
The genetic complement of a plant (PLANTS) as represented in its DNA.
A plant genus of the family BRASSICACEAE that contains ARABIDOPSIS PROTEINS and MADS DOMAIN PROTEINS. The species A. thaliana is used for experiments in classical plant genetics as well as molecular genetic studies in plant physiology, biochemistry, and development.
An organism of the vegetable kingdom suitable by nature for use as a food, especially by human beings. Not all parts of any given plant are edible but all parts of edible plants have been known to figure as raw or cooked food: leaves, roots, tubers, stems, seeds, buds, fruits, and flowers. The most commonly edible parts of plants are FRUIT, usually sweet, fleshy, and succulent. Most edible plants are commonly cultivated for their nutritional value and are referred to as VEGETABLES.
Any of the hormones produced naturally in plants and active in controlling growth and other functions. There are three primary classes: auxins, cytokinins, and gibberellins.
Proteins that originate from plants species belonging to the genus ARABIDOPSIS. The most intensely studied species of Arabidopsis, Arabidopsis thaliana, is commonly used in laboratory experiments.
The inherent or induced capacity of plants to withstand or ward off biological attack by pathogens.
A plant genus of the family SOLANACEAE. Members contain NICOTINE and other biologically active chemicals; its dried leaves are used for SMOKING.
A thin layer of cells forming the outer integument of seed plants and ferns. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)
Closable openings in the epidermis of plants on the underside of leaves. They allow the exchange of gases between the internal tissues of the plant and the outside atmosphere.
Members of the group of vascular plants which bear flowers. They are differentiated from GYMNOSPERMS by their production of seeds within a closed chamber (OVARY, PLANT). The Angiosperms division is composed of two classes, the monocotyledons (Liliopsida) and dicotyledons (Magnoliopsida). Angiosperms represent approximately 80% of all known living plants.
The encapsulated embryos of flowering plants. They are used as is or for animal feed because of the high content of concentrated nutrients like starches, proteins, and fats. Rapeseed, cottonseed, and sunflower seed are also produced for the oils (fats) they yield.
Poisoning by the ingestion of plants or its leaves, berries, roots or stalks. The manifestations in both humans and animals vary in severity from mild to life threatening. In animals, especially domestic animals, it is usually the result of ingesting moldy or fermented forage.
The loss of water vapor by plants to the atmosphere. It occurs mainly from the leaves through pores (stomata) whose primary function is gas exchange. The water is replaced by a continuous column of water moving upwards from the roots within the xylem vessels. (Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990)
The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.
A plant species of the family SOLANACEAE, native of South America, widely cultivated for their edible, fleshy, usually red fruit.
The reproductive organs of plants.
A localized proliferation of plant tissue forming a swelling or outgrowth, commonly with a characteristic shape and unlike any organ of the normal plant. Plant tumors or galls usually form in response to the action of a pathogen or a pest. (Holliday, P., A Dictionary of Plant Pathology, 1989, p330)
Complex nucleoprotein structures which contain the genomic DNA and are part of the CELL NUCLEUS of PLANTS.
The above-ground plant without the roots.
The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.
Material prepared from plants.
A plant species of the family POACEAE. It is a tall grass grown for its EDIBLE GRAIN, corn, used as food and animal FODDER.
Very young plant after GERMINATION of SEEDS.
The act of feeding on plants by animals.
Units that convert some other form of energy into electrical energy.
Total mass of all the organisms of a given type and/or in a given area. (From Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990) It includes the yield of vegetative mass produced from any given crop.
The large family of plants characterized by pods. Some are edible and some cause LATHYRISM or FAVISM and other forms of poisoning. Other species yield useful materials like gums from ACACIA and various LECTINS like PHYTOHEMAGGLUTININS from PHASEOLUS. Many of them harbor NITROGEN FIXATION bacteria on their roots. Many but not all species of "beans" belong to this family.
Sugar-rich liquid produced in plant glands called nectaries. It is either produced in flowers or other plant structures, providing a source of attraction for pollinating insects and animals, as well as being a nutrient source to animal mutualists which provide protection of plants against herbivores.
Eighteen-carbon cyclopentyl polyunsaturated fatty acids derived from ALPHA-LINOLENIC ACID via an oxidative pathway analogous to the EICOSANOIDS in animals. Biosynthesis is inhibited by SALICYLATES. A key member, jasmonic acid of PLANTS, plays a similar role to ARACHIDONIC ACID in animals.
The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.
The outer layer of the woody parts of plants.
The relationship between two different species of organisms that are interdependent; each gains benefits from the other or a relationship between different species where both of the organisms in question benefit from the presence of the other.
The synthesis by organisms of organic chemical compounds, especially carbohydrates, from carbon dioxide using energy obtained from light rather than from the oxidation of chemical compounds. Photosynthesis comprises two separate processes: the light reactions and the dark reactions. In higher plants; GREEN ALGAE; and CYANOBACTERIA; NADPH and ATP formed by the light reactions drive the dark reactions which result in the fixation of carbon dioxide. (from Oxford Dictionary of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 2001)
Physiological functions characteristic of plants.
A group of alicyclic hydrocarbons with the general formula R-C5H9.
Acetic acid derivatives of the heterocyclic compound indole. (Merck Index, 11th ed)
A plant species of the genus SOLANUM, family SOLANACEAE. The starchy roots are used as food. SOLANINE is found in green parts.
The unconsolidated mineral or organic matter on the surface of the earth that serves as a natural medium for the growth of land plants.
Systems of medicine based on cultural beliefs and practices handed down from generation to generation. The concept includes mystical and magical rituals (SPIRITUAL THERAPIES); PHYTOTHERAPY; and other treatments which may not be explained by modern medicine.
Substances released by PLANTS such as PLANT GUMS and PLANT RESINS.
A functional system which includes the organisms of a natural community together with their environment. (McGraw Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
A compound obtained from the bark of the white willow and wintergreen leaves. It has bacteriostatic, fungicidal, and keratolytic actions.
Knobbed structures formed from and attached to plant roots, especially of LEGUMES, which result from symbiotic infection by nitrogen fixing bacteria such as RHIZOBIUM or FRANKIA. Root nodules are structures related to MYCORRHIZAE formed by symbiotic associations with fungi.
Protein or glycoprotein substances of plant origin that bind to sugar moieties in cell walls or membranes. Some carbohydrate-metabolizing proteins (ENZYMES) from PLANTS also bind to carbohydrates, however they are not considered lectins. Many plant lectins change the physiology of the membrane of BLOOD CELLS to cause agglutination, mitosis, or other biochemical changes. They may play a role in plant defense mechanisms.
The reproductive cells of plants.
Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.
Symbiotic combination (dual organism) of the MYCELIUM of FUNGI with the roots of plants (PLANT ROOTS). The roots of almost all higher plants exhibit this mutually beneficial relationship, whereby the fungus supplies water and mineral salts to the plant, and the plant supplies CARBOHYDRATES to the fungus. There are two major types of mycorrhizae: ectomycorrhizae and endomycorrhizae.
Use of plants or herbs to treat diseases or to alleviate pain.
A large family of narrow-leaved herbaceous grasses of the order Cyperales, subclass Commelinidae, class Liliopsida (monocotyledons). Food grains (EDIBLE GRAIN) come from members of this family. RHINITIS, ALLERGIC, SEASONAL can be induced by POLLEN of many of the grasses.
Plant cell inclusion bodies that contain the photosynthetic pigment CHLOROPHYLL, which is associated with the membrane of THYLAKOIDS. Chloroplasts occur in cells of leaves and young stems of plants. They are also found in some forms of PHYTOPLANKTON such as HAPTOPHYTA; DINOFLAGELLATES; DIATOMS; and CRYPTOPHYTA.
The failure of PLANTS to complete fertilization and obtain seed (SEEDS) as a result of defective POLLEN or ovules, or other aberrations. (Dict. of Plant Genet. and Mol. Biol., 1998)
The fertilizing element of plants that contains the male GAMETOPHYTES.
A plant genus of the family Cruciferae. It contains many species and cultivars used as food including cabbage, cauliflower, broccoli, Brussel sprouts, kale, collard greens, MUSTARD PLANT; (B. alba, B. junica, and B. nigra), turnips (BRASSICA NAPUS) and rapeseed (BRASSICA RAPA).
The initial stages of the growth of SEEDS into a SEEDLINGS. The embryonic shoot (plumule) and embryonic PLANT ROOTS (radicle) emerge and grow upwards and downwards respectively. Food reserves for germination come from endosperm tissue within the seed and/or from the seed leaves (COTYLEDON). (Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990)
A large plant family of the order Asterales, subclass Asteridae, class Magnoliopsida. The family is also known as Compositae. Flower petals are joined near the base and stamens alternate with the corolla lobes. The common name of "daisy" refers to several genera of this family including Aster; CHRYSANTHEMUM; RUDBECKIA; TANACETUM.
The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.
Oils derived from plants or plant products.
The arrangement of two or more amino acid or base sequences from an organism or organisms in such a way as to align areas of the sequences sharing common properties. The degree of relatedness or homology between the sequences is predicted computationally or statistically based on weights assigned to the elements aligned between the sequences. This in turn can serve as a potential indicator of the genetic relatedness between the organisms.
Prolonged dry periods in natural climate cycle. They are slow-onset phenomena caused by rainfall deficit combined with other predisposing factors.
The study of the origin, structure, development, growth, function, genetics, and reproduction of plants.
A kingdom of eukaryotic, heterotrophic organisms that live parasitically as saprobes, including MUSHROOMS; YEASTS; smuts, molds, etc. They reproduce either sexually or asexually, and have life cycles that range from simple to complex. Filamentous fungi, commonly known as molds, refer to those that grow as multicellular colonies.
A variable annual leguminous vine (Pisum sativum) that is cultivated for its rounded smooth or wrinkled edible protein-rich seeds, the seed of the pea, and the immature pods with their included seeds. (From Webster's New Collegiate Dictionary, 1973)
The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.
A plant genus of the family POACEAE that is the source of EDIBLE GRAIN. A hybrid with rye (SECALE CEREALE) is called TRITICALE. The seed is ground into FLOUR and used to make BREAD, and is the source of WHEAT GERM AGGLUTININS.
Abscission-accelerating plant growth substance isolated from young cotton fruit, leaves of sycamore, birch, and other plants, and from potatoes, lemons, avocados, and other fruits.
A class of organic compounds known as STEROLS or STEROIDS derived from plants.
An element with the atomic symbol N, atomic number 7, and atomic weight [14.00643; 14.00728]. Nitrogen exists as a diatomic gas and makes up about 78% of the earth's atmosphere by volume. It is a constituent of proteins and nucleic acids and found in all living cells.
A plant genus of the family POACEAE. The EDIBLE GRAIN, barley, is widely used as food.
A species of gram-negative, fluorescent, phytopathogenic bacteria in the genus PSEUDOMONAS. It is differentiated into approximately 50 pathovars with different plant pathogenicities and host specificities.
A class of plants within the Bryophyta comprising the mosses, which are found in both damp (including freshwater) and drier situations. Mosses possess erect or prostrate leafless stems, which give rise to leafless stalks bearing capsules. Spores formed in the capsules are released and grow to produce new plants. (Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990). Many small plants bearing the name moss are in fact not mosses. The "moss" found on the north side of trees is actually a green alga (CHLOROPHYTA). Irish moss is really a red alga (RHODOPHYTA). Beard lichen (beard moss), Iceland moss, oak moss, and reindeer moss are actually LICHENS. Spanish moss is a common name for both LICHENS and an air plant (TILLANDSIA usneoides) of the pineapple family. Club moss is an evergreen herb of the family LYCOPODIACEAE.
That portion of the electromagnetic spectrum in the visible, ultraviolet, and infrared range.
The capacity of an organism to defend itself against pathological processes or the agents of those processes. This most often involves innate immunity whereby the organism responds to pathogens in a generic way. The term disease resistance is used most frequently when referring to plants.
The protoplasm and plasma membrane of plant, fungal, bacterial or archaeon cells without the CELL WALL.
The process of cumulative change at the level of DNA; RNA; and PROTEINS, over successive generations.
Porphyrin derivatives containing magnesium that act to convert light energy in photosynthetic organisms.
A group of plant cells that are capable of dividing infinitely and whose main function is the production of new growth at the growing tip of a root or stem. (From Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990)
An annual legume. The SEEDS of this plant are edible and used to produce a variety of SOY FOODS.
A species of gram-negative, aerobic bacteria isolated from soil and the stems, leafs, and roots of plants. Some biotypes are pathogenic and cause the formation of PLANT TUMORS in a wide variety of higher plants. The species is a major research tool in biotechnology.
Self-replicating cytoplasmic organelles of plant and algal cells that contain pigments and may synthesize and accumulate various substances. PLASTID GENOMES are used in phylogenetic studies.
A family (Aphididae) of small insects, in the suborder Sternorrhyncha, that suck the juices of plants. Important genera include Schizaphis and Myzus. The latter is known to carry more than 100 virus diseases between plants.
A genus of gram-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped bacteria that activate PLANT ROOT NODULATION in leguminous plants. Members of this genus are nitrogen-fixing and common soil inhabitants.
Woody, usually tall, perennial higher plants (Angiosperms, Gymnosperms, and some Pterophyta) having usually a main stem and numerous branches.
Change brought about to an organisms genetic composition by unidirectional transfer (TRANSFECTION; TRANSDUCTION, GENETIC; CONJUGATION, GENETIC, etc.) and incorporation of foreign DNA into prokaryotic or eukaryotic cells by recombination of part or all of that DNA into the cell's genome.
Organic compounds that have a relatively high VAPOR PRESSURE at room temperature.
A creeping annual plant species of the CUCURBITACEAE family. It has a rough succulent, trailing stem and hairy leaves with three to five pointed lobes.
Plant hormones that promote the separation of daughter cells after mitotic division of a parent cell. Frequently they are purine derivatives.
A technique for growing plants in culture solutions rather than in soil. The roots are immersed in an aerated solution containing the correct proportions of essential mineral salts. (From Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990)
Any of several BRASSICA species that are commonly called mustard. Brassica alba is white mustard, B. juncea is brown or Chinese mustard, and B. nigra is black, brown, or red mustard. The plant is grown both for mustard seed from which oil is extracted or used as SPICES, and for its greens used as VEGETABLES or ANIMAL FEED. There is no relationship to MUSTARD COMPOUNDS.
The unfavorable effect of environmental factors (stressors) on the physiological functions of an organism. Prolonged unresolved physiological stress can affect HOMEOSTASIS of the organism, and may lead to damaging or pathological conditions.
A large order of insects characterized by having the mouth parts adapted to piercing or sucking. It is comprised of four suborders: HETEROPTERA, Auchenorrhyncha, Sternorrhyncha, and Coleorrhyncha.
A clear, odorless, tasteless liquid that is essential for most animal and plant life and is an excellent solvent for many substances. The chemical formula is hydrogen oxide (H2O). (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
An endosymbiont that is either a bacterium or fungus living part of its life in a plant. Endophytes can benefit host plants by preventing pathogenic organisms from colonizing them.
The variety of all native living organisms and their various forms and interrelationships.
A plant family of the order Solanales, subclass Asteridae. Among the most important are POTATOES; TOMATOES; CAPSICUM (green and red peppers); TOBACCO; and BELLADONNA.
The non-genetic biological changes of an organism in response to challenges in its ENVIRONMENT.
Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.
A set of genes descended by duplication and variation from some ancestral gene. Such genes may be clustered together on the same chromosome or dispersed on different chromosomes. Examples of multigene families include those that encode the hemoglobins, immunoglobulins, histocompatibility antigens, actins, tubulins, keratins, collagens, heat shock proteins, salivary glue proteins, chorion proteins, cuticle proteins, yolk proteins, and phaseolins, as well as histones, ribosomal RNA, and transfer RNA genes. The latter three are examples of reiterated genes, where hundreds of identical genes are present in a tandem array. (King & Stanfield, A Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)
A division of the plant kingdom. Bryophyta contains the subdivision, Musci, which contains the classes: Andreaeopsida, BRYOPSIDA, and SPHAGNOPSIDA.
Seedless nonflowering plants of the class Filicinae. They reproduce by spores that appear as dots on the underside of feathery fronds. In earlier classifications the Pteridophyta included the club mosses, horsetails, ferns, and various fossil groups. In more recent classifications, pteridophytes and spermatophytes (seed-bearing plants) are classified in the Subkingdom Tracheobionta (also known as Tracheophyta).
The physical distribution of plants in various forms and stages of development through time and space.
A phylum of fungi which have cross-walls or septa in the mycelium. The perfect state is characterized by the formation of a saclike cell (ascus) containing ascospores. Most pathogenic fungi with a known perfect state belong to this phylum.
Single-stranded complementary DNA synthesized from an RNA template by the action of RNA-dependent DNA polymerase. cDNA (i.e., complementary DNA, not circular DNA, not C-DNA) is used in a variety of molecular cloning experiments as well as serving as a specific hybridization probe.
Plant tissue that carries water up the root and stem. Xylem cell walls derive most of their strength from LIGNIN. The vessels are similar to PHLOEM sieve tubes but lack companion cells and do not have perforated sides and pores.
A class of plant growth hormone isolated from cultures of Gibberella fujikuroi, a fungus causing Bakanae disease in rice. There are many different members of the family as well as mixtures of multiple members; all are diterpenoid acids based on the gibberellane skeleton.
A plant species of the family FABACEAE widely cultivated for ANIMAL FEED.
Gymnosperms are a group of vascular plants whose seeds are not enclosed by a ripened ovary (fruit), in contrast to ANGIOSPERMS whose seeds are surrounded by an ovary wall. The seeds of many gymnosperms (literally, "naked seed") are borne in cones and are not visible. Taxonomists now recognize four distinct divisions of extant gymnospermous plants (CONIFEROPHYTA; CYCADOPHYTA; GINKGOPHYTA; and GNETOPHYTA).
Facilities that convert NUCLEAR ENERGY into electrical energy.
The fleshy or dry ripened ovary of a plant, enclosing the seed or seeds.
The outermost layer of a cell in most PLANTS; BACTERIA; FUNGI; and ALGAE. The cell wall is usually a rigid structure that lies external to the CELL MEMBRANE, and provides a protective barrier against physical or chemical agents.
A plant genus of the family Plantaginaceae. The small plants usually have a dense tuft of basal leaves and long, leafless stalks bearing a terminal spike of small flowers. The seeds, known as PSYLLIUM, swell in water and are used as laxatives. The leaves have been used medicinally.
A system of traditional medicine which is based on the beliefs and practices of the African peoples. It includes treatment by medicinal plants and other materia medica as well as by the ministrations of diviners, medicine men, witch doctors, and sorcerers.
A plant genus in the family LILIACEAE (sometimes placed in Asparagaceae) that contains ECDYSTEROIDS and is an ingredient of Siotone. The shoots are used as a vegetable and the roots are used in FOLK MEDICINE.
A part of the embryo in a seed plant. The number of cotyledons is an important feature in classifying plants. In seeds without an endosperm, they store food which is used in germination. In some plants, they emerge above the soil surface and become the first photosynthetic leaves. (From Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990)
The mint plant family. They are characteristically aromatic, and many of them are cultivated for their oils. Most have square stems, opposite leaves, and two-lipped, open-mouthed, tubular corollas (united petals), with five-lobed, bell-like calyxes (united sepals).
The study of the actions and properties of medicinal agents, often derived from PLANTS, indigenous to populations or ETHNIC GROUPS.
The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in the soil. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms.
A test used to determine whether or not complementation (compensation in the form of dominance) will occur in a cell with a given mutant phenotype when another mutant genome, encoding the same mutant phenotype, is introduced into that cell.
A plant genus of the family CUCURBITACEAE, order Violales, subclass Dilleniidae, which includes pumpkin, gourd and squash.
A genus herbs of the Asteraceae family. The SEEDS yield oil and are used as food and animal feed; the roots of Helianthus tuberosus (Jerusalem artichoke) are edible.
The region of the stem beneath the stalks of the seed leaves (cotyledons) and directly above the young root of the embryo plant. It grows rapidly in seedlings showing epigeal germination and lifts the cotyledons above the soil surface. In this region (the transition zone) the arrangement of vascular bundles in the root changes to that of the stem. (From Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990)
The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.
A genus of gram negative, aerobic, rod-shaped bacteria found in soil, plants, and marine mud.
A plant genus in the family FABACEAE which is the source of edible beans and the lectin PHYTOHEMAGGLUTININS.
A genus of PLANT VIRUSES, in the family CAULIMOVIRIDAE, that are transmitted by APHIDS in a semipersistent manner. Aphid-borne transmission of some caulimoviruses requires certain virus-coded proteins termed transmission factors.
A plant species of the family BRASSICACEAE best known for the edible roots.
A plant species of the family FABACEAE used to study GENETICS because it is DIPLOID, self fertile, has a small genome, and short generation time.
The relationship between an invertebrate and another organism (the host), one of which lives at the expense of the other. Traditionally excluded from definition of parasites are pathogenic BACTERIA; FUNGI; VIRUSES; and PLANTS; though they may live parasitically.
The interactions between a host and a pathogen, usually resulting in disease.
A nonmetallic element with atomic symbol C, atomic number 6, and atomic weight [12.0096; 12.0116]. It may occur as several different allotropes including DIAMOND; CHARCOAL; and GRAPHITE; and as SOOT from incompletely burned fuel.
A mitosporic Leotiales fungal genus of plant pathogens. It has teleomorphs in the genus Botryotina.
Higher plants that live primarily in terrestrial habitats, although some are secondarily aquatic. Most obtain their energy from PHOTOSYNTHESIS. They comprise the vascular and non-vascular plants.
Glucuronidase is an enzyme (specifically, a glycosidase) that catalyzes the hydrolysis of glucuronic acid from various substrates, playing crucial roles in metabolic processes like detoxification and biotransformation within organisms.
Any of the various plants of the genus Lactuca, especially L. sativa, cultivated for its edible leaves. (From American Heritage Dictionary, 2d ed)
Eukaryotes in the group STRAMENOPILES, formerly considered FUNGI, whose exact taxonomic level is unsettled. Many consider Oomycetes (Oomycota) a phylum in the kingdom Stramenopila, or alternatively, as Pseudofungi in the phylum Heterokonta of the kingdom Chromista. They are morphologically similar to fungi but have no close phylogenetic relationship to them. Oomycetes are found in both fresh and salt water as well as in terrestrial environments. (Alexopoulos et al., Introductory Mycology, 4th ed, pp683-4). They produce flagellated, actively motile spores (zoospores) that are pathogenic to many crop plants and FISHES.
Short sequences (generally about 10 base pairs) of DNA that are complementary to sequences of messenger RNA and allow reverse transcriptases to start copying the adjacent sequences of mRNA. Primers are used extensively in genetic and molecular biology techniques.
A family of sterols commonly found in plants and plant oils. Alpha-, beta-, and gamma-isomers have been characterized.
Adaptation to a new environment or to a change in the old.
A plant species of the family APIACEAE that is widely cultivated for the edible yellow-orange root. The plant has finely divided leaves and flat clusters of small white flowers.
The determination of the pattern of genes expressed at the level of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION, under specific circumstances or in a specific cell.
The spurge family of flowering plants, in the order Euphorbiales, contains some 7,500 species in 275 genera. The family consists of annual and perennial herbs and woody shrubs or trees.
The science, art or practice of cultivating soil, producing crops, and raising livestock.
Non-native organisms brought into a region, habitat, or ECOSYSTEM by human activity.
The total process by which organisms produce offspring. (Stedman, 25th ed)
The gourd plant family of the order Violales, subclass Dilleniidae, class Magnoliopsida. It is sometimes placed in its own order, Cucurbitales. 'Melon' generally refers to CUCUMIS; CITRULLUS; or MOMORDICA.
Genotypic differences observed among individuals in a population.
Plant proteins that mediate LIGHT SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION. They are involved in PHOTOTROPISM and other light adaption responses during plant growth and development . They include the phototropins, phytochromes (PHYTOCHROME), and members of the ubiquitous cryptochrome family.
A plant genus of the family LAMIACEAE best known for the thyme spice added to foods.
A mitosporic Hypocreales fungal genus, various species of which are important parasitic pathogens of plants and a variety of vertebrates. Teleomorphs include GIBBERELLA.
A group of FLAVONOIDS derived from FLAVONOLS, which lack the ketone oxygen at the 4-position. They are glycosylated versions of cyanidin, pelargonidin or delphinidin. The conjugated bonds result in blue, red, and purple colors in flowers of plants.
A plant genus of the family POACEAE. The grain is used for FOOD and for ANIMAL FEED. This should not be confused with KAFFIR LIME or with KEFIR milk product.
Pesticides used to destroy unwanted vegetation, especially various types of weeds, grasses (POACEAE), and woody plants. Some plants develop HERBICIDE RESISTANCE.
Cellular processes in biosynthesis (anabolism) and degradation (catabolism) of CARBOHYDRATES.
Proteins found in any species of bacterium.
A sequence of amino acids in a polypeptide or of nucleotides in DNA or RNA that is similar across multiple species. A known set of conserved sequences is represented by a CONSENSUS SEQUENCE. AMINO ACID MOTIFS are often composed of conserved sequences.
A plant family of the order Arales, subclass Arecidae, class Liliopsida (monocot). Many members contain OXALIC ACID and calcium oxalate (OXALATES).
The process in certain BACTERIA; FUNGI; and CYANOBACTERIA converting free atmospheric NITROGEN to biologically usable forms of nitrogen, such as AMMONIA; NITRATES; and amino compounds.
A plant genus of the family ROSACEAE known for the edible fruit.
A carboxy-lyase that plays a key role in photosynthetic carbon assimilation in the CALVIN-BENSON CYCLE by catalyzing the formation of 3-phosphoglycerate from ribulose 1,5-biphosphate and CARBON DIOXIDE. It can also utilize OXYGEN as a substrate to catalyze the synthesis of 2-phosphoglycolate and 3-phosphoglycerate in a process referred to as photorespiration.
Substituted thioglucosides. They are found in rapeseed (Brassica campestris) products and related cruciferae. They are metabolized to a variety of toxic products which are most likely the cause of hepatocytic necrosis in animals and humans.
The most abundant natural aromatic organic polymer found in all vascular plants. Lignin together with cellulose and hemicellulose are the major cell wall components of the fibers of all wood and grass species. Lignin is composed of coniferyl, p-coumaryl, and sinapyl alcohols in varying ratios in different plant species. (From Merck Index, 11th ed)
INSECTS of the order Coleoptera, containing over 350,000 species in 150 families. They possess hard bodies and their mouthparts are adapted for chewing.
The process of germ cell development in plants, from the primordial PLANT GERM CELLS to the mature haploid PLANT GAMETES.
Mutagenesis where the mutation is caused by the introduction of foreign DNA sequences into a gene or extragenic sequence. This may occur spontaneously in vivo or be experimentally induced in vivo or in vitro. Proviral DNA insertions into or adjacent to a cellular proto-oncogene can interrupt GENETIC TRANSLATION of the coding sequences or interfere with recognition of regulatory elements and cause unregulated expression of the proto-oncogene resulting in tumor formation.
Flammable, amorphous, vegetable products of secretion or disintegration, usually formed in special cavities of plants. They are generally insoluble in water and soluble in alcohol, carbon tetrachloride, ether, or volatile oils. They are fusible and have a conchoidal fracture. They are the oxidation or polymerization products of the terpenes, and are mixtures of aromatic acids and esters. Most are soft and sticky, but harden after exposure to cold. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed & Dorland, 28th ed)
A phylum of fungi that produce their sexual spores (basidiospores) on the outside of the basidium. It includes forms commonly known as mushrooms, boletes, puffballs, earthstars, stinkhorns, bird's-nest fungi, jelly fungi, bracket or shelf fungi, and rust and smut fungi.
Degree of saltiness, which is largely the OSMOLAR CONCENTRATION of SODIUM CHLORIDE plus any other SALTS present. It is an ecological factor of considerable importance, influencing the types of organisms that live in an ENVIRONMENT.
The absence of light.
Interruption or suppression of the expression of a gene at transcriptional or translational levels.
A ubiquitous sodium salt that is commonly used to season food.
High molecular weight polysaccharides present in the cell walls of all plants. Pectins cement cell walls together. They are used as emulsifiers and stabilizers in the food industry. They have been tried for a variety of therapeutic uses including as antidiarrheals, where they are now generally considered ineffective, and in the treatment of hypercholesterolemia.
Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.
One of the three domains of life (the others being Eukarya and ARCHAEA), also called Eubacteria. They are unicellular prokaryotic microorganisms which generally possess rigid cell walls, multiply by cell division, and exhibit three principal forms: round or coccal, rodlike or bacillary, and spiral or spirochetal. Bacteria can be classified by their response to OXYGEN: aerobic, anaerobic, or facultatively anaerobic; by the mode by which they obtain their energy: chemotrophy (via chemical reaction) or PHOTOTROPHY (via light reaction); for chemotrophs by their source of chemical energy: CHEMOLITHOTROPHY (from inorganic compounds) or chemoorganotrophy (from organic compounds); and by their source for CARBON; NITROGEN; etc.; HETEROTROPHY (from organic sources) or AUTOTROPHY (from CARBON DIOXIDE). They can also be classified by whether or not they stain (based on the structure of their CELL WALLS) with CRYSTAL VIOLET dye: gram-negative or gram-positive.
RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.
A plant species of the genus VICIA, family FABACEAE. The edible beans are well known but they cause FAVISM in some individuals with GLUCOSEPHOSPHATE DEHYDROGENASE DEFICIENCY. This plant contains vicine, convicine, Vicia lectins, unknown seed protein, AAP2 transport protein, and Vicia faba DNA-binding protein 1.
Large and highly vacuolated cells possessing many chloroplasts occuring in the interior cross-section of leaves, juxtaposed between the epidermal layers.
The external elements and conditions which surround, influence, and affect the life and development of an organism or population.
A blue-green biliprotein widely distributed in the plant kingdom.
A plant family of the order Selaginellales, class Lycopodiopsida, division Lycopodiophyta, subkingdom Tracheobionta. Members contain bilobetin. The rarely used common name of resurrection plant is mainly used with CRATEROSTIGMA.
Endogenous substances, usually proteins, which are effective in the initiation, stimulation, or termination of the genetic transcription process.
A monocot family within the order Liliales. This family is divided by some botanists into other families such as Convallariaceae, Hyacinthaceae and Amaryllidaceae. Amaryllidaceae, which have inferior ovaries, includes CRINUM; GALANTHUS; LYCORIS; and NARCISSUS and are known for AMARYLLIDACEAE ALKALOIDS.
Substances or mixtures that are added to the soil to supply nutrients or to make available nutrients already present in the soil, in order to increase plant growth and productivity.
The ability of organisms to sense and adapt to high concentrations of salt in their growth environment.
Partial cDNA (DNA, COMPLEMENTARY) sequences that are unique to the cDNAs from which they were derived.
Recombinant proteins produced by the GENETIC TRANSLATION of fused genes formed by the combination of NUCLEIC ACID REGULATORY SEQUENCES of one or more genes with the protein coding sequences of one or more genes.
Directed modification of the gene complement of a living organism by such techniques as altering the DNA, substituting genetic material by means of a virus, transplanting whole nuclei, transplanting cell hybrids, etc.

HUA1 and HUA2 are two members of the floral homeotic AGAMOUS pathway. (1/565)

The identities of the four floral organ types in an Arabidopsis flower are specified by the combinatorial activities of the floral homeotic A, B, and C function genes; AGAMOUS is the only known C function gene. We have identified two genes that interact with AG in the specification of floral structure, HUA1 and HUA2, from a screen for enhancers of a weak ag allele, ag-4. HUA1 and HUA2 are involved in all aspects of AG function. HUA2 encodes a novel protein that contains nuclear localization signals and signature motifs that suggest HUA2, like AG, may be a transcription factor. Molecular analyses suggest that HUA2 (and possibly HUA1) acts to facilitate AG action at the same hierarchical level as AG.  (+info)

Rac homologues and compartmentalized phosphatidylinositol 4, 5-bisphosphate act in a common pathway to regulate polar pollen tube growth. (2/565)

Pollen tube cells elongate based on actin- dependent targeted secretion at the tip. Rho family small GTPases have been implicated in the regulation of related processes in animal and yeast cells. We have functionally characterized Rac type Rho family proteins that are expressed in growing pollen tubes. Expression of dominant negative Rac inhibited pollen tube elongation, whereas expression of constitutive active Rac induced depolarized growth. Pollen tube Rac was found to accumulate at the tip plasma membrane and to physically associate with a phosphatidylinositol monophosphate kinase (PtdIns P-K) activity. Phosphatidylinositol 4, 5-bisphosphate (PtdIns 4, 5-P2), the product of PtdIns P-Ks, showed a similar intracellular localization as Rac. Expression of the pleckstrin homology (PH)-domain of phospholipase C (PLC)-delta1, which binds specifically to PtdIns 4, 5-P2, inhibited pollen tube elongation. These results indicate that Rac and PtdIns 4, 5-P2 act in a common pathway to control polar pollen tube growth and provide direct evidence for a function of PtdIns 4, 5-P2 compartmentalization in the regulation of this process.  (+info)

Phloem transport: Are you chaperoned? (3/565)

Long-distance transport via the vasculature in plants is critical for nutrient dissemination, as well as transport of growth regulatory molecules such as hormones. Evidence is now accumulating that protein and RNA molecules also use this transport pathway, possibly to regulate developmental and physiological processes.  (+info)

The Arabidopsis FILAMENTOUS FLOWER gene is required for flower formation. (4/565)

A screen for mutations affecting flower formation was carried out and several filamentous flower (fil) alleles were identified. In fil mutants, floral primordia occasionally give rise to pedicels lacking flowers at their ends. This defect is dramatically enhanced in fil rev double mutants, in which every floral primordium produces a flowerless pedicel. These data suggest that the FIL and REV genes are required for an early step of flower formation, possibly for the establishment of a flower-forming domain within the floral primordium. The FIL gene is also required for establishment of floral meristem identity and for flower development. During flower development, the FIL gene is required for floral organ formation in terms of the correct numbers and positions; correct spatial activity of the AGAMOUS, APETALA3, PISTILLATA and SUPERMAN genes; and floral organ development.  (+info)

Polyadenylation accelerates the degradation of the mitochondrial mRNA associated with cytoplasmic male sterility in sunflower. (5/565)

In sunflower, PET1-cytoplasmic male sterility is correlated with the presence of a novel mitochondrial gene (orf522) located 3' to the atpA gene. The dicistronic atpA-orf522 transcripts are preferentially destabilized in male florets of 'restored to fertility' plants as compared with sterile plants. In this report, we show that atpA-orf522 transcripts may be polyadenylated in vivo at their 3' termini and that a tissue-specific increase in the level of polyadenylated atpA-orf522 transcripts correlates with the tissue-specific instability of atpA-orf522 mRNAs in male florets of the restored hybrid plants. In addition, we have identified two distinct ribonuclease activities in sunflower mitochondria, one of which preferentially degrades polyadenylated as compared with non-polyadenylated RNA substrates corresponding to the 3' UTR of atpA-orf522 transcripts. These in vivo and in vitro results show that polyadenylation is involved in the degradation pathway of the mitochondrial atpA-orf522 transcripts and that polyadenylation can be developmentally regulated by a nuclear gene(s) upon restoration of fertility.  (+info)

Cloning and characterization of a novel Mg(2+)/H(+) exchanger. (6/565)

Cellular functions require adequate homeostasis of several divalent metal cations, including Mg(2+) and Zn(2+). Mg(2+), the most abundant free divalent cytoplasmic cation, is essential for many enzymatic reactions, while Zn(2+) is a structural constituent of various enzymes. Multicellular organisms have to balance not only the intake of Mg(2+) and Zn(2+), but also the distribution of these ions to various organs. To date, genes encoding Mg(2+) transport proteins have not been cloned from any multicellular organism. We report here the cloning and characterization of an Arabidopsis thaliana transporter, designated AtMHX, which is localized in the vacuolar membrane and functions as an electrogenic exchanger of protons with Mg(2+) and Zn(2+) ions. Functional homologs of AtMHX have not been cloned from any organism. Ectopic overexpression of AtMHX in transgenic tobacco plants render them sensitive to growth on media containing elevated levels of Mg(2+) or Zn(2+), but does not affect the total amounts of these minerals in shoots of the transgenic plants. AtMHX mRNA is mainly found at the vascular cylinder, and a large proportion of the mRNA is localized in close association with the xylem tracheary elements. This localization suggests that AtMHX may control the partitioning of Mg(2+) and Zn(2+) between the various plant organs.  (+info)

PLENA and FARINELLI: redundancy and regulatory interactions between two Antirrhinum MADS-box factors controlling flower development. (7/565)

We report the discovery of an Antirrhinum MADS-box gene, FARINELLI (FAR), and the isolation of far mutants by a reverse genetic screen. Despite striking similarities between FAR and the class C MADS-box gene PLENA (PLE), the phenotypes of their respective mutants are dramatically different. Unlike ple mutants, which show homeotic conversion of reproductive organs to perianth organs and a loss of floral determinacy, far mutants have normal flowers which are partially male-sterile. Expression studies of PLE and FAR, in wild-type and mutant backgrounds, show complex interactions between the two genes. Double mutant analysis reveals an unexpected, redundant negative control over the B-function MADS-box genes. This feature of the two Antirrhinum C-function-like genes is markedly different from the control of the inner boundary of the B-function expression domain in Arabidopsis, and we propose and discuss a model to account for these differences. The difference in phenotypes of mutants in two highly related genes illustrates the importance of the position within the regulatory network in determining gene function.  (+info)

Transcriptional activation of APETALA1 by LEAFY. (8/565)

Plants produce new appendages reiteratively from groups of stem cells called shoot apical meristems. LEAFY (LFY) and APETALA1 (AP1) are pivotal for the switch to the reproductive phase, where instead of leaves the shoot apical meristem produces flowers. Use of steroid-inducible activation of LFY demonstrated that early expression of AP1 is a result of transcriptional induction by LFY. This AP1 induction is independent of protein synthesis and occurs specifically in the tissues and at the developmental stage in which floral fate is assumed. Later expression of AP1 appears to be only indirectly affected by LFY.  (+info)

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Plant Structures" is not a medical term. It is a term used in the field of botany to refer to the different parts of a plant, such as roots, stems, leaves, flowers, and fruits. Each of these structures has specific functions that contribute to the overall growth, reproduction, and survival of the plant. If you have any questions related to biology or botany, I'd be happy to try and help answer them!

Appetitive behavior is a term used in the field of psychology and neuroscience to refer to actions or behaviors that are performed in order to obtain a reward or positive reinforcement. These behaviors are often driven by basic biological needs, such as hunger, thirst, or the need for social interaction. They can also be influenced by learned associations and past experiences.

In the context of medical terminology, appetitive behavior may be used to describe a patient's level of interest in food or their desire to eat. For example, a patient with a good appetite may have a strong desire to eat and may seek out food regularly, while a patient with a poor appetite may have little interest in food and may need to be encouraged to eat.

Appetitive behavior is regulated by a complex interplay of hormonal, neural, and psychological factors. Disruptions in these systems can lead to changes in appetitive behavior, such as increased or decreased hunger and eating. Appetitive behavior is an important area of study in the field of obesity research, as it is thought that understanding the underlying mechanisms that drive appetitive behavior may help to develop more effective treatments for weight management.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Lepidoptera" is not a medical term. It is a taxonomic order that includes moths and butterflies, which are insects known for their distinctive wing scales. This term is used in the field of biology, not medicine.

I apologize for any confusion, but "plants" is not a term that has a medical definition. The term "plants" refers to a large and diverse group of organisms that obtain their energy through photosynthesis, which is the process of converting sunlight into chemical energy. Plants are typically characterized by having cells with cell walls containing cellulose, chloroplasts containing the pigment chlorophyll, and the ability to synthesize their own food through photosynthesis.

In a medical or biological context, you might be thinking of "plant-based" or "phytomedicine," which refer to the use of plants or plant extracts as a form of medicine or treatment. Phytomedicines have been used for thousands of years in many traditional systems of medicine, and some plant-derived compounds have been found to have therapeutic benefits in modern medicine as well. However, "plants" itself does not have a medical definition.

Genetically modified plants (GMPs) are plants that have had their DNA altered through genetic engineering techniques to exhibit desired traits. These modifications can be made to enhance certain characteristics such as increased resistance to pests, improved tolerance to environmental stresses like drought or salinity, or enhanced nutritional content. The process often involves introducing genes from other organisms, such as bacteria or viruses, into the plant's genome. Examples of GMPs include Bt cotton, which has a gene from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis that makes it resistant to certain pests, and golden rice, which is engineered to contain higher levels of beta-carotene, a precursor to vitamin A. It's important to note that genetically modified plants are subject to rigorous testing and regulation to ensure their safety for human consumption and environmental impact before they are approved for commercial use.

I believe there may be a slight misunderstanding in your question. "Plant leaves" are not a medical term, but rather a general biological term referring to a specific organ found in plants.

Leaves are organs that are typically flat and broad, and they are the primary site of photosynthesis in most plants. They are usually green due to the presence of chlorophyll, which is essential for capturing sunlight and converting it into chemical energy through photosynthesis.

While leaves do not have a direct medical definition, understanding their structure and function can be important in various medical fields, such as pharmacognosy (the study of medicinal plants) or environmental health. For example, certain plant leaves may contain bioactive compounds that have therapeutic potential, while others may produce allergens or toxins that can impact human health.

"Plant proteins" refer to the proteins that are derived from plant sources. These can include proteins from legumes such as beans, lentils, and peas, as well as proteins from grains like wheat, rice, and corn. Other sources of plant proteins include nuts, seeds, and vegetables.

Plant proteins are made up of individual amino acids, which are the building blocks of protein. While animal-based proteins typically contain all of the essential amino acids that the body needs to function properly, many plant-based proteins may be lacking in one or more of these essential amino acids. However, by consuming a variety of plant-based foods throughout the day, it is possible to get all of the essential amino acids that the body needs from plant sources alone.

Plant proteins are often lower in calories and saturated fat than animal proteins, making them a popular choice for those following a vegetarian or vegan diet, as well as those looking to maintain a healthy weight or reduce their risk of chronic diseases such as heart disease and cancer. Additionally, plant proteins have been shown to have a number of health benefits, including improving gut health, reducing inflammation, and supporting muscle growth and repair.

A plant root is not a medical term per se, but it is a term from botany, which is the study of plants. However, I can certainly provide a definition for you.

Plant roots are the underground organs of a plant that typically grow downward into the soil. They serve several important functions, including:

1. Anchorage: Roots help to stabilize the plant and keep it upright in the ground.
2. Absorption: Roots absorb water and nutrients from the soil, which are essential for the plant's growth and development.
3. Conduction: Roots conduct water and nutrients up to the above-ground parts of the plant, such as the stem and leaves.
4. Vegetative reproduction: Some plants can reproduce vegetatively through their roots, producing new plants from root fragments or specialized structures called rhizomes or tubers.

Roots are composed of several different tissues, including the epidermis, cortex, endodermis, and vascular tissue. The epidermis is the outermost layer of the root, which secretes a waxy substance called suberin that helps to prevent water loss. The cortex is the middle layer of the root, which contains cells that store carbohydrates and other nutrients. The endodermis is a thin layer of cells that surrounds the vascular tissue and regulates the movement of water and solutes into and out of the root. The vascular tissue consists of xylem and phloem, which transport water and nutrients throughout the plant.

A gene in plants, like in other organisms, is a hereditary unit that carries genetic information from one generation to the next. It is a segment of DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) that contains the instructions for the development and function of an organism. Genes in plants determine various traits such as flower color, plant height, resistance to diseases, and many others. They are responsible for encoding proteins and RNA molecules that play crucial roles in the growth, development, and reproduction of plants. Plant genes can be manipulated through traditional breeding methods or genetic engineering techniques to improve crop yield, enhance disease resistance, and increase nutritional value.

A plant extract is a preparation containing chemical constituents that have been extracted from a plant using a solvent. The resulting extract may contain a single compound or a mixture of several compounds, depending on the extraction process and the specific plant material used. These extracts are often used in various industries including pharmaceuticals, nutraceuticals, cosmetics, and food and beverage, due to their potential therapeutic or beneficial properties. The composition of plant extracts can vary widely, and it is important to ensure their quality, safety, and efficacy before use in any application.

A medical definition for "plant shoots" may not be readily available, as the term is primarily used in botany and horticulture. However, I can provide you with a general definition:

Plant shoots refer to the above-ground portion of a plant, which typically includes structures like stems, leaves, flowers, and buds. Shoots originate from the seed or the growing tip of the plant and are responsible for photosynthesis, nutrient absorption, and reproduction. In some contexts, "plant shoots" might also refer to new growth that emerges from an existing plant, such as when a leaf or stem sprouts a new branch or flower.

Medicinal plants are defined as those plants that contain naturally occurring chemical compounds which can be used for therapeutic purposes, either directly or indirectly. These plants have been used for centuries in various traditional systems of medicine, such as Ayurveda, Chinese medicine, and Native American medicine, to prevent or treat various health conditions.

Medicinal plants contain a wide variety of bioactive compounds, including alkaloids, flavonoids, tannins, terpenes, and saponins, among others. These compounds have been found to possess various pharmacological properties, such as anti-inflammatory, analgesic, antimicrobial, antioxidant, and anticancer activities.

Medicinal plants can be used in various forms, including whole plant material, extracts, essential oils, and isolated compounds. They can be administered through different routes, such as oral, topical, or respiratory, depending on the desired therapeutic effect.

It is important to note that while medicinal plants have been used safely and effectively for centuries, they should be used with caution and under the guidance of a healthcare professional. Some medicinal plants can interact with prescription medications or have adverse effects if used inappropriately.

DNA, or deoxyribonucleic acid, is the genetic material present in the cells of all living organisms, including plants. In plants, DNA is located in the nucleus of a cell, as well as in chloroplasts and mitochondria. Plant DNA contains the instructions for the development, growth, and function of the plant, and is passed down from one generation to the next through the process of reproduction.

The structure of DNA is a double helix, formed by two strands of nucleotides that are linked together by hydrogen bonds. Each nucleotide contains a sugar molecule (deoxyribose), a phosphate group, and a nitrogenous base. There are four types of nitrogenous bases in DNA: adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), and thymine (T). Adenine pairs with thymine, and guanine pairs with cytosine, forming the rungs of the ladder that make up the double helix.

The genetic information in DNA is encoded in the sequence of these nitrogenous bases. Large sequences of bases form genes, which provide the instructions for the production of proteins. The process of gene expression involves transcribing the DNA sequence into a complementary RNA molecule, which is then translated into a protein.

Plant DNA is similar to animal DNA in many ways, but there are also some differences. For example, plant DNA contains a higher proportion of repetitive sequences and transposable elements, which are mobile genetic elements that can move around the genome and cause mutations. Additionally, plant cells have cell walls and chloroplasts, which are not present in animal cells, and these structures contain their own DNA.

'Plant development' is not a term typically used in medical definitions, as it is more commonly used in the field of botany to describe the growth and differentiation of plant cells, tissues, and organs over time. However, in a broader context, plant development can be defined as the series of changes and processes that occur from the fertilization of a plant seed to the formation of a mature plant, including germination, emergence, organ formation, growth, and reproduction.

In medicine, terms related to plant development may include "phytotherapy" or "herbal medicine," which refer to the use of plants or plant extracts as medicinal treatments for various health conditions. The study of how these plants develop and produce their active compounds is an important area of research in pharmacology and natural products chemistry.

'Toxic plants' refer to those species of plants that contain toxic substances capable of causing harmful effects or adverse health reactions in humans and animals when ingested, touched, or inhaled. These toxins can cause a range of symptoms from mild irritation to serious conditions such as organ failure, paralysis, or even death depending on the plant, the amount consumed, and the individual's sensitivity to the toxin.

Toxic plants may contain various types of toxins, including alkaloids, glycosides, proteins, resinous substances, and essential oils. Some common examples of toxic plants include poison ivy, poison oak, nightshade, hemlock, oleander, castor bean, and foxglove. It is important to note that some parts of a plant may be toxic while others are not, and the toxicity can also vary depending on the stage of growth or environmental conditions.

If you suspect exposure to a toxic plant, it is essential to seek medical attention immediately and, if possible, bring a sample of the plant for identification.

A plant cell is defined as a type of eukaryotic cell that makes up the structural basis of plants and other forms of multicellular plant-like organisms, such as algae and mosses. These cells are typically characterized by their rigid cell walls, which provide support and protection, and their large vacuoles, which store nutrients and help maintain turgor pressure within the cell.

Plant cells also contain chloroplasts, organelles that carry out photosynthesis and give plants their green color. Other distinctive features of plant cells include a large central vacuole, a complex system of membranes called the endoplasmic reticulum, and numerous mitochondria, which provide energy to the cell through cellular respiration.

Plant cells are genetically distinct from animal cells, and they have unique structures and functions that allow them to carry out photosynthesis, grow and divide, and respond to their environment. Understanding the structure and function of plant cells is essential for understanding how plants grow, develop, and interact with their surroundings.

A plant stem is not typically defined in a medical context, but rather in the field of botany. However, I can certainly provide a general biological definition for you.

In plants, stems are organs that serve primarily as support structures, holding leaves, flowers, and fruits aloft where they can receive sunlight and exchange gases. They also act as conduits, transporting water, nutrients, and sugars made during photosynthesis between the roots and shoots of a plant.

The stem is usually composed of three main tissue systems: dermal, vascular, and ground. The dermal tissue system forms the outermost layer(s) of the stem, providing protection and sometimes participating in gas exchange. The vascular tissue system contains the xylem (which transports water and nutrients upward) and phloem (which transports sugars and other organic compounds downward). The ground tissue system, located between the dermal and vascular tissues, is responsible for food storage and support.

While not a direct medical definition, understanding the structure and function of plant stems can be relevant in fields such as nutrition, agriculture, and environmental science, which have implications for human health.

A plant genome refers to the complete set of genetic material or DNA present in the cells of a plant. It contains all the hereditary information necessary for the development and functioning of the plant, including its structural and functional characteristics. The plant genome includes both coding regions that contain instructions for producing proteins and non-coding regions that have various regulatory functions.

The plant genome is composed of several types of DNA molecules, including chromosomes, which are located in the nucleus of the cell. Each chromosome contains one or more genes, which are segments of DNA that code for specific proteins or RNA molecules. Plants typically have multiple sets of chromosomes, with each set containing a complete copy of the genome.

The study of plant genomes is an active area of research in modern biology, with important applications in areas such as crop improvement, evolutionary biology, and medical research. Advances in DNA sequencing technologies have made it possible to determine the complete sequences of many plant genomes, providing valuable insights into their structure, function, and evolution.

'Arabidopsis' is a genus of small flowering plants that are part of the mustard family (Brassicaceae). The most commonly studied species within this genus is 'Arabidopsis thaliana', which is often used as a model organism in plant biology and genetics research. This plant is native to Eurasia and Africa, and it has a small genome that has been fully sequenced. It is known for its short life cycle, self-fertilization, and ease of growth, making it an ideal subject for studying various aspects of plant biology, including development, metabolism, and response to environmental stresses.

Edible plants are those that can be safely consumed by humans and other animals as a source of nutrition. They have various parts (such as fruits, vegetables, seeds, roots, stems, and leaves) that can be used for food after being harvested and prepared properly. Some edible plants have been cultivated and domesticated for agricultural purposes, while others are gathered from the wild. It is important to note that not all plants are safe to eat, and some may even be toxic or deadly if consumed. Proper identification and knowledge of preparation methods are crucial before consuming any plant material.

Plant growth regulators (PGRs) are natural or synthetic chemical substances that, when present in low concentrations, can influence various physiological and biochemical processes in plants. These processes include cell division, elongation, and differentiation; flowering and fruiting; leaf senescence; and stress responses. PGRs can be classified into several categories based on their mode of action and chemical structure, including auxins, gibberellins, cytokinins, abscisic acid, ethylene, and others. They are widely used in agriculture to improve crop yield and quality, regulate plant growth and development, and enhance stress tolerance.

Arabidopsis proteins refer to the proteins that are encoded by the genes in the Arabidopsis thaliana plant, which is a model organism commonly used in plant biology research. This small flowering plant has a compact genome and a short life cycle, making it an ideal subject for studying various biological processes in plants.

Arabidopsis proteins play crucial roles in many cellular functions, such as metabolism, signaling, regulation of gene expression, response to environmental stresses, and developmental processes. Research on Arabidopsis proteins has contributed significantly to our understanding of plant biology and has provided valuable insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying various agronomic traits.

Some examples of Arabidopsis proteins include transcription factors, kinases, phosphatases, receptors, enzymes, and structural proteins. These proteins can be studied using a variety of techniques, such as biochemical assays, protein-protein interaction studies, and genetic approaches, to understand their functions and regulatory mechanisms in plants.

"Plant immunity" refers to the complex defense mechanisms that plants have evolved to protect themselves from pathogens, such as bacteria, viruses, fungi, and nematodes. Plants do not have an adaptive immune system like humans, so they rely on their innate immune responses to detect and respond to pathogen invasion.

Plant immunity can be broadly categorized into two types: PTI (PAMP-triggered immunity) and ETI (Effector-triggered immunity). PTI is activated when the plant recognizes conserved microbial patterns, known as PAMPs (Pathogen-Associated Molecular Patterns), through pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) located on the cell surface. This recognition triggers a series of defense responses, such as the production of reactive oxygen species, the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), and the expression of defense genes.

ETI is activated when the plant recognizes effector proteins produced by pathogens to suppress PTI. Effector recognition typically occurs through resistance (R) proteins that can directly or indirectly recognize effectors, leading to the activation of stronger defense responses, such as the hypersensitive response (HR), which involves localized programmed cell death to limit pathogen spread.

Overall, plant immunity is a complex and dynamic process involving multiple layers of defense mechanisms that help plants protect themselves from pathogens and maintain their health and productivity.

Tobacco is not a medical term, but it refers to the leaves of the plant Nicotiana tabacum that are dried and fermented before being used in a variety of ways. Medically speaking, tobacco is often referred to in the context of its health effects. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), "tobacco" can also refer to any product prepared from the leaf of the tobacco plant for smoking, sucking, chewing or snuffing.

Tobacco use is a major risk factor for a number of diseases, including cancer, heart disease, stroke, lung disease, and various other medical conditions. The smoke produced by burning tobacco contains thousands of chemicals, many of which are toxic and can cause serious health problems. Nicotine, one of the primary active constituents in tobacco, is highly addictive and can lead to dependence.

I apologize for the confusion, but "Plant Epidermis" is not a medical term. Instead, it is a term used in botany to describe the outermost layer of cells in plant tissues. The epidermis serves as a protective barrier for the plant, regulating gas exchange and water loss through stomata, and producing cutin, a waxy substance that helps prevent water loss.

In summary, "Plant Epidermis" is a term related to plant biology and not medicine.

Stomata are microscopic pores found in the epidermis of plant leaves, stems, and other organs. They are essential for gas exchange between the plant and the atmosphere, allowing the uptake of carbon dioxide for photosynthesis and the release of oxygen. Plant stomata consist of two guard cells that surround and regulate the size of the pore. The opening and closing of the stomatal pore are influenced by environmental factors such as light, humidity, and temperature, as well as internal signals within the plant.

Angiosperms, also known as flowering plants, are a group of plants that produce seeds enclosed within an ovary. The term "angiosperm" comes from the Greek words "angeion," meaning "case" or "capsule," and "sperma," meaning "seed." This group includes the majority of plant species, with over 300,000 known species.

Angiosperms are characterized by their reproductive structures, which consist of flowers. The flower contains male and female reproductive organs, including stamens (which produce pollen) and carpels (which contain the ovules). After fertilization, the ovule develops into a seed, while the ovary matures into a fruit, which provides protection and nutrition for the developing embryo.

Angiosperms are further divided into two main groups: monocots and eudicots. Monocots have one cotyledon or embryonic leaf, while eudicots have two. Examples of monocots include grasses, lilies, and orchids, while examples of eudicots include roses, sunflowers, and legumes.

Angiosperms are ecologically and economically important, providing food, shelter, and other resources for many organisms, including humans. They have evolved a wide range of adaptations to different environments, from the desert to the ocean floor, making them one of the most diverse and successful groups of plants on Earth.

In medical terms, "seeds" are often referred to as a small amount of a substance, such as a radioactive material or drug, that is inserted into a tissue or placed inside a capsule for the purpose of treating a medical condition. This can include procedures like brachytherapy, where seeds containing radioactive materials are used in the treatment of cancer to kill cancer cells and shrink tumors. Similarly, in some forms of drug delivery, seeds containing medication can be used to gradually release the drug into the body over an extended period of time.

It's important to note that "seeds" have different meanings and applications depending on the medical context. In other cases, "seeds" may simply refer to small particles or structures found in the body, such as those present in the eye's retina.

Plant poisoning is a form of poisoning that occurs when someone ingests, inhales, or comes into contact with any part of a plant that contains toxic substances. These toxins can cause a range of symptoms, depending on the type and amount of plant consumed or exposed to, as well as the individual's age, health status, and sensitivity to the toxin.

Symptoms of plant poisoning may include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, difficulty breathing, skin rashes, seizures, or in severe cases, even death. Some common plants that can cause poisoning include poison ivy, poison oak, foxglove, oleander, and hemlock, among many others.

If you suspect plant poisoning, it is important to seek medical attention immediately and bring a sample of the plant or information about its identity if possible. This will help healthcare providers diagnose and treat the poisoning more effectively.

Plant transpiration is the process by which water vapor escapes from leaves and other aerial parts of plants to the atmosphere. It is a type of evapotranspiration, which refers to both evaporation from land surfaces and transpiration from plants. Water molecules are absorbed by plant roots from the soil, move up through the xylem tissue to the leaves, and then evaporate from the leaf surface through stomatal pores. This process helps in the transportation of nutrients from the soil to various parts of the plant, regulates the temperature of the plant, and maintains the turgor pressure within the cells. Plant transpiration is influenced by environmental factors such as light intensity, temperature, humidity, and wind speed.

Phylogeny is the evolutionary history and relationship among biological entities, such as species or genes, based on their shared characteristics. In other words, it refers to the branching pattern of evolution that shows how various organisms have descended from a common ancestor over time. Phylogenetic analysis involves constructing a tree-like diagram called a phylogenetic tree, which depicts the inferred evolutionary relationships among organisms or genes based on molecular sequence data or other types of characters. This information is crucial for understanding the diversity and distribution of life on Earth, as well as for studying the emergence and spread of diseases.

"Lycopersicon esculentum" is the scientific name for the common red tomato. It is a species of fruit from the nightshade family (Solanaceae) that is native to western South America and Central America. Tomatoes are widely grown and consumed in many parts of the world as a vegetable, although they are technically a fruit. They are rich in nutrients such as vitamin C, potassium, and lycopene, which has been studied for its potential health benefits.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "flowers" is not a term that has a medical definition. The term "flowers" is commonly used to refer to the reproductive structures of flowering plants (angiosperms), which are characterized by having both male and female reproductive organs or separate male and female flowers.

If you have any questions related to medical terminology or health conditions, I would be happy to try to help answer those for you!

A plant tumor, also known as a gall or neoplasm, is an abnormal growth that occurs in plants. These growths can be caused by various factors such as genetic mutations, bacterial or viral infections, and physical injuries. However, the most well-known cause of plant tumors are crown galls, which are induced by the bacterium Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

When this bacterium infects a plant through a wound, it transfers a portion of its DNA (T-DNA) into the plant's cells. The T-DNA contains genes that encode enzymes responsible for the production of auxins and cytokinins, two types of plant hormones that promote cell division and growth. As a result, the infected plant cells start to divide uncontrollably, leading to the formation of a tumor-like growth.

Plant tumors can vary in size and appearance, ranging from small bumps to large, disfigured growths. While they are not typically harmful to the plant, they can reduce its aesthetic value and economic productivity. In some cases, plant tumors may also provide a habitat for pests and diseases, which can further harm the plant.

Chromosomes in plants are thread-like structures that contain genetic material, DNA, and proteins. They are present in the nucleus of every cell and are inherited from the parent plants during sexual reproduction. Chromosomes come in pairs, with each pair consisting of one chromosome from each parent.

In plants, like in other organisms, chromosomes play a crucial role in inheritance, development, and reproduction. They carry genetic information that determines various traits and characteristics of the plant, such as its physical appearance, growth patterns, and resistance to diseases.

Plant chromosomes are typically much larger than those found in animals, making them easier to study under a microscope. The number of chromosomes varies among different plant species, ranging from as few as 2 in some ferns to over 1000 in certain varieties of wheat.

During cell division, the chromosomes replicate and then separate into two identical sets, ensuring that each new cell receives a complete set of genetic information. This process is critical for the growth and development of the plant, as well as for the production of viable seeds and offspring.

Aerial parts of plants refer to the above-ground portions of a plant, including leaves, stems, flowers, and fruits. These parts are often used in medicine, either in their entirety or as isolated extracts, to take advantage of their medicinal properties. The specific components of aerial parts that are used in medicine can vary depending on the plant species and the desired therapeutic effects. For example, the leaves of some plants may contain active compounds that have anti-inflammatory or analgesic properties, while the flowers of others may be rich in antioxidants or compounds with sedative effects. In general, aerial parts of plants are used in herbal medicine to treat a wide range of conditions, including respiratory, digestive, and nervous system disorders, as well as skin conditions and infections.

An amino acid sequence is the specific order of amino acids in a protein or peptide molecule, formed by the linking of the amino group (-NH2) of one amino acid to the carboxyl group (-COOH) of another amino acid through a peptide bond. The sequence is determined by the genetic code and is unique to each type of protein or peptide. It plays a crucial role in determining the three-dimensional structure and function of proteins.

"Plant preparations" is not a term with a specific medical definition in the field of medicine or pharmacology. However, it is commonly used to refer to various forms of plant material that have been prepared for medicinal use. This can include dried and powdered plant parts, such as leaves, roots, or flowers, as well as extracts or concentrates made from plants. These preparations may be used in traditional medicine or as the basis for modern pharmaceuticals. It is important to note that the safety, effectiveness, and quality of plant preparations can vary widely, and they should only be used under the guidance of a qualified healthcare provider.

'Zea mays' is the biological name for corn or maize, which is not typically considered a medical term. However, corn or maize can have medical relevance in certain contexts. For example, cornstarch is sometimes used as a diluent for medications and is also a component of some skin products. Corn oil may be found in topical ointments and creams. In addition, some people may have allergic reactions to corn or corn-derived products. But generally speaking, 'Zea mays' itself does not have a specific medical definition.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "seedling" is not a term that has a specific medical definition. It is an agricultural and horticultural term that refers to a young plant grown from a seed, typically during the early stages of its growth. If you have any questions related to health or medicine, I'd be happy to try to help with those!

Herbivory is not a medical term, but rather a term used in biology and ecology. It refers to the practice of consuming plants or plant matter for food. Herbivores are animals that eat only plants, and their diet can include leaves, stems, roots, flowers, fruits, seeds, and other parts of plants.

While herbivory is not a medical term, it is still relevant to the field of medicine in certain contexts. For example, understanding the diets and behaviors of herbivores can help inform public health initiatives related to food safety and disease transmission. Additionally, research on herbivory has contributed to our understanding of the evolution of plant-animal interactions and the development of ecosystems.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "power plants" is not a term used in medical definitions. It is a term commonly used to refer to industrial facilities that generate and distribute power, typically in the form of electricity. If you have any questions related to medicine or health, I would be happy to try to help answer those!

Biomass is defined in the medical field as a renewable energy source derived from organic materials, primarily plant matter, that can be burned or converted into fuel. This includes materials such as wood, agricultural waste, and even methane gas produced by landfills. Biomass is often used as a source of heat, electricity, or transportation fuels, and its use can help reduce greenhouse gas emissions and dependence on fossil fuels.

In the context of human health, biomass burning can have both positive and negative impacts. On one hand, biomass can provide a source of heat and energy for cooking and heating, which can improve living standards and reduce exposure to harmful pollutants from traditional cooking methods such as open fires. On the other hand, biomass burning can also produce air pollution, including particulate matter and toxic chemicals, that can have negative effects on respiratory health and contribute to climate change.

Therefore, while biomass has the potential to be a sustainable and low-carbon source of energy, it is important to consider the potential health and environmental impacts of its use and implement appropriate measures to minimize any negative effects.

Fabaceae is the scientific name for a family of flowering plants commonly known as the legume, pea, or bean family. This family includes a wide variety of plants that are important economically, agriculturally, and ecologically. Many members of Fabaceae have compound leaves and produce fruits that are legumes, which are long, thin pods that contain seeds. Some well-known examples of plants in this family include beans, peas, lentils, peanuts, clover, and alfalfa.

In addition to their importance as food crops, many Fabaceae species have the ability to fix nitrogen from the atmosphere into the soil through a symbiotic relationship with bacteria that live in nodules on their roots. This makes them valuable for improving soil fertility and is one reason why they are often used in crop rotation and as cover crops.

It's worth noting that Fabaceae is sometimes still referred to by its older scientific name, Leguminosae.

I apologize for any confusion, but "Plant Nectar" is not a term used in medical definitions. Nectar is a sweet liquid produced by plants in flowers to attract pollinators such as insects and birds. It's a sugar-rich substance that serves as a source of energy for these animals. While it may have some nutritional value, it's not something that would be relevant to medical definitions or human health in a direct sense.

Oxylipins are a class of bioactive lipid molecules derived from the oxygenation of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). They play crucial roles in various physiological and pathophysiological processes, including inflammation, immunity, and cellular signaling. Oxylipins can be further categorized based on their precursor PUFAs, such as arachidonic acid (AA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and linoleic acid (LA). These oxylipins are involved in the regulation of vascular tone, platelet aggregation, neurotransmission, and pain perception. They exert their effects through various receptors and downstream signaling pathways, making them important targets for therapeutic interventions in several diseases, such as cardiovascular disorders, cancer, and neurological conditions.

A base sequence in the context of molecular biology refers to the specific order of nucleotides in a DNA or RNA molecule. In DNA, these nucleotides are adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), and thymine (T). In RNA, uracil (U) takes the place of thymine. The base sequence contains genetic information that is transcribed into RNA and ultimately translated into proteins. It is the exact order of these bases that determines the genetic code and thus the function of the DNA or RNA molecule.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Plant Bark" is not a term with a specific medical definition. In general, the bark refers to the outermost covering of a tree or other plant, which serves as protection and provides a barrier against external threats. It is composed of layers including the inner bark (phloem), which transports nutrients throughout the plant, and the outer bark (periderm), which is made up of dead cells that form a protective layer.

While some plants or plant parts do have medicinal properties and are used in various forms of traditional or alternative medicine, "Plant Bark" by itself does not have any specific medical connotations. If you're referring to a specific type of plant bark with potential medicinal uses, please provide more details so I can give a more accurate response.

In the context of medicine and biology, symbiosis is a type of close and long-term biological interaction between two different biological organisms. Generally, one organism, called the symbiont, lives inside or on another organism, called the host. This interaction can be mutually beneficial (mutualistic), harmful to the host organism (parasitic), or have no effect on either organism (commensal).

Examples of mutualistic symbiotic relationships in humans include the bacteria that live in our gut and help us digest food, as well as the algae that live inside corals and provide them with nutrients. Parasitic symbioses, on the other hand, involve organisms like viruses or parasitic worms that live inside a host and cause harm to it.

It's worth noting that while the term "symbiosis" is often used in popular culture to refer to any close relationship between two organisms, in scientific contexts it has a more specific meaning related to long-term biological interactions.

Photosynthesis is not strictly a medical term, but it is a fundamental biological process with significant implications for medicine, particularly in understanding energy production in cells and the role of oxygen in sustaining life. Here's a general biological definition:

Photosynthesis is a process by which plants, algae, and some bacteria convert light energy, usually from the sun, into chemical energy in the form of organic compounds, such as glucose (or sugar), using water and carbon dioxide. This process primarily takes place in the chloroplasts of plant cells, specifically in structures called thylakoids. The overall reaction can be summarized as:

6 CO2 + 6 H2O + light energy → C6H12O6 + 6 O2

In this equation, carbon dioxide (CO2) and water (H2O) are the reactants, while glucose (C6H12O6) and oxygen (O2) are the products. Photosynthesis has two main stages: the light-dependent reactions and the light-independent reactions (Calvin cycle). The light-dependent reactions occur in the thylakoid membrane and involve the conversion of light energy into ATP and NADPH, which are used to power the Calvin cycle. The Calvin cycle takes place in the stroma of chloroplasts and involves the synthesis of glucose from CO2 and water using the ATP and NADPH generated during the light-dependent reactions.

Understanding photosynthesis is crucial for understanding various biological processes, including cellular respiration, plant metabolism, and the global carbon cycle. Additionally, research into artificial photosynthesis has potential applications in renewable energy production and environmental remediation.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Plant Physiological Processes" is not a standard medical term. Instead, it falls under the domain of plant science or botany.

In a broad sense, plant physiological processes refer to the functions and mechanisms that occur within plants at the cellular and molecular levels, which enable them to grow, develop, reproduce, and respond to their environment. These processes include photosynthesis, respiration, nutrient uptake and translocation, hormone signaling, water relations, and various other biochemical reactions.

If you're looking for a term related to medical definitions, please provide more context or clarify your request, and I would be happy to help.

Cyclopentanes are a class of hydrocarbons that contain a cycloalkane ring of five carbon atoms. The chemical formula for cyclopentane is C5H10. It is a volatile, flammable liquid that is used as a solvent and in the production of polymers. Cyclopentanes are also found naturally in petroleum and coal tar.

Cyclopentanes have a unique structure in which the carbon atoms are arranged in a pentagonal shape, with each carbon atom bonded to two other carbon atoms and one or two hydrogen atoms. This structure gives cyclopentane its characteristic "bowl-shaped" geometry, which allows it to undergo various chemical reactions, such as ring-opening reactions, that can lead to the formation of other chemicals.

Cyclopentanes have a variety of industrial and commercial applications. For example, they are used in the production of plastics, resins, and synthetic rubbers. They also have potential uses in the development of new drugs and medical technologies, as their unique structure and reactivity make them useful building blocks for the synthesis of complex molecules.

Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) is not exactly a medical term, but rather a scientific term used in the field of biochemistry and physiology. It is a type of auxin, which is a plant hormone that regulates various growth and development processes in plants. IAA is the most abundant and best-studied natural auxin.

Medically, indole-3-acetic acid may be mentioned in the context of certain medical conditions or treatments related to plants or plant-derived substances. For example, some research has investigated the potential use of IAA in promoting wound healing in plants or in agricultural applications. However, it is not a substance that is typically used in medical treatment for humans or animals.

"Solanum tuberosum" is the scientific name for a plant species that is commonly known as the potato. According to medical and botanical definitions, Solanum tuberosum refers to the starchy, edible tubers that grow underground from this plant. Potatoes are native to the Andes region of South America and are now grown worldwide. They are an important food source for many people and are used in a variety of culinary applications.

Potatoes contain several essential nutrients, including carbohydrates, fiber, protein, vitamin C, and some B vitamins. However, they can also be high in calories, especially when prepared with added fats like butter or oil. Additionally, potatoes are often consumed in forms that are less healthy, such as French fries and potato chips, which can contribute to weight gain and other health problems if consumed excessively.

In a medical context, potatoes may also be discussed in relation to food allergies or intolerances. While uncommon, some people may have adverse reactions to potatoes, including skin rashes, digestive symptoms, or difficulty breathing. These reactions are typically caused by an immune response to proteins found in the potato plant, rather than the tubers themselves.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "soil" is not a term that has a medical definition. Soil is defined as the top layer of earth in which plants grow, a mixture of organic material, clay, sand, and silt. If you have any questions related to medicine or health, I would be happy to try to help answer them for you.

Traditional medicine (TM) refers to health practices, approaches, knowledge and beliefs incorporating plant, animal and mineral-based medicines, spiritual therapies, manual techniques and exercises, applied singularly or in combination to treat, diagnose and prevent illnesses or maintain well-being. Although traditional medicine has been practiced since prehistoric times, it is still widely used today and may include:

1. Traditional Asian medicines such as acupuncture, herbal remedies, and qigong from China; Ayurveda, Yoga, Unani and Siddha from India; and Jamu from Indonesia.
2. Traditional European herbal medicines, also known as phytotherapy.
3. North American traditional indigenous medicines, including Native American and Inuit practices.
4. African traditional medicines, such as herbal, spiritual, and manual techniques practiced in various African cultures.
5. South American traditional medicines, like Mapuche, Curanderismo, and Santo Daime practices from different countries.

It is essential to note that traditional medicine may not follow the scientific principles, evidence-based standards, or quality control measures inherent to conventional (also known as allopathic or Western) medicine. However, some traditional medicines have been integrated into modern healthcare systems and are considered complementary or alternative medicines (CAM). The World Health Organization encourages member states to develop policies and regulations for integrating TM/CAM practices into their healthcare systems, ensuring safety, efficacy, and quality while respecting cultural diversity.

Medical definitions typically focus on the relevance of a term to medical practice, and I'm not sure if there is a specific medical definition for "plant exudates." However, in a broader context, plant exudates refer to the various substances that are released or exuded by plants, often as a result of damage or stress. These can include a wide variety of compounds, such as sap, resins, latex, gums, essential oils, and tannins. Some of these compounds can have medicinal properties and are used in various forms of traditional and modern medicine. For example, the resin from certain pine trees (rosin) has been used to treat respiratory ailments, while willow bark, which contains salicin (a precursor to aspirin), has been used for pain relief for centuries.

An "ecosystem" is not a term that has a specific medical definition, as it is a concept that is more commonly used in the fields of ecology and environmental science. However, I can provide you with the general ecological definition of an ecosystem:

An ecosystem is a community of living organisms interacting with each other and their non-living environment, including both biotic factors (plants, animals, microorganisms) and abiotic factors (climate, soil, water, and air). These interactions create a complex network of relationships that form the foundation of ecological processes, such as energy flow, nutrient cycling, and population dynamics.

While there is no direct medical definition for an ecosystem, understanding the principles of ecosystems can have important implications for human health. For example, healthy ecosystems can provide clean air and water, regulate climate, support food production, and offer opportunities for recreation and relaxation, all of which contribute to overall well-being. Conversely, degraded ecosystems can lead to increased exposure to environmental hazards, reduced access to natural resources, and heightened risks of infectious diseases. Therefore, maintaining the health and integrity of ecosystems is crucial for promoting human health and preventing disease.

Salicylic Acid is a type of beta hydroxy acid (BHA) that is commonly used in dermatology due to its keratolytic and anti-inflammatory properties. It works by causing the cells of the epidermis to shed more easily, preventing the pores from becoming blocked and promoting the growth of new skin cells. Salicylic Acid is also a potent anti-inflammatory agent, which makes it useful in the treatment of inflammatory acne and other skin conditions associated with redness and irritation. It can be found in various over-the-counter skincare products, such as cleansers, creams, and peels, as well as in prescription-strength formulations.

Root nodules in plants refer to the specialized structures formed through the symbiotic relationship between certain leguminous plants and nitrogen-fixing bacteria, most commonly belonging to the genus Rhizobia. These nodules typically develop on the roots of the host plant, providing an ideal environment for the bacteria to convert atmospheric nitrogen into ammonia, a form that can be directly utilized by the plant for growth and development.

The formation of root nodules begins with the infection of the plant's root hair cells by Rhizobia bacteria. This interaction triggers a series of molecular signals leading to the differentiation of root cortical cells into nodule primordia, which eventually develop into mature nodules. The nitrogen-fixing bacteria reside within these nodules in membrane-bound compartments called symbiosomes, where they reduce atmospheric nitrogen into ammonia through an enzyme called nitrogenase.

The plant, in turn, provides the bacteria with carbon sources and other essential nutrients required for their growth and survival within the nodules. The fixed nitrogen is then transported from the root nodules to other parts of the plant, enhancing its overall nitrogen nutrition and promoting sustainable growth without the need for external nitrogen fertilizers.

In summary, root nodules in plants are essential structures formed through symbiotic associations with nitrogen-fixing bacteria, allowing leguminous plants to convert atmospheric nitrogen into a usable form while also benefiting the environment by reducing the reliance on chemical nitrogen fertilizers.

Plant lectins are proteins or glycoproteins that are abundantly found in various plant parts such as seeds, leaves, stems, and roots. They have the ability to bind specifically to carbohydrate structures present on cell membranes, known as glycoconjugates. This binding property of lectins is reversible and non-catalytic, meaning it does not involve any enzymatic activity.

Lectins play several roles in plants, including defense against predators, pathogens, and herbivores. They can agglutinate red blood cells, stimulate the immune system, and have been implicated in various biological processes such as cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis (programmed cell death). Some lectins also exhibit mitogenic activity, which means they can stimulate the proliferation of certain types of cells.

In the medical field, plant lectins have gained attention due to their potential therapeutic applications. For instance, some lectins have been shown to possess anti-cancer properties and are being investigated as potential cancer treatments. However, it is important to note that some lectins can be toxic or allergenic to humans and animals, so they must be used with caution.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but the term "germ cells" is typically used in the context of animals and humans, referring to the reproductive cells (sperm and eggs) that can give rise to new individuals. It is not commonly used to describe plants.

In plants, the terms often used to refer to the reproductive cells are "male gametophyte" and "female gametophyte." The male gametophyte produces sperm cells, while the female gametophyte produces egg cells. These gametophytes are found within the pollen grains (male) and ovules (female) of plants.

Therefore, there isn't a medical definition for "germ cells, plant," as the term is not applicable in this context.

A mutation is a permanent change in the DNA sequence of an organism's genome. Mutations can occur spontaneously or be caused by environmental factors such as exposure to radiation, chemicals, or viruses. They may have various effects on the organism, ranging from benign to harmful, depending on where they occur and whether they alter the function of essential proteins. In some cases, mutations can increase an individual's susceptibility to certain diseases or disorders, while in others, they may confer a survival advantage. Mutations are the driving force behind evolution, as they introduce new genetic variability into populations, which can then be acted upon by natural selection.

Mycorrhizae are symbiotic associations between fungi and the roots of most plant species. In a mycorrhizal association, fungi colonize the root tissues of plants and extend their mycelial networks into the surrounding soil. This association enhances the nutrient uptake capacity of the host plant, particularly with regards to phosphorus and nitrogen, while the fungi receive carbohydrates from the plant for their own growth and metabolism.

Mycorrhizal fungi can be broadly classified into two types: ectomycorrhizae and endomycorrhizae (or arbuscular mycorrhizae). Ectomycorrhizae form a sheath around the root surface, while endomycorrhizae penetrate the root cells and form structures called arbuscules, where nutrient exchange occurs. Mycorrhizal associations play crucial roles in maintaining ecosystem stability, promoting plant growth, and improving soil structure and fertility.

Phytotherapy is the use of extracts of natural origin, especially plants or plant parts, for therapeutic purposes. It is also known as herbal medicine and is a traditional practice in many cultures. The active compounds in these plant extracts are believed to have various medicinal properties, such as anti-inflammatory, analgesic, or sedative effects. Practitioners of phytotherapy may use the whole plant, dried parts, or concentrated extracts to prepare teas, capsules, tinctures, or ointments for therapeutic use. It is important to note that the effectiveness and safety of phytotherapy are not always supported by scientific evidence, and it should be used with caution and preferably under the guidance of a healthcare professional.

Poaceae is not a medical term but a taxonomic category, specifically the family name for grasses. In a broader sense, you might be asking for a medical context where knowledge of this plant family could be relevant. For instance, certain members of the Poaceae family can cause allergies or negative reactions in some people.

In a medical definition, Poaceae would be defined as:

The family of monocotyledonous plants that includes grasses, bamboo, and sedges. These plants are characterized by narrow leaves with parallel veins, jointed stems (called "nodes" and "internodes"), and flowers arranged in spikelets. Some members of this family are important food sources for humans and animals, such as rice, wheat, corn, barley, oats, and sorghum. Other members can cause negative reactions, like skin irritation or allergies, due to their silica-based defense structures called phytoliths.

Chloroplasts are specialized organelles found in the cells of green plants, algae, and some protists. They are responsible for carrying out photosynthesis, which is the process by which these organisms convert light energy from the sun into chemical energy in the form of organic compounds, such as glucose.

Chloroplasts contain the pigment chlorophyll, which absorbs light energy from the sun. They also contain a system of membranes and enzymes that convert carbon dioxide and water into glucose and oxygen through a series of chemical reactions known as the Calvin cycle. This process not only provides energy for the organism but also releases oxygen as a byproduct, which is essential for the survival of most life forms on Earth.

Chloroplasts are believed to have originated from ancient cyanobacteria that were engulfed by early eukaryotic cells and eventually became integrated into their host's cellular machinery through a process called endosymbiosis. Over time, chloroplasts evolved to become an essential component of plant and algal cells, contributing to their ability to carry out photosynthesis and thrive in a wide range of environments.

'Plant infertility' is not a standard medical term, as it is typically used in the context of agriculture and plant biology. However, I can provide you with a general definition related to this context:

Plant infertility refers to the inability of a plant to produce viable seeds, fruits, or propagules due to various factors affecting its reproductive system. These factors may include genetic disorders, environmental stressors (such as extreme temperatures, drought, or nutrient deficiencies), pathogens, pests, or poor pollination. In some cases, assisted reproduction techniques, such as hand-pollination or embryo rescue, might be employed to overcome infertility issues in plants.

Pollen, in a medical context, refers to the fine powder-like substance produced by the male reproductive organ of seed plants. It contains microscopic grains known as pollen grains, which are transported by various means such as wind, water, or insects to the female reproductive organ of the same or another plant species for fertilization.

Pollen can cause allergic reactions in some individuals, particularly during the spring and summer months when plants release large amounts of pollen into the air. These allergies, also known as hay fever or seasonal allergic rhinitis, can result in symptoms such as sneezing, runny nose, congestion, itchy eyes, and coughing.

It is important to note that while all pollen has the potential to cause allergic reactions, certain types of plants, such as ragweed, grasses, and trees, are more likely to trigger symptoms in sensitive individuals.

'Brassica' is a term used in botanical nomenclature, specifically within the family Brassicaceae. It refers to a genus of plants that includes various vegetables such as broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, kale, and mustard greens. These plants are known for their nutritional value and health benefits. They contain glucosinolates, which have been studied for their potential anti-cancer properties. However, it is not a medical term per se, but rather a taxonomic category used in the biological sciences.

In the context of medical terminology, "germination" is not typically used as a term to describe a physiological process in humans or animals. It is primarily used in the field of botany to refer to the process by which a seed or spore sprouts and begins to grow into a new plant.

However, if you are referring to the concept of germination in the context of bacterial or viral growth, then it could be defined as:

The process by which bacteria, viruses, or other microorganisms become active and start to multiply, often after a period of dormancy or latency. This can occur when the microorganisms encounter favorable conditions, such as moisture, warmth, or nutrients, that allow them to grow and reproduce. In medical contexts, this term is more commonly used in relation to infectious diseases caused by these microorganisms.

Asteraceae is a family of flowering plants commonly known as the daisy family or sunflower family. It is one of the largest and most diverse families of vascular plants, with over 1,900 genera and 32,000 species. The family includes a wide variety of plants, ranging from annual and perennial herbs to shrubs and trees.

The defining characteristic of Asteraceae is the presence of a unique type of inflorescence called a capitulum, which resembles a single flower but is actually composed of many small flowers (florets) arranged in a dense head. The florets are typically bisexual, with both male and female reproductive structures, and are radially symmetrical.

Asteraceae includes many economically important plants, such as sunflowers, daisies, artichokes, lettuce, chicory, and ragweed. Some species of Asteraceae are also used in traditional medicine and have been found to contain bioactive compounds with potential therapeutic uses.

It's worth noting that the taxonomy of this family has undergone significant revisions in recent years, and some genera and species have been moved to other families or renamed.

Species specificity is a term used in the field of biology, including medicine, to refer to the characteristic of a biological entity (such as a virus, bacterium, or other microorganism) that allows it to interact exclusively or preferentially with a particular species. This means that the biological entity has a strong affinity for, or is only able to infect, a specific host species.

For example, HIV is specifically adapted to infect human cells and does not typically infect other animal species. Similarly, some bacterial toxins are species-specific and can only affect certain types of animals or humans. This concept is important in understanding the transmission dynamics and host range of various pathogens, as well as in developing targeted therapies and vaccines.

Medical definitions generally do not include plant oils as a specific term. However, in a biological or biochemical context, plant oils, also known as vegetable oils, are defined as lipid extracts derived from various parts of plants such as seeds, fruits, and leaves. They mainly consist of triglycerides, which are esters of glycerol and three fatty acids. The composition of fatty acids can vary between different plant sources, leading to a range of physical and chemical properties that make plant oils useful for various applications in the pharmaceutical, cosmetic, and food industries. Some common examples of plant oils include olive oil, coconut oil, sunflower oil, and jojoba oil.

In genetics, sequence alignment is the process of arranging two or more DNA, RNA, or protein sequences to identify regions of similarity or homology between them. This is often done using computational methods to compare the nucleotide or amino acid sequences and identify matching patterns, which can provide insight into evolutionary relationships, functional domains, or potential genetic disorders. The alignment process typically involves adjusting gaps and mismatches in the sequences to maximize the similarity between them, resulting in an aligned sequence that can be visually represented and analyzed.

"Drought" is not a medical term. It is a term used in meteorology and environmental science to refer to a prolonged period of abnormally low rainfall, leading to water shortage and scarcity in the affected areas. Droughts can have various impacts on human health, including dehydration, heat-related illnesses, reduced air quality, increased transmission of waterborne diseases, and mental health issues related to stress and displacement. However, drought itself is not a medical condition.

Botany is the scientific study of plants, encompassing various disciplines such as plant structure, function, evolution, diversity, distribution, ecology, and application. It involves examining different aspects like plant anatomy, physiology, genetics, molecular biology, systematics, and ethnobotany. The field of botany has contributed significantly to our understanding of the natural world, agriculture, medicine, and environmental conservation.

Fungi, in the context of medical definitions, are a group of eukaryotic organisms that include microorganisms such as yeasts and molds, as well as the more familiar mushrooms. The study of fungi is known as mycology.

Fungi can exist as unicellular organisms or as multicellular filamentous structures called hyphae. They are heterotrophs, which means they obtain their nutrients by decomposing organic matter or by living as parasites on other organisms. Some fungi can cause various diseases in humans, animals, and plants, known as mycoses. These infections range from superficial, localized skin infections to systemic, life-threatening invasive diseases.

Examples of fungal infections include athlete's foot (tinea pedis), ringworm (dermatophytosis), candidiasis (yeast infection), histoplasmosis, coccidioidomycosis, and aspergillosis. Fungal infections can be challenging to treat due to the limited number of antifungal drugs available and the potential for drug resistance.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "peas" is not a term typically used in medical definitions. Peas are a type of legume that is commonly consumed as a vegetable. They are rich in nutrients such as protein, fiber, vitamin C, and vitamin K. If you have any questions about the health benefits or potential risks of consuming peas, I would be happy to try to help with that.

A phenotype is the physical or biochemical expression of an organism's genes, or the observable traits and characteristics resulting from the interaction of its genetic constitution (genotype) with environmental factors. These characteristics can include appearance, development, behavior, and resistance to disease, among others. Phenotypes can vary widely, even among individuals with identical genotypes, due to differences in environmental influences, gene expression, and genetic interactions.

"Triticum" is the genus name for a group of cereal grains that includes common wheat (T. aestivum), durum wheat (T. durum), and spelt (T. spelta). These grains are important sources of food for humans, providing carbohydrates, proteins, and various nutrients. They are used to make a variety of foods such as bread, pasta, and breakfast cereals. Triticum species are also known as "wheat" in layman's terms.

Abscisic acid (ABA) is a plant hormone that plays a crucial role in the regulation of various physiological processes, including seed dormancy, bud dormancy, leaf senescence, and response to abiotic stresses such as drought, salinity, and cold temperatures. It is a sesquiterpene compound that is synthesized in plants primarily in response to environmental stimuli that trigger the onset of stress responses.

ABA functions by regulating gene expression, cell growth and development, and stomatal closure, which helps prevent water loss from plants under drought conditions. It also plays a role in the regulation of plant metabolism and the activation of defense mechanisms against pathogens and other environmental stressors. Overall, abscisic acid is an essential hormone that enables plants to adapt to changing environmental conditions and optimize their growth and development.

Phytosterols are a type of plant-derived sterol that have a similar structure to cholesterol, a compound found in animal products. They are found in small quantities in many fruits, vegetables, nuts, seeds, legumes, and vegetable oils. Phytosterols are known to help lower cholesterol levels by reducing the absorption of dietary cholesterol in the digestive system.

In medical terms, phytosterols are often referred to as "plant sterols" or "phytostanols." They have been shown to have a modest but significant impact on lowering LDL (or "bad") cholesterol levels when consumed in sufficient quantities, typically in the range of 2-3 grams per day. As a result, foods fortified with phytosterols are sometimes recommended as part of a heart-healthy diet for individuals with high cholesterol or a family history of cardiovascular disease.

It's worth noting that while phytosterols have been shown to be safe and effective in reducing cholesterol levels, they should not be used as a substitute for other lifestyle changes such as regular exercise, smoking cessation, and weight management. Additionally, individuals with sitosterolemia, a rare genetic disorder characterized by an abnormal accumulation of plant sterols in the body, should avoid consuming foods fortified with phytosterols.

Nitrogen is not typically referred to as a medical term, but it is an element that is crucial to medicine and human life.

In a medical context, nitrogen is often mentioned in relation to gas analysis, respiratory therapy, or medical gases. Nitrogen (N) is a colorless, odorless, and nonreactive gas that makes up about 78% of the Earth's atmosphere. It is an essential element for various biological processes, such as the growth and maintenance of organisms, because it is a key component of amino acids, nucleic acids, and other organic compounds.

In some medical applications, nitrogen is used to displace oxygen in a mixture to create a controlled environment with reduced oxygen levels (hypoxic conditions) for therapeutic purposes, such as in certain types of hyperbaric chambers. Additionally, nitrogen gas is sometimes used in cryotherapy, where extremely low temperatures are applied to tissues to reduce pain, swelling, and inflammation.

However, it's important to note that breathing pure nitrogen can be dangerous, as it can lead to unconsciousness and even death due to lack of oxygen (asphyxiation) within minutes.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Hordeum" is not a medical term. It is actually the genus name for barley in botany. If you have any medical terms or concepts that you would like me to explain, please let me know!

"Pseudomonas syringae" is a gram-negative, aerobic bacterium that is widely found in various environments, including water, soil, and plant surfaces. It is known to be a plant pathogen, causing diseases in a wide range of plants such as beans, peas, tomatoes, and other crops. The bacteria can infect plants through wounds or natural openings, leading to symptoms like spots on leaves, wilting, and dieback. Some strains of "P. syringae" are also associated with frost damage on plants, as they produce a protein that facilitates ice crystal formation at higher temperatures.

It's important to note that while "Pseudomonas syringae" can cause disease in plants, it is not typically considered a human pathogen and does not usually cause illness in humans.

Bryopsida is a class within the division Bryophyta, which includes the mosses. It is a large and diverse group that contains the majority of moss species. Members of this class are characterized by their stalked, spore-producing structures called sporangia, which are typically borne on specialized leaves called perichaetial leaves. The spores produced within these sporangia are released and can germinate to form new moss individuals.

It is important to note that the classification of plants, including mosses, has undergone significant revisions in recent years, and some sources may use different terminology or groupings than what is described here. However, Bryopsida remains a widely recognized and well-established class within the mosses.

In the context of medical terminology, "light" doesn't have a specific or standardized definition on its own. However, it can be used in various medical terms and phrases. For example, it could refer to:

1. Visible light: The range of electromagnetic radiation that can be detected by the human eye, typically between wavelengths of 400-700 nanometers. This is relevant in fields such as ophthalmology and optometry.
2. Therapeutic use of light: In some therapies, light is used to treat certain conditions. An example is phototherapy, which uses various wavelengths of ultraviolet (UV) or visible light for conditions like newborn jaundice, skin disorders, or seasonal affective disorder.
3. Light anesthesia: A state of reduced consciousness in which the patient remains responsive to verbal commands and physical stimulation. This is different from general anesthesia where the patient is completely unconscious.
4. Pain relief using light: Certain devices like transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) units have a 'light' setting, indicating lower intensity or frequency of electrical impulses used for pain management.

Without more context, it's hard to provide a precise medical definition of 'light'.

Disease resistance, in a medical context, refers to the inherent or acquired ability of an organism to withstand or limit infection by a pathogen, such as bacteria, viruses, fungi, or parasites. This resistance can be due to various factors including the presence of physical barriers (e.g., intact skin), chemical barriers (e.g., stomach acid), and immune responses that recognize and eliminate the pathogen.

Inherited disease resistance is often determined by genetics, where certain genetic variations can make an individual more or less susceptible to a particular infection. For example, some people are naturally resistant to certain diseases due to genetic factors that prevent the pathogen from infecting their cells or replicating within them.

Acquired disease resistance can occur through exposure to a pathogen, which triggers an immune response that confers immunity or resistance to future infections by the same pathogen. This is the basis of vaccination, where a weakened or dead form of a pathogen is introduced into the body to stimulate an immune response without causing disease.

Overall, disease resistance is an important factor in maintaining health and preventing the spread of infectious diseases.

A protoplast is not a term that is typically used in medical definitions, but rather it is a term commonly used in cell biology and botany. A protoplast refers to a plant or bacterial cell that has had its cell wall removed, leaving only the plasma membrane and the cytoplasmic contents, including organelles such as mitochondria, chloroplasts, ribosomes, and other cellular structures.

Protoplasts can be created through enzymatic or mechanical means to isolate the intracellular components for various research purposes, such as studying membrane transport, gene transfer, or cell fusion. In some cases, protoplasts may be used in medical research, particularly in areas related to plant pathology and genetic engineering of plants for medical applications.

Molecular evolution is the process of change in the DNA sequence or protein structure over time, driven by mechanisms such as mutation, genetic drift, gene flow, and natural selection. It refers to the evolutionary study of changes in DNA, RNA, and proteins, and how these changes accumulate and lead to new species and diversity of life. Molecular evolution can be used to understand the history and relationships among different organisms, as well as the functional consequences of genetic changes.

Chlorophyll is a green pigment found in the chloroplasts of photosynthetic plants, algae, and some bacteria. It plays an essential role in light-dependent reactions of photosynthesis by absorbing light energy, primarily from the blue and red parts of the electromagnetic spectrum, and converting it into chemical energy to fuel the synthesis of carbohydrates from carbon dioxide and water. The structure of chlorophyll includes a porphyrin ring, which binds a central magnesium ion, and a long phytol tail. There are several types of chlorophyll, including chlorophyll a and chlorophyll b, which have distinct absorption spectra and slightly different structures. Chlorophyll is crucial for the process of photosynthesis, enabling the conversion of sunlight into chemical energy and the release of oxygen as a byproduct.

A meristem, in the context of plant biology, refers to a type of tissue found in plants that is responsible for their growth. These tissues are composed of cells that have the ability to divide and differentiate into various specialized cell types. Meristems are typically located at the tips of roots and shoots (apical meristems), as well as within the vascular bundles (cambial meristems) and in the cork layers (phellogen meristems). They contribute to the increase in length and girth of plant organs, allowing plants to grow throughout their life.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "soybeans" are not a medical term. They are a type of legume that is commonly used in agriculture and food production. The medical community might discuss soybeans in the context of nutrition or allergies, but there isn't a formal medical definition for this term.

Here's some general information: Soybeans, scientifically known as Glycine max, are native to East Asia and are now grown worldwide. They are a significant source of plant-based protein and oil. Soybeans contain various nutrients, including essential amino acids, fiber, B vitamins, and minerals like calcium, iron, magnesium, and zinc. They are used in various food products such as tofu, soy milk, tempeh, and miso. Additionally, soybeans are also used in the production of industrial products, including biodiesel, plastics, and inks. Some people may have allergic reactions to soybeans or soy products.

'Agrobacterium tumefaciens' is a gram-negative, soil-dwelling bacterium that is known for its ability to cause plant tumors or crown galls. It does this through the transfer and integration of a segment of DNA called the Ti (Tumor-inducing) plasmid into the plant's genome. This transferred DNA includes genes that encode enzymes for the production of opines, which serve as a nutrient source for the bacterium, and genes that cause unregulated plant cell growth leading to tumor formation.

This unique ability of 'Agrobacterium tumefaciens' to transfer and integrate foreign DNA into plants has been exploited in genetic engineering to create transgenic plants with desired traits. The Ti plasmid is often used as a vector to introduce new genes into the plant genome, making it an essential tool in plant biotechnology.

Plastids are membrane-bound organelles found in the cells of plants and algae. They are responsible for various cellular functions, including photosynthesis, storage of starch, lipids, and proteins, and the production of pigments that give plants their color. The most common types of plastids are chloroplasts (which contain chlorophyll and are involved in photosynthesis), chromoplasts (which contain pigments such as carotenoids and are responsible for the yellow, orange, and red colors of fruits and flowers), and leucoplasts (which do not contain pigments and serve mainly as storage organelles). Plastids have their own DNA and can replicate themselves within the cell.

Aphids, also known as plant lice, are small sap-sucking insects that belong to the superfamily Aphidoidea in the order Hemiptera. They are soft-bodied and pear-shaped, with most species measuring less than 1/8 inch (3 millimeters) long.

Aphids feed on a wide variety of plants by inserting their needle-like mouthparts into the plant's vascular system to extract phloem sap. This feeding can cause stunted growth, yellowing, curling, or distortion of leaves and flowers, and may even lead to the death of the plant in severe infestations.

Aphids reproduce rapidly and can produce several generations per year. Many species give birth to live young (nymphs) rather than laying eggs, which allows them to increase their population numbers quickly. Aphids also have a complex life cycle that may involve sexual reproduction, parthenogenesis (reproduction without fertilization), and winged or wingless forms.

Aphids are an important pest in agriculture and horticulture, causing significant damage to crops and ornamental plants. They can also transmit plant viruses and produce honeydew, a sticky substance that attracts ants and supports the growth of sooty mold fungi.

Controlling aphids may involve cultural practices such as pruning, watering, and removing weeds; biological control using natural enemies such as lady beetles, lacewings, and parasitic wasps; or chemical control using insecticides.

Rhizobium is not a medical term, but rather a term used in microbiology and agriculture. It refers to a genus of gram-negative bacteria that can fix nitrogen from the atmosphere into ammonia, which can then be used by plants as a nutrient. These bacteria live in the root nodules of leguminous plants (such as beans, peas, and clover) and form a symbiotic relationship with them.

The host plant provides Rhizobium with carbon sources and a protected environment within the root nodule, while the bacteria provide the plant with fixed nitrogen. This mutualistic interaction plays a crucial role in maintaining soil fertility and promoting plant growth.

While Rhizobium itself is not directly related to human health or medicine, understanding its symbiotic relationship with plants can have implications for agricultural practices, sustainable farming, and global food security.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "trees" is not a medical term. It is a common term used in various fields, including biology, ecology, and dendrology, to refer to a woody perennial plant with a single stem or trunk that supports branches and leaves in most species.

If you have any questions related to medical terminology or health-related topics, please provide more context so I can offer an accurate and helpful response.

Genetic transformation is the process by which an organism's genetic material is altered or modified, typically through the introduction of foreign DNA. This can be achieved through various techniques such as:

* Gene transfer using vectors like plasmids, phages, or artificial chromosomes
* Direct uptake of naked DNA using methods like electroporation or chemically-mediated transfection
* Use of genome editing tools like CRISPR-Cas9 to introduce precise changes into the organism's genome.

The introduced DNA may come from another individual of the same species (cisgenic), from a different species (transgenic), or even be synthetically designed. The goal of genetic transformation is often to introduce new traits, functions, or characteristics that do not exist naturally in the organism, or to correct genetic defects.

This technique has broad applications in various fields, including molecular biology, biotechnology, and medical research, where it can be used to study gene function, develop genetically modified organisms (GMOs), create cell lines for drug screening, and even potentially treat genetic diseases through gene therapy.

Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) are organic chemicals that have a low boiling point and easily evaporate at room temperature. They can be liquids or solids. VOCs include a variety of chemicals, such as benzene, toluene, xylene, and formaldehyde, which are found in many household products, including paints, paint strippers, and other solvents; cleaning supplies; pesticides; building materials and furnishings; office equipment such as copiers and printers, correction fluids and carbonless copy paper; and glues and adhesives.

VOCs can cause both short- and long-term health effects. Short-term exposure to high levels of VOCs can cause headaches, dizziness, visual disturbances, and memory problems. Long-term exposure can cause damage to the liver, kidneys, and central nervous system. Some VOCs are also suspected or known carcinogens.

It is important to properly use, store, and dispose of products that contain VOCs to minimize exposure. Increasing ventilation by opening windows and doors or using fans can also help reduce exposure to VOCs.

'Cucumis sativus' is the scientific name for the vegetable we commonly know as a cucumber. It belongs to the family Cucurbitaceae and is believed to have originated in South Asia. Cucumbers are widely consumed raw in salads, pickled, or used in various culinary applications. They have a high water content and contain various nutrients such as vitamin K, vitamin C, and potassium.

Cytokinins are a type of plant growth hormone that play a crucial role in cell division, differentiation, and growth. They were first discovered in 1950s and named for their ability to promote cytokinesis, the process of cell division. Cytokinins belong to a class of compounds called adenine derivatives, which are structurally similar to nucleotides, the building blocks of DNA and RNA.

Cytokinins are produced in the roots and shoots of plants and are transported throughout the plant via the vascular system. They have been shown to regulate various aspects of plant growth and development, including shoot initiation, leaf expansion, apical dominance, and senescence. Cytokinins also interact with other hormones such as auxins, gibberellins, and abscisic acid to modulate plant responses to environmental stresses.

Cytokinins have been used in horticulture and agriculture to enhance crop yields, improve plant quality, and delay senescence. They are also being studied for their potential role in human health, particularly in the context of cancer research.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "hydroponics" is not a medical term. It is an agricultural technique and term. Hydroponics refers to the practice of growing plants in nutrient-rich water solutions, without soil. This method allows plants to obtain their necessary nutrients directly from the water, which is enriched with dissolved minerals. Common hydroponic systems include wick systems, deep water culture, nutrient film technique, ebb and flow system, aeroponics, and drip systems.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Mustard Plant" is not a term typically used in medical definitions. Mustard plants are actually a type of crop plant from the Brassicaceae family, which also includes vegetables like broccoli and cabbage. The seeds from these plants are often ground to make mustard condiments and spices. If you're looking for information related to potential medicinal uses or health effects of mustard plants or their derivatives, I would be happy to help with that.

Physiological stress is a response of the body to a demand or threat that disrupts homeostasis and activates the autonomic nervous system and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. This results in the release of stress hormones such as adrenaline, cortisol, and noradrenaline, which prepare the body for a "fight or flight" response. Increased heart rate, rapid breathing, heightened sensory perception, and increased alertness are some of the physiological changes that occur during this response. Chronic stress can have negative effects on various bodily functions, including the immune, cardiovascular, and nervous systems.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Hemiptera" is not a medical term. It is a taxonomic order in the classification of living things, also known as "true bugs." This group includes species such as cicadas, aphids, and bedbugs. If you have a medical term in mind, please provide it so I can give you an accurate definition.

Medical definitions of water generally describe it as a colorless, odorless, tasteless liquid that is essential for all forms of life. It is a universal solvent, making it an excellent medium for transporting nutrients and waste products within the body. Water constitutes about 50-70% of an individual's body weight, depending on factors such as age, sex, and muscle mass.

In medical terms, water has several important functions in the human body:

1. Regulation of body temperature through perspiration and respiration.
2. Acting as a lubricant for joints and tissues.
3. Facilitating digestion by helping to break down food particles.
4. Transporting nutrients, oxygen, and waste products throughout the body.
5. Helping to maintain healthy skin and mucous membranes.
6. Assisting in the regulation of various bodily functions, such as blood pressure and heart rate.

Dehydration can occur when an individual does not consume enough water or loses too much fluid due to illness, exercise, or other factors. This can lead to a variety of symptoms, including dry mouth, fatigue, dizziness, and confusion. Severe dehydration can be life-threatening if left untreated.

Endophytes are microorganisms, typically bacteria or fungi, that live inside the tissues of plants without causing any visible disease or harm to the plant. They can be found in almost all plant species and are known to exist in a mutualistic relationship with their host plants. Endophytes can provide various benefits to the plants such as growth promotion, increased resistance to pathogens, and protection against herbivores. Some endophytic fungi also produce bioactive compounds that have potential applications in medicine, agriculture, and industry.

Biodiversity is the variety of different species of plants, animals, and microorganisms that live in an ecosystem. It also includes the variety of genes within a species and the variety of ecosystems (such as forests, grasslands, deserts, and oceans) that exist in a region or on Earth as a whole. Biodiversity is important for maintaining the health and balance of ecosystems, providing resources and services such as food, clean water, and pollination, and contributing to the discovery of new medicines and other useful products. The loss of biodiversity can have negative impacts on the functioning of ecosystems and the services they provide, and can threaten the survival of species and the livelihoods of people who depend on them.

"Solanaceae" is not a medical term but a taxonomic category in biology, referring to the Nightshade family of plants. This family includes several plants that have economic and medicinal importance, as well as some that are toxic or poisonous. Some common examples of plants in this family include:

- Solanum lycopersicum (tomato)
- Solanum tuberosum (potato)
- Capsicum annuum (bell pepper and chili pepper)
- Nicotiana tabacum (tobacco)
- Atropa belladonna (deadly nightshade)
- Hyoscyamus niger (henbane)

While Solanaceae isn't a medical term itself, certain plants within this family have medical significance. For instance, some alkaloids found in these plants can be used as medications or pharmaceutical precursors, such as atropine and scopolamine from Atropa belladonna, hyoscine from Hyoscyamus niger, and capsaicin from Capsicum species. However, it's important to note that many of these plants also contain toxic compounds, so they must be handled with care and used only under professional supervision.

Physiological adaptation refers to the changes or modifications that occur in an organism's biological functions or structures as a result of environmental pressures or changes. These adaptations enable the organism to survive and reproduce more successfully in its environment. They can be short-term, such as the constriction of blood vessels in response to cold temperatures, or long-term, such as the evolution of longer limbs in animals that live in open environments.

In the context of human physiology, examples of physiological adaptation include:

1. Acclimatization: The process by which the body adjusts to changes in environmental conditions, such as altitude or temperature. For example, when a person moves to a high-altitude location, their body may produce more red blood cells to compensate for the lower oxygen levels, leading to improved oxygen delivery to tissues.

2. Exercise adaptation: Regular physical activity can lead to various physiological adaptations, such as increased muscle strength and endurance, enhanced cardiovascular function, and improved insulin sensitivity.

3. Hormonal adaptation: The body can adjust hormone levels in response to changes in the environment or internal conditions. For instance, during prolonged fasting, the body releases stress hormones like cortisol and adrenaline to help maintain energy levels and prevent muscle wasting.

4. Sensory adaptation: Our senses can adapt to different stimuli over time. For example, when we enter a dark room after being in bright sunlight, it takes some time for our eyes to adjust to the new light level. This process is known as dark adaptation.

5. Aging-related adaptations: As we age, various physiological changes occur that help us adapt to the changing environment and maintain homeostasis. These include changes in body composition, immune function, and cognitive abilities.

Biological models, also known as physiological models or organismal models, are simplified representations of biological systems, processes, or mechanisms that are used to understand and explain the underlying principles and relationships. These models can be theoretical (conceptual or mathematical) or physical (such as anatomical models, cell cultures, or animal models). They are widely used in biomedical research to study various phenomena, including disease pathophysiology, drug action, and therapeutic interventions.

Examples of biological models include:

1. Mathematical models: These use mathematical equations and formulas to describe complex biological systems or processes, such as population dynamics, metabolic pathways, or gene regulation networks. They can help predict the behavior of these systems under different conditions and test hypotheses about their underlying mechanisms.
2. Cell cultures: These are collections of cells grown in a controlled environment, typically in a laboratory dish or flask. They can be used to study cellular processes, such as signal transduction, gene expression, or metabolism, and to test the effects of drugs or other treatments on these processes.
3. Animal models: These are living organisms, usually vertebrates like mice, rats, or non-human primates, that are used to study various aspects of human biology and disease. They can provide valuable insights into the pathophysiology of diseases, the mechanisms of drug action, and the safety and efficacy of new therapies.
4. Anatomical models: These are physical representations of biological structures or systems, such as plastic models of organs or tissues, that can be used for educational purposes or to plan surgical procedures. They can also serve as a basis for developing more sophisticated models, such as computer simulations or 3D-printed replicas.

Overall, biological models play a crucial role in advancing our understanding of biology and medicine, helping to identify new targets for therapeutic intervention, develop novel drugs and treatments, and improve human health.

A multigene family is a group of genetically related genes that share a common ancestry and have similar sequences or structures. These genes are arranged in clusters on a chromosome and often encode proteins with similar functions. They can arise through various mechanisms, including gene duplication, recombination, and transposition. Multigene families play crucial roles in many biological processes, such as development, immunity, and metabolism. Examples of multigene families include the globin genes involved in oxygen transport, the immune system's major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes, and the cytochrome P450 genes associated with drug metabolism.

'Bryophyta' is the formal scientific name for a division of non-vascular plants that includes mosses. These plants are small, typically range in size from a few millimeters to a few centimeters, and lack true roots, stems, and leaves. They have simple reproductive structures and obtain water and nutrients directly from the environment through their body surfaces. Mosses are an important part of many ecosystems, particularly in damp or shaded habitats, where they play a role in soil stabilization, nutrient cycling, and water retention.

Ferns are a group of vascular plants that reproduce by means of spores rather than seeds. They are characterized by their frond-like leaves and lack of flowers or fruits. Ferns have been around for millions of years, with some fossilized ferns dating back to the Devonian period, over 360 million years ago.

Ferns are an important part of many ecosystems, particularly in tropical rainforests where they provide habitat and food for a variety of animals. They also play a role in soil erosion control and nutrient cycling.

Medically, some ferns have been used in traditional medicine to treat various ailments, such as bracken fern which has been used to treat wounds, burns, and skin diseases. However, it is important to note that not all ferns are safe for consumption or use as medicines, and some can be toxic if ingested or applied topically. It is always recommended to consult with a healthcare professional before using any plant-based remedies.

I apologize for the confusion, but "Plant Dispersal" is not a term used in medical definitions. It is a concept from botany and ecology that refers to the means by which plants distribute their seeds or spores to new locations, enhancing their chances of colonizing new habitats and ensuring genetic diversity.

If you have any questions related to medical topics, I would be happy to help. Please provide more information so I can better assist you.

Ascomycota is a phylum in the kingdom Fungi, also known as sac fungi. This group includes both unicellular and multicellular organisms, such as yeasts, mold species, and morel mushrooms. Ascomycetes are characterized by their reproductive structures called ascus, which contain typically eight haploid spores produced sexually through a process called ascogony. Some members of this phylum have significant ecological and economic importance, as they can be decomposers, mutualistic symbionts, or plant pathogens causing various diseases. Examples include the baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, ergot fungus Claviceps purpurea, and morel mushroom Morchella esculenta.

Complementary DNA (cDNA) is a type of DNA that is synthesized from a single-stranded RNA molecule through the process of reverse transcription. In this process, the enzyme reverse transcriptase uses an RNA molecule as a template to synthesize a complementary DNA strand. The resulting cDNA is therefore complementary to the original RNA molecule and is a copy of its coding sequence, but it does not contain non-coding regions such as introns that are present in genomic DNA.

Complementary DNA is often used in molecular biology research to study gene expression, protein function, and other genetic phenomena. For example, cDNA can be used to create cDNA libraries, which are collections of cloned cDNA fragments that represent the expressed genes in a particular cell type or tissue. These libraries can then be screened for specific genes or gene products of interest. Additionally, cDNA can be used to produce recombinant proteins in heterologous expression systems, allowing researchers to study the structure and function of proteins that may be difficult to express or purify from their native sources.

Xylem is a term used in the field of botany and plant anatomy, but I understand you're asking for a medical definition. In human anatomy, there isn't a direct structure equivalent to xylem. However, I can provide the general definition of xylem from its botanical context:

Xylem is one of the two types of vascular tissues in plants (the other being phloem). It is responsible for transporting water and dissolved nutrients from the roots to various parts of the plant, including stems, leaves, and flowers. Xylem consists of several types of cells, including vessels, tracheids, xylem fibers, and xylem parenchyma. The transportation in xylem occurs due to the cohesion-tension mechanism, where water is pulled up through the plant via transpiration pull.

Gibberellins (GAs) are a type of plant hormones that regulate various growth and developmental processes, including stem elongation, germination of seeds, leaf expansion, and flowering. They are a large family of diterpenoid compounds that are synthesized from geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP) in the plastids and then modified through a series of enzymatic reactions in the endoplasmic reticulum and cytoplasm.

GAs exert their effects by binding to specific receptors, which activate downstream signaling pathways that ultimately lead to changes in gene expression and cellular responses. The biosynthesis and perception of GAs are tightly regulated, and disruptions in these processes can result in various developmental abnormalities and growth disorders in plants.

In addition to their role in plant growth and development, GAs have also been implicated in the regulation of various physiological processes, such as stress tolerance, nutrient uptake, and senescence. They have also attracted interest as potential targets for crop improvement, as modulating GA levels and sensitivity can enhance traits such as yield, disease resistance, and abiotic stress tolerance.

'Medicago sativa' is the scientific name for a plant species more commonly known as alfalfa. In a medical context, alfalfa is often considered a herbal supplement and its medicinal properties include being a source of vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants. It has been used in traditional medicine to treat a variety of conditions such as kidney problems, asthma, arthritis, and high cholesterol levels. However, it's important to note that the effectiveness of alfalfa for these uses is not conclusively established by scientific research and its use may have potential risks or interactions with certain medications. Always consult a healthcare provider before starting any new supplement regimen.

Gymnosperms are a group of seed-producing plants that include conifers, cycads, Ginkgo, and gnetophytes. The name "gymnosperm" comes from the Greek words "gymnos," meaning naked, and "sperma," meaning seed. This refers to the fact that the seeds of gymnosperms are not enclosed within an ovary or fruit, but are exposed on the surface of modified leaves called cones or strobili.

Gymnosperms are vascular plants, which means they have specialized tissues for transporting water and nutrients throughout the plant. They are also heterosporous, meaning that they produce two types of spores: male microspores and female megaspores. The microspores develop into male gametophytes, which produce sperm cells, while the megaspores develop into female gametophytes, which produce egg cells.

Gymnosperms are an important group of plants that have been around for millions of years. They are adapted to a wide range of environments, from temperate forests to deserts and high mountain ranges. Many gymnosperms are evergreen, with needle-like or scale-like leaves that are able to resist drought and cold temperatures.

Conifers, which include trees such as pines, firs, spruces, and redwoods, are the most diverse and widespread group of gymnosperms. They are characterized by their woody cones and needle-shaped leaves. Cycads are another group of gymnosperms that are found in tropical and subtropical regions. They have large, stiff leaves and produce large seeds that are enclosed in a fleshy covering. Ginkgo is a unique gymnosperm that has been around for over 200 million years. It is a deciduous tree with fan-shaped leaves and large, naked seeds.

Gnetophytes are a small group of gymnosperms that include the ephedra, welwitschia, and gnetum. They have unique features such as vessels in their wood and motile sperm cells, which are not found in other gymnosperms.

Overall, gymnosperms are an important group of plants that have adapted to a wide range of environments and play a crucial role in many ecosystems.

I believe there might be some confusion in your question. "Nuclear power plants" and "medical definitions" are two separate concepts that don't typically intersect.

A nuclear power plant is a facility that utilizes the process of nuclear fission to generate electricity on a large scale. In a nuclear power plant, heat is produced when a neutron strikes the nucleus of a uranium-235 atom, causing it to split and release energy. This heat is used to produce steam, which drives a turbine connected to an electrical generator.

On the other hand, medical definitions pertain to terms related to medicine, healthcare, human health conditions, treatments, and procedures.

If you have any questions about nuclear medicine, which is a branch of medicine that uses small amounts of radioactive materials to diagnose and treat various diseases, I would be happy to help with that.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "fruit" is not a medical term per se. It is a common term used to describe the part of a plant that develops from the ovary after flowering and contains seeds. However, in a nutritional or dietary context, "fruits" are often referred to as foods that are typically sweet and juicy, and come from plants' flowers. They are rich in fiber, vitamins, and minerals, making them an essential part of a healthy diet. But in a strict medical sense, there isn't a specific definition for "fruit."

A cell wall is a rigid layer found surrounding the plasma membrane of plant cells, fungi, and many types of bacteria. It provides structural support and protection to the cell, maintains cell shape, and acts as a barrier against external factors such as chemicals and mechanical stress. The composition of the cell wall varies among different species; for example, in plants, it is primarily made up of cellulose, hemicellulose, and pectin, while in bacteria, it is composed of peptidoglycan.

"Plantago" is the genus name for a group of plants commonly known as plantains. There are several species within this genus, including Plantago major (common plantain) and Plantago lanceolata (narrow-leaved plantain), which are found in many parts of the world. These plants have been used in traditional medicine for their alleged healing properties, such as soothing skin irritations, reducing inflammation, and promoting wound healing. However, it is important to note that the medical community's scientific evidence supporting these claims is limited, and further research is needed before any definitive health benefits can be attributed to Plantago species.

African traditional medicine (ATM) refers to the practices and beliefs regarding both physical and spiritual health and well-being that are indigenous to Africa. It includes various forms of healing, such as herbalism, spiritualism, and ancestral veneration, which may be practiced by traditional healers, including herbalists, diviners, and traditional birth attendants. These practices are often closely intertwined with the cultural, religious, and social beliefs of the community. It's important to note that the specific practices and beliefs can vary widely among different African cultures and communities.

An Asparagus plant, scientifically known as *Asparagus officinalis*, is a perennial vegetable that belongs to the family *Asparagaceae*. It is native to Europe and western Asia. The plant is characterized by its long, thin green spears that grow out of the ground. These spears are harvested and eaten as a spring vegetable. The plant also produces fern-like foliage and small red berries. Asparagus is rich in nutrients, including fiber, vitamin C, vitamin A, and folate. It is also a good source of antioxidants.

A cotyledon is a seed leaf in plants, which is part of the embryo within the seed. Cotyledons are often referred to as "seed leaves" because they are the first leaves to emerge from the seed during germination and provide nutrients to the developing plant until it can produce its own food through photosynthesis.

In some plants, such as monocotyledons, there is only one cotyledon, while in other plants, such as dicotyledons, there are two cotyledons. The number of cotyledons is a characteristic that is used to classify different types of plants.

Cotyledons serve important functions during the early stages of plant growth, including providing energy and nutrients to the developing plant, protecting the embryo, and helping to anchor the seed in the soil. Once the plant has established its root system and begun to produce true leaves through photosynthesis, the cotyledons may wither or fall off, depending on the species.

I apologize for the confusion, but "Lamiaceae" is not a medical term. It is a taxonomic category in biology, specifically it is a family of flowering plants that includes many familiar herbs such as mint, rosemary, sage, basil, and lavender. These plants are often used in medicine, cooking, and for ornamental purposes. The Lamiaceae family is characterized by their square stems, opposite leaves, and two-lipped flowers.

Ethnopharmacology is a branch of pharmacology that focuses on the study of traditional medicines and their active components, as well as the cultural, historical, and social practices surrounding their use. It involves the interdisciplinary investigation of indigenous knowledge, beliefs, and customs related to medicinal plants and other natural remedies.

The main objectives of ethnopharmacology include:

1. Identifying and documenting traditional medicines and healing practices used by various cultures around the world.
2. Investigating the pharmacological properties and mechanisms of action of these traditional remedies, often through laboratory experiments and clinical trials.
3. Evaluating the safety, efficacy, and quality of traditional medicines to establish their potential therapeutic value in modern healthcare settings.
4. Promoting the sustainable use of natural resources and preserving indigenous knowledge and cultural heritage related to traditional medicine.
5. Fostering collaboration between scientists, healthcare professionals, and local communities to develop new drugs, therapies, and treatment approaches based on traditional medicines.

Examples of ethnopharmacological research include studying the active ingredients in Ayurvedic herbs, evaluating the effectiveness of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) formulations, and investigating the potential benefits of psychoactive plants used in shamanic rituals.

I apologize, but there seems to be a misunderstanding. "Soil microbiology" is not a medical term; rather, it is a branch of microbiology that deals with the study of microorganisms in soil. It involves understanding the diversity, ecology, and biochemistry of bacteria, fungi, algae, protozoa, and other microscopic life forms found in soil. This field has applications in agriculture, environmental science, and waste management but is not directly related to medical definitions or human health.

A genetic complementation test is a laboratory procedure used in molecular genetics to determine whether two mutated genes can complement each other's function, indicating that they are located at different loci and represent separate alleles. This test involves introducing a normal or wild-type copy of one gene into a cell containing a mutant version of the same gene, and then observing whether the presence of the normal gene restores the normal function of the mutated gene. If the introduction of the normal gene results in the restoration of the normal phenotype, it suggests that the two genes are located at different loci and can complement each other's function. However, if the introduction of the normal gene does not restore the normal phenotype, it suggests that the two genes are located at the same locus and represent different alleles of the same gene. This test is commonly used to map genes and identify genetic interactions in a variety of organisms, including bacteria, yeast, and animals.

'Cucurbita' is a genus of herbaceous vines in the gourd family, Cucurbitaceae. This genus includes several species of plants that are commonly known as squashes or gourds, such as pumpkins, zucchinis, and acorn squashes. The fruits of these plants are widely cultivated and consumed for their nutritional value and versatility in cooking.

The name 'Cucurbita' comes from the Latin word for "gourd" or "pumpkin." Plants in this genus are native to the Americas, with some species originating in Mexico and Central America and others in the southern United States. They have been cultivated by humans for thousands of years and are an important part of many traditional diets around the world.

In a medical context, 'Cucurbita' may be mentioned in relation to the use of certain species as traditional remedies or in nutritional studies. For example, pumpkin seeds have been used in traditional medicine to treat parasitic infections, and some research suggests that they may have anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. However, it is important to note that the scientific evidence for these potential health benefits is still limited, and more research is needed before any firm conclusions can be drawn.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Helianthus" is not a medical term. It is the genus name for sunflowers in the family Asteraceae. Sunflowers are native to North America and are known for their large, daisy-like flowers and tall stems. They have various uses, including ornamental purposes, food (seeds and oil), and medicinal applications in some traditional systems of medicine. However, there isn't a widely accepted medical definition associated with the term "Helianthus."

A hypocotyl is not a medical term per se, but it is a term used in the field of botany, which is a branch of biology that deals with the study of plants. Therefore, I'd be happy to provide you with a definition of hypocotyl in a botanical context:

The hypocotyl is the portion of the embryo or seedling of a plant that lies between the cotyledons (the embryonic leaves) and the radicle (the embryonic root). In other words, it is the stem-like structure that connects the shoot and the root systems in a developing plant.

When a seed germinates, the hypocotyl elongates and pushes the cotyledons upward through the soil, allowing the young plant to emerge into the light. The hypocotyl can vary in length depending on the species of plant, and its growth is influenced by various environmental factors such as light and temperature.

While the term "hypocotyl" may not be commonly used in medical contexts, understanding basic botanical concepts like this one can still be useful for healthcare professionals who work with patients who have plant-related allergies or other health issues related to plants.

Signal transduction is the process by which a cell converts an extracellular signal, such as a hormone or neurotransmitter, into an intracellular response. This involves a series of molecular events that transmit the signal from the cell surface to the interior of the cell, ultimately resulting in changes in gene expression, protein activity, or metabolism.

The process typically begins with the binding of the extracellular signal to a receptor located on the cell membrane. This binding event activates the receptor, which then triggers a cascade of intracellular signaling molecules, such as second messengers, protein kinases, and ion channels. These molecules amplify and propagate the signal, ultimately leading to the activation or inhibition of specific cellular responses.

Signal transduction pathways are highly regulated and can be modulated by various factors, including other signaling molecules, post-translational modifications, and feedback mechanisms. Dysregulation of these pathways has been implicated in a variety of diseases, including cancer, diabetes, and neurological disorders.

'Agrobacterium' is a genus of Gram-negative, rod-shaped bacteria that are known for their ability to genetically transform plants. The most well-known species in this genus is 'Agrobacterium tumefaciens,' which causes a plant disease called crown gall. This bacterium has the natural ability to transfer a portion of its own DNA (called T-DNA) into the plant's genome, leading to the overproduction of certain plant hormones and ultimately resulting in the formation of tumor-like growths on the infected plant tissue.

This unique ability to transfer genetic material between species has made 'Agrobacterium' a valuable tool in molecular biology and genetic engineering. Scientists can use this bacterium as a vector to introduce foreign DNA into plants, allowing for the study and manipulation of plant genes. This technique is widely used in research and agriculture to create genetically modified organisms (GMOs) with desired traits such as resistance to pests, improved nutritional content, or increased yield.

"Phaseolus" is a term that refers to a genus of plants in the legume family Fabaceae, also known as the pea family. The most common and well-known species in this genus is "Phaseolus vulgaris," which is commonly called the common bean. This includes many familiar varieties such as kidney beans, black beans, navy beans, pinto beans, and green beans.

These plants are native to the Americas and have been cultivated for thousands of years for their edible seeds (beans) and pods (green beans). They are an important source of protein, fiber, vitamins, and minerals in many diets around the world.

It's worth noting that "Phaseolus" is a taxonomic term used in the scientific classification of plants, and it does not have a specific medical definition. However, the beans from these plants do have various health benefits and potential medicinal properties, such as being associated with reduced risk of heart disease, improved gut health, and better blood sugar control.

A caulimovirus is a type of virus that primarily infects plants. It is a double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) virus, which means that its genetic material is composed of a pair of DNA strands. Caulimoviruses are named after the type species of the group, Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV).

Caulimoviruses are unique among dsDNA viruses because they replicate through an RNA intermediate, using a reverse transcriptase enzyme to produce DNA copies of their genome. This is similar to the way that retroviruses, which infect animals, replicate.

Caulimoviruses are relatively large viruses, with genomes ranging in size from about 7 to 8 kilobases (kb). They have a complex structure, with several proteins encoded by their genome that are involved in various aspects of the virus's replication and assembly.

Caulimoviruses infect a wide range of plant hosts, including many important crops such as cauliflower, cabbage, tomato, and pepper. They can cause serious diseases in these plants, leading to significant economic losses. There are no known caulimovirus infections of humans or other animals.

'Brassica napus' is the scientific name for a species of plant that includes both rapeseed and canola. It is a type of cruciferous vegetable that is widely cultivated for its seeds, which are used to produce oil, as well as for its leaves and stems, which are eaten as vegetables in some parts of the world.

Rapeseed oil, which is produced from the seeds of 'Brassica napus', has historically been used as a source of industrial lubricant and as a fuel for diesel engines. However, modern canola oil, which is also produced from 'Brassica napus' but has been bred to have lower levels of erucic acid and glucosinolates, is more commonly used as a food oil due to its mild flavor and high smoke point.

The leaves and stems of 'Brassica napus' are also edible and are commonly consumed in parts of Europe and Asia. They can be prepared in a variety of ways, including boiling, steaming, or stir-frying. The plant is also sometimes used as a cover crop or green manure due to its ability to improve soil health and reduce erosion.

'Medicago truncatula' is not a medical term, but a scientific name for a plant species. It is commonly known as barrel medic or yellow trefoil and is native to the Mediterranean region. It is a model organism in the field of plant genetics and molecular biology due to its small genome size and ease of transformation. While it does not have direct medical applications, studies on this plant can contribute to our understanding of fundamental biological processes and may have indirect implications for human health.

Host-parasite interactions refer to the relationship between a parasitic organism (the parasite) and its host, which can be an animal, plant, or human body. The parasite lives on or inside the host and derives nutrients from it, often causing harm in the process. This interaction can range from relatively benign to severe, depending on various factors such as the species of the parasite, the immune response of the host, and the duration of infection.

The host-parasite relationship is often categorized based on the degree of harm caused to the host. Parasites that cause little to no harm are called commensals, while those that cause significant damage or disease are called parasitic pathogens. Some parasites can even manipulate their hosts' behavior and physiology to enhance their own survival and reproduction, leading to complex interactions between the two organisms.

Understanding host-parasite interactions is crucial for developing effective strategies to prevent and treat parasitic infections, as well as for understanding the ecological relationships between different species in natural ecosystems.

Host-pathogen interactions refer to the complex and dynamic relationship between a living organism (the host) and a disease-causing agent (the pathogen). This interaction can involve various molecular, cellular, and physiological processes that occur between the two entities. The outcome of this interaction can determine whether the host will develop an infection or not, as well as the severity and duration of the illness.

During host-pathogen interactions, the pathogen may release virulence factors that allow it to evade the host's immune system, colonize tissues, and obtain nutrients for its survival and replication. The host, in turn, may mount an immune response to recognize and eliminate the pathogen, which can involve various mechanisms such as inflammation, phagocytosis, and the production of antimicrobial agents.

Understanding the intricacies of host-pathogen interactions is crucial for developing effective strategies to prevent and treat infectious diseases. This knowledge can help identify new targets for therapeutic interventions, inform vaccine design, and guide public health policies to control the spread of infectious agents.

In the context of medical definitions, 'carbon' is not typically used as a standalone term. Carbon is an element with the symbol C and atomic number 6, which is naturally abundant in the human body and the environment. It is a crucial component of all living organisms, forming the basis of organic compounds, such as proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids (DNA and RNA).

Carbon forms strong covalent bonds with various elements, allowing for the creation of complex molecules that are essential to life. In this sense, carbon is a fundamental building block of life on Earth. However, it does not have a specific medical definition as an isolated term.

'Botrytis' is a genus of saprophytic fungi that are commonly known as "gray mold" or "noble rot." The term is used to describe various species within the Botrytis genus, but the most well-known and economically significant species is Botrytis cinerea.

Botrytis cinerea is a necrotrophic fungus that can infect and cause decay in a wide range of plant hosts, including fruits, vegetables, flowers, and ornamental plants. The fungus typically enters the host through wounds, dead tissue, or natural openings such as stomata. Once inside, it produces enzymes that break down plant cells, allowing it to feed on the decaying matter.

In some cases, Botrytis cinerea can cause significant economic losses in agricultural crops, particularly when conditions are conducive to its growth and spread, such as high humidity and cool temperatures. However, the fungus is also responsible for the production of some highly valued wines, such as Sauternes and Tokaji Aszú, where it infects grapes and causes them to dehydrate and shrivel, concentrating their sugars and flavors. This process is known as "noble rot" and can result in complex, richly flavored wines with distinctive aromas and flavors.

'Embryophyta' is a taxonomic group that includes land plants, also known as embryophytes. This group consists of the bryophytes (mosses, liverworts, and hornworts), tracheophytes (vascular plants), and a few extinct plant groups. The defining characteristic of embryophytes is their alternation of generations life cycle, which includes a multicellular diploid sporophyte generation that produces spores through meiosis, and a multicellular haploid gametophyte generation that produces gametes through mitosis. The term 'Embryophyta' is used to distinguish land plants from their algal ancestors, which are classified in separate taxonomic groups.

Glucuronidase is an enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of glucuronic acid from various substrates, including molecules that have been conjugated with glucuronic acid as part of the detoxification process in the body. This enzyme plays a role in the breakdown and elimination of certain drugs, toxins, and endogenous compounds, such as bilirubin. It is found in various tissues and organisms, including humans, bacteria, and insects. In clinical contexts, glucuronidase activity may be measured to assess liver function or to identify the presence of certain bacterial infections.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "lettuce" is not a medical term. It is a type of vegetable that belongs to the family Asteraceae. It is commonly used in salads and sandwiches due to its crisp leaves and mild flavor. If you have any questions about lettuce or its nutritional value, I would be happy to help with that instead.

Oomycetes, also known as water molds or downy mildews, are a group of primarily aquatic, filamentous microorganisms. They were once classified as fungi due to their similar morphology and ecological roles, but they are now known to be more closely related to brown algae and diatoms.

Oomycetes have cell walls made of cellulose and unique osmotically active compounds called cell wall glycoproteins. They reproduce both sexually and asexually, producing structures such as zoospores that can swim through water to find new hosts. Oomycetes are parasites or saprophytes, feeding on other organisms or dead organic matter.

Some oomycetes are important plant pathogens, causing diseases such as potato blight (Phytophthora infestans) and sudden oak death (Phytophthora ramorum). They can cause significant damage to crops and natural ecosystems, making them a focus of study in plant pathology.

DNA primers are short single-stranded DNA molecules that serve as a starting point for DNA synthesis. They are typically used in laboratory techniques such as the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and DNA sequencing. The primer binds to a complementary sequence on the DNA template through base pairing, providing a free 3'-hydroxyl group for the DNA polymerase enzyme to add nucleotides and synthesize a new strand of DNA. This allows for specific and targeted amplification or analysis of a particular region of interest within a larger DNA molecule.

Sitosterols are a type of plant sterol or phytosterol that are structurally similar to cholesterol, a steroid lipid found in animals. They are found in small amounts in human diets, primarily in vegetable oils, nuts, seeds, and avocados. Sitosterols are not synthesized by the human body but can be absorbed from the diet and have been shown to lower cholesterol levels in the blood when consumed in sufficient quantities. This is because sitosterols compete with cholesterol for absorption in the digestive tract, reducing the amount of cholesterol that enters the bloodstream. Some margarines and other foods are fortified with sitosterols or other phytosterols to help reduce cholesterol levels in people with high cholesterol.

Acclimatization is the process by which an individual organism adjusts to a change in its environment, enabling it to maintain its normal physiological functions and thus survive and reproduce. In the context of medicine, acclimatization often refers to the body's adaptation to changes in temperature, altitude, or other environmental factors that can affect health.

For example, when a person moves from a low-altitude area to a high-altitude area, their body may undergo several physiological changes to adapt to the reduced availability of oxygen at higher altitudes. These changes may include increased breathing rate and depth, increased heart rate, and altered blood chemistry, among others. This process of acclimatization can take several days or even weeks, depending on the individual and the degree of environmental change.

Similarly, when a person moves from a cold climate to a hot climate, their body may adjust by increasing its sweat production and reducing its heat production, in order to maintain a stable body temperature. This process of acclimatization can help prevent heat-related illnesses such as heat exhaustion and heat stroke.

Overall, acclimatization is an important physiological process that allows organisms to adapt to changing environments and maintain their health and well-being.

'Daucus carota' is the scientific name for the common carrot, a root vegetable that is widely consumed and cultivated around the world. Carrots are rich in beta-carotene, a type of vitamin A, and are also a good source of dietary fiber, vitamin K, potassium, and other nutrients.

The 'Daucus' part of the name refers to the genus of plants that carrots belong to, while 'carota' is the specific species name. This plant is native to Europe and Southwestern Asia, but it is now grown in many parts of the world due to its popularity as a food crop.

Carrots can be consumed raw or cooked and are often used in a variety of dishes such as salads, soups, stews, and juices. They come in different colors, including orange, purple, yellow, and white, although the most common type is the orange one. Carrots have numerous health benefits, such as improving vision, reducing the risk of heart disease, and promoting healthy skin.

Gene expression profiling is a laboratory technique used to measure the activity (expression) of thousands of genes at once. This technique allows researchers and clinicians to identify which genes are turned on or off in a particular cell, tissue, or organism under specific conditions, such as during health, disease, development, or in response to various treatments.

The process typically involves isolating RNA from the cells or tissues of interest, converting it into complementary DNA (cDNA), and then using microarray or high-throughput sequencing technologies to determine which genes are expressed and at what levels. The resulting data can be used to identify patterns of gene expression that are associated with specific biological states or processes, providing valuable insights into the underlying molecular mechanisms of diseases and potential targets for therapeutic intervention.

In recent years, gene expression profiling has become an essential tool in various fields, including cancer research, drug discovery, and personalized medicine, where it is used to identify biomarkers of disease, predict patient outcomes, and guide treatment decisions.

Euphorbiaceae is not a medical term, but a taxonomic category in botany. It refers to the spurge family, which is a large family of flowering plants that includes around 300 genera and 7,500 species. Some members of this family have medicinal uses, but others are toxic or invasive. Therefore, it is important to use caution when handling or consuming any plant material from this family.

I apologize for any confusion, but "agriculture" is not a term that has a medical definition. Agriculture refers to the cultivation and breeding of animals, plants, and fungi for food, fiber, biofuel, medicinal plants, and other products used to sustain and enhance human life. It is an important industry and practice that has been developed over thousands of years and continues to play a critical role in global food production and security.

In the context of medical and ecological health, an "introduced species" refers to a plant or animal population that has been intentionally or unintentionally introduced by human actions into a new environment, outside of their natural historical range, where they do not have any known native predecessors. These introductions can occur through various means such as accidental transportation in cargo, deliberate releases for purposes like biological control or pets, and escapes from cultivation.

Introduced species can become invasive if they adapt well to their new environment, reproduce rapidly, outcompete native species for resources, and disrupt local ecosystems. This can lead to significant ecological changes, loss of biodiversity, impacts on human health, and economic consequences. Some introduced species carry diseases or parasites that can affect humans, livestock, and wildlife in the new environment, posing potential public health concerns.

Reproduction, in the context of biology and medicine, refers to the process by which organisms produce offspring. It is a complex process that involves the creation, development, and growth of new individuals from parent organisms. In sexual reproduction, this process typically involves the combination of genetic material from two parents through the fusion of gametes (sex cells) such as sperm and egg cells. This results in the formation of a zygote, which then develops into a new individual with a unique genetic makeup.

In contrast, asexual reproduction does not involve the fusion of gametes and can occur through various mechanisms such as budding, fragmentation, or parthenogenesis. Asexual reproduction results in offspring that are genetically identical to the parent organism.

Reproduction is a fundamental process that ensures the survival and continuation of species over time. It is also an area of active research in fields such as reproductive medicine, where scientists and clinicians work to understand and address issues related to human fertility, contraception, and genetic disorders.

Cucurbitaceae is the scientific name for the gourd family of plants, which includes a variety of vegetables and fruits such as cucumbers, melons, squashes, and pumpkins. These plants are characterized by their trailing or climbing growth habits and their large, fleshy fruits that have hard seeds enclosed in a protective coat. The fruits of these plants are often used as food sources, while other parts of the plant may also have various uses such as medicinal or ornamental purposes.

Genetic variation refers to the differences in DNA sequences among individuals and populations. These variations can result from mutations, genetic recombination, or gene flow between populations. Genetic variation is essential for evolution by providing the raw material upon which natural selection acts. It can occur within a single gene, between different genes, or at larger scales, such as differences in the number of chromosomes or entire sets of chromosomes. The study of genetic variation is crucial in understanding the genetic basis of diseases and traits, as well as the evolutionary history and relationships among species.

Photoreceptors in plants are specialized cells or organelles that can detect and respond to light, which is crucial for various physiological processes such as photosynthesis, growth, and development. Unlike animal photoreceptors, which are mainly used for vision, plant photoreceptors serve multiple functions in the plant's life cycle.

There are several types of photoreceptors in plants, including:

1. Phytochromes: These are dimeric proteins with covalently bound linear tetrapyrrole chromophores that can exist in two interconvertible forms, Pr (red-absorbing) and Pfr (far-red-absorbing). The Pr form absorbs red light (600-700 nm), while the Pfr form absorbs far-red light (700-800 nm). Phytochromes regulate various developmental processes, such as seed germination, de-etiolation, shade avoidance, and flowering.

2. Cryptochromes: These are blue/UV-A light receptors that contain flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) as a chromophore. They play essential roles in plant development, including de-etiolation, photoperiodic regulation of flowering, and circadian clock entrainment.

3. Phototropins: These are serine/threonine kinases with two flavin mononucleotide (FMN) chromophores per molecule. They mediate various light-dependent responses, such as phototropism, chloroplast movement, stomatal opening, and leaf flattening.

4. UVR8: This is a UV-B receptor that contains a dimeric form of the protein with tryptophan residues acting as chromophores. It regulates plant responses to UV-B radiation, including DNA damage repair, photomorphogenesis, and stress tolerance.

5. Time-of-day sensors: These are clock-associated proteins that can sense light and regulate the circadian clock in plants. Examples include ZEITLUPE (ZTL), FLAVIN-BINDING, KELCH REPEAT, F-BOX 1 (FKF1), and LOV KELCH PROTEIN 2 (LKP2).

Overall, these light receptors play crucial roles in plant development, growth, and survival by mediating various light-dependent responses.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but the term "Thymus Plant" refers to a type of plant and does not have a medical definition. The Thymus plant belongs to the mint family and is commonly used as an herb in cooking. It is known for its small, fragrant leaves and is often used to add flavor to dishes. In some cases, the essential oil from the thymus plant may be used in medicinal products, such as throat lozenges or mouthwashes, due to its antiseptic properties. However, a "Thymus plant" itself does not have a medical definition. If you have any questions about medicinal plants or herbs, I'd be happy to try and help answer those for you!

"Fusarium" is a genus of fungi that are widely distributed in the environment, particularly in soil, water, and on plants. They are known to cause a variety of diseases in animals, including humans, as well as in plants. In humans, Fusarium species can cause localized and systemic infections, particularly in immunocompromised individuals. These infections often manifest as keratitis (eye infection), onychomycosis (nail infection), and invasive fusariosis, which can affect various organs such as the lungs, brain, and bloodstream. Fusarium species produce a variety of toxins that can contaminate crops and pose a threat to food safety and human health.

Anthocyanins are a type of plant pigment that belong to the flavonoid group. They are responsible for providing colors ranging from red, purple, and blue to black in various fruits, vegetables, flowers, and leaves. Anthocyanins have been studied extensively due to their potential health benefits, which include antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-cancer properties. They also play a role in protecting plants from environmental stressors such as UV radiation, pathogens, and extreme temperatures. Chemically, anthocyanins are water-soluble compounds that can form complex structures with other molecules, leading to variations in their color expression depending on pH levels.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Sorghum" is not a medical term. It is actually the name of a genus of various grasses, one species of which is cultivated as a cereal crop. Sorghum is primarily used for food, animal feed, and the production of biofuel. If you have any questions about medical terminology or health-related topics, I'd be happy to help with those instead!

Herbicides are a type of pesticide used to control or kill unwanted plants, also known as weeds. They work by interfering with the growth processes of the plant, such as inhibiting photosynthesis, disrupting cell division, or preventing the plant from producing certain essential proteins.

Herbicides can be classified based on their mode of action, chemical composition, and the timing of their application. Some herbicides are selective, meaning they target specific types of weeds while leaving crops unharmed, while others are non-selective and will kill any plant they come into contact with.

It's important to use herbicides responsibly and according to the manufacturer's instructions, as they can have negative impacts on the environment and human health if not used properly.

Carbohydrate metabolism is the process by which the body breaks down carbohydrates into glucose, which is then used for energy or stored in the liver and muscles as glycogen. This process involves several enzymes and chemical reactions that convert carbohydrates from food into glucose, fructose, or galactose, which are then absorbed into the bloodstream and transported to cells throughout the body.

The hormones insulin and glucagon regulate carbohydrate metabolism by controlling the uptake and storage of glucose in cells. Insulin is released from the pancreas when blood sugar levels are high, such as after a meal, and promotes the uptake and storage of glucose in cells. Glucagon, on the other hand, is released when blood sugar levels are low and signals the liver to convert stored glycogen back into glucose and release it into the bloodstream.

Disorders of carbohydrate metabolism can result from genetic defects or acquired conditions that affect the enzymes or hormones involved in this process. Examples include diabetes, hypoglycemia, and galactosemia. Proper management of these disorders typically involves dietary modifications, medication, and regular monitoring of blood sugar levels.

Bacterial proteins are a type of protein that are produced by bacteria as part of their structural or functional components. These proteins can be involved in various cellular processes, such as metabolism, DNA replication, transcription, and translation. They can also play a role in bacterial pathogenesis, helping the bacteria to evade the host's immune system, acquire nutrients, and multiply within the host.

Bacterial proteins can be classified into different categories based on their function, such as:

1. Enzymes: Proteins that catalyze chemical reactions in the bacterial cell.
2. Structural proteins: Proteins that provide structural support and maintain the shape of the bacterial cell.
3. Signaling proteins: Proteins that help bacteria to communicate with each other and coordinate their behavior.
4. Transport proteins: Proteins that facilitate the movement of molecules across the bacterial cell membrane.
5. Toxins: Proteins that are produced by pathogenic bacteria to damage host cells and promote infection.
6. Surface proteins: Proteins that are located on the surface of the bacterial cell and interact with the environment or host cells.

Understanding the structure and function of bacterial proteins is important for developing new antibiotics, vaccines, and other therapeutic strategies to combat bacterial infections.

A conserved sequence in the context of molecular biology refers to a pattern of nucleotides (in DNA or RNA) or amino acids (in proteins) that has remained relatively unchanged over evolutionary time. These sequences are often functionally important and are highly conserved across different species, indicating strong selection pressure against changes in these regions.

In the case of protein-coding genes, the corresponding amino acid sequence is deduced from the DNA sequence through the genetic code. Conserved sequences in proteins may indicate structurally or functionally important regions, such as active sites or binding sites, that are critical for the protein's activity. Similarly, conserved non-coding sequences in DNA may represent regulatory elements that control gene expression.

Identifying conserved sequences can be useful for inferring evolutionary relationships between species and for predicting the function of unknown genes or proteins.

Araceae is a family of flowering plants, also known as the arum or aroid family. It includes a diverse range of species, such as calla lilies, peace lilies, and jack-in-the-pulpit. These plants are characterized by their unique inflorescence structure, which consists of a specialized leaf-like structure called a spathe that surrounds and protects a spike-like structure called a spadix, where the flowers are located.

The flowers of Araceae plants are often small and inconspicuous, and may be surrounded by showy bracts or modified leaves. Many species in this family produce attractive berries or fruits that contain seeds. Some members of Araceae contain calcium oxalate crystals, which can cause irritation to the skin and mucous membranes if handled improperly.

Araceae plants are found worldwide, with a majority of species occurring in tropical regions. They are grown for their ornamental value, as well as for their edible fruits and tubers. Some species have medicinal uses, while others are invasive and can cause ecological damage in certain areas.

Nitrogen fixation is a process by which nitrogen gas (N2) in the air is converted into ammonia (NH3) or other chemically reactive forms, making it available to plants and other organisms for use as a nutrient. This process is essential for the nitrogen cycle and for the growth of many types of plants, as most plants cannot utilize nitrogen gas directly from the air.

In the medical field, nitrogen fixation is not a commonly used term. However, in the context of microbiology and infectious diseases, some bacteria are capable of fixing nitrogen and this ability can contribute to their pathogenicity. For example, certain species of bacteria that colonize the human body, such as those found in the gut or on the skin, may be able to fix nitrogen and use it for their own growth and survival. In some cases, these bacteria may also release fixed nitrogen into the environment, which can have implications for the ecology and health of the host and surrounding ecosystems.

"Fragaria" is the genus name for plants in the family Rosaceae, which includes various species of strawberries. These plants are native to temperate regions of the world and are widely cultivated for their edible fruits. The term "Fragaria" itself does not have a specific medical definition, but certain compounds found in strawberries, such as flavonoids and vitamin C, have been studied for potential health benefits.

Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) is a crucial enzyme in the Calvin cycle, which is a process that plants use to convert carbon dioxide into glucose during photosynthesis. RuBisCO catalyzes the reaction between ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate and carbon dioxide, resulting in the formation of two molecules of 3-phosphoglycerate, which can then be converted into glucose.

RuBisCO is considered to be the most abundant enzyme on Earth, making up as much as 50% of the soluble protein found in leaves. It is a large and complex enzyme, consisting of eight small subunits and eight large subunits that are arranged in a barrel-shaped structure. The active site of the enzyme, where the reaction between ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate and carbon dioxide takes place, is located at the interface between two large subunits.

RuBisCO also has a secondary function as an oxygenase, which can lead to the production of glycolate, a toxic compound for plants. This reaction occurs when the enzyme binds with oxygen instead of carbon dioxide and is more prevalent in environments with low carbon dioxide concentrations and high oxygen concentrations. The glycolate produced during this process needs to be recycled through a series of reactions known as photorespiration, which can result in significant energy loss for the plant.

Glucosinolates are naturally occurring compounds found in various plants, particularly in cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, and mustard greens. They are sulfur-containing glucosides that can be hydrolyzed by the enzyme myrosinase when the plant tissue is damaged, leading to the formation of biologically active compounds like isothiocyanates, thiocyanates, and nitriles. These breakdown products have been shown to exhibit various health benefits, such as anti-cancer, anti-inflammatory, and antimicrobial activities. However, excessive intake or exposure may also cause adverse effects in some individuals.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Lignin" is not a medical term. It is a term used in the field of biology and chemistry, particularly in botany and wood science. Lignin is a complex organic polymer that binds cellulose fibers together, providing strength and rigidity to the cell walls of plants. It is a major component of wood and bark.

If you have any medical terms you would like defined or any other questions, please let me know!

"Beetles" is not a medical term. It is a common name used to refer to insects belonging to the order Coleoptera, which is one of the largest orders in the class Insecta. Beetles are characterized by their hardened forewings, known as elytra, which protect their hind wings and body when not in use for flying.

There are many different species of beetles found all over the world, and some can have an impact on human health. For example, certain types of beetles, such as bed bugs and carpet beetles, can cause skin irritation and allergic reactions in some people. Other beetles, like the Colorado potato beetle, can damage crops and lead to economic losses for farmers. However, it is important to note that most beetles are not harmful to humans and play an essential role in ecosystems as decomposers and pollinators.

Gametogenesis in plants refers to the process of formation and development of gametes or sex cells (male: sperm and female: egg) through meiotic cell division. This process occurs within specialized reproductive organs called anthers (in male gametophyte) and ovules (in female gametophyte).

In the case of male gametogenesis, also known as microsporogenesis, diploid microspore mother cells undergo meiosis to produce haploid microspores. These microspores further develop into mature pollen grains through a process called pollen grain development or maturation.

Female gametogenesis, also known as megasporogenesis, involves the formation of megaspore mother cells within the ovule sac. The megaspore mother cell undergoes meiosis to produce four haploid megaspores. Only one of these megaspores survives and develops into a multicellular female gametophyte, also known as an embryo sac. This embryo sac contains several cells, including the egg cell, two synergids, three antipodal cells, and two polar nuclei.

These male and female gametes are involved in fertilization to form a zygote, which eventually develops into a new plant through the process of embryogenesis.

Insertional mutagenesis is a process of introducing new genetic material into an organism's genome at a specific location, which can result in a change or disruption of the function of the gene at that site. This technique is often used in molecular biology research to study gene function and regulation. The introduction of the foreign DNA is typically accomplished through the use of mobile genetic elements, such as transposons or viruses, which are capable of inserting themselves into the genome.

The insertion of the new genetic material can lead to a loss or gain of function in the affected gene, resulting in a mutation. This type of mutagenesis is called "insertional" because the mutation is caused by the insertion of foreign DNA into the genome. The effects of insertional mutagenesis can range from subtle changes in gene expression to the complete inactivation of a gene.

This technique has been widely used in genetic research, including the study of developmental biology, cancer, and genetic diseases. It is also used in the development of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) for agricultural and industrial applications.

In a medical context, "resins, plant" refer to the sticky, often aromatic substances produced by certain plants. These resins are typically composed of a mixture of volatile oils, terpenes, and rosin acids. They may be present in various parts of the plant, including leaves, stems, and roots, and are often found in specialized structures such as glands or ducts.

Plant resins have been used for centuries in traditional medicine and other applications. Some resins have antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, or analgesic properties and have been used to treat a variety of ailments, including skin conditions, respiratory infections, and pain.

Examples of plant resins with medicinal uses include:

* Frankincense (Boswellia spp.) resin has been used in traditional medicine to treat inflammation, arthritis, and asthma.
* Myrrh (Commiphora spp.) resin has been used as an antiseptic, astringent, and anti-inflammatory agent.
* Pine resin has been used topically for its antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory properties.

It's important to note that while some plant resins have demonstrated medicinal benefits, they should be used with caution and under the guidance of a healthcare professional. Some resins can have adverse effects or interact with medications, and it's essential to ensure their safe and effective use.

Basidiomycota is a phylum in the kingdom Fungi that consists of organisms commonly known as club fungi or club mushrooms. The name Basidiomycota is derived from the presence of a characteristic reproductive structure called a basidium, which is where spores are produced.

The basidiomycetes include many familiar forms such as mushrooms, toadstools, bracket fungi, and other types of polypores. They have a complex life cycle that involves both sexual and asexual reproduction. The sexual reproductive stage produces a characteristic fruiting body, which may be microscopic or highly visible, depending on the species.

Basidiomycota fungi play important ecological roles in decomposing organic matter, forming mutualistic relationships with plants, and acting as parasites on other organisms. Some species are economically important, such as edible mushrooms, while others can be harmful or even deadly to humans and animals.

Salinity is not a term that has a specific medical definition. However, in general terms, salinity refers to the level of salt or sodium content in a substance, usually measured in parts per thousand (ppt). In a medical context, salinity might be discussed in relation to things like the body's fluid balance or the composition of certain bodily fluids, such as sweat or tears.

It is worth noting that in some cases, high salinity levels can have negative effects on health. For example, consuming water with very high salt content can lead to dehydration and electrolyte imbalances, which can be dangerous. Similarly, exposure to high-salinity environments (such as seawater) can cause skin irritation and other problems in some people. However, these are not direct medical definitions of salinity.

I am not aware of a medical definition for the term "darkness." In general, darkness refers to the absence of light. It is not a term that is commonly used in the medical field, and it does not have a specific clinical meaning. If you have a question about a specific medical term or concept, I would be happy to try to help you understand it.

Gene silencing is a process by which the expression of a gene is blocked or inhibited, preventing the production of its corresponding protein. This can occur naturally through various mechanisms such as RNA interference (RNAi), where small RNAs bind to and degrade specific mRNAs, or DNA methylation, where methyl groups are added to the DNA molecule, preventing transcription. Gene silencing can also be induced artificially using techniques such as RNAi-based therapies, antisense oligonucleotides, or CRISPR-Cas9 systems, which allow for targeted suppression of gene expression in research and therapeutic applications.

Sodium Chloride is defined as the inorganic compound with the chemical formula NaCl, representing a 1:1 ratio of sodium and chloride ions. It is commonly known as table salt or halite, and it is used extensively in food seasoning and preservation due to its ability to enhance flavor and inhibit bacterial growth. In medicine, sodium chloride is used as a balanced electrolyte solution for rehydration and as a topical wound irrigant and antiseptic. It is also an essential component of the human body's fluid balance and nerve impulse transmission.

Pectins are complex polysaccharides that are commonly found in the cell walls of plants. In the context of food and nutrition, pectins are often referred to as dietary fiber. They have a variety of important functions within the body, including promoting digestive health by adding bulk to stools and helping to regulate bowel movements.

Pectins are also used in the medical field as a demulcent, which is a substance that forms a soothing film over mucous membranes. This can be helpful in treating conditions such as gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).

In addition to their use in medicine, pectins are widely used in the food industry as a gelling agent, thickener, and stabilizer. They are commonly found in jams, jellies, and other preserved fruits, as well as in baked goods and confectionery products.

Bacterial DNA refers to the genetic material found in bacteria. It is composed of a double-stranded helix containing four nucleotide bases - adenine (A), thymine (T), guanine (G), and cytosine (C) - that are linked together by phosphodiester bonds. The sequence of these bases in the DNA molecule carries the genetic information necessary for the growth, development, and reproduction of bacteria.

Bacterial DNA is circular in most bacterial species, although some have linear chromosomes. In addition to the main chromosome, many bacteria also contain small circular pieces of DNA called plasmids that can carry additional genes and provide resistance to antibiotics or other environmental stressors.

Unlike eukaryotic cells, which have their DNA enclosed within a nucleus, bacterial DNA is present in the cytoplasm of the cell, where it is in direct contact with the cell's metabolic machinery. This allows for rapid gene expression and regulation in response to changing environmental conditions.

Bacteria are single-celled microorganisms that are among the earliest known life forms on Earth. They are typically characterized as having a cell wall and no membrane-bound organelles. The majority of bacteria have a prokaryotic organization, meaning they lack a nucleus and other membrane-bound organelles.

Bacteria exist in diverse environments and can be found in every habitat on Earth, including soil, water, and the bodies of plants and animals. Some bacteria are beneficial to their hosts, while others can cause disease. Beneficial bacteria play important roles in processes such as digestion, nitrogen fixation, and biogeochemical cycling.

Bacteria reproduce asexually through binary fission or budding, and some species can also exchange genetic material through conjugation. They have a wide range of metabolic capabilities, with many using organic compounds as their source of energy, while others are capable of photosynthesis or chemosynthesis.

Bacteria are highly adaptable and can evolve rapidly in response to environmental changes. This has led to the development of antibiotic resistance in some species, which poses a significant public health challenge. Understanding the biology and behavior of bacteria is essential for developing strategies to prevent and treat bacterial infections and diseases.

Messenger RNA (mRNA) is a type of RNA (ribonucleic acid) that carries genetic information copied from DNA in the form of a series of three-base code "words," each of which specifies a particular amino acid. This information is used by the cell's machinery to construct proteins, a process known as translation. After being transcribed from DNA, mRNA travels out of the nucleus to the ribosomes in the cytoplasm where protein synthesis occurs. Once the protein has been synthesized, the mRNA may be degraded and recycled. Post-transcriptional modifications can also occur to mRNA, such as alternative splicing and addition of a 5' cap and a poly(A) tail, which can affect its stability, localization, and translation efficiency.

'Vicia faba' is the scientific name for the fava bean plant, which belongs to the legume family (Fabaceae). It is also known as broad bean or horse bean. The plant is widely cultivated as a vegetable crop, and its seeds, pods, and young leaves are all edible. Fava beans are rich in proteins, dietary fiber, vitamins, and minerals, making them an essential component of many diets around the world. However, some people may have an adverse reaction to fava beans due to a genetic disorder called favism, which can cause hemolytic anemia.

Mesophyll cells are photosynthetic cells located in the interior tissue of a leaf, specifically within the chloroplast-containing portion called the mesophyll. These cells are responsible for capturing sunlight and converting it into chemical energy through the process of photosynthesis. They can be further divided into two types: palisade mesophyll cells and spongy mesophyll cells.

Palisade mesophyll cells are columnar-shaped cells that contain many chloroplasts and are located closer to the upper epidermis of the leaf. They are arranged in one or more layers and are primarily responsible for capturing light during photosynthesis.

Spongy mesophyll cells, on the other hand, are loosely arranged and have a sponge-like structure. They contain fewer chloroplasts than palisade mesophyll cells and are located closer to the lower epidermis of the leaf. These cells facilitate gas exchange between the plant and the environment by allowing for the diffusion of carbon dioxide into the leaf and oxygen out of the leaf.

Overall, mesophyll cells play a critical role in photosynthesis and help to maintain the health and growth of the plant.

The term "environment" in a medical context generally refers to the external conditions and surroundings that can have an impact on living organisms, including humans. This includes both physical factors such as air quality, water supply, soil composition, temperature, and radiation, as well as biological factors such as the presence of microorganisms, plants, and animals.

In public health and epidemiology, the term "environmental exposure" is often used to describe the contact between an individual and a potentially harmful environmental agent, such as air pollution or contaminated water. These exposures can have significant impacts on human health, contributing to a range of diseases and disorders, including respiratory illnesses, cancer, neurological disorders, and reproductive problems.

Efforts to protect and improve the environment are therefore critical for promoting human health and preventing disease. This includes measures to reduce pollution, conserve natural resources, promote sustainable development, and mitigate the impacts of climate change.

Phytochrome is a photoreceptor protein responsible for detecting and mediating responses to different wavelengths of light, primarily red and far-red, in plants and some microorganisms. It plays a crucial role in various physiological processes such as seed germination, stem elongation, leaf expansion, chlorophyll production, and flowering.

The phytochrome protein exists in two interconvertible forms: Pr (the red-light-absorbing form) and Pfr (the far-red-light-absorbing form). The conversion between these forms regulates the downstream signaling pathways that control plant growth and development. Red light (around 660 nm) promotes the formation of the Pfr form, while far-red light (around 730 nm) converts it back to the Pr form. This reversible photoresponse allows plants to adapt their growth patterns based on the quality and duration of light they receive.

Selaginellaceae is a family of non-vascular plants in the division Lycopodiophyta, also known as lycophytes. These plants are commonly referred to as spikemosses or selaginellas. Selaginellaceae includes around 700 species of small, low-growing, and often creeping or climbing plants that superficially resemble mosses. However, they differ from true mosses in several ways, including their vascular system and the presence of seeds (although these are not true seeds like those found in seed plants).

The leaves of Selaginellaceae species are small and simple, with a single vein running down the center. The leaves are arranged in an alternate pattern along the stem, which is often branched. One distinctive feature of Selaginellaceae is the presence of microphylls, tiny leaf-like structures that contain only one vein.

Selaginellaceae species reproduce using spores rather than seeds. The spores are produced in small, cone-like structures called strobili, which are often borne on specialized leaves. When the spores are mature, they are released and can be dispersed by wind or water.

Overall, Selaginellaceae is an important group of non-vascular plants that have a long evolutionary history and provide valuable insights into the early development of land plants.

Transcription factors are proteins that play a crucial role in regulating gene expression by controlling the transcription of DNA to messenger RNA (mRNA). They function by binding to specific DNA sequences, known as response elements, located in the promoter region or enhancer regions of target genes. This binding can either activate or repress the initiation of transcription, depending on the properties and interactions of the particular transcription factor. Transcription factors often act as part of a complex network of regulatory proteins that determine the precise spatiotemporal patterns of gene expression during development, differentiation, and homeostasis in an organism.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Liliaceae" is not a medical term. It is a taxonomic category in botany, specifically it is the family name for plants that include lilies, tulips, and related species. In a medical context, you might be referring to the specific plant species themselves, or possibly the allergic reactions some people can have to the pollen of these plants. If you have any more specific questions about botanical terms in a medical context, I'd be happy to try and help further.

Fertilizers are substances that are added to soil to provide nutrients necessary for plant growth and development. They typically contain macronutrients such as nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and potassium (K) in forms that can be readily taken up by plants. These three nutrients are essential for photosynthesis, energy transfer, and the production of proteins, nucleic acids, and other vital plant compounds.

Fertilizers may also contain secondary nutrients like calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg), and sulfur (S) as well as micronutrients such as iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), zinc (Zn), copper (Cu), boron (B), and molybdenum (Mo). These elements play crucial roles in various plant metabolic processes, including enzyme activation, chlorophyll synthesis, and hormone production.

Fertilizers can be organic or synthetic. Organic fertilizers include materials like compost, manure, bone meal, and blood meal, which release nutrients slowly over time as they decompose. Synthetic fertilizers, also known as inorganic or chemical fertilizers, are manufactured chemicals that contain precise amounts of specific nutrients. They can be quickly absorbed by plants but may pose environmental risks if not used properly.

Proper fertilization is essential for optimal plant growth and crop yield. However, overuse or improper application of fertilizers can lead to nutrient runoff, soil degradation, water pollution, and other negative environmental impacts. Therefore, it's crucial to follow recommended fertilizer application rates and practices based on the specific needs of the plants and local regulations.

Salt tolerance, in a medical context, refers to the body's ability to maintain normal physiological functions despite high levels of salt (sodium chloride) in the system. While our kidneys usually regulate sodium levels, certain medical conditions such as some forms of kidney disease or heart failure can impair this process, leading to an accumulation of sodium in the body. Some individuals may have a genetic predisposition to better handle higher salt intakes, but generally, a high-salt diet is discouraged due to risks of hypertension and other health issues for most people.

Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) are short, single-pass DNA sequences that are derived from cDNA libraries. They represent a quick and cost-effective method for large-scale sequencing of gene transcripts and provide an unbiased view of the genes being actively expressed in a particular tissue or developmental stage. ESTs can be used to identify and study new genes, to analyze patterns of gene expression, and to develop molecular markers for genetic mapping and genome analysis.

Recombinant fusion proteins are artificially created biomolecules that combine the functional domains or properties of two or more different proteins into a single protein entity. They are generated through recombinant DNA technology, where the genes encoding the desired protein domains are linked together and expressed as a single, chimeric gene in a host organism, such as bacteria, yeast, or mammalian cells.

The resulting fusion protein retains the functional properties of its individual constituent proteins, allowing for novel applications in research, diagnostics, and therapeutics. For instance, recombinant fusion proteins can be designed to enhance protein stability, solubility, or immunogenicity, making them valuable tools for studying protein-protein interactions, developing targeted therapies, or generating vaccines against infectious diseases or cancer.

Examples of recombinant fusion proteins include:

1. Etaglunatide (ABT-523): A soluble Fc fusion protein that combines the heavy chain fragment crystallizable region (Fc) of an immunoglobulin with the extracellular domain of the human interleukin-6 receptor (IL-6R). This fusion protein functions as a decoy receptor, neutralizing IL-6 and its downstream signaling pathways in rheumatoid arthritis.
2. Etanercept (Enbrel): A soluble TNF receptor p75 Fc fusion protein that binds to tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and inhibits its proinflammatory activity, making it a valuable therapeutic option for treating autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and psoriasis.
3. Abatacept (Orencia): A fusion protein consisting of the extracellular domain of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) linked to the Fc region of an immunoglobulin, which downregulates T-cell activation and proliferation in autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis.
4. Belimumab (Benlysta): A monoclonal antibody that targets B-lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS) protein, preventing its interaction with the B-cell surface receptor and inhibiting B-cell activation in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).
5. Romiplostim (Nplate): A fusion protein consisting of a thrombopoietin receptor agonist peptide linked to an immunoglobulin Fc region, which stimulates platelet production in patients with chronic immune thrombocytopenia (ITP).
6. Darbepoetin alfa (Aranesp): A hyperglycosylated erythropoiesis-stimulating protein that functions as a longer-acting form of recombinant human erythropoietin, used to treat anemia in patients with chronic kidney disease or cancer.
7. Palivizumab (Synagis): A monoclonal antibody directed against the F protein of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), which prevents RSV infection and is administered prophylactically to high-risk infants during the RSV season.
8. Ranibizumab (Lucentis): A recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody fragment that binds and inhibits vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A), used in the treatment of age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, and other ocular disorders.
9. Cetuximab (Erbitux): A chimeric monoclonal antibody that binds to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), used in the treatment of colorectal cancer and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.
10. Adalimumab (Humira): A fully humanized monoclonal antibody that targets tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), used in the treatment of various inflammatory diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, and Crohn's disease.
11. Bevacizumab (Avastin): A recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody that binds to VEGF-A, used in the treatment of various cancers, including colorectal, lung, breast, and kidney cancer.
12. Trastuzumab (Herceptin): A humanized monoclonal antibody that targets HER2/neu receptor, used in the treatment of breast cancer.
13. Rituximab (Rituxan): A chimeric monoclonal antibody that binds to CD20 antigen on B cells, used in the treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and rheumatoid arthritis.
14. Palivizumab (Synagis): A humanized monoclonal antibody that binds to the F protein of respiratory syncytial virus, used in the prevention of respiratory syncytial virus infection in high-risk infants.
15. Infliximab (Remicade): A chimeric monoclonal antibody that targets TNF-α, used in the treatment of various inflammatory diseases, including Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, rheumatoid arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis.
16. Natalizumab (Tysabri): A humanized monoclonal antibody that binds to α4β1 integrin, used in the treatment of multiple sclerosis and Crohn's disease.
17. Adalimumab (Humira): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets TNF-α, used in the treatment of various inflammatory diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, Crohn's disease, and ulcerative colitis.
18. Golimumab (Simponi): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets TNF-α, used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and ulcerative colitis.
19. Certolizumab pegol (Cimzia): A PEGylated Fab' fragment of a humanized monoclonal antibody that targets TNF-α, used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and Crohn's disease.
20. Ustekinumab (Stelara): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets IL-12 and IL-23, used in the treatment of psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, and Crohn's disease.
21. Secukinumab (Cosentyx): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets IL-17A, used in the treatment of psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis.
22. Ixekizumab (Taltz): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets IL-17A, used in the treatment of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis.
23. Brodalumab (Siliq): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets IL-17 receptor A, used in the treatment of psoriasis.
24. Sarilumab (Kevzara): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets the IL-6 receptor, used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.
25. Tocilizumab (Actemra): A humanized monoclonal antibody that targets the IL-6 receptor, used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis, polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis, giant cell arteritis, and chimeric antigen receptor T-cell-induced cytokine release syndrome.
26. Siltuximab (Sylvant): A chimeric monoclonal antibody that targets IL-6, used in the treatment of multicentric Castleman disease.
27. Satralizumab (Enspryng): A humanized monoclonal antibody that targets IL-6 receptor alpha, used in the treatment of neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder.
28. Sirukumab (Plivensia): A human monoclonal antibody that targets IL-6, used in the treatment

Genetic engineering, also known as genetic modification, is a scientific process where the DNA or genetic material of an organism is manipulated to bring about a change in its characteristics. This is typically done by inserting specific genes into the organism's genome using various molecular biology techniques. These new genes may come from the same species (cisgenesis) or a different species (transgenesis). The goal is to produce a desired trait, such as resistance to pests, improved nutritional content, or increased productivity. It's widely used in research, medicine, and agriculture. However, it's important to note that the use of genetically engineered organisms can raise ethical, environmental, and health concerns.

'Citrus' is a genus of flowering plants in the rue family, Rutaceae. It includes several species of shrubs and trees that produce fruits known as citrus fruits. Some common examples of citrus fruits are oranges, lemons, limes, grapefruits, and pomelos. These fruits are popular for their juicy pulp and fragrant zest, which are used in a wide variety of culinary applications around the world.

Citrus fruits are also known for their high vitamin C content and other health benefits. They contain various bioactive compounds such as flavonoids and carotenoids, which have antioxidant properties and may help protect against chronic diseases like cancer and cardiovascular disease. Additionally, citrus fruits are a good source of dietary fiber, which can aid in digestion and help regulate blood sugar levels.

In medical terms, citrus fruits may be recommended as part of a healthy diet to help prevent nutrient deficiencies and promote overall health. However, it's important to note that some people may have allergies or sensitivities to citrus fruits, which can cause symptoms like mouth irritation, hives, or anaphylaxis in severe cases. Additionally, citrus fruits can interact with certain medications, so it's always a good idea to consult with a healthcare provider before making any significant changes to your diet.

Inflorescence is a term used in the field of botany, which includes the study of plants. However, I understand that you are asking for a medical definition. In the context of medicine, specifically in pathology, inflorescence may refer to the arrangement or growth pattern of lesions or neoplasms (abnormal growths) in a particular area of the body.

To provide a precise medical definition, I would need more context about how the term is being used. Nonetheless, based on the botanical definition, inflorescence refers to the cluster or arrangement of flowers on a stem or branch. It can take various forms, such as spikes, racemes, panicles, umbels, and corymbs, depending on the pattern in which flowers are arranged.

An antigen is any substance that can stimulate an immune response, leading to the production of antibodies or activation of immune cells. In plants, antigens are typically found on the surface of plant cells and may be derived from various sources such as:

1. Pathogens: Plant pathogens like bacteria, viruses, fungi, and oomycetes have unique molecules on their surfaces that can serve as antigens for the plant's immune system. These antigens are recognized by plant pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) and trigger an immune response.
2. Endogenous proteins: Some plant proteins, when expressed in abnormal locations or quantities, can be recognized as foreign by the plant's immune system and elicit an immune response. These proteins may serve as antigens and are involved in self/non-self recognition.
3. Glycoproteins: Plant cell surface glycoproteins, which contain carbohydrate moieties, can also act as antigens. They play a role in plant-microbe interactions and may be recognized by both the plant's immune system and pathogens.
4. Allergens: Certain plant proteins can cause allergic reactions in humans and animals when ingested or inhaled. These proteins, known as allergens, can also serve as antigens for the human immune system, leading to the production of IgE antibodies and triggering an allergic response.
5. Transgenic proteins: In genetically modified plants, new proteins introduced through genetic engineering may be recognized as foreign by the plant's immune system or even by the human immune system in some cases. These transgenic proteins can serve as antigens and have been a subject of concern in relation to food safety and potential allergies.

Understanding plant antigens is crucial for developing effective strategies for plant disease management, vaccine development, and improving food safety and allergy prevention.

Rubiaceae is not a medical term, but a taxonomic category in botany. It refers to the family of flowering plants that includes more than 13,500 species, distributed across approximately 600 genera. Some well-known members of this family include coffee (Coffea arabica), gardenias (Gardenia jasminoides), and madder (Rubia tinctorum).

In a medical context, certain plants from the Rubiaceae family have been used in traditional medicine for various purposes. For example:

* Coffee (Coffea arabica) beans are used to prepare caffeinated beverages that can help with alertness and concentration.
* Gardenia fruits and flowers have been used in traditional Chinese medicine to treat anxiety, insomnia, and inflammation.
* Madder root (Rubia tinctorum) has been used as a dye and in traditional medicine to treat skin conditions and digestive disorders.

However, it's important to note that the medicinal use of plants from this family should be based on scientific evidence and under the guidance of healthcare professionals, as some of these plants can have side effects or interact with medications.

"Cold temperature" is a relative term and its definition can vary depending on the context. In general, it refers to temperatures that are lower than those normally experienced or preferred by humans and other warm-blooded animals. In a medical context, cold temperature is often defined as an environmental temperature that is below 16°C (60.8°F).

Exposure to cold temperatures can have various physiological effects on the human body, such as vasoconstriction of blood vessels near the skin surface, increased heart rate and metabolic rate, and shivering, which helps to generate heat and maintain body temperature. Prolonged exposure to extreme cold temperatures can lead to hypothermia, a potentially life-threatening condition characterized by a drop in core body temperature below 35°C (95°F).

It's worth noting that some people may have different sensitivities to cold temperatures due to factors such as age, health status, and certain medical conditions. For example, older adults, young children, and individuals with circulatory or neurological disorders may be more susceptible to the effects of cold temperatures.

Potexvirus is a genus of viruses in the family Alphaflexiviridae. These are positive-sense single-stranded RNA viruses that infect a wide range of plants, causing various diseases such as mosaic, necrosis, and stunting. The name "Potexvirus" is derived from the type species potato virus X (PVX). The virions are flexuous rods, non-enveloped, and about 12-13 nm in diameter and 470-580 nm in length. The genome is approximately 6.4 kb in size and encodes five open reading frames (ORFs). The first ORF encodes the replicase protein, while the other four ORFs encode the triple gene block proteins involved in viral movement, a coat protein, and a small cysteine-rich protein of unknown function. Potexviruses are transmitted by mechanical contact or contaminated tools and seeds.

Phenols, also known as phenolic acids or phenol derivatives, are a class of chemical compounds consisting of a hydroxyl group (-OH) attached to an aromatic hydrocarbon ring. In the context of medicine and biology, phenols are often referred to as a type of antioxidant that can be found in various foods and plants.

Phenols have the ability to neutralize free radicals, which are unstable molecules that can cause damage to cells and contribute to the development of chronic diseases such as cancer, heart disease, and neurodegenerative disorders. Some common examples of phenolic compounds include gallic acid, caffeic acid, ferulic acid, and ellagic acid, among many others.

Phenols can also have various pharmacological activities, including anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, and analgesic effects. However, some phenolic compounds can also be toxic or irritating to the body in high concentrations, so their use as therapeutic agents must be carefully monitored and controlled.

Chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) refers to the genetic material present in the chloroplasts, which are organelles found in the cells of photosynthetic organisms such as plants, algae, and some bacteria. Chloroplasts are responsible for capturing sunlight energy and converting it into chemical energy through the process of photosynthesis.

Chloroplast DNA is circular and contains a small number of genes compared to the nuclear genome. It encodes for some of the essential components required for chloroplast function, including proteins involved in photosynthesis, transcription, and translation. The majority of chloroplast proteins are encoded by the nuclear genome and are imported into the chloroplast after being synthesized in the cytoplasm.

Chloroplast DNA is inherited maternally in most plants, meaning that it is passed down from the maternal parent to their offspring through the egg cell. This mode of inheritance has been used in plant breeding and genetic engineering to introduce desirable traits into crops.

Biological transport refers to the movement of molecules, ions, or solutes across biological membranes or through cells in living organisms. This process is essential for maintaining homeostasis, regulating cellular functions, and enabling communication between cells. There are two main types of biological transport: passive transport and active transport.

Passive transport does not require the input of energy and includes:

1. Diffusion: The random movement of molecules from an area of high concentration to an area of low concentration until equilibrium is reached.
2. Osmosis: The diffusion of solvent molecules (usually water) across a semi-permeable membrane from an area of lower solute concentration to an area of higher solute concentration.
3. Facilitated diffusion: The assisted passage of polar or charged substances through protein channels or carriers in the cell membrane, which increases the rate of diffusion without consuming energy.

Active transport requires the input of energy (in the form of ATP) and includes:

1. Primary active transport: The direct use of ATP to move molecules against their concentration gradient, often driven by specific transport proteins called pumps.
2. Secondary active transport: The coupling of the movement of one substance down its electrochemical gradient with the uphill transport of another substance, mediated by a shared transport protein. This process is also known as co-transport or counter-transport.

Volatilization, in the context of pharmacology and medicine, refers to the process by which a substance (usually a medication or drug) transforms into a vapor state at room temperature or upon heating. This change in physical state allows the substance to evaporate and be transferred into the air, potentially leading to inhalation exposure.

In some medical applications, volatilization is used intentionally, such as with essential oils for aromatherapy or topical treatments that utilize a vapor action. However, it can also pose concerns when volatile substances are unintentionally released into the air, potentially leading to indoor air quality issues or exposure risks.

It's important to note that in clinical settings, volatilization is not typically used as a route of administration for medications, as other methods such as oral, intravenous, or inhalation via nebulizers are more common and controlled.

"Ralstonia solanacearum" is a gram-negative, rod-shaped soil-borne bacterium that is a plant pathogen capable of causing bacterial wilt in a wide range of plants, including many economically important crops such as potatoes, tomatoes, eggplants, and peppers. The bacteria are seed-borne and can also survive in water and plant debris, making them difficult to control. They infect the vascular system of the plant, leading to wilting, yellowing, and often death of the plant. The bacterium is known to have a wide geographical distribution and is considered a quarantine pathogen in many countries due to its impact on agriculture.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Petunia" is not a medical term. It's the name of a genus of plants in the family Solanaceae, commonly known as petunias. They are popular ornamental plants due to their vibrant and diverse flowers. If you have any questions about botany or gardening, I'd be happy to try to help with those!

"Medicago" is a genus of flowering plants in the family Fabaceae, also known as the legume or pea family. It includes several species that are important forage crops and green manure, such as Medicago sativa (alfalfa or lucerne) and Medicago lupulina (black medic). These plants have the ability to fix nitrogen from the atmosphere through their root nodules, which benefits the soil and other nearby plants. They are often used in rotational grazing systems and for erosion control.

'Avena sativa' is the scientific name for a type of grass species known as common oat or cultivated oat. It is widely grown as a crop for its seed, which is used as a food source for both humans and animals. Oats are rich in fiber, vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants, making them a popular choice for breakfast cereals, baked goods, and animal feeds. In addition to their nutritional value, oats have also been used in traditional medicine for various purposes, such as treating skin irritation and promoting hair growth.

In the field of medicine, "time factors" refer to the duration of symptoms or time elapsed since the onset of a medical condition, which can have significant implications for diagnosis and treatment. Understanding time factors is crucial in determining the progression of a disease, evaluating the effectiveness of treatments, and making critical decisions regarding patient care.

For example, in stroke management, "time is brain," meaning that rapid intervention within a specific time frame (usually within 4.5 hours) is essential to administering tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a clot-busting drug that can minimize brain damage and improve patient outcomes. Similarly, in trauma care, the "golden hour" concept emphasizes the importance of providing definitive care within the first 60 minutes after injury to increase survival rates and reduce morbidity.

Time factors also play a role in monitoring the progression of chronic conditions like diabetes or heart disease, where regular follow-ups and assessments help determine appropriate treatment adjustments and prevent complications. In infectious diseases, time factors are crucial for initiating antibiotic therapy and identifying potential outbreaks to control their spread.

Overall, "time factors" encompass the significance of recognizing and acting promptly in various medical scenarios to optimize patient outcomes and provide effective care.

Tertiary protein structure refers to the three-dimensional arrangement of all the elements (polypeptide chains) of a single protein molecule. It is the highest level of structural organization and results from interactions between various side chains (R groups) of the amino acids that make up the protein. These interactions, which include hydrogen bonds, ionic bonds, van der Waals forces, and disulfide bridges, give the protein its unique shape and stability, which in turn determines its function. The tertiary structure of a protein can be stabilized by various factors such as temperature, pH, and the presence of certain ions. Any changes in these factors can lead to denaturation, where the protein loses its tertiary structure and thus its function.

Brassinosteroids are a class of steroid hormones found in plants that play crucial roles in various aspects of plant growth and development. They were first discovered in the 1970s and are named after Brassica napus, the rape seed plant from which they were initially isolated. These hormones are involved in regulating processes such as cell division, cell elongation, vascular differentiation, stress tolerance, and photomorphogenesis.

Brassinosteroids function by interacting with specific receptor proteins located on the plasma membrane of plant cells. This interaction triggers a series of intracellular signaling events that ultimately lead to changes in gene expression and various cellular responses. Defects in brassinosteroid biosynthesis or signaling can result in dwarfism, reduced fertility, and other developmental abnormalities in plants.

Some well-known brassinosteroids include brassinolide, castasterone, and typhasterol. These hormones are present in trace amounts in plants but have significant effects on plant growth and development. Brassinosteroids also exhibit various stress tolerance-promoting activities, such as enhancing resistance to drought, salinity, extreme temperatures, and pathogen attacks.

In summary, brassinosteroids are a class of steroid hormones that play essential roles in regulating plant growth, development, and stress responses. They interact with specific receptor proteins on the plasma membrane, triggering intracellular signaling events leading to changes in gene expression and various cellular responses.

... is a classical scientific work on morphology and anatomy in relation to ... 1908-1921) The structure and biology of Arctic flowering plants. Meddelelser om Grønland, 36, Warming, E. (1908) 1. Ericinæ ( ...
... is an official DVD released by Björk on August 31, 2004. It is a 45- ... "Björk The Inner or Deep Part of An Animal or Plant Structure". exclaim.ca. Retrieved 13 May 2019. The Inner or Deep Part of an ... Animal or Plant Structure page at Bjork.com v t e (Articles with short description, Short description is different from ...
The company activities are: reclamation systems; hydrotechnical structures; landfill construction; engineering work; pond ... operating a sewage system and water treatment plant; cleaning town streets and maintaining green spaces. The town has a Fire ... digging; plant hire; road, street and bridge building. Sewing factory, the division of "Alytaus Dainava" (from 1979), which ...
"Toshima Waste Incineration Plant". Emporis. Archived from the original on November 11, 2017. Retrieved May 14, 2020. "TEPCO ... List of tallest structures in Japan Tokyo portal Cities portal Japan portal Geography portal A. ^ This structure is not a ... It also stands as the tallest structure in Japan, the tallest tower in the world and the third-tallest freestanding structure ... In Tokyo, there are 53 buildings and structures that stand taller than 187 metres (614 feet). The tallest structure in the ...
Structure and Movement". Cilia and Flagella: Structure and Movement. ISBN 0-7167-3136-3. Pazour GJ (October 2004). " ... McCann HC, Guttman DS (2008). "Evolution of the type III secretion system and its effectors in plant-microbe interactions". The ... Other structures, more uncommon, are the paraflagellar (or paraxial, paraxonemal) rod, the R fiber, and the S fiber.: 63-84 For ... However, it has also been suggested that the flagellum may have evolved first or the two structures evolved in parallel. Early ...
Popularity of the packings grew in the 1980s, particularly for revamps in oil and petrochemical plants. These structured ... "Air Separation Technology- Structured Packing" (PDF). Retrieved 14 December 2015. "Plant Operations: Packing". Separation ... Structured packings have been established for several decades. The first generation of structured packing arose in the early ... "Structured Packing For Absorption - Distillation Columns". Retrieved 14 December 2015. Koch Glitsch. "Structured Packing" (PDF ...
"Evolution and diversity of plant cell walls: From algae to flowering plants". Annual Review of Plant Biology. 62: 567-590. doi: ... The cytoskeleton provides stiffening structure and points of attachment for motor structures that enable the cell to move, ... The cells of plants, algae, fungi and most chromalveolates, but not animals, are surrounded by a cell wall. This is a layer ... Plants and various groups of algae have plastids as well as mitochondria. Plastids, like mitochondria, have their own DNA and ...
Textile fibre plant; Tool and non-standard equipment plant; Process equipment plant; Metal structures plant; Forging and ... Its structure includes the Faculty of Medicine, the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, the Faculty of Economics, the Faculty of ... The only scientifically known locality of a plant species protected by the Biodiversity Act is that in the Karasivria locality ... Near Stara Zagora, a ritual structure nearly 8,000 years old has also been discovered. During extensive excavations in the ...
Experimentally, the fitness value of a plant structure is determined by removing that part of the plant and observing the ... weeds List of companion plants List of pest-repelling plants Plant disease resistance Plant tolerance to herbivory Plant ... Plant defense against herbivory or host-plant resistance (HPR) is a range of adaptations evolved by plants which improve their ... The earliest land plants evolved from aquatic plants around 450 million years ago (Ma) in the Ordovician period. Many plants ...
28.7 Residential structures. . . . . . . $12.4 Nonresidential plant & equipment . $11.8 Inventories . . . . . . . . . . . . $ ... Structures and equipment . . . . . . $5.6 Federally owned or financed . . . $2.2 Federally owned . . . . . . . . . . .$1.0 ...
Sewage treatment plants in the United States, Buildings and structures in Grand Canyon National Park, Buildings and structures ... The plant was expanded in 1934 to serve the Bright Angel Lodge. The treatment plant consists of a set of bar-screen boxes, a ... The Grand Canyon Water Reclamation Plant in Grand Canyon National Park was one of the first water reclamation plants in the ... The plant operated with its original equipment until it closed. Most of the equipment is original. The historic land embraced ...
Polytrichales are acrocarpous mosses - they have vertical stems with terminal reproductive structures, with the sporophyte ... The stems of Polytrichales have conducting systems which are analogous to the xylem and phloem of vascular plants. The water- ... Unlike the xylem of vascular plants, there is no secondary thickening of cell walls, as bryophytes lack lignin. The phloem ... Their sporophytes have conducting systems analogous to those of vascular plants. Dawsonia superba is found in New Zealand, ...
Structure. 5 (3): 403-14. doi:10.1016/s0969-2126(97)00197-4. PMID 9083109. Li X, Su RT, Hsu HT, Sze H (January 1998). "The ... molecular chaperone calnexin associates with the vacuolar H(+)-ATPase from oat seedlings". The Plant Cell. 10 (1): 119-30. doi: ...
"Structure". Russianhelicopters.aero. Retrieved 6 May 2017. "Russian Defense Business Directory". Federation of American ... Stupino Machine-Building Plant (Russian: Ступинское машиностроительное производственное предприятие) is a company based in ...
The structure of most plant defensins is cross-linked by four disulfide bridges: three in core and one linking the N- and C- ... Plant defensins are a large component of the plant innate immune system. A plant genome typically contains large numbers of ... Plant defensins (formerly gamma-thionins) are a family of small, cysteine-rich defensins found in plants that serve to defend ... Most characterized plant defensins are antimicrobial peptides. Both antifungal and antibacterial plant defensins have been ...
Gutzeit, Herwig (2014). Plant Natural Products: Synthesis, Biological Functions and Practical Applications. Wiley. pp. 19-21. ... Inuzuka, Kozo (1961). "π Electronic structure of cinnamaldehyde". Bulletin of the Chemical Society of Japan. 34 (11): 1557-60. ... Li, Zhi; Nair, Satish K. (2015-11-03). "Structural Basis for Specificity and Flexibility in a Plant 4-Coumarate:CoA Ligase". ... Koukol, J.; Conn, E. E. (1961-10-01). "The metabolism of aromatic compounds in higher plants. IV. Purification and properties ...
The Plant Cell. 19 (2): 656-72. doi:10.1105/tpc.106.045351. PMC 1867334. PMID 17307930. Kerfeld CA (2004). "Structure and ... "The crystal structure of a cyanobacterial water-soluble carotenoid binding protein". Structure. 11 (1): 55-65. doi:10.1016/ ... The Plant Cell. 18 (4): 992-1007. doi:10.1105/tpc.105.040121. PMC 1425857. PMID 16531492. Wilson A, Boulay C, Wilde A, Kerfeld ... The Plant Cell. 24 (5): 1972-83. doi:10.1105/tpc.112.096909. PMC 3442581. PMID 22634762. This article incorporates text from ...
First, antibodies with high specificities for plant SPS also target the bacterial SPS, indicating the structure is conserved ... various studies indicate that the structure of its SPS is similar to plant SPS. ... Annual Review of Plant Physiology and Plant Molecular Biology. 47: 431-444. CiteSeerX 10.1.1.473.6911. doi:10.1146/annurev. ... and Bonpl". Plant Physiology. 95 (2): 623-7. doi:10.1104/pp.95.2.623. PMC 1077577. PMID 16668028. Guy CL, Huber JL, Huber SC ( ...
The plant had been completely shut down for almost 22 months following the earthquake. A destructive earthquake struck a lone, ... While no structure can be entirely impervious to earthquake damage, the goal of earthquake engineering is to erect structures ... The experiment was webcast live on July 14, 2009, to yield insight on how to make wooden structures stronger and better able to ... When such infill plates occupy each level within a framed bay of a structure, they constitute a SPSW system. Whereas most ...
Faik, Ahmed (2013), "Plant Cell Wall Structure-Pretreatment" the Critical Relationship in Biomass Conversion to Fermentable ... they help plants to defend against herbivores and pathogens (biotic stress). Xylan also plays a significant role in plant ... How Plants Make Cellulose and Other (1→4)-β-d-Glycans". Plant Physiology. 155 (1): 171-184. doi:10.1104/pp.110.163360. ISSN ... Given that plants contain up to 30% xylan, xylanase is important to the nutrient cycle. The degradation of xylan and other ...
No plant or structures remain. Wenlock Goldfield was listed on the Queensland Heritage Register on 3 March 2006 having ... Larsen's Consolidated plant, to the north, is located alongside a large tailings dam site over Tunnel Creek. The area of mill ... The Peninsula Mines Limited was using an oil engine driven boring plant. By 1935 the yield was 1,326 ounces of gold (more than ... Surviving plant at the site includes: One-cylinder portable steam engine - Marshall Sons & Co. Gainsborough & London. One- ...
As such, one element of the contract is that the final assembly of the trains will take place in the US, at their plant in Salt ... Structures (RTS). Simmons-Boardman Publishing. June 5, 2015. "TEX Rail Set To Become Reality, But…". CBS DFW. June 28, 2016. "D ... http://www.sltrib.com/news/business/2017/10/13/stadler-breaks-ground-on-railcar-manufacturing-plant-expected-to-employ-1000-in- ...
The CC-type GRXs are only found in higher plants. In Arabidopsis GRXs are involved in flower development and Salicylic acid ... Foloppe N, Nilsson L (February 2004). "The glutaredoxin -C-P-Y-C- motif: influence of peripheral residues". Structure. 12 (2): ... Beside their function in antioxidant defense, bacterial and plant GRX were shown to bind iron-sulfur clusters and to deliver ... Approximately 30 GRX isoforms are described in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana and 48 in Oryza sativa L. According to ...
It was built between 1956 and 1964 with the following structure: caustic soda plant (1960), toxan[check spelling] plant (1961) ... At old plants have been added new ones: fatty alcohols, vinyl compounds, caustic soda. At the rubber plant, new polyisoprene ... 10 Oil Refinery, Borzești Chemical Plant, Borzești Power Plant and Chemical Equipment Company, being the largest industrial ... The petrochemical plant was built in four stages: First stage (1952-1960), comprises the first works from the Borzești Thermal ...
Some types of plant habit include: Herbaceous plants (also called herbs or forbs): a plant whose structures above the surface ... In addition to shape, habit indicates plant structure; for instance, whether the plant is herbaceous or woody. Each plant ... Monocarpic - plants that live for a number of years then, after flowering and seed setting, die. Life cycles Plant structures ... While these structures are annual in nature, the plant itself may be annual, biannual, or perennial. Herbaceous plants that ...
". "Shvabe's structure". Shvabe. Retrieved 30 April 2017. "Загорский оптико-механический завод в Сергиевом Посаде, несмотря на ... On 8 June 2022, the plant experienced a fire, one of several unusual fires in 2022 in Russia. On 9 August 2023, the plant ... Zagorsk Optical-Mechanical Plant (Russian: Загорский оптико-механический завод) is a company based in Sergiyev Posad (formerly ... The Zagorsk Optical-Mechanical Plant is a producer of pyrotechnics and precision optical equipment for the military, such as ...
Plants also show asymmetry. For example the direction of helical growth in Arabidopsis, the most commonly studied model plant, ... In a region of the embryo referred to as the node there are small hair-like structures (monocilia) that all rotate together in ... Early flowering plants had radially symmetric flowers but since then many plants have evolved bilaterally symmetrical flowers. ... In addition to animals, the flowers of some plants also show bilateral symmetry. Such plants are referred to as zygomorphic and ...
There should have been 8080 bars in the whole structure and 576 bars in the Unit 1 reactor platform. The incident was ... Daya Nuclear Power Plant (Chinese: 大亚湾核电站; pinyin: Dàyàwān Hédiànzhàn) is a nuclear power plant located in Daya Bay in Longgang ... In April 2011, Daya Bay Power Plant won an unprecedented four out of six awards in the annual nuclear power plant safety ... Kadoorie envisioned the plant as part of a "grand strategy" to enhance economic links with Mainland China and help to preserve ...
"Ownership Structure". About. Sydney Desalination Plant Pty Ltd. 2013. Archived from the original on 26 February 2014. Retrieved ... The Sydney Desalination Plant also known as the Kurnell Desalination Plant is a potable drinking water desalination plant that ... The plant is located in the Kurnell industrial estate, in Southern Sydney in the Australian state of New South Wales. The plant ... The desalination plant is connected to the Tasman Sea via intake and outlet tunnels. The plant is connected to the water supply ...
"Shvabe's structure". Shvabe. Retrieved 30 April 2017. "Russian Defense Business Directory". Federation of American Scientists. ... Urals Optical-Mechanical Plant (Russian: Уральский оптико-механический завод) is a company based in Yekaterinburg, Russia. It ... is part of the Shvabe Holding (Rostec group). The Urals Optical-Mechanical Plant Production Association is one of Russia's ...
The Structure and Biology of Arctic Flowering Plants is a classical scientific work on morphology and anatomy in relation to ... 1908-1921) The structure and biology of Arctic flowering plants. Meddelelser om Grønland, 36, Warming, E. (1908) 1. Ericinæ ( ...
Structure of the hyperosmolality-gated calcium-permeable channel OSCA1.2.. Liu, X., Wang, J., Sun, L.. (2018) Nat Commun 9: ... 3D View: Structure , 1D-3D View , Electron Density , Validation Report , Predict Membrane ... 3D View: Structure , 1D-3D View , Electron Density , Validation Report , Predict Membrane ... The structure of AtOSCA1.2 serves as a platform for the study of the mechanism underlying osmotic stress responses and ...
Plant Structures, matching, foldable activity, study guide, critical thinking ... Plant Structures: Foldable Activity. To view these resources with no ads, please Login or Subscribe to help support our content ... This foldable teaches students about Plant Structures. Print out the high resolution version of the front and back of the ...
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Jackson). Jackson turned to CDI for explosives demolition design for and felling of the taller structures at the site, once the ... The focus of Phase 1 was to bring the adjacent, but differently configured, boiler structures down, simultaneously, to a level ... who reviewed and then stamped all of the structural modifications which were to be performed by Jackson in the structures, per ... hundreds of acres of low-rise structures and facilities had been cleared by Jackson using mechanical demolition methods. ...
Plant and Animal Structures introduces students to a variety of internal and external structures of plants and animals. Unit ... Plant and Animal Structures introduces students to a variety of internal and external structures of plants and animals. Unit ... 3D unit Plant and Animal Structures introduces students to a variety of internal and external structures of plants and animals ... Building Blocks of Science Literacy Series™: Plant and Animal Structures On-Grade Reader, Pack of 30 #515003B (in stock) ...
We demonstrated by using real data that the prediction accuracies of GP across structured hybrid populations were lower than ... GP models in the structured hybrid population, especially in the environment where yields had higher heritability. GP by ... of the validation population in the training population could increase the prediction accuracies of GP across structured hybrid ... Plants 2016, 2, 16150. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]. *Heffner, E.L.; Lorenz, A.J.; Jannink, J.L.; Sorrells, M.E. Plant breeding ...
We also find habitat suitability for the butterfly to be structured primarily by host plant habitat associations, which are in ... We also find habitat suitability for the butterfly to be structured primarily by host plant habitat associations, which are in ... as well as 20,696 records from 13 milkweed host plant species. We find high heterogeneity of suitable habitats across the ... turn structured by a diverse suite of climatic variables. These results add to our knowledge of range and occupancy ...
Plant growth in elevated CO2 alters mitochondrial number and chloroplast fine structure. Publication Status is Submitted Or ... These changes may reflect a major shift in plant metabolism and energy balance that may help to explain enhanced plant ... Growth in elevated CO2 increased numbers of mitochondria per unit cell area by 1.3-2.4 times the number in control plants grown ... With increasing interest in the effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 on plant growth and the global carbon balance, there is a ...
Learn more about flowers and the vital role they play in the plant structure. ... Flowers are the reproductive structures of the plant. They house all of the plants reproductive organs and make the plants ... Two mechanisms of reproduction are possible in plants: sexual reproduction (which requires two plants or two plant parts), or ... and other animals that help in the reproductive process by transferring sex cells between plants, plant parts, or to new ...
Structure and Functions of Plants,ICSE V - X ... Structure of Atom - I (Class XI). Unlock. Linear Inequations ... This is a concept-building practice test and may not have exact structure as you would expect in the actual exam. Please ... exercise your discretion to attempt it or go to structured Featured Section. ...
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Restoring urban forests to attract wildlife will require attention to forest structure, and planting plants accordingly. ... Planting Plans: A Little Structure Goes a Long Way. by Fate Syewoangnuan , Nov 27, 2019 , At Home Resources, Restoration ... Additionally, a diversity of plant structures provide different niches for different animals to co-exist in the same habitat. ... During our events, many of our volunteers like to know what we are planting, and why we chose those plants. That question is ...
Structure and Function of Plants and Animals - Downloadable Only ... Grade 1 - Survival Traits - Structure and Function of Plants ... 19) Insect Structures and Functions - Matching and Answer Sheet (color - 2 pages). 20) Parts of a Plant - Matching and Answer ... 14) Animal Structures and Functions - Matching and Answer Sheet (2 pages). 15) Structures and Functions in Dogs - Matching and ... 7) Structure and Function - Reptiles Mini-Poster (color - 1 page) 8) Structure and Function - Mammals Mini-Poster (color - 1 ...
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  • Both male and female sex cells are produced within the flower, and as is the case with other organisms, one of each type of the reproductive cells must come together before a new plant can be produced. (doterra.com)
  • These structures are most commonly used for transfer to the female reproductive system of the plant by other organisms like bees or wind. (vetrina-eventi.com)
  • The Structure and Biology of Arctic Flowering Plants is a classical scientific work on morphology and anatomy in relation to the harsh arctic environment. (wikipedia.org)
  • Warming, E. ed. (1908-1921) The structure and biology of Arctic flowering plants. (wikipedia.org)
  • Brown W (1938) The bearing of nectaries on the phylogeny of flowering plants. (springer.com)
  • In most flowering plants, the male gametophyte is produced within the anther, a part of the flower's reproductive system. (vetrina-eventi.com)
  • Antheridia are male sex organs that produce and store male gametophytes in non-flowering plants such as mosses and ferns. (vetrina-eventi.com)
  • Microsporangia are small structures found in non-flowering plants such as ferns and gymnosperms. (vetrina-eventi.com)
  • They are small, round structures produced within the anthers of flowering plants. (vetrina-eventi.com)
  • Nine species (representing seven plant families) in several experimental facilities with different CO2-dosing technologies were examined. (columbia.edu)
  • Different plant species grow to different heights, and the variety of these heights is a major component of structural diversity. (greenseattle.org)
  • Studies have shown that plant species diversity is not nearly as important as plant structural diversity in determining wildlife diversity. (greenseattle.org)
  • The ontology allows users to ascribe attributes of plant structure (anatomy and morphology) and developmental stages to data types, such as genes and phenotypes, to provide a semantic framework to make meaningful cross-species and database comparisons. (oregonstate.edu)
  • The Viola plants had not previously been examined for these peptides and thus represent novel species in which these unusual macrocyclic peptides are produced. (rcsb.org)
  • Petal development, micromorphology, structure and ultrastructure in four Eranthis species were investigated under SEM, TEM and LM. (springer.com)
  • These structures may vary in location and appearance depending on the plant species. (vetrina-eventi.com)
  • The genetic diversity provided by male gametophytes ensures successful plant reproduction, allowing the species to adapt and evolve to changing environmental conditions. (vetrina-eventi.com)
  • Plant traits differed by locale and by plant species. (uark.edu)
  • Oxalate content within the same plant species can vary widely. (medscape.com)
  • The objective of this study was to determine uranium (U) and other metal(loid) concentrations (As, Cd, Cs, Pb, Mo, Se, Th, and V) in eight species of plants that are commonly used for medicinal purposes on Diné (Navajo) lands in northwestern New Mexico. (cdc.gov)
  • Role of soil structure in relation to plant growth Soil structure influences the amount and nature of porosity. (agriinfo.in)
  • The amount of oxalate manufactured depends not only on the particular variety of plant but also on the soil and water conditions in which it grows. (medscape.com)
  • Plant biota samples (N = 32) and corresponding soil sources were collected. (cdc.gov)
  • PENETRON ADMIX, a crystalline concrete waterproofing admixture, was specified to increase the durability of the water treatment plant's concrete structures exposed to constant hydrostatic pressure. (penetron.com)
  • Any excess calcium absorbed by the plant from ground water is extracted from the plant's tissue fluid by the oxalate in the leaves, fruits, nuts, or bark. (medscape.com)
  • What is the first structure to prevent water loss in the leaf? (answers.com)
  • Why does some aquatic plants have hairy leaf surfaces? (answers.com)
  • The two structures in plant leaves that prevent the loss of water are stomata (located in the bottom part of the leaf) and the epidermis (covers the top and bottom of the leaf). (answers.com)
  • Stable isotope analyses of plants and ants, in addition to plant measurements such as specific leaf area, trichome number, nitrogen per area and leaf thickness, were used. (uark.edu)
  • Transport tissue in plants composed of xylem (transports water and dissolved minerals) and phloem (transports food). (studyclix.ie)
  • In a second project I explored if traits of plants that host ants change between lowland and pre-montane tropical forests and if the differences impact plant-ant associations. (uark.edu)
  • Flowers are the reproductive structures of the plant. (doterra.com)
  • Two mechanisms of reproduction are possible in plants: sexual reproduction (which requires two plants or two plant parts), or asexual reproduction (which uses the reproductive parts of just a single plant). (doterra.com)
  • These characteristics attract insects, birds, and other animals that help in the reproductive process by transferring sex cells between plants, plant parts, or to new locations. (doterra.com)
  • Once released, the pollen grain travels to the female reproductive structure of the plant, where it will fertilize the egg cell and initiate seed production. (vetrina-eventi.com)
  • 2016). Fast-slow continuum and reproductive strategies structure plant life-history variation worldwide. (bvsalud.org)
  • Understanding the physical and molecular cues that initiate the formation and function of branching structures and resolve the underlying mechanisms of growth and transport in branched tissues will benefit relevant industries including those involved in fermentation, biofuel production, and health care. (springer.com)
  • A structure composed of two or more different tissues that work together to carry out a specific function. (studyclix.ie)
  • First, nutrient levels in blood and tissues change, followed by intracellular changes in biochemical functions and structure. (msdmanuals.com)
  • This year's theme was "Protect the Source," and it included a children's art contest and a tour of the 25 mgd P. W. Swann Water Treatment Plant. (tpomag.com)
  • Because Frankfort's water utility expects a 50% increase in demand over the next 20 years, and the condition of the existing West Water Treatment Plant was deteriorating, getting a new facility in place became urgent," explains Christopher Chen, Director of The Penetron Group. (penetron.com)
  • The Armstrong Road Water Treatment Plant project was designed and administered by Wessler Engineering and comprised a 12,000-foot water main extension, a new water treatment plant (capacity: six million gallons per day / MGD), and a one-million-gallon composite water storage tank. (penetron.com)
  • The exposed concrete structures of the new Armstrong Road water treatment plant and pump station in Frankfort, IN, are protected by PENETRON ADMIX. (penetron.com)
  • The main questions asked at the community level were: 1) Do network structure and levels of specialization change geographically and, 2) What is the level of resilience of these associations if plants become extinct? (uark.edu)
  • These structures consist of a series of interlocking rings or grids that surround the plant, keeping it contained and preventing sprawling. (ubuy.mg)
  • We demonstrated by using real data that the prediction accuracies of GP across structured hybrid populations were lower than those of within-population GP. (mdpi.com)
  • Including relatives of the validation population in the training population could increase the prediction accuracies of GP across structured hybrid populations drastically. (mdpi.com)
  • Using the widespread herb, Argentina anserina , we measured ecological attributes (population density on the landscape, area of population occupancy, and plant and flower density) spanning a 1000 m elevation gradient, with high elevation populations at the range limit. (nature.com)
  • However, plant density was elevated within edge populations. (nature.com)
  • Despite high plant density in leading edge populations, their small effective size, isolation and clonality could constrain adaptive potential. (nature.com)
  • When the programmers ARE SUCCESSFUL with their STRUCTURING--they are able to create alters that match what you have just read about. (whale.to)
  • This program included participation by CDI's structural engineer who reviewed and then stamped all of the structural modifications which were to be performed by Jackson in the structures, per CDI's design. (controlled-demolition.com)
  • Our research shows that elevated CO2 produces significant fine structural changes in major cellular organelles that appear to be an important component of the metabolic responses of plants to this global change. (columbia.edu)
  • Here we define the structural features of the two apparent subfamilies of the CCK peptides which may be significant for the likely defense related role of these peptides within plants. (rcsb.org)
  • Glover BJ, Whitney HM (2010) Structural colour and iridescence in plants: the poorly studied relations of pigment colour. (springer.com)
  • we also demonstrate the utility of this approach for collaborations on plants and neurons. (springer.com)
  • The budding yeast coevolution network captures the hierarchy of eukaryotic cellular structure and function, provides a roadmap for genotype-to-phenotype discovery, and portrays the genome as an extensively linked ensemble of genes. (biorxiv.org)
  • Branched biological structures are evident across all taxonomic kingdoms and size scales. (springer.com)
  • Several macrocyclic peptides ( approximately 30 amino acids), with diverse biological activities, have been isolated from the Rubiaceae and Violaceae plant families over recent years. (rcsb.org)
  • Here, we report the atomic structure of Arabidopsis OSCA1.2 determined by single-particle cryo-electron microscopy. (rcsb.org)
  • The Plant Ontology Database: a community resource for plant structure and developmental stages controlled vocabulary and annotations. (oregonstate.edu)
  • Modules within the network provide insight into cellular and genomic structure and function, such as genes functioning in distinct cellular compartments and DNA replication. (biorxiv.org)
  • Understanding the structures that contain male gametophytes and their role in plant reproduction is essential to many scientific fields, including evolutionary biology and plant breeding. (vetrina-eventi.com)
  • Stable isotope analysis is commonly used in ecological studies to determine trophic structure. (uark.edu)
  • Flowers are an innovative characteristic of angiosperms, and elaborate petals usually have highly specialized structures to adapt to different living environments and pollinators. (springer.com)
  • Endress PK (1994) Floral structure and evolution of primitive angiosperms: recent advances. (springer.com)
  • For example, a young strawberry plant has white flowers with yellow centers, and so does the adult plant. (weebly.com)
  • These changes may reflect a major shift in plant metabolism and energy balance that may help to explain enhanced plant productivity in response to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations. (columbia.edu)
  • Nitrogenase is the only enzyme that can break the triple bond in nitrogen molecules, making nitrogen available for plant metabolism. (lu.se)
  • In a nutshell, having a diverse group of plants makes for a more resilient forest, with a greater range of resources for wildlife. (greenseattle.org)
  • I found that network structure and levels of specialization in three forests do not vary and that these associations are not resilient to host plant loss. (uark.edu)
  • 3. Easy to assemble and dismantle: the steel structure warehouse can be rebuilt for dozens of times. (mocfa.org)
  • 4. Firm structure: the steel structure warehouse adopts steel frame structure and sandwich panels. (mocfa.org)
  • The Global Mobile Power Plant Market accounted for US$ 1,619.2 Mn in 2018 and is expected to grow at a CAGR of 11.0% during the forecast period 2019 - 2027 to account to US$ 4,052.3 Mn by 2027. (openpr.com)
  • To look at possibilities in the Global Mobile Power Plant Market for shareholder by recognizing excessive-growth segments of the market. (openpr.com)
  • With increasing interest in the effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 on plant growth and the global carbon balance, there is a need for greater understanding of how plants respond to variations in atmospheric partial pressure of CO2. (columbia.edu)
  • Growth in elevated CO2 increased numbers of mitochondria per unit cell area by 1.3-2.4 times the number in control plants grown in lower CO2 and produced a statistically significant increase in the amount of chloroplast stroma (nonappressed) thylakoid membranes compared with those in lower CO2 treatments. (columbia.edu)
  • As a gardening enthusiast, you understand the importance of providing proper support to your plants for their optimal growth and development. (ubuy.mg)
  • To guide and secure the growth of delicate or unruly plants, plant ties and clips come in handy. (ubuy.mg)
  • Plant ties and clips are adjustable, making it easy to accommodate the growth and movement of your plants as they flourish. (ubuy.mg)
  • When it comes to plant reproduction, male gametophytes play an essential role in pollination and ultimately fertilization. (vetrina-eventi.com)
  • The 4 way joint connector is for connecting 4 aluminium rods in a Mainframe fruit cage and plant protection garden structure system. (quickcrop.ie)
  • Plant stakes are versatile and widely used for supporting various plants, including flowers, shrubs, and vegetables. (ubuy.mg)
  • This structure is similar to kalata B1 and circulin A, the only two macrocyclic peptides for which a structure was available, suggesting that despite the sequence variation throughout the peptides they form a family in which the overall fold is conserved. (rcsb.org)
  • This model still shows a large variation in DFT estimate of the energy difference between structures protonated on Fe or on S, 25-163 kJ/mol. (lu.se)
  • This dissertation uses network theory to analyze positive plant-ant associations in three Neotropical forests. (uark.edu)
  • Whether they have deep roots to soak up water, or big leaves to soak up sunlight, their plants are surely unique. (weebly.com)
  • While many students knew some basic structures like roots and stem, students didn't really know their specific jobs! (weebly.com)
  • Plant and Animal Structures introduces students to a variety of internal and external structures of plants and animals. (carolina.com)
  • Whether it be spines for protection or to create shade, or big leave ﻽ s to collect more sunlight to produce food, plants have adaptations just like animals. (weebly.com)
  • It's easier to see similarities with animals (what students are doing in science), but plants can be a bit more challenging. (weebly.com)
  • Whether you have roses, cucumbers, or other vining plants, a garden trellis offers the necessary support while allowing proper air circulation and sunlight exposure. (ubuy.mg)
  • Studying growing branched structures and the dynamics of cellular interactions with both biotic and abiotic cues provides context for molecule production and genetic manipulations. (springer.com)
  • Eco-evolutionary models of spatiotemporal dynamics of plant-pollinator communities. (lu.se)
  • These can be hazardous to use for operators, and appropriate protective structures need to be in place to prevent injury. (worksafe.govt.nz)
  • We have produced guidance with the NZ Contractors' Federation on best practice measures for operator protective structures. (worksafe.govt.nz)
  • This approved code of practice describes good practice for operator protective structures, operator training, loading for transportation, and seat belts. (worksafe.govt.nz)
  • Protective outer layer of tissue in plants. (studyclix.ie)
  • We also find that benign abiotic conditions, low degree of competition, and high interactive range between the plants and antagonistic herbivores or mutualistic pollinators can generate a higher level of diversification in both herbivores and pollinators. (lu.se)
  • These structure function relationships are useful for designing new ACE inhibitors and potential blood-pressure-lowering compounds based on phenolic compounds. (ugent.be)
  • The structure and function of nerve cells. (brightstorm.com)
  • That means Engineering will not increase powergrid on any of the new Citadels for instance, and that none of the missile support skills will function for the structure missile launchers. (eveonline.com)
  • Mixed with fresh concrete, it triggers a catalytic reaction to form a non-soluble crystalline structure throughout the pores and capillary tracts of the concrete, sealing it tightly from water or liquid penetration. (penetron.com)
  • First, we use experimental data of structures and reactions related to nitrogenase to see what DFT functionals give the most accurate results. (lu.se)
  • Rigs: provide further specialization into a specific structure role. (eveonline.com)
  • While it was orig- inally thought that CBD was the metabolic parent to THC in the cannabis plant, rather, they are both bio- synthesised as THCA and CBDA from a cannabigerolic acid precursor (Fig. 2) according to genetically determined ratios [5], and then decarboxylated by heat or extraction to produce THC and CBD proper. (researchgate.net)
  • The model reference control and model reference adaptive control problems are considered for a class of linear time-varying plants with bounded, piecewise smooth parameters. (elsevierpure.com)
  • A controller structure that solves the model reference control problem, with zero tracking error, in the case of smooth slowly time-varying plant parameters is introduced. (elsevierpure.com)
  • When the plant parameters are unknown, the robust adaptive law is used to adjust the controller parameters and establish both boundedness of all signals in the adaptive loop and good tracking properties, provided that the smooth time-variations of the plant parameters are sufficiently slow and the minimum time between discontinuities is large enough. (elsevierpure.com)
  • It is shown that when the plant parameters become constant, the tracking error converges asymptotically to zero. (elsevierpure.com)
  • Employees of the Department of Energy (DOE), its predecessor agencies, and DOE contractors or subcontractors who worked in any areas at the Mound Plant site from October 1, 1949, through February 28, 1959, for a number of work days aggregating at least 250 work days or in combination with work days within the parameters established for one or more other classes of employees in the SEC. (cdc.gov)
  • First graders will be making lots of observations to determine the specific needs of plants and draw conclusions about how the structures of plants help them meet their needs. (weebly.com)
  • When it comes to plant support structures, there is a variety of options available to cater to specific plant needs. (ubuy.mg)
  • In most cases, specific equipment may be required to isolate and observe these structures. (vetrina-eventi.com)
  • What that means in practice is that, while most of the various structure rigs and modules that are going to be available can be fitted into any type of hull, some will be better suited than others at a specific task. (eveonline.com)
  • First graders concluded that plants definitely need light and air to grow, but that the leaves and stem specifically respond to where the source of light is coming from. (weebly.com)
  • What two structures in plants leaves help prevent the loss of water? (answers.com)
  • Painting with a dark colour can make the fence or wall seem to disappear into the background and then you can add plants to be the star attraction. (tidygardens.co.nz)
  • In general, plants that are grown in fields with a high concentration of ground water calcium have higher concentrations of oxalate. (medscape.com)
  • The Plant Ontology Consortium (POC, http://www.plantontology.org ) is a collaborative effort among model plant genome databases and plant researchers that aims to create, maintain and facilitate the use of a controlled vocabulary (ontology) for plants. (oregonstate.edu)
  • These microscopic structures contain the male sex cells needed for successful plant reproduction. (vetrina-eventi.com)
  • Before diving into the structures that contain male gametophytes, it's essential to understand what these structures are and their role in plant reproduction. (vetrina-eventi.com)
  • Male gametophytes play a crucial role in plant reproduction, contributing significantly to genetic diversity and adaptation. (vetrina-eventi.com)
  • Male gametophytes are essential structures in plant reproduction, containing the male sex cells required for fertilization. (vetrina-eventi.com)
  • viii) creation of industrial plants to manufacture micronutrients-enriched flour. (who.int)
  • Although these structures can be challenging to identify, advances in technology and techniques to isolate and observe them are continually improving. (vetrina-eventi.com)
  • A network approach was used to depict all obligate plant-ant interactions within a community. (uark.edu)
  • Mobile Power Plant Market is growing at a High CAGR during the forecast period 2030. (openpr.com)
  • In the greenhouse, high elevation plants exhibited stronger clonal potential than low elevation plants, likely explaining increased plant density in the field. (nature.com)
  • That's why we offer a wide selection of high-quality plant support structures that are durable, reliable, and easy to use. (ubuy.mg)
  • 1. We have 100,000 sqm workshop and 950 workers,we are the biggest steel structure exporter in north of China,I guarantee you high quality and better service! (mocfa.org)
  • Plant support structures are essential tools that help maintain the structure and stability of various plants, ensuring they stand tall and strong. (ubuy.mg)
  • Consumers increasingly choose plant-based sources of protein, but still crave the satisfying taste of meat. (foodnavigator.com)
  • We are steel structure building Manufacturer located in Qingdao China, We were gaining good reputation among our customers for our professional, warm and thoughtful service. (mocfa.org)