Substances released by PLANTS such as PLANT GUMS and PLANT RESINS.
Exudates are fluids, CELLS, or other cellular substances that are slowly discharged from BLOOD VESSELS usually from inflamed tissues. Transudates are fluids that pass through a membrane or squeeze through tissue or into the EXTRACELLULAR SPACE of TISSUES. Transudates are thin and watery and contain few cells or PROTEINS.
PLANTS, or their progeny, whose GENOME has been altered by GENETIC ENGINEERING.
Expanded structures, usually green, of vascular plants, characteristically consisting of a bladelike expansion attached to a stem, and functioning as the principal organ of photosynthesis and transpiration. (American Heritage Dictionary, 2d ed)
The usually underground portions of a plant that serve as support, store food, and through which water and mineral nutrients enter the plant. (From American Heritage Dictionary, 1982; Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990)
Proteins found in plants (flowers, herbs, shrubs, trees, etc.). The concept does not include proteins found in vegetables for which VEGETABLE PROTEINS is available.
The functional hereditary units of PLANTS.
Concentrated pharmaceutical preparations of plants obtained by removing active constituents with a suitable solvent, which is evaporated away, and adjusting the residue to a prescribed standard.
New immature growth of a plant including stem, leaves, tips of branches, and SEEDLINGS.
Plants whose roots, leaves, seeds, bark, or other constituent parts possess therapeutic, tonic, purgative, curative or other pharmacologic attributes, when administered to man or animals.
Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of plants.
Processes orchestrated or driven by a plethora of genes, plant hormones, and inherent biological timing mechanisms facilitated by secondary molecules, which result in the systematic transformation of plants and plant parts, from one stage of maturity to another.
Plants or plant parts which are harmful to man or other animals.
Basic functional unit of plants.
Parts of plants that usually grow vertically upwards towards the light and support the leaves, buds, and reproductive structures. (From Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990)
A plant genus of the family BRASSICACEAE that contains ARABIDOPSIS PROTEINS and MADS DOMAIN PROTEINS. The species A. thaliana is used for experiments in classical plant genetics as well as molecular genetic studies in plant physiology, biochemistry, and development.
The genetic complement of a plant (PLANTS) as represented in its DNA.
An organism of the vegetable kingdom suitable by nature for use as a food, especially by human beings. Not all parts of any given plant are edible but all parts of edible plants have been known to figure as raw or cooked food: leaves, roots, tubers, stems, seeds, buds, fruits, and flowers. The most commonly edible parts of plants are FRUIT, usually sweet, fleshy, and succulent. Most edible plants are commonly cultivated for their nutritional value and are referred to as VEGETABLES.
The parts of plants, including SEEDS.
Presence of fluid in the pleural cavity resulting from excessive transudation or exudation from the pleural surfaces. It is a sign of disease and not a diagnosis in itself.
Any of the hormones produced naturally in plants and active in controlling growth and other functions. There are three primary classes: auxins, cytokinins, and gibberellins.

Changes in Azospirillum brasilense motility and the effect of wheat seedling exudates. (1/78)

The rhizobacterium Azospirillum brasilense Sp245 swims, swarms (Swa(+) phenotype) or, very rarely, migrates with the formation of granular macrocolonies (Gri(+) phenotype). Our aims were (i) to identify Sp245 mutants that swarm faster than the parent strain or differ from it in the mode of spreading and (ii) to compare the mutants' responses to wheat seedling exudates. In isotropic liquid media, the swimming speeds of all motile A. brasilense strains were not influenced by the exudates. However, the exudates significantly stimulated the swarming of Sp245. In several Sp245 mutants, the superswarming phenotype was insensitive to local colonial density and to the presence of wheat seedling exudates. An A. brasilense polar-flagellum-defective Gri(+) mutant BK759.G gave rise to stable Swa(++) derivatives with restored flagellum production. This transition was concurrent with plasmid rearrangements and was stimulated in the presence of wheat seedling exudates. The swarming rate of the Swa(++) derivatives of BK759.G was affected by the local density of their colonies but not by the presence of the exudates.  (+info)

Flavonoids and strigolactones in root exudates as signals in symbiotic and pathogenic plant-fungus interactions. (2/78)

