A localized proliferation of plant tissue forming a swelling or outgrowth, commonly with a characteristic shape and unlike any organ of the normal plant. Plant tumors or galls usually form in response to the action of a pathogen or a pest. (Holliday, P., A Dictionary of Plant Pathology, 1989, p330)
A species of gram-negative, aerobic bacteria isolated from soil and the stems, leafs, and roots of plants. Some biotypes are pathogenic and cause the formation of PLANT TUMORS in a wide variety of higher plants. The species is a major research tool in biotechnology.
PLANTS, or their progeny, whose GENOME has been altered by GENETIC ENGINEERING.
A genus of gram-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped bacteria that activate PLANT ROOT NODULATION in leguminous plants. Members of this genus are nitrogen-fixing and common soil inhabitants.
Expanded structures, usually green, of vascular plants, characteristically consisting of a bladelike expansion attached to a stem, and functioning as the principal organ of photosynthesis and transpiration. (American Heritage Dictionary, 2d ed)
Proteins found in plants (flowers, herbs, shrubs, trees, etc.). The concept does not include proteins found in vegetables for which VEGETABLE PROTEINS is available.
The usually underground portions of a plant that serve as support, store food, and through which water and mineral nutrients enter the plant. (From American Heritage Dictionary, 1982; Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990)
The functional hereditary units of PLANTS.
New immature growth of a plant including stem, leaves, tips of branches, and SEEDLINGS.
Concentrated pharmaceutical preparations of plants obtained by removing active constituents with a suitable solvent, which is evaporated away, and adjusting the residue to a prescribed standard.
Plants whose roots, leaves, seeds, bark, or other constituent parts possess therapeutic, tonic, purgative, curative or other pharmacologic attributes, when administered to man or animals.
Processes orchestrated or driven by a plethora of genes, plant hormones, and inherent biological timing mechanisms facilitated by secondary molecules, which result in the systematic transformation of plants and plant parts, from one stage of maturity to another.
Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of plants.
Plants or plant parts which are harmful to man or other animals.
Basic functional unit of plants.
The genetic complement of a plant (PLANTS) as represented in its DNA.
Parts of plants that usually grow vertically upwards towards the light and support the leaves, buds, and reproductive structures. (From Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990)
A plant genus of the family BRASSICACEAE that contains ARABIDOPSIS PROTEINS and MADS DOMAIN PROTEINS. The species A. thaliana is used for experiments in classical plant genetics as well as molecular genetic studies in plant physiology, biochemistry, and development.
An organism of the vegetable kingdom suitable by nature for use as a food, especially by human beings. Not all parts of any given plant are edible but all parts of edible plants have been known to figure as raw or cooked food: leaves, roots, tubers, stems, seeds, buds, fruits, and flowers. The most commonly edible parts of plants are FRUIT, usually sweet, fleshy, and succulent. Most edible plants are commonly cultivated for their nutritional value and are referred to as VEGETABLES.
The parts of plants, including SEEDS.
Members of the group of vascular plants which bear flowers. They are differentiated from GYMNOSPERMS by their production of seeds within a closed chamber (OVARY, PLANT). The Angiosperms division is composed of two classes, the monocotyledons (Liliopsida) and dicotyledons (Magnoliopsida). Angiosperms represent approximately 80% of all known living plants.
Any of the hormones produced naturally in plants and active in controlling growth and other functions. There are three primary classes: auxins, cytokinins, and gibberellins.
Proteins that originate from plants species belonging to the genus ARABIDOPSIS. The most intensely studied species of Arabidopsis, Arabidopsis thaliana, is commonly used in laboratory experiments.
A plant genus of the family SOLANACEAE. Members contain NICOTINE and other biologically active chemicals; its dried leaves are used for SMOKING.
The inherent or induced capacity of plants to withstand or ward off biological attack by pathogens.
Multicellular, eukaryotic life forms of kingdom Plantae (sensu lato), comprising the VIRIDIPLANTAE; RHODOPHYTA; and GLAUCOPHYTA; all of which acquired chloroplasts by direct endosymbiosis of CYANOBACTERIA. They are characterized by a mainly photosynthetic mode of nutrition; essentially unlimited growth at localized regions of cell divisions (MERISTEMS); cellulose within cells providing rigidity; the absence of organs of locomotion; absence of nervous and sensory systems; and an alternation of haploid and diploid generations.
The reproductive organs of plants.
Molecular products metabolized and secreted by neoplastic tissue and characterized biochemically in cells or body fluids. They are indicators of tumor stage and grade as well as useful for monitoring responses to treatment and predicting recurrence. Many chemical groups are represented including hormones, antigens, amino and nucleic acids, enzymes, polyamines, and specific cell membrane proteins and lipids.
The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.
A mass spectrometry technique used for analysis of nonvolatile compounds such as proteins and macromolecules. The technique involves preparing electrically charged droplets from analyte molecules dissolved in solvent. The electrically charged droplets enter a vacuum chamber where the solvent is evaporated. Evaporation of solvent reduces the droplet size, thereby increasing the coulombic repulsion within the droplet. As the charged droplets get smaller, the excess charge within them causes them to disintegrate and release analyte molecules. The volatilized analyte molecules are then analyzed by mass spectrometry.
An analytical method used in determining the identity of a chemical based on its mass using mass analyzers/mass spectrometers.
A generic term for fats and lipoids, the alcohol-ether-soluble constituents of protoplasm, which are insoluble in water. They comprise the fats, fatty oils, essential oils, waxes, phospholipids, glycolipids, sulfolipids, aminolipids, chromolipids (lipochromes), and fatty acids. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)
Tumors or cancer of the human BREAST.
Transplantation between animals of different species.
Liquid chromatographic techniques which feature high inlet pressures, high sensitivity, and high speed.
Mutant mice homozygous for the recessive gene "nude" which fail to develop a thymus. They are useful in tumor studies and studies on immune responses.
A plant genus in the family PINACEAE, order Pinales, class Pinopsida, division Coniferophyta. They are evergreen trees mainly in temperate climates.
The variety of all native living organisms and their various forms and interrelationships.
A functional system which includes the organisms of a natural community together with their environment. (McGraw Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
The ceasing of existence of a species or taxonomic groups of organisms.
Genes that inhibit expression of the tumorigenic phenotype. They are normally involved in holding cellular growth in check. When tumor suppressor genes are inactivated or lost, a barrier to normal proliferation is removed and unregulated growth is possible.
Nuclear phosphoprotein encoded by the p53 gene (GENES, P53) whose normal function is to control CELL PROLIFERATION and APOPTOSIS. A mutant or absent p53 protein has been found in LEUKEMIA; OSTEOSARCOMA; LUNG CANCER; and COLORECTAL CANCER.
Proteins that are normally involved in holding cellular growth in check. Deficiencies or abnormalities in these proteins may lead to unregulated cell growth and tumor development.
Immunoglobulin molecules having a specific amino acid sequence by virtue of which they interact only with the ANTIGEN (or a very similar shape) that induced their synthesis in cells of the lymphoid series (especially PLASMA CELLS).
The complex series of phenomena, occurring between the end of one CELL DIVISION and the end of the next, by which cellular material is duplicated and then divided between two daughter cells. The cell cycle includes INTERPHASE, which includes G0 PHASE; G1 PHASE; S PHASE; and G2 PHASE, and CELL DIVISION PHASE.
A cell line derived from cultured tumor cells.
The property of antibodies which enables them to react with some ANTIGENIC DETERMINANTS and not with others. Specificity is dependent on chemical composition, physical forces, and molecular structure at the binding site.
A plant genus of the family ROSACEAE. The common names of chokeberry or chokecherry are also used for some species of PRUNUS.
Substances used to obtain a lighter skin complexion or to treat HYPERPIGMENTATION disorders.
Substances that reduce or suppress INFLAMMATION.
The fleshy or dry ripened ovary of a plant, enclosing the seed or seeds.
Surface ligands, usually glycoproteins, that mediate cell-to-cell adhesion. Their functions include the assembly and interconnection of various vertebrate systems, as well as maintenance of tissue integration, wound healing, morphogenic movements, cellular migrations, and metastasis.
Highly specialized EPITHELIAL CELLS that line the HEART; BLOOD VESSELS; and lymph vessels, forming the ENDOTHELIUM. They are polygonal in shape and joined together by TIGHT JUNCTIONS. The tight junctions allow for variable permeability to specific macromolecules that are transported across the endothelial layer.
Native Hawaiians used this species to stupefy fish. A poison made from ʻākia in combination with other plants was used to ... Possible anti-tumor activity. ʻĀkia is used in Hawaiʻi as landscape specimen. Seeds and flowers are used to make beautiful lei ... There are 12 Wikstroemia species endemic to the Hawaiian Islands. Wikstroemia oahuensis is a relatively common plant in a wide ... This species is highly variable, with the leaves ranging from large and long to small and round. The stems do not snap but peel ...
Some species are familiar as ornamental plants cultivated for their large, colorful flowers. Most species produce yellow ... A. cathartica has been used to treat liver tumors, jaundice, splenomegaly, and malaria.[citation needed] In analyses, some ... Cutting is ineffective as a means of control, because the plants respond to coppicing. There are about 12 to 15 valid species ... The plants do not tolerate shade or salty or alkaline soils, and they are sensitive to frost. They grow rapidly, sometimes ...
Luteolin - anti-mutagenic, anti-tumor, anti-oxidant, and anti-inflammatory. Quercetin - 3-O-β-D-galactoside is common in plants ... Sitosterol and stigmasterol - common compounds found in almost all plant species. Pinoresinol - inhibitor of 15-lipoxygenase. ... and decreased towards the base of the plant. All the gousiekte-causing plants have symbiotic bacteria in their leaves, and at ... showing that the toxin is either from an interaction with the plant or solely produced by the plant. The structure of ...
Fassett was a founding member of the American Society of Plant Taxonomists in 1935, and served as the president of the ... Several species were named in honor of Fassett, including: Callitriche fassettii Schotsman, 1966 Elatine fassettiana Steyerm., ... He died of a brain tumor in Boothbay Harbor, Maine on September 14, 1954. Fassett authored over 100 professional papers, most ...
This plant is clump forming from a thick rhizome. The above ground parts of the plant die back by mid-summer, but may persist ... Trillium sessile has been used medicinally to treat tumors. T. sessile is sometimes cited as having been used as a poultice for ... The seeds have an elaiosome which attracts ants and wasps such as Vespula species. This fatty appendage increases the range of ... CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link) Missouri Plants: T. sessile ILLINOIS PLANT INFORMATION NETWORK: Trillium sessile James ...
He remained there until his death from a brain tumor in 1963. The species Cavendishia campii, Fuschia campii, and ... In 1949, he also served as President of the American Society of Plant Taxonomists. In 1953, he was hired as chair of the ... Receiving new funding from the Garden, he remained in Ecuador with his assistants to collect plants. He collected 5,828 unique ...
The roots of both species contain berberine, a known anti-tumor alkaloid. The plant is therefore considered poisonous. Native ... species in homonymic genus In 1800, Brickell used the name Jeffersonia to refer to some plants in the Loganiaceae, thus ... The Iroquois used a decoction of the plant to treat gall and diarrhea. The whole plant was used in early American medicine as ... Modern medicine does not use this plant. Flora of North America: Jeffersonia USDA Plants Database: Jeffersonia Barbara Coffin; ...
... is a plant species in the genus Torilis. Japanese hedge parsley is considered both an annual and biennial plant in the carrot ... Torilin is a compound from the fruits of the plant and has been shown to inhibit the growth of blood vessels in tumor ... The plant's current distribution as an invasive species is in southern parts of Canada and in the Midwestern, Eastern, Southern ... This species has been commonly misidentified with other species within the genus Torilis (T. arvensis), which has inhibited ...
... that homoplasmic mitochondrial DNA mutations may be found in human tumors. The term may also refer to uniformity of plant ... Researchers also believe that this could be a by-product of species hybridization. There is evidence of both homoplasmic and ... For example, a specific type of mutation in one specific area of mtDNA was found to be in several different tumor types. ... In one study, doctors found that a cancer patient's tumor consisted of only homoplasmic cells with mutant mtDNA and that ...
IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2012.2. Downloaded on 30 May 2013. "Couroupita guianensis Aubl. - the Plant List ... Native Amazonians use extracts of several parts of the tree to treat hypertension, tumors, pain, and inflammation. It has been ... Couroupita guianensis is planted as an ornamental for its showy, scented flowers, and as a botanical specimen for its ... The fruits are spherical with a woody shell and reach diameters of up to 25 centimeters (10 inches), which give the species the ...
... is a natural product synthesized by numerous plant species, especially species in the carrot family Apiaceae. ... These studies have shown possible inhibition of 7,12-Dimethylbenz(a)anthracene, which are initiators of skin tumors. Evidence ... blocks DNA adduct formation and skin tumor initiation by 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene in SENCAR mice". Carcinogenesis. 23 (10 ...
They can infect corn plants (Zea mays) producing tumor-like galls that render the ears unsaleable. This corn smut, is also ... The order contains 8 families, 49 genera, and 851 species. Ustinaginales is also known and classified as the smut fungi. They ... are serious plant pathogens, with only the dikaryotic stage being obligately parasitic. Has a thick-walled resting spore ( ...
... a species of perennial plant, the root of which is promoted for its therapeutic value, including a claimed ability to help ... Although it may cause a temporary reduction in tumor size for some patients, there is no evidence that it improves survival ... Quercetin - a plant pigment used in dietary supplements that have been promoted for their ability to prevent and treat cancer; ... Goldenseal can have toxic side effects, and high doses can cause death." Gotu kola - a swamp plant native to parts of Asia and ...
... At: Plant Names At: IPNI page 178 In: Bignonia In: volume 3 Of: Nova genera et species plantarum At: N At: Titles At ... They also showed no cytotoxicity for tumor cells. The pentacyclic triterpenoids ursolic acid and oleanolic acid have been ... Astianthus is a monotypic genus of flowering plants in the Bignoniaceae family. The sole species is Astianthus viminalis. It is ... Astianthus in International Plant Names Index. (see External links below). David Don. 1823. "Description of five new genera of ...
By altering the hormone balance in the plant cell, the division of those cells cannot be controlled by the plant, and tumors ... Agrobacterium does not infect all plant species, but there are several other effective techniques for plant transformation ... Pitzschke A, Hirt H (March 2010). "New insights into an old story: Agrobacterium-induced tumour formation in plants by plant ... from the bacterial tumour-inducing (Ti) plasmid. The closely related species, Agrobacterium rhizogenes, induces root tumors, ...
... tumor-producing Agrobacterium species are pathogenic and do not benefit the plant. The wide variety of plants affected by ... Agrobacterium species live predominantly saprophytic lifestyles, so its common even for plant-parasitic species of this genus ... Performing mandatory inspections of nursery stock and rejecting infected plants as well as not planting susceptible plants in ... from a plasmid into the plant cell, which is incorporated at a semi-random location into the plant genome. Plant genomes can be ...
A tumour inducing (Ti) plasmid is a plasmid found in pathogenic species of Agrobacterium, including A. tumefaciens, A. ... The ability of A. tumefaciens to induce crown gall tumours in certain plant species but not others has been attributed to the ... Adding A. tumefaciens DNA alone did not cause tumors in plants, while very little A. tumefaciens DNA was found to be integrated ... The addition of deoxyribonucleases (DNases) to degrade DNA also failed to prevent the formation and growth of the plant tumors ...
Because chronic intoxication with swainsonine causes a variety of neurological disorders in livestock, these plant species are ... Swainsonine's activity against tumors is attributed to its stimulation of macrophages. Swainsonine also has potential uses as ... Some plants do not produce the toxic compound itself; they are host of endophytic fungi which produces swainsonine The ... 2-dihydroxyindolizidine-two precursors of swainsonine in the fungus pathway-in the shoots of the plant, Harris et al. proposed ...
Some species are used in traditional medicine. Species of Thapsia are herbaceous perennials, growing 50 to 200 cm high. The ... The active constituent kills tumor cells by destroying their calcium balance. A biotech company called GenSpera, Inc. in San ... Thapsia villosa L. Thapsia nitida Thapsia villosa "Thapsia L. , Plants of the World Online , Kew Science". Plants of the World ... About 21 species of Thapsia are currently recognized. It is, however, a complex genus, and some authors may recognize different ...
This species is also cultivated for its wood and planted in coastal landscaping as a windbreak and for erosion control. A ... Some plants are used in folk medicine to treat conditions such as peptic ulcers, tumors, infections, pain, and inflammation. C ... Species include: Calophyllum caledonicum Calophyllum brasiliense plantation Calophyllum antillanum Domesticated plants and ... one shipment may contain boards from several different species. Plants of the genus are also known for their chemistry, with a ...
Laloi C, Havaux M (2015). "Key players of singlet oxygen-induced cell death in plants". Frontiers in Plant Science. 6: 39. doi: ... "Reactive Oxygen Species Regulate T Cell Immune Response in the Tumor Microenvironment". Oxidative Medicine and Cellular ... Oxygen toxicity Pro-oxidant Reactive nitrogen species Reactive sulfur species Reactive carbonyl species Reactive oxygen species ... tumor cell proliferation; and invasion, agiogenesis as well as metastasis. And ROS also control the expression of various tumor ...
It has been applied with plants, bacteria, mammalian oocytes, mouse embryos, and human tumor cells. In 1966, Rotman and ... The phenomenon is widely used to measure cellular viability of many different species including animals, plants, and ... Eugene A. Woltering, Tumor Chemosensitivity Testing An Evolving Technique. Lab Medicine 21, 82-84, 1990.. ... Widholm, Jack M. "The use of fluorescein diacetate and phenosafranine for determining viability of cultured plant cells." Stain ...
prostrata". New Zealand Plant Conservation Network. Retrieved 2020-12-23. "Flora search results". New Zealand Plant ... Like many species of Pimelea, it is poisonous to animals, particularly horses. It was originally used as a source of the toxin ... prostratin, which can serve as a tumor-inhibiting agent. "Pimelea prostrata subsp. prostrata". New Zealand Plant Conservation ... Pimelea prostrata, commonly known as Strathmore weed, New Zealand Daphne, and Pinatoro (Māori) is a species of small shrub, of ...
The plants containing such compounds have been a source for traditional medicine to treat a wide variety of ailments such ... Arglabin is extracted from Artemisia glabella, a species of wormwood, found in the Karaganda Region of Kazakhstan. Arglabin and ... pivitol in human tumors. Arglabin has also shown to reduce inflammation induced by atherosclerosis. It also exhibits ... It is isolated from the epigeal portion of the Artemisia glabella plant, also known as a smooth wormwood, commonly found in the ...
... fast-growing tumors on solanaceous plants. This strain is used for moving genes of interest into many hundreds of species of ... EHA101 was one of the first and most widely used Agrobacterium helper plasmid for plant gene transfer. Created in 1985 in the ... Hood, E.E.; Gelvin, S.B.; Melchers, L.S. & Hoekema, A. (1993). "New Agrobacterium helper plasmids for gene transfer to plants ... This latter strain has been useful to plant biotechnologists who use kanamycin as a selectable marker on their binary plasmids ...
Croton species are used as food plants by the larvae of some Lepidoptera species including Schinia citrinellus, which feeds ... It is a source of the organic compound phorbol and its tumor-promoting esters, such as 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate. In ... Croton is an extensive flowering plant genus in the spurge family, Euphorbiaceae. The plants of this genus were described and ... "World Checklist of Selected Plant Families". Retrieved February 28, 2015. Gledhill, D. (2008). The Names of Plants (4 ed.). ...
For example, plant galls have been characterized as tumors, but some authors argue that plants do not develop cancer. In some ... All species of animals, land plants and most fungi are multicellular, as are many algae, whereas a few organisms are partially ... Riker, A. J. (1958). "Plant tumors: Introduction". Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of ... and land plants. It evolved repeatedly for Chloroplastida (green algae and land plants), once or twice for animals, once for ...
penetration phenotype mixing plant virus Any virus capable of infecting one or more plant species. positive-sense ssRNA virus ... passenger virus A virus that is frequently found in samples from diseased tissue, such as tumors, but does not contribute to ... mycovirus Any virus capable of infecting one or more species of fungi. Contents: A B C D E G H I K L M N O P Q R S T U V Z See ... co-option coinfection The simultaneous infection of a cell or host by more than one pathogen, i.e. by more than one species or ...
... is an ant-pollinated species of parasitic plant in the family Cytinaceae having four subspecies. It is found ... Cytinus hypocistis has been used in traditional medicine to treat dysentery and tumors of the throat, and has been used for its ... was first described and published in Species Plantarum 1: 442. 1753. "Plant Name Details for Asarum hypocistis". IPNI. ... "Plant Name Details for Cytinus hypocistis". IPNI. Retrieved November 15, 2012. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link) "Flora ...
The identification and the in situ localization of specific low-abundant lipid species involved in cancer biology are still ... Finally, this study highlights the importance of characterizing the heterogeneous distribution of low-abundant lipid species, ... Phosphoglycerolipids are master players in plant hormone signal transduction. Plant Cell Rep 2013, 32, 839-851. [Google Scholar ... Grey highlighted (+) corresponds to the localization of the PL species in tissues.. m/zobs. Necrosis. Inflammation. Tumor. ...
Reactive oxygen species. TNF-α:. Tumour necrosis factor-α.. Conflict of Interests. All authors declare no conflict of interests ... Plants produce secondary metabolites that protect them from toxins and insects. Some of these plant metabolites, such as ... whilst two chalconoids from the desert plant Pulicaria incisa inhibited the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by ... and ubiquinone and are the natural precursors of flavonoids and isoflavonoids in higher plants [4, 8-10]. In plants, chalcones ...
How plant microbes could feed the world and save endangered species By Amber Dance. September 6, 2018. ... Surplus chromosomes may fuel tumor growth in some cancers By Tina Hesman Saey. 14 hours ago. ... Plants once isolated to a small patch of forest could, over time, move along a corridor to more fertile ground. ... Ongoing accumulation of plant diversity through habitat connectivity in an 18-year experiment. Science. Vol 365, September 27, ...
... hybrid sterility and differences in ploidy levels are well known for contributing to gene-flow barriers in plants. Another ... Plant Infertility / genetics * Plant Tumors / etiology * Plants / genetics * Plants / immunology* * Plasmids / immunology ... Hybrid Necrosis: Autoimmunity as a Potential Gene-Flow Barrier in Plant Species Nat Rev Genet. 2007 May;8(5):382-93. doi: ... hybrid sterility and differences in ploidy levels are well known for contributing to gene-flow barriers in plants. Another ...
Alkaline Phosphatase (Placental) / PLAP (Germ Cell Tumor Marker) Antibody, Mouse Monoclonal Antibody [Clone GM022 ] validated ... Plant. Species Independent. Beluga. Trichinella spiralis. Shark. Carp. E.coli. Crab. Insect. Toxoplasma gondii. Human. P. ... Plants. African elephant. Rhesus. Medaka. Cow. Squirrel. Opossum. Sheep. Virus. Horse. Guinea Pig. Gerbil. Fungi. Drosophila. ... All Species. S. Aureus. ZA. Yeast. Xenopus. Vaccinia Virus. SARS. Neisseria Gonorrhoeae. EBV. C.Elegans. Dog. Fish. ...
... and acts as a tumor suppressor in many tumor types. Order the TP53 antibody from Abgent today! ... Plant. Species Independent. Beluga. Trichinella spiralis. Shark. Carp. E.coli. Crab. Insect. Toxoplasma gondii. Human. P. ... Plants. African elephant. Rhesus. Medaka. Cow. Squirrel. Opossum. Sheep. Virus. Horse. Guinea Pig. Gerbil. Fungi. Drosophila. ... All Species. S. Aureus. ZA. Yeast. Xenopus. Vaccinia Virus. SARS. Neisseria Gonorrhoeae. EBV. C.Elegans. Dog. Fish. ...
More than 50 species of plants are potential hosts for Wound tumor virus. It was first reported in Melilotus officinalis. The ... Wound tumor virus is an invertebrate and plant virus found in the United States of America belonging to the genus Phytoreovirus ... virus causes tumors to form on the plant at the stem and roots - with the root tumors being more severe. The virus is spread by ... NCBI database entry for Wound tumor virus v t e v t e. ...
Plant Extracts / pharmacology*. Reactive Oxygen Species. Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha / antagonists & inhibitors, metabolism. ... 0/Anti-Inflammatory Agents; 0/Antioxidants; 0/NF-kappa B; 0/Plant Extracts; 0/Reactive Oxygen Species; 0/Tumor Necrosis Factor- ... Ginkgo biloba extract inhibits tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced reactive oxygen species generation, transcription factor ... Keywords: Keywords Atherosclerosis, Cell adhesion molecules, Aronia Melanocarpa, Nuclear factor-κB, Reactive oxygen species.. ...
The apterous viviparous female and alate oviparous female of a new aphid species, Tamalia milleri sp. nov., a representative of ... Plant Tumors / parasitology* ... A new species of the nearctic gall-forming genus Tamalia Baker ... The apterous viviparous female and alate oviparous female of a new aphid species, Tamalia milleri sp. nov., a representative of ... The distribution of Tamalia and a key to identification of the known species of the genus are provided. ...
Worlds Largest Inventory of Known Plant Species Compiled by German Researchers. "Symphony of Cellular Activities" Revealed by ... How an Infectious Tumor in Endangered Tasmanian Devils Evolved As It Spread. ... "Rubisco is the primary driver for producing food, so it can take CO2 from the atmosphere and fix that into sugar for plants and ... In a study appearing in Nature Plants, Banda and researchers from UC Davis, UC Berkeley, and Berkeley Lab report the discovery ...
All species were used in steam sauna and bath, but only 3 species were used in hotbed and mother roasting. Essential oils of ... and postpartum plant use and salience. Essential oils from the main species used were extracted using steam distillation and ... which species are used, the medicinal properties of these species, and the medicinal efficacy of their chemical constituents. ... Steam sauna medicinal plant use through dermal condensation of essential oils, and steam bath cleansing of the perineal area is ...
Other species still show marked contamination: livestock, birds, fish, plants and trees. Grazing sheep in the UK, 2,000 miles ... cancers and noncancerous tumors. Photographs of the tumors and birth defects are frightening. ... In 1986, Chernobyl 4 was state of the art and its lid was stronger than domes covering some plants in the US. Soviet engineers ... At least new nuclear plants are safe, right? The Nuclear Regulatory Commission ruled the flagship of new designs, the Toshiba- ...
Independent plant, microbe and insect reserach provides only a limited view of the biotic interactions that dictate plant- ... and plant protection. Such compounds are industrially exploitable, and biotechnological endeavors have produced actinomycetal ... or numerous secondary allelopathic plant compounds that act as chemical defense and provide unique bio-fertilizer and ... Terrestrial plants, inter alia Eucalyptus trees, have evolved direct and indirect associations with microbes and insects. Each ...
They are native to Asia and are an invasive plant species in South Africa. They spread through the dispersal of seeds. ... Traditionally, they are used to treat bronchitis, leprosy, and tumor. Their bark works as an astringent, tonic, and ... The researchers found that seed extracts of the two plants contain phenolic and flavonoids compounds, both of which are known ... Scientists have discovered a way to destroy cancer tumors using nothing but sound waves - NaturalNews.com ...
This bacterium has the widest host range of any plant pathogen. It is capable of causing tumors, or ... It is capable of causing tumors, or "galls," on virtually all plant species, except the monocots (grasses). A similar bacterium ... and canes of infected plants. These galls interfere with water and nutrient flow in the plants. Seriously infected plants may ... The tops of infected plants may appear normal. If infection is severe, plants may be stunted, produce dry, poorly developed ...
Scopoletin is a coumarin compound, which can be found in several Artemisia species and other plant genera. Microarray-based RNA ... In conclusion, scopoletin might serve as lead compound for drug development because of its favorable activity against tumor ... This was also true for the expression of the oncogene EGFR and the mutational status of the tumor suppressor gene, TP53. ... Scopoletin is a coumarin compound, which can be found in several Artemisia species and other plant genera. Microarray-based RNA ...
Berberine was detected in four of investigated plant species-C. majus, M. cordata, B. thunbergii, and M. aquifolium. The lowest ... According to literature reports, sanguinarine induces apoptosis of many tumor cell lines [2, 3]. Berberine also possesses ... many western communities still use the plant-based drugs, including plants from traditional Chinese medicine. The plant-based ... In this paper, we report on the separation and determination of four isoquinoline alkaloids in nine plant species in order to ...
cultivar (from cultivated + variety) (abbr: cv.) A category of plants that are, firstly, below the level of a sub-species ... a bacterial gene carried by the Ti plasmid is transferred by the bacteria into a higher plant cell, where it causes a tumour- ... 2. Plant. Part of a plant with a genetically different constitution as compared with other parts of the same plant. It may ... crown The region at the base of the stem of cereals and forage species from which tillers or branches arise. In woody plants, ...
Native Hawaiians used this species to stupefy fish. A poison made from ʻākia in combination with other plants was used to ... Possible anti-tumor activity. ʻĀkia is used in Hawaiʻi as landscape specimen. Seeds and flowers are used to make beautiful lei ... There are 12 Wikstroemia species endemic to the Hawaiian Islands. Wikstroemia oahuensis is a relatively common plant in a wide ... This species is highly variable, with the leaves ranging from large and long to small and round. The stems do not snap but peel ...
Useful in biliousness, asthma and cough, poultice for tumour and pile. Fruit edible, carminative, diuretic and deobstruent. ... Present findings confined to 10 fruit plant species belonging to 10 genera of 9 families. The plant species are: Citrullus ... Fruit Plant Species Mentioned in the Holy Quran and Ahadith and Their Ethnomedicinal Importance 1 ... Plants species were arranged in systematic order of botanical names in alphabetic order followed by family, Quranic name, ...
... shows that levels currently considered safe can cause tumors an... ... wild plant with resistence to RoundUp. The truth is, we know far too little about how genes transfer between species to rule ... Actually, glyphosate is dangerous for plants only. However, the molecule has to find its way across the cell walls of the plant ... Actually, glyphosate is dangerous for plants only. However, the molecule has to find its way across the cell walls of the plant ...
Palliative Radiation of Chest Tumors. Current Cancer Therapy Reviews. *Improving the Efficacy of Plant Polyphenols. Anti-Cancer ... What Makes Species Productive of Anti-Cancer Drugs? Clues from Drugs Species Origin, Druglikeness, Target and Pathway. Author( ... Title:What Makes Species Productive of Anti-Cancer Drugs? Clues from Drugs Species Origin, Druglikeness, Target and Pathway ... Pan, L.; Chai, H.B.; Kinghorn, A.D. Discovery of new anticancer agents from higher plants. Front. Biosci. (Schol. Ed.), 2012, 4 ...
Reactive Oxygen Species Regulate T Cell Immune Response in the Tumor Microenvironment ... To evaluate plant defense response, oxidative burst and phenol-oxidizing enzymes were assayed.. Resistance/susceptibility of ... Antioxidant enzymes involves in scavenging reactive oxygen species in the cellular system and safe guard the cells from ... the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by certain cells, particularly MACROPHAGES and NEUTROPHILS, following challenge ...
In the deal-with-it manner of all plants, the tree just grows around the tumor - another benefit of being a plant. On the other ... Another Agrobacterium species causes "hairy-root disease," a cancerlike proliferation of root tissue. Various fungi and viruses ... I know this question is going to sound oddball, but do plants get cancer? Considering the fact that plants grow, as do all ... For example, trees and other woody plants get galls, tissue masses caused by the bacterial plant pathogen Agrobacterium ...
... a new plant-based drug called APG-157 showed signs of helping patients fight oral and oropharyngeal cancers. These cancers are ... For the cancer patients who took the medication, there was a decrease in Bacteroides and an increase in T cells in the tumor ... The therapy also reduced the relative abundance of Bacteroides species, a group of gram-negative bacteria. Gram negative refers ... New plant-based drug shown to help patients with head and neck cancers. *Download PDF Copy ...
Agrobacterium does not infect all plant species, but there are several other effective techniques for plant transformation ... from the bacterial tumour-inducing (Ti) plasmid. The closely related species, Agrobacterium rhizogenes, induces root tumors, ... Agrobacterium-induced tumour formation in plants by plant transformation". The EMBO Journal. 29 (6): 1021-32. doi:10.1038/emboj ... By altering the hormone balance in the plant cell, the division of those cells cannot be controlled by the plant, and tumors ...
38) In addition, the antiepileptic properties of plant species such as Aconitum species, Piper species, and Rauwolfia ... of a Gloriosa superba extract improves the in vivo antitumoural activity of gemcitabine in a murine pancreatic tumour model ... Phytochemical screening and Antimicrobial studies were carried out in a medicinally important plant species, Rauwolfia ... 1. (Plants) any tropical tree or shrub of the apocynaceous genus Rauwolfia, esp R. serpentina of SE Asia ...
... another South American plant; in fact, it is native practice to almost always combine these two plant species. ... Some constituents or groups of constituents of lapacho have indeed been found to suppress tumor formation and reduce tumor ... these undoubtedly contribute to the plants effectiveness in the treatment of tumors and infections. ... unaware as to which parts of the plant contain the active material, harvest all parts of the plant; curers, unaware of the ...
The high quality, evidence-based information on each Plant Profiler page is gathered by Natural Standard, the authority on ... The Plant Profiler provides detailed information and bioactive compounds for numerous different plant species. ... Another species, Euphorbia tirucalli L., significantly enhanced survival and concurrently reduced tumor growth in the ... Constituents: Euphorbia species contain methyl esters and derivatives14 as well as diterpene polyesters4,15 and other terpene ...
It is an endangered species. It was used in Ancient Egypt to heal wounds to make ointments. Not sure if it works. plantago ... Ancient Egyptians used it to treat arthritis, asthma, tumors and ulcers. It is toxic and causes hemorrhaging in mice. ... What plant in ancient Egypt was ezov? In the Bible, ezov is described as a small plant found on or near walls,[2] with an ... The plant oil from this ezov plant had to be something stronger than some mere mint oil. Had to be stronger than something ...
  • In the brain, the chalcone isoliquiritigenin has anxiolytic effects [ 19 ] whilst two chalconoids from the desert plant Pulicaria incisa inhibited the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by astrocytes and prevented their oxidant-induced cell death [ 20 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by certain cells, particularly MACROPHAGES and NEUTROPHILS , following challenge by a PATHOGEN . (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Cells lacking Prdx-1, Prdx-4, or both showed increased levels of reactive oxygen species formation and a higher level of protein carbonylation in response to RSV infection. (psu.edu)
  • Furthermore, BA induces the formation of reactive oxygen species that are essential for BA-triggered cell death. (aspetjournals.org)
  • The generation of reactive oxygen species is blocked by BCL-2 and requires new protein synthesis but is unaffected by caspase inhibitors, suggesting that BA toxicity sequentially involves new protein synthesis, formation of reactive oxygen species, and activation of crm-A-insensitive caspases. (aspetjournals.org)
  • We find that BA-induced apoptosis of glioma cells is characterized by a sequential requirement for new protein, but not RNA, synthesis, generation of reactive oxygen species, and caspase processing associated with poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase cleavage. (aspetjournals.org)
  • 2011 ) documented that the antimicrobial peptides VS2 and VS3 enter into C . albicans cells, resulting in the accumulation of reactive oxygen species and cell death. (springer.com)
  • Although in tumor cells, curcumin did not significantly affect IR-induced activation of AKT and nuclear factor-κB, we found that it caused a significant increase in the production of reactive oxygen species, which further led to sustained extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 activation. (aspetjournals.org)
  • The antioxidant compound N -acetylcysteine blocked the curcumin-induced increased reactive oxygen species (ROS), sustained activation of ERK1/2, and decreased survival after IR in HeLa cells, implicating a ROS-dependent mechanism for curcumin radiosensitivity. (aspetjournals.org)
  • The bacteria induce galls or tumors on the roots, crowns, trunks, and canes of infected plants. (osu.edu)
  • The bacteria overwinter inside the plant (systemically) in galls, or in the soil. (osu.edu)
  • The bacteria are most commonly introduced into a planting site on or in planting material. (osu.edu)
  • Avoid planting clean material in sites previously infested with the bacteria. (osu.edu)
  • The agent is a nonpathogenic strain of bacterium ( Agrobacterium radiobacter strain 84) that protects the plants against infection by the naturally occurring strains of pathogenic bacteria in the soil. (osu.edu)
  • The bacteria species Flavobacterium akiainvivens was originally isolated from rotting ʻākia wood, and the shrub lends it its name. (wikipedia.org)
  • The therapy also reduced the relative abundance of Bacteroides species, a group of gram-negative bacteria. (news-medical.net)
  • Agrobacterium is a genus of Gram-negative bacteria established by H. J. Conn that uses horizontal gene transfer to cause tumors in plants . (wikipedia.org)
  • It also carries genes for the biosynthesis of the plant hormones , auxin and cytokinins , and for the biosynthesis of opines , providing a carbon and nitrogen source for the bacteria that most other micro-organisms can't use, giving Agrobacterium a selective advantage . (wikipedia.org)
  • A process for the incorporation of foreign DNA into the genome of monocotyledonous plants by infecting the monocotyledonous plants for incubating the protoplasts thereof, with Agrobacterium or Rhizobium bacteria containing a virulence region and at least one T-region originating from a Ti-plasmid or a Ri-plasmid or both, which T region is provided with said foreign DNA. (epo.org)
  • The transfer DNA (abbreviated T-DNA) is the transferred DNA of the tumor-inducing (Ti) plasmid of some species of bacteria such as Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Agrobacterium rhizogenes. (wikipedia.org)
  • By transferring the T-DNA into the plant genome, the bacterium essentially reprograms the plant cells to grow into a tumor and produce a unique food source for the bacteria. (wikipedia.org)
  • First, the bacteria multiply in the wound sap before infection and then attach to the plant cell walls. (wikipedia.org)
  • Fungi were once considered to be primitive members of the plant kingdom, just slightly more advanced than bacteria. (apsnet.org)
  • Agrobacterium are Gram-negative, motile, soil-dwelling plant pathogens with the species name given based on the disease phenotype associated with the bacteria. (uniprot.org)
  • The tumor is correlated with the presence of a large tumor-inducing plasmid (Ti plasmid) in the bacteria. (uniprot.org)
  • The 400 known viruses are classified in several ways: by genome core (RNA or DNA), host (animals, plants, or bacteria), method of reproduction (such as retrovirus), mode of transmission (such as enterovirus), and disease produced (such as hepatitis virus). (thefreedictionary.com)
  • In a paper published in Nature this week, Jikei University School of Medicine scientist Tadayuki Iwase and his colleagues show how a common species of "good" bacteria frequently found on the skin, Staphylococcus epidermidis , produces a chemical weapon that disables its impetigo-inducing cousin, Staph aureus, includeing MRSA. (thenakedscientists.com)
  • But more than 90% of the volunteers were also carrying a second Staph species called Staphylococcus epidermidis , one of the most common human commensal or "good" bacteria and it seems that this friendly bug holds the key to kicking out Staph aureus in some people. (thenakedscientists.com)
  • Hexokinases (HK, EC: 2.7.1.1) are found in many organisms including bacteria, plants and mammals and play an important role in glucose metabolism. (abcam.com)
  • Nodules are a growth on the roots of leguminous plants where the bacteria reside. (thefullwiki.org)
  • The plant then releases flavanoids , which induce the expression of nod genes within the bacteria. (thefullwiki.org)
  • AMPs possess an activity against bacteria, fungi, viruses, and tumor cells and exhibit immunomodulatory effects (Pasupuleti et al. (springer.com)
  • It is capable of causing tumors, or "galls," on virtually all plant species, except the monocots (grasses). (osu.edu)
  • These galls interfere with water and nutrient flow in the plants. (osu.edu)
  • Galls usually develop on the crown or trunk of the plant near the soil line or underground on the roots. (osu.edu)
  • In early stages of development the galls appear as tumor-like swellings that are more or less spherical, white or flesh-colored, rough, spongy (soft), and wart-like. (osu.edu)
  • In addition to primary galls, secondary galls may also form around other wounds and on other portions of the plant in the absence of the bacterium. (osu.edu)
  • The hybrid plants produced tumor-like calluses and galls on the stem and leaves. (plantcell.org)
  • A. tumefaciens is known for calling the formation of galls on plants that it infects. (kenyon.edu)
  • The disease causes the formation of tumor-like swellings called galls that can generally be found on the crown of the plant just above the soil. (kenyon.edu)
  • In conclusion, scopoletin might serve as lead compound for drug development because of its favorable activity against tumor cells with ABC-transporter expression, although NF-κB activation may be considered as resistance factor for this compound. (mdpi.com)
  • Unfortunately, drug resistance occurs not only with long-established cytotoxic drugs, but also with the more recent small molecules and therapeutic antibodies, which are directed against specific targets in tumor cells [ 1 ]. (mdpi.com)
  • A protective tissue, consisting of parenchyma cells, that develops over a cut or damaged plant surface. (fao.org)
  • APG-157 also resulted in the expression of genes that are associated with attracting immune system T cells to the tumor area. (news-medical.net)
  • This therapy could have a beneficial effect when used in combination with immunotherapy drugs that help immune system T cells recognize and kill tumors. (news-medical.net)
  • For the cancer patients who took the medication, there was a decrease in Bacteroides and an increase in T cells in the tumor tissue as compared to cancer patients who took the placebo. (news-medical.net)
  • It also attracts T cells to the tumor micro-environment. (news-medical.net)
  • [8] By altering the hormone balance in the plant cell, the division of those cells cannot be controlled by the plant, and tumors form. (wikipedia.org)
  • Other secondary metabolites display antibiotic activity against pathogens and tumor cells to different degrees (Li et al. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • Confrontation of fibroblasts with cancer cells in vitro: gene network analysis of transcriptome changes and differential capacity to inhibit tumor growth. (ki.se)
  • Agrobacterium is then used as a vector to transfer the engineered T-DNA into the plant cells where it integrates into the plant genome. (wikipedia.org)
  • The aim of this study was to identify the chemical constituents of different leaf extracts from P. mucronatum and P. microphyllum and assess cytotoxic activity against strains from a human tumour cells. (scielo.br)
  • The tested human tumour cells were NCI-H292 (human pulmonar mucoepidermoid carcinoma), MCF-7 (human breast adenocarcinoma) and HEp-2 (epidermoid carcinoma of the larynx). (scielo.br)
  • Exosomes may have originally evolved in plants as a means of communication between plant cells and as a way of modulating the first-line innate immune defenses that plants deploy upon pathogen invasion (Ju et al. (greenmedinfo.com)
  • CD95 is a cell surface receptor of the tumor necrosis factor/nerve growth factor receptor superfamily expressed on a variety of normal and neoplastic cells ( Nagata, 1997 ). (aspetjournals.org)
  • However, here we characterize a cascade of apoptosis triggered by the novel antineoplastic agent BA in cultured malignant glioma cells that is independent of CD95-ligand/receptor interaction and the p53 status of the tumor cells. (aspetjournals.org)
  • A plant used in Chinese Herbal Medicine has been successfully tested on skin cancer cells and mice. (pacherbs.com)
  • Dried samples from a selection of 76 of these plants were used to produce 253 extracts, and these were tested on various cancer cells. (pacherbs.com)
  • We tested a substance called β-β-dimethylacrylshikonin, which we had obtained from the plant, directly on malignant melanoma cells and were able to prove it had an effect," says Kretschmer. (pacherbs.com)
  • In a study published Tuesday in PLOS medicine , scientists at The Institute of Cancer Research, London, who developed the combined test, used the index to distinguish cancer cells from normal cells in tumors, according to a news release. (foxnews.com)
  • We have known for a while that genetic diversity between cancer cells in tumors is associated with more aggressive disease, and our new results also show that diversity of cells within the tumor microenvironment also contributes to aggressive breast cancer," Dr. Rachael Natrajan, team leader in the Breast Cancer Now Toby Robins Research Centre at The Institute of Cancer Research, London, said in the release. (foxnews.com)
  • Population genomics of tumour cells to find positively selected variants, which probably help the tumour to adapt. (google.com)
  • Malignant breast tumors consist of supporting stromal cells and epithelial cancerous cells. (pnas.org)
  • The cancer cell population is fueled by a reservoir of tumor-initiating cells, and these cells can give rise to the bulk of the tumor. (pnas.org)
  • Breast tumors contain tumorigenic cancer cells, termed "tumor-initiating cells" (TICs), which are capable of both replenishing themselves and giving rise to populations of nontumorigenic breast cancer cells (non-TICs). (pnas.org)
  • G3BP2 regulates breast tumor initiation through the stabilization of Squamous cell carcinoma antigen recognized by T cells 3 (SART3) mRNA, which leads to increased expression of the pluripotency transcription factors Octamer-binding protein 4 (Oct-4) and Nanog Homeobox (Nanog). (pnas.org)
  • Furthermore, these data suggest a possible connection between stress granule formation and tumor initiation in breast cancer cells. (pnas.org)
  • Breast tumors are highly heterogeneous collections of cancerous and stromal cells. (pnas.org)
  • One of the stellar achievements of twentieth century plant biology was the genetic transformation of somatic cells enabling the regeneration of whole plants that were stably transformed and capable of transmitting the inserted genetic material to subsequent generations. (plantcell.org)
  • This achievement grew out of three independent lines of research initiated early in the twentieth century: plant tissue culture, regeneration of plants from single somatic cells, and the study of crown gall disease. (plantcell.org)
  • White (1939a) defined a plant tissue culture as a system in which cells satisfied two main requirements of remaining "undifferentiated yet capable of unlimited growth" ( White, 1939a ). (plantcell.org)
  • Agrobacterium tumefaciens cells attached to a plant cell. (kenyon.edu)
  • When a wound opens on the plant tissue, the motile cells of A. tumefaciens move into the tissue by chemotaxis as a response to the release of sugars and other components normally in the roots. (kenyon.edu)
  • While A . tumefaciens cells without Ti plasmids recognize and move towards plant wounds, the strains containing the Ti plasmids respond even more strongly because they recognize phenolic compounds such as acetosyringone that come out of the wound (Deacon). (kenyon.edu)
  • Intumescences are a physiological disorder characterized by hypertrophy and possibly hyperplasia of plant tissue cells. (k-state.edu)
  • The study has important implications for human health, and is particularly useful for understanding the changes that occur in cells during the development of the tumors that underlie cancers. (eurekalert.org)
  • MMR-deficiency predisposes cells to become tumorous, presumably because MMR-deficient cells lack the gene protection that reduces the risk of mutation in the genes that normally suppress tumor formation. (eurekalert.org)
  • Future improvements in the therapeutic index for radiotherapy depend on increasing the sensitivity of tumor cells to radiation and reducing the effects of radiation on normal tissues. (aspetjournals.org)
  • A relationship between tumor necrosis factor-alpha production and tannin structure. (who.int)
  • The health consequences include increased fetal and infant deaths, birth defects, diseases of every organ system, cancers and noncancerous tumors. (truthout.org)
  • In a UCLA-led phase I clinical trial, a new plant-based drug called APG-157 showed signs of helping patients fight oral and oropharyngeal cancers. (news-medical.net)
  • In spite of the difficulties, the interest remains extremely high, because this plant holds great promise for the effective treatment of cancers such as leukemia, candida and other troublesome infections, debilitating diseases (including arthritis), as well as a host of other complaints. (healthfree.com)
  • Though one would expect rats and mice to acquire cancers similarly, studies conducted on both species found that forty-six percent of chemicals found to be cancer-causing in rats were not cancer-causing in mice. (all-creatures.org)
  • The genetic architecture is generally simple, and complies with the Bateson-Dobzhansky-Muller model for hybrid incompatibility between species. (nih.gov)
  • It's ROUNDUP exposure that's linked to tumors - NOT genetic modifications. (slashdot.org)
  • Agrobacterium is well known for its ability to transfer DNA between itself and plants, and for this reason it has become an important tool for genetic engineering . (wikipedia.org)
  • The ability of Agrobacterium to transfer genes to plants and fungi is used in biotechnology , in particular, genetic engineering for plant improvement . (wikipedia.org)
  • Since dye-linked dehydrogenation activity for several unique compounds related to plants as substrates including opine(s) and l -hydroxyproline had been reported in bacterial cell-free extract from 1950s to 1980s, those genetic and molecular information have only recently been elucidated [ 3 , 4 , 5 , 6 ]. (intechopen.com)
  • In genetic engineering, the tumor-promoting and opine-synthesis genes are removed from the T-DNA and replaced with a gene of interest and/or a selection marker, which is required to establish which plants have been successfully transformed. (wikipedia.org)
  • Biologists from Harvard University are examining whether the earlier arrival of warm weather will clash with genetic programming of plants. (scitechdaily.com)
  • The scientists took the gene and used genetic engineering to add it to a plant called Arabidopsis - a type of cress commonly used by plant researchers. (thenakedscientists.com)
  • The virus causes tumors to form on the plant at the stem and roots - with the root tumors being more severe. (wikipedia.org)
  • The closely related species, Agrobacterium rhizogenes , induces root tumors, and carries the distinct Ri (root-inducing) plasmid. (wikipedia.org)
  • The plasmid T-DNA is integrated semi-randomly into the genome of the host cell, [7] and the tumor morphology genes on the T-DNA are expressed, causing the formation of a gall. (wikipedia.org)
  • The ratio of auxin to cytokinin produced by the tumor genes determines the morphology of the tumor (root-like, disorganized or shoot-like). (wikipedia.org)
  • [13] [14] The genes to be introduced into the plant are cloned into a plant transformation vector that contains the T-DNA region of the disarmed plasmid , together with a selectable marker (such as antibiotic resistance ) to enable selection for plants that have been successfully transformed. (wikipedia.org)
  • These alterations include mutations in DNA repair genes, tumor suppressor genes, oncogenes and genes involve in cell growth & differentiation. (frontiersin.org)
  • For more than two decades, Agrobacterium tumefaciens has been exploited for introducing genes into plants for basic research as well as for commercial production of transgenic crops. (wikipedia.org)
  • Agrobacterium tumefaciens is capable of transferring foreign DNA to both monocotyledons and dicotyledonous plants efficiently while taking care of critically important factors like the genotype of plants, types and ages of tissues inoculated, kind of vectors, strains of Agrobacterium, selection marker genes and selective agents, and various conditions of tissue culture. (wikipedia.org)
  • The bacterial virulence genes expression of approximately 10 operons is activated by perception of phenolic compounds such as acetosyringone emitted by wounded plant tissue and follows cell-cell contact. (wikipedia.org)
  • Then this process succeeds the macromolecular translocation from Agrobacterium to cytoplasm of host cell, transmission of T-DNA along with associated proteins (called T-complex) to the host cell nucleus followed by disassembly of the T-complex, stable integration of T-DNA into host plant genome, and expression of the transferred genes. (wikipedia.org)
  • To interact with host plant proteins many Agrobacterium virulence proteins encoded by vir genes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Both species of worm differ in one of the examined genes by 17 percent, which is twice as much as the equivalent difference between humans and chimpanzees. (bio-medicine.org)
  • Naturally derived antioxidants exert their anti-ageing action via a panoply of signalling systems, many of which engaging reactive oxygen and nitrogen species scavenging, with the Nrf2/Keap1-ARE system and improving the many survival genes and functions (such as the pathway mTOR/Foxo/SIRT1) able to slow cellular senescence. (iasc.org)
  • To carry out cross-species comparison on a global scale, rates of AS have been defined as the number of AS events that occur in a set number of loci or genes and by restricting the analysis to a constant number of genes, EST, or both. (plantphysiol.org)
  • Use natural plant hybrids to distinguish the effect of cis-regulation of genes (promoter sequence) vs trans-regulation (transcription factors). (google.com)
  • They'll trek into deep time to investigate how ancient networks of genes taught themselves to assemble the fabulous jack-in-the-box of a newborn's brain and the monstrous one of a tumor cell. (yahoo.com)
  • Insecticidal genes placed in food plants may jump to other species, creating superweeds. (yahoo.com)
  • So the researchers, led by WHO, sequenced the genes in a common ornamental species of burning bush, to find the gene that produces the key components of the oil - molecules called acetyl glycerides. (thenakedscientists.com)
  • Nif and fix are important genes involved in nitrogen fixation among Bradyrizobium species. (thefullwiki.org)
  • Fix genes are important for symbiotic nitrogen fixation and were first discovered in rhizobia species. (thefullwiki.org)
  • in addition, Argorbacterium is used in numerous research projects as a means with which to introduce new genes into the genomes of a number of plants. (kenyon.edu)
  • The genes that cause gall formation in plants are located for the most part on the the Ti plasmid. (kenyon.edu)
  • Researchers at the University of Oxford have discovered that a cellular mechanism preferentially protects plant genes from the damaging effects of mutation. (eurekalert.org)
  • Whilst DNA sequence mutation is the fundamental fuel of species evolution, mutations in genes are often harmful. (eurekalert.org)
  • In addition, these studies can be informative to the currently ongoing clinical trials with Navitoclax in other hematologic malignancies or solid tumors. (bio-medicine.org)
  • Testicular germ cell cancer, a disease that is rare but growing in incidence in men in the United States, is considered to be among the most curable of solid tumors. (news-medical.net)
  • Study authors analyzed 1,026 samples of untreated breast tumors from three hospitals. (foxnews.com)
  • Violets were also alleged to boast antiseptic properties and were often prescribed by medieval herbalists, as many claimed they calmed pain and prevented the development of malignant tumors. (serenataflowers.com)
  • Radiation therapy plays a critical role in the local and regional control of malignant tumors. (aspetjournals.org)
  • Possible anti-tumor activity. (wikipedia.org)
  • The National Cancer Institute also undertook a twenty-five-year screening program, testing 40,000 plant species on animals for anti-tumor activity. (all-creatures.org)
  • Scopoletin is a coumarin compound, which can be found in several Artemisia species and other plant genera. (mdpi.com)
  • Present findings confined to 10 fruit plant species belonging to 10 genera of 9 families. (scribd.com)
  • Recent taxonomic studies have reclassified all of the Agrobacterium species into new genera, such as Ahrensia , Pseudorhodobacter , Ruegeria , and Stappia , [1] [2] but most species have been controversially reclassified as Rhizobium species. (wikipedia.org)
  • Through his painstaking studies of morphological transformations in human-bred species such as pigeons and bulldogs, and his observations of the changing characteristics of Galapagos finches and so on, Darwin had come to believe that the history of life on Earth could be modeled as a tree, the branches representing the species, genera, and other orders of beings. (cabinetmagazine.org)
  • It contains all plants (species and genera) in the database and the states of USA and Canada where they occur. (uci.edu)
  • Plants that Fight Cancer is an up-to-date, extensive review of plant genera and species with documented anti-tumor and anti-leukaemic properties. (google.co.uk)
  • The third section explores each of more than 150 terrestrial plant genera and species, with a review of their traditional uses, mythology, botany, active ingredients, and product applications, along with photographs and illustrations and an analysis of expected results and risks. (google.co.uk)
  • Oleaceae are a family containing 24 extant genera and around 600 species of mesophytic shrubs, trees and occasionally vines. (absoluteastronomy.com)
  • The Curcurbiteae family, also referred as cucurbits form a very large group with approximately 130 genera and 800 species and can be cultivated in warmer region of worldwide and make popular food crop plants some of these species include squashes, pumpkins, melons and gourds. (omicsonline.org)
  • Another species, Euphorbia tirucalli L., significantly enhanced survival and concurrently reduced tumor growth in the peritoneal cavity in mice. (sigmaaldrich.com)
  • Tumors are incited by the conjugative transfer of a DNA segment ( T-DNA ) from the bacterial tumour-inducing (Ti) plasmid . (wikipedia.org)
  • The capability of this specialized tumor-inducing (Ti) plasmid is attributed to two essential regions required for DNA transfer to the host cell. (wikipedia.org)
  • has an unusual chromosomal organization - it has a 2 Mb linear and a 2.8 Mb circular chromosome as well as a 206.479 kbp Ti (tumor-inducing) plasmid. (kenyon.edu)
  • Nursery stock is dipped in a suspension of commercially prepared Agrobacterium radiobacter strain 84 at planting time. (osu.edu)
  • Another Agrobacterium species causes "hairy-root disease," a cancerlike proliferation of root tissue. (straightdope.com)
  • Agrobacterium tumefaciens is the most commonly studied species in this genus. (wikipedia.org)
  • Agrobacterium tumefaciens causes crown-gall disease in plants. (wikipedia.org)
  • Although generally seen as an infection in plants, Agrobacterium can be responsible for opportunistic infections in humans with weakened immune systems , [9] [10] but has not been shown to be a primary pathogen in otherwise healthy individuals. (wikipedia.org)
  • Plant tumors known as crown gall are incited by pathogenic, soil-inhabiting Agrobacterium species including Agrobacterium tumefaciens . (intechopen.com)
  • The closest prior art was identified as document (8) which provided some indication that some monocotyledons are susceptible to Agrobacterium, as shown by the formation of crown gall-like tumors after infection. (epo.org)
  • The synthesis of the plant hormones auxin and cytokinin by enzymes encoded in the T-DNA enables the plant cell to grow uncontrollably, thus forming the crown gall tumors typically induced by Agrobacterium tumefaciens infection. (wikipedia.org)
  • This natural process of horizontal gene transfer in plants is being utilized as a tool for fundamental and applied research in plant biology through Agrobacterium tumefaciens mediated foreign gene transformation and insertional mutagenesis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Agrobacterium has been known to evolve a control system that hijacks host factors and cellular processes for several pathways of host-plant defense response to invade the host cell nucleus. (wikipedia.org)
  • For the integration of T-DNA into the target host genome, Agrobacterium carries out multiple interactions with host-plant factors. (wikipedia.org)
  • At the turn of the century Agrobacterium tumefaciens was identified as the causal agent in crown gall disease in dicotyledonous plants. (kenyon.edu)
  • Agrobacterium tumefaciens causes crown gall disease by first transferring part of its DNA into an opening in the plant. (kenyon.edu)
  • Both compounds support anti-predatory behavior and inhibit the growth of tumors. (frontiersin.org)
  • With potential to inhibit the growth of Bacteroides species, APG-157 could also improve cancer therapy through oral microbial changes. (news-medical.net)
  • others inhibit growth of tumors or lower blood pressure in mammals. (efloras.org)
  • Wound tumor virus is an invertebrate and plant virus found in the United States of America belonging to the genus Phytoreovirus and the family Reoviridae. (wikipedia.org)
  • The differences between T. milleri and a related species, T. dicksoni Remaudière & Stroyan as well as other taxa of this genus are discussed. (nih.gov)
  • The distribution of Tamalia and a key to identification of the known species of the genus are provided. (nih.gov)
  • Numerous alkaloids have been identified from plants of the genus, some with pharmacologic potential. (efloras.org)
  • To do this and to have many species in same genus (as is) requires extinction. (cabinetmagazine.org)
  • semi-synthetic derivatives of podophyllotoxin isolated from species of the genus Podophyllum (Berberidaceae) (Jacobo-Herrera et al. (scielo.br)
  • The type species of the genus Seadornavirus (family Reoviridae), isolated in Asia. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • The scientific name of the plant is Onosma paniculata Bureau & Franch, a member of the Onosma genus. (pacherbs.com)
  • The p53 tumor suppressor gene ( TP53 ) is the most frequently altered gene in human cancer and also is found mutated in human gliomas. (aspetjournals.org)
  • Biological activity of endophytic fungi of Rauwolfia serpentina Benth: An ethnomedicinal plant used in folk medicines in Northeast India. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • 2008). Endophytic fungi are ubiquitous in plant species and are tnutualistic to their host (Li et al. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • By the early twentieth century, the Tree of Life had been segmented into four major branches or "kingdoms": animals, plants, fungi, and prokaryotes , a catchall term for the vast and largely undocumented swathes of microorganisms that have no cell nucleus-Haeckel's moneren by another name. (cabinetmagazine.org)
  • Fungi may not be our next of kin, but they are more closely related to animals than they are to plants. (apsnet.org)
  • Recent studies have provided support for the recognition of additional phyla, such as Glomeromycota, a group of fungi once placed in Zygomycota that form an association with the roots of most plants (Fig. 2). (apsnet.org)
  • 2000). Based on fossil evidence, the earliest vascular land plants didn't appear until approximately 425 million years ago, and some scientists believe that fungi may have played an essential role in the colonization of land by these early plants (Redeker et al. (apsnet.org)
  • To come up with this figure, Hawksworth estimated the known numbers of plant and fungal species from countries in which both plants and fungi have been well-studied-Great Britain and Ireland, in this case-and determined there were six fungal species for every native plant species. (apsnet.org)
  • The total number of plant species worldwide is approximately 250,000, and if the ratio of fungi to plants in Great Britain is typical of what occurs elsewhere, there should be at least 1. (apsnet.org)
  • Moreover, when immunohistochemical methods are employed, the use of antibodies raised against different phospholipid head groups does not allow the individual localization of specific lipid molecular species in tissues. (mdpi.com)
  • Wounds that commonly serve as infection sites are those made during pruning, machinery operations, freezing injury, growth cracks, soil insects, and any other factor that causes injury to plant tissues. (osu.edu)
  • UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers found that treatment with this botanical drug resulted in high concentrations of curcumin and its byproducts circulating in the blood and absorbed by tumor tissues within three hours after being taken orally. (news-medical.net)
  • Fungal endophytes are microorganisms that colonize living, internal tissues of plants without causing any immediate, overtly negative effects (Aly et al. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • Cell function may be described as producing progression or regression, often found as alternating features in tumors or as variations between normal tissues and tumors. (springer.com)
  • Each of these interactors produce specialized metabolites such as Abyssomycine C, a derivate of the para-aminobenzoic and folic acid biosynthesis (actinomyces), the polyketide Pederin, isolated from the intestine of the beetle Paederus spp, or numerous secondary allelopathic plant compounds that act as chemical defense and provide unique bio-fertilizer and pharmaceutical products. (frontiersin.org)
  • This causes a (re)organization of phyllo-, rhizo-sphere interactivities with insects and microbes in a new environment, thus providing an excellent working model for comparing or contrasting how bio-fertilizer and bio-medicinal active compounds affect plant fitness, adaptation, fecundity, and plant protection. (frontiersin.org)
  • Insects either directly produce for defense relevant compounds, or transform precursor compounds, taken up during plant puncturing, into the end product. (frontiersin.org)
  • can be found among the compounds derived from insects intestinal microbiome, insects or plants. (frontiersin.org)
  • The researchers found that seed extracts of the two plants contain phenolic and flavonoids compounds, both of which are known to possess antioxidant properties. (naturalnews.com)
  • Plant-based compounds are still researched for their anticancer activity and for their quantity in plants. (hindawi.com)
  • It is established that about 120 plant-derived compounds are used in western medicine, and about 80% of the world population use medicinal plants in primary health care. (hindawi.com)
  • Alkaloids are naturally occurring chemical compounds with the strongest pharmacological activity among substances synthesized by plants. (hindawi.com)
  • APG-157 is made up of multiple compounds produced by plants, including curcumin. (news-medical.net)
  • The drug is made up of botanical compounds including curcumin from the Curcuma longa plant, which is commonly referred to as turmeric and is a member of the ginger family. (news-medical.net)
  • The so-called dye-linked dehydrogenases catalyze the oxidation of various biomolecules in the presence of an artificial electron acceptor, in which several unique compounds related to plants as substrates such as opine(s) and L-hydroxyproline are contained. (intechopen.com)
  • An increasing amount of cancer research is being directed towards the investigation of plant-derived anticancer compounds, many of which have been used in traditional herbal treatments for centuries. (google.co.uk)
  • Following an overview of the disease and the diverse methods of therapy and clinical testing, the book provides a detailed examination of the plants whose compounds are currently used in conventional cancer treatment, the species which show the greatest potential as future candidates, and other species with established anticancer properties. (google.co.uk)
  • The text closes with a discussion of algal extracts and isolated metabolites with anticancer activity, a summary of published research for each species, and chemical structures of the most important compounds. (google.co.uk)
  • Essential oils (EOs) are natural volatile complex compounds that are characterized by a strong scent and produced by aromatic plants as secondary metabolites ( 1 ). (spandidos-publications.com)
  • Since species as closely related as mice and rats do not acquire cancer the same, it is not surprising that of twenty compounds known not to cause cancer in humans, nineteen did cause cancer in animals. (all-creatures.org)
  • Plants cannot use atmospheric nitrogen (N 2 ) they must use nitrogen compounds such as nitrates . (thefullwiki.org)
  • Thus, searching for compounds that can specifically stimulate tumor cell death is very important for developing antitumor strategies. (rsc.org)
  • Ethanol extracts of whole plant Euphorbia prostrata and its partitioned fractions may demonstrate anti-inflammatory properties, as seen in carrageenan animal models. (sigmaaldrich.com)
  • Glucocerebrosides found in methanolic extracts from the plant Euphorbia peplis L. are theorized to contribute to antifungal and antitubercular activity. (sigmaaldrich.com)
  • The plant and its extracts continue to be used topically for wound healing and internally to stimulate the immune system. (drugs.com)
  • The extracts of P. mucronatum species showed an inhibitory effect towards NCI-H292 (83.19%/hexane), MCF-7 (88.69%/dichloromethane) and HEp-2 (93.40%/hexane). (scielo.br)
  • Most of the research in this field has evaluated the regulative effects and even pathways of herbal extracts with antioxidant property in the ageing process, and various age-related disorders such as cardiovascular disease, ischaemia-reperfusion injury, coronary and myocardial circulatory perfusion, peripheral vascular resistance, and even neurodegenerative disorders are prevented plant phytochemicals often via their antioxidant potential. (iasc.org)
  • L1 protein was detected in concentrated plant extracts at concentrations up to 1.0 mg/kg in transgenic plants and up to 0.4 mg/kg in TMV-infected plants. (asm.org)
  • They started by analyzing hundreds of plant extracts. (pacherbs.com)
  • The Casearia species (Salicaceae) occur in the tropics and subtropics and their extracts are rich in clerodane-type diterpenes, known as casearins. (academicjournals.org)
  • According to the literature, extracts from Casearia sylvestris exhibit cytotoxic and genotoxic effects in different tumor cell lines, possibly related to the casearins. (academicjournals.org)
  • Twenty-eight extracts prepared from plants used in African traditional medicine and from Rhamnus glandulosa Ait. (encognitive.com)
  • Virucidal activity of plant extracts -- The direct effect of plant extracts on HSV-1 and ASFV was determined by incubating both viruses for 1 h at 37øC with the extracts at the MTC. (encognitive.com)
  • Effect of plant extracts on viral replication -- Vero cell monolayers were incubated for 30 min at 37øC with the extracts at MTC. (encognitive.com)
  • Extracts and metabolites of this plant, particularly those from seeds and fruits possess useful pharmacological activities. (omicsonline.org)
  • On the other hand, with a human tumor, you don't need a backhoe to get it out. (straightdope.com)
  • Numerous in vitro studies performed in recent years have shown that most types of drug-induced cytotoxicity in human tumor cell lines are associated with the induction of apoptosis. (aspetjournals.org)
  • When they come in contact with wounded tissue of a susceptible host, they enter the plant and induce gall formation, thus completing the disease cycle. (osu.edu)
  • carcinoma A malignant tumour derived from epithelial tissue, which forms the skin and the outer cell layers of internal organs. (fao.org)
  • These flies lay eggs in plant tissue, causing the plant to surround eggs with a small, tumor-like swelling. (msu.edu)
  • Biomarkers measure either the levels of a contaminant (or its byproducts) in plant or animal tissue or the organism's biological response to the contaminant. (epa.gov)
  • Tissue levels of pesticides, PCBs, and mercury , which have been used for many years to evaluate exposures in the brown pelican, bald eagle, lake trout, and a host of other fish and wildlife species. (epa.gov)
  • Pathological anomalies in plant or animal tissue, such as damage to plant tissue from ground-level ozone. (epa.gov)
  • Many plant species are prone to physiological disorders in which lesions develop on the leaf tissue. (k-state.edu)
  • This increase stems from higher plant colonization rates and lower extinction rates in connected versus unconnected fragments, researchers report in the Sept. 27 Science . (sciencenews.org)
  • In a study appearing in Nature Plants , Banda and researchers from UC Davis, UC Berkeley, and Berkeley Lab report the discovery and characterization of a previously undescribed lineage of form I rubisco - one that the researchers suspect diverged from form I rubisco prior to the evolution of cyanobacteria. (scitechdaily.com)
  • An international team of researchers has completed the first major survey in Asia of a deadly fungus that has wiped out more than 200 species of amphibians worldwide. (bio-medicine.org)
  • Researchers have developed sensors that can be printed onto plant leaves and reveal when the plants are experiencing drought conditions. (scitechdaily.com)
  • But when the researchers examined the worms using advanced methods for DNA analysis, they discovered that they were in fact two different species. (bio-medicine.org)
  • The new species of worm has not yet been given a name, since researchers have not yet decided which of the two will keep the old name, Lumbriculus variegatus . (bio-medicine.org)
  • The researchers identified one plant that seemed promising enough for further studies. (pacherbs.com)
  • They found that patients who had tumors with a high diversity score plus mutations in the p53 tumor had some of the poorest survival chances. (foxnews.com)
  • Led by Oxford's Prof. Nicholas Harberd, the team looked at 9000 mutations accumulated in five generations of a MMR-deficient strain of the model plant species Arabidopsis thaliana , and compared them with mutations arising in an MMR-proficient strain. (eurekalert.org)
  • At sufficient exposure levels, environmental contaminants can begin to have toxic effects on individuals within animal or plant populations. (epa.gov)
  • We find out how a transmissible facial tumour is devastating devil populations in Tasmania and also hear how the Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) causes cancer. (thenakedscientists.com)
  • According to literature reports, sanguinarine induces apoptosis of many tumor cell lines [ 2 , 3 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • Steam sauna medicinal plant use through inhalation of essential oils vapors can possibly have medicinal efficacy, but is unlikely to alleviate the ailments commonly encountered during postpartum convalescence. (biomedcentral.com)
  • In the production of edible vaccines, the gene-encoding bacterial or viral disease-causing agent can be incorporated in plants without losing its immunogenic property. (springer.com)
  • p>A pan proteome is the full set of proteins thought to be expressed by a group of highly related organisms (e.g. multiple strains of the same bacterial species). (uniprot.org)
  • Steam sauna medicinal plant use through dermal condensation of essential oils, and steam bath cleansing of the perineal area is possibly a pragmatic use of the reported medicinal plants, as terpene constituents have documented antimicrobial, analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Phytochemical screening and Antimicrobial studies were carried out in a medicinally important plant species, Rauwolfia tetraphylla. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are an important part of the natural immune systems and are widely distributed in many plant and animal species. (springer.com)
  • Some of these plant metabolites, such as chalcones, have significant antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antiproliferative properties in a range of cell types [ 1 - 7 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • Considering the fact that plants grow, as do all living things, via cellular division, can some of these cell growths become cancerous? (straightdope.com)
  • L-Hydroxyproline is detected in such hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein of plant cell walls. (intechopen.com)
  • Edible vaccines can be produced by incorporating transgene in to the selected plant cell. (springer.com)
  • According to the release, the study marked the first time scientists accounted for both genetics and cell types around a tumor to predict an individual's survival rate. (foxnews.com)
  • They are also excellent models for many areas of basic plant biology and for eukaryotic cell biology. (danforthcenter.org)
  • The most direct translational impacts of our work will be in algal biotechnology where cell size, growth metabolism, and oil composition are important yield traits, while our work on sexual cycles may enable development of breeding and improvement strategies for algal crop species. (danforthcenter.org)
  • A key regulator of this checkpoint is the Chlamydomonas retinoblastoma (RB) tumor suppressor pathway, whose function in cell size and cell cycle regulation is a major focus of investigation. (danforthcenter.org)
  • Indirect evidence suggests that the RB tumor suppressor pathway might be coupled to germ/soma differentiation and to dimorphic germ cell production. (danforthcenter.org)
  • This produces a plant-growth regulator (or deregulator) called tumor-inducing principle. (straightdope.com)
  • The disease is characterised by a tumour -like growth or gall on the infected plant, often at the junction between the root and the shoot. (wikipedia.org)
  • RhoA knockout fibroblasts lose tumor-inhibitory capacity in vitro and promote tumor growth in vivo. (ki.se)
  • Plants have provided a new avenue in curbing tumor growth. (scitechdaily.com)
  • High cypsela production, variation in cypsela dormancy, intermittent germination patterns and vigorous growth habit make this species a serious invader. (cabi.org)
  • Chloroplasts from higher plants and green algae represent a large fraction of cellular biomass yet it is unknown how their growth is regulated with respect to cytoplasmic growth. (danforthcenter.org)
  • After photosynthesis , nitrogen fixation (or uptake) is the second most important process for the growth and development of plants. (thefullwiki.org)
  • These could be excised from the plant with minimal trauma and grown aseptically for a few weeks in nutrient media, but ultimately growth ceased. (plantcell.org)
  • Reporting that pumpkin exhibiting important physiological properties as wound healing, tumour growth inhibition, hypoglycaemic effects and immunomodulating [ 4 ]. (omicsonline.org)
  • Heat stress is problematic to root growth in the production of containerized nursery plants. (k-state.edu)
  • More than 50 species of plants are potential hosts for Wound tumor virus. (wikipedia.org)
  • They invade the crown, roots and stems of a great variety of plants via wounds causing tumors. (uniprot.org)
  • Bitter roots of the plant help. (crimson-sage.com)
  • The plant roots secrete amino acids and sugars into the rhizosphere . (thefullwiki.org)
  • Our previous study demonstrated that MAF-1A exerts activity against a variety of Candida species, including drug-resistant strains (Zhou et al. (springer.com)
  • In plants, chalcones protect against UV exposure, pathogens, and insects, and their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties make them of increasing interest in the treatment of human conditions such as cancer, inflammation, tuberculosis, and malaria [ 2 , 7 , 11 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • This bacterium has the widest host range of any plant pathogen. (osu.edu)
  • 2016 ). Among all Candida species, C . albicans is the most common pathogen (Gajdacs et al. (springer.com)
  • The crown gall bacterium is soil-borne and persists for long periods of time in the soil in plant debris. (osu.edu)
  • Opines including nopaline and octopine are produced from nutrients of plant by pathogenic agrobacteria species in a crown gall tumor and subsequently degraded for their nutrients by (hypothetical) opine dehydrogenase(s) (OpnDH). (intechopen.com)
  • The combination of this with document (7) which disclosed the Ti transformation of dicotyledons was found insufficient to negatively affect inventive step as it would not make it obvious that Ti could transform monocotyledons without the formation of crown gall-like tumors. (epo.org)
  • They are slow growing in contrast to Rhizobium species, which are considered fast growing rhizobia. (thefullwiki.org)
  • Using the procarcinogen diethylnitrosamine (DEN) to initiate tumorigenesis in mice, we discovered that TCS substantially accelerates hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) development, acting as a liver tumor promoter. (pnas.org)
  • The identification and the in situ localization of specific low-abundant lipid species involved in cancer biology are still challenging for both fundamental studies and lipid marker discovery. (mdpi.com)
  • What Makes Species Productive of Anti-Cancer Drugs? (eurekaselect.com)
  • Background: Despite the substantial contribution of natural products to the FDA drug approval list, the discovery of anti-cancer drugs from the huge amount of species on the planet remains looking for a needle in a haystack. (eurekaselect.com)
  • However, the way anti-cancer nature-derived drugs distribute in phylogenetic tree has not been reported, and it is oversimplified to just focus anti-cancer drug discovery on the drug-productive clusters, since the number of species in each cluster remains too large to be managed. (eurekaselect.com)
  • Do plants get cancer? (straightdope.com)
  • I know this question is going to sound oddball, but do plants get cancer? (straightdope.com)
  • Cancer treatment involves surgery of tumor, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. (frontiersin.org)
  • We started out from the question as to which plants are used in TCM as a cure for cancer-like diseases and whether an active substance for fighting cancer can be obtained from them," explains project team member Kretschmer. (pacherbs.com)
  • The Ecosystem Diversity Index fuses a cancer imaging technique and methods used by ecologists to study animal and plant species. (foxnews.com)
  • In this study, we demonstrate that loss of GTPase-activating protein (SH3 domain)-binding protein 2 (G3BP2) inhibits breast tumor initiation, a finding that may lead to improved cancer treatments. (pnas.org)
  • 1971. Plant antitumor agentes: VI. (scielo.br)
  • We have known about this plant for almost 100 years, yet efforts to import medicinally active lapacho have failed more than they have succeeded. (healthfree.com)
  • Always seek advice from a professional before using a plant medicinally. (pfaf.org)
  • New research indicates that an invasive species of grass is making wildfires in the western USA larger, hotter and more frequent. (scitechdaily.com)
  • They look impressive, but are actually considered a bit of a pest, as they're an invasive species. (thenakedscientists.com)
  • With background in biology and Ph.D. degree in plant genetics, Andrey Alexeyenko has focused his research interests on understanding normal physiology and pathology with gene network and systems biology approaches. (ki.se)
  • Confinement as a term is fairly broad and can include steam sauna and bathing, mother roasting and hotbeds, dietary proscriptions and consumption of medicinal plant decoctions. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Bioactive metabolites from chaetomium globosum L18, an endophytic fungus in the medicinal plant curcuma wenyujin. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • ACT An endophytic fungus, strain L18, isolated from the medicinal plant Curcuma wenyujin Y.H. Chen et C. Ling was identified as Chaeromium globosum Kunze based on morphological characteristics and sequence data for the internal transcribed spacer (ITS-5.8S-IT52) of the nuclear ribosomal DNA. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • The in vitro anti-inflammatory activity was determined by measuring the production of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in RAW264.7 murine macrophages treated with lipopolysaccharide. (spandidos-publications.com)
  • Plants produce secondary metabolites that protect them from toxins and insects. (hindawi.com)
  • The diversity inside insect intestines, in phyllo-, rhizo-spheres and soils of natural and agriculturally-used systems accommodate a wealth of secondary metabolite-producing microbes as well as invasive plants. (frontiersin.org)
  • Also secondary metabolites released by plants, exhibiting allelopathical effects, are of biotechnological value. (frontiersin.org)
  • It is most often defined as a woody plant that has many secondary branches supported clear of the ground on a single main stem or trunk with clear apical dominance. (absoluteastronomy.com)
  • An important field of investigation to discover new therapeutic molecules that can treat more efficiently pain is that of secondary metabolites present in medicinal plants. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The infectious agents now known as viruses originally attracted attention because of the diseases they produce in their animal and plant hosts. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Papillomaviruses (PVs) are small double-stranded DNA viruses (family Papillomaviridae ) that infect many different vertebrate species ( 12 ). (asm.org)
  • A lipid -containing envelope is a common feature of animal viruses, but uncommon in plant viruses. (encyclopedia.com)
  • I. European patent No. 0 159 418 with the title 'A process for the incorporation of foreign DNA into the genome of monocotyledonous plants' was granted with four claims based on European patent application No. 84 200 792.4 filed on 4 June 1984. (epo.org)
  • Documents (10) and (18) constituted a posteriori proof that the Ti DNA was incorporated into the plant genome following the infection of wounded plants. (epo.org)
  • At the genome level it can teach us about the evolution of AS, the conservation of mechanisms that control AS, and its biological consequences for a species. (plantphysiol.org)
  • Plus, biofuel hope from the burning bush plant, the battle between Staphylococcus species, and the introduction of Synthia - the first microbe with a genuinely synthetic genome. (thenakedscientists.com)
  • The aim of the present study was to investigate the biological activity of 20 essential oils (EOs) derived from herbal plants and citrus fruits. (spandidos-publications.com)
  • Recent studies have found increased hexokinase activity in various human metastatic tumors. (abcam.com)
  • Plumbagin, a napthoquinone, has shown to have antifertility activity similar to embelin, an antifertility agent of plant origin. (stuartxchange.org)
  • Twenty plants, belonging to fifteen plant families, used in folk medicine by Guinea-Bissau traditional healers to treat several infectious diseases, were screened for in vitro antiviral activity against a clinical strain of Herpes simplex virus type I (HSV-1) and a strain of African swine fever virus (ASFV). (encognitive.com)
  • This is the first report on the antiviral activity against HSV-1 and ASFV from these plants. (encognitive.com)
  • Edible vaccines are nothing but transgenic plant and animal-based production of or those contain agents that trigger an animal's immune response. (springer.com)
  • This method can be used to generate transgenic plants carrying a foreign gene. (wikipedia.org)
  • A total of 10 different species were used by three or more of the ethnic groups included in this study. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Many commercial preparations are available containing components derived from different plant parts as well as from different species and varieties. (drugs.com)
  • Animals that seem identical may belong to completely different species. (bio-medicine.org)
  • Different species have different characteristics. (bio-medicine.org)
  • Comparison of AS between different species is of interest. (plantphysiol.org)
  • Invasive candidiasis is a major threat to human health, and Candida albicans is the most common pathogenic species responsible for this condition. (springer.com)
  • Evasion of the pathways leading to apoptosis is critical for the development of tumors. (aspetjournals.org)
  • Inflammation is an initial host immune reaction mediated by inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) ( 9 ). (spandidos-publications.com)
  • Finally, this study highlights the importance of characterizing the heterogeneous distribution of low-abundant lipid species, relevant in complex histological samples for biological purposes. (mdpi.com)
  • High molecular weight plant polyphenolics (tannins) as biological antioxidants. (who.int)
  • In biology, a species is one of the basic units of biological classification and a taxonomic rank. (absoluteastronomy.com)
  • Novelty was acknowledged over documents (3) and (7) as both these documents were concerned with dicotyledonous, not monocotyledonous plants. (epo.org)
  • Chalcones are similar to other known antioxidants such as resveratrol, curcumin, and ubiquinone and are the natural precursors of flavonoids and isoflavonoids in higher plants [ 4 , 8 - 10 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • Curcumin, a polyphenol extracted from rhizomes of the plant Curcuma longa , is a widely studied chemopreventive agent that was shown to have a low toxicity profile in three human clinical trials. (aspetjournals.org)
  • Plants in these two practices are likely to serve mainly hygienic purposes, by segregating the mother from infection sources such as beds, mats, stools, cloth and towels. (biomedcentral.com)
  • If infection is severe, plants may be stunted, produce dry, poorly developed fruit, or show various deficiency symptoms due to impaired uptake and transport of nutrients and water. (osu.edu)