Secondary plant compounds are important signals in several symbiotic and pathogenic plant-microbe interactions. The present review is limited to two groups of secondary plant compounds, flavonoids and strigolactones, which have been reported in root exudates. Data on flavonoids as signaling compounds are available from several symbiotic and pathogenic plant-microbe interactions, whereas only recently initial data on the role of strigolactones as plant signals in the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis have been reported. Data from other plant-microbe interactions and strigolactones are not available yet. In the present article we are focusing on flavonoids in plant-fungal interactions such as the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) association and the signaling between different Fusarium species and plants. Moreover the role of strigolactones in the AM association is discussed and new data on the effect of strigolactones on fungi, apart from arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), are provided.  (+info)

Root exudates regulate soil fungal community composition and diversity. (3/78)

Plants are in constant contact with a community of soil biota that contains fungi ranging from pathogenic to symbiotic. A few studies have demonstrated a critical role of chemical communication in establishing highly specialized relationships, but the general role for root exudates in structuring the soil fungal community is poorly described. This study demonstrates that two model plant species (Arabidopsis thaliana and Medicago truncatula) are able to maintain resident soil fungal populations but unable to maintain nonresident soil fungal populations. This is mediated largely through root exudates: the effects of adding in vitro-generated root exudates to the soil fungal community were qualitatively and quantitatively similar to the results observed for plants grown in those same soils. This effect is observed for total fungal biomass, phylotype diversity, and overall community similarity to the starting community. Nonresident plants and root exudates influenced the fungal community by both positively and negatively impacting the relative abundance of individual phylotypes. A net increase in fungal biomass was observed when nonresident root exudates were added to resident plant treatments, suggesting that increases in specific carbon substrates and/or signaling compounds support an increased soil fungal population load. This study establishes root exudates as a mechanism through which a plant is able to regulate soil fungal community composition.  (+info)

Ogataea chonburiensis sp. nov. and Ogataea nakhonphanomensis sp. nov., thermotolerant, methylotrophic yeast species isolated in Thailand, and transfer of Pichia siamensis and Pichia thermomethanolica to the genus Ogataea. (4/78)

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Bitterness in almonds. (5/78)

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Temporal release of fatty acids and sugars in the spermosphere: impacts on Enterobacter cloacae-induced biological control. (6/78)

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Response to flavonoids as a factor influencing competitiveness and symbiotic activity of Rhizobium leguminosarum. (7/78)

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Pollination in Nicotiana alata stimulates synthesis and transfer to the stigmatic surface of NaStEP, a vacuolar Kunitz proteinase inhibitor homologue. (8/78)

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Medical definitions typically focus on the relevance of a term to medical practice, and I'm not sure if there is a specific medical definition for "plant exudates." However, in a broader context, plant exudates refer to the various substances that are released or exuded by plants, often as a result of damage or stress. These can include a wide variety of compounds, such as sap, resins, latex, gums, essential oils, and tannins. Some of these compounds can have medicinal properties and are used in various forms of traditional and modern medicine. For example, the resin from certain pine trees (rosin) has been used to treat respiratory ailments, while willow bark, which contains salicin (a precursor to aspirin), has been used for pain relief for centuries.

Exudates and transudates are two types of bodily fluids that can accumulate in various body cavities or tissues as a result of injury, inflammation, or other medical conditions. Here are the medical definitions:

1. Exudates: These are fluids that accumulate due to an active inflammatory process. Exudates contain high levels of protein, white blood cells (such as neutrophils and macrophages), and sometimes other cells like red blood cells or cellular debris. They can be yellow, green, or brown in color and may have a foul odor due to the presence of dead cells and bacteria. Exudates are often seen in conditions such as abscesses, pneumonia, pleurisy, or wound infections.

Examples of exudative fluids include pus, purulent discharge, or inflammatory effusions.

2. Transudates: These are fluids that accumulate due to increased hydrostatic pressure or decreased oncotic pressure within the blood vessels. Transudates contain low levels of protein and cells compared to exudates. They are typically clear and pale yellow in color, with no odor. Transudates can be found in conditions such as congestive heart failure, liver cirrhosis, or nephrotic syndrome.

Examples of transudative fluids include ascites, pleural effusions, or pericardial effusions.

It is essential to differentiate between exudates and transudates because their underlying causes and treatment approaches may differ significantly. Medical professionals often use various tests, such as fluid analysis, to determine whether a fluid sample is an exudate or transudate.

Genetically modified plants (GMPs) are plants that have had their DNA altered through genetic engineering techniques to exhibit desired traits. These modifications can be made to enhance certain characteristics such as increased resistance to pests, improved tolerance to environmental stresses like drought or salinity, or enhanced nutritional content. The process often involves introducing genes from other organisms, such as bacteria or viruses, into the plant's genome. Examples of GMPs include Bt cotton, which has a gene from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis that makes it resistant to certain pests, and golden rice, which is engineered to contain higher levels of beta-carotene, a precursor to vitamin A. It's important to note that genetically modified plants are subject to rigorous testing and regulation to ensure their safety for human consumption and environmental impact before they are approved for commercial use.

I believe there may be a slight misunderstanding in your question. "Plant leaves" are not a medical term, but rather a general biological term referring to a specific organ found in plants.

Leaves are organs that are typically flat and broad, and they are the primary site of photosynthesis in most plants. They are usually green due to the presence of chlorophyll, which is essential for capturing sunlight and converting it into chemical energy through photosynthesis.

While leaves do not have a direct medical definition, understanding their structure and function can be important in various medical fields, such as pharmacognosy (the study of medicinal plants) or environmental health. For example, certain plant leaves may contain bioactive compounds that have therapeutic potential, while others may produce allergens or toxins that can impact human health.

A plant root is not a medical term per se, but it is a term from botany, which is the study of plants. However, I can certainly provide a definition for you.

Plant roots are the underground organs of a plant that typically grow downward into the soil. They serve several important functions, including:

1. Anchorage: Roots help to stabilize the plant and keep it upright in the ground.
2. Absorption: Roots absorb water and nutrients from the soil, which are essential for the plant's growth and development.
3. Conduction: Roots conduct water and nutrients up to the above-ground parts of the plant, such as the stem and leaves.
4. Vegetative reproduction: Some plants can reproduce vegetatively through their roots, producing new plants from root fragments or specialized structures called rhizomes or tubers.

Roots are composed of several different tissues, including the epidermis, cortex, endodermis, and vascular tissue. The epidermis is the outermost layer of the root, which secretes a waxy substance called suberin that helps to prevent water loss. The cortex is the middle layer of the root, which contains cells that store carbohydrates and other nutrients. The endodermis is a thin layer of cells that surrounds the vascular tissue and regulates the movement of water and solutes into and out of the root. The vascular tissue consists of xylem and phloem, which transport water and nutrients throughout the plant.

"Plant proteins" refer to the proteins that are derived from plant sources. These can include proteins from legumes such as beans, lentils, and peas, as well as proteins from grains like wheat, rice, and corn. Other sources of plant proteins include nuts, seeds, and vegetables.

Plant proteins are made up of individual amino acids, which are the building blocks of protein. While animal-based proteins typically contain all of the essential amino acids that the body needs to function properly, many plant-based proteins may be lacking in one or more of these essential amino acids. However, by consuming a variety of plant-based foods throughout the day, it is possible to get all of the essential amino acids that the body needs from plant sources alone.

Plant proteins are often lower in calories and saturated fat than animal proteins, making them a popular choice for those following a vegetarian or vegan diet, as well as those looking to maintain a healthy weight or reduce their risk of chronic diseases such as heart disease and cancer. Additionally, plant proteins have been shown to have a number of health benefits, including improving gut health, reducing inflammation, and supporting muscle growth and repair.

A gene in plants, like in other organisms, is a hereditary unit that carries genetic information from one generation to the next. It is a segment of DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) that contains the instructions for the development and function of an organism. Genes in plants determine various traits such as flower color, plant height, resistance to diseases, and many others. They are responsible for encoding proteins and RNA molecules that play crucial roles in the growth, development, and reproduction of plants. Plant genes can be manipulated through traditional breeding methods or genetic engineering techniques to improve crop yield, enhance disease resistance, and increase nutritional value.

A plant extract is a preparation containing chemical constituents that have been extracted from a plant using a solvent. The resulting extract may contain a single compound or a mixture of several compounds, depending on the extraction process and the specific plant material used. These extracts are often used in various industries including pharmaceuticals, nutraceuticals, cosmetics, and food and beverage, due to their potential therapeutic or beneficial properties. The composition of plant extracts can vary widely, and it is important to ensure their quality, safety, and efficacy before use in any application.

A medical definition for "plant shoots" may not be readily available, as the term is primarily used in botany and horticulture. However, I can provide you with a general definition:

Plant shoots refer to the above-ground portion of a plant, which typically includes structures like stems, leaves, flowers, and buds. Shoots originate from the seed or the growing tip of the plant and are responsible for photosynthesis, nutrient absorption, and reproduction. In some contexts, "plant shoots" might also refer to new growth that emerges from an existing plant, such as when a leaf or stem sprouts a new branch or flower.

Medicinal plants are defined as those plants that contain naturally occurring chemical compounds which can be used for therapeutic purposes, either directly or indirectly. These plants have been used for centuries in various traditional systems of medicine, such as Ayurveda, Chinese medicine, and Native American medicine, to prevent or treat various health conditions.

Medicinal plants contain a wide variety of bioactive compounds, including alkaloids, flavonoids, tannins, terpenes, and saponins, among others. These compounds have been found to possess various pharmacological properties, such as anti-inflammatory, analgesic, antimicrobial, antioxidant, and anticancer activities.

Medicinal plants can be used in various forms, including whole plant material, extracts, essential oils, and isolated compounds. They can be administered through different routes, such as oral, topical, or respiratory, depending on the desired therapeutic effect.

It is important to note that while medicinal plants have been used safely and effectively for centuries, they should be used with caution and under the guidance of a healthcare professional. Some medicinal plants can interact with prescription medications or have adverse effects if used inappropriately.

DNA, or deoxyribonucleic acid, is the genetic material present in the cells of all living organisms, including plants. In plants, DNA is located in the nucleus of a cell, as well as in chloroplasts and mitochondria. Plant DNA contains the instructions for the development, growth, and function of the plant, and is passed down from one generation to the next through the process of reproduction.

The structure of DNA is a double helix, formed by two strands of nucleotides that are linked together by hydrogen bonds. Each nucleotide contains a sugar molecule (deoxyribose), a phosphate group, and a nitrogenous base. There are four types of nitrogenous bases in DNA: adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), and thymine (T). Adenine pairs with thymine, and guanine pairs with cytosine, forming the rungs of the ladder that make up the double helix.

The genetic information in DNA is encoded in the sequence of these nitrogenous bases. Large sequences of bases form genes, which provide the instructions for the production of proteins. The process of gene expression involves transcribing the DNA sequence into a complementary RNA molecule, which is then translated into a protein.

Plant DNA is similar to animal DNA in many ways, but there are also some differences. For example, plant DNA contains a higher proportion of repetitive sequences and transposable elements, which are mobile genetic elements that can move around the genome and cause mutations. Additionally, plant cells have cell walls and chloroplasts, which are not present in animal cells, and these structures contain their own DNA.

'Plant development' is not a term typically used in medical definitions, as it is more commonly used in the field of botany to describe the growth and differentiation of plant cells, tissues, and organs over time. However, in a broader context, plant development can be defined as the series of changes and processes that occur from the fertilization of a plant seed to the formation of a mature plant, including germination, emergence, organ formation, growth, and reproduction.

In medicine, terms related to plant development may include "phytotherapy" or "herbal medicine," which refer to the use of plants or plant extracts as medicinal treatments for various health conditions. The study of how these plants develop and produce their active compounds is an important area of research in pharmacology and natural products chemistry.

'Toxic plants' refer to those species of plants that contain toxic substances capable of causing harmful effects or adverse health reactions in humans and animals when ingested, touched, or inhaled. These toxins can cause a range of symptoms from mild irritation to serious conditions such as organ failure, paralysis, or even death depending on the plant, the amount consumed, and the individual's sensitivity to the toxin.

Toxic plants may contain various types of toxins, including alkaloids, glycosides, proteins, resinous substances, and essential oils. Some common examples of toxic plants include poison ivy, poison oak, nightshade, hemlock, oleander, castor bean, and foxglove. It is important to note that some parts of a plant may be toxic while others are not, and the toxicity can also vary depending on the stage of growth or environmental conditions.

If you suspect exposure to a toxic plant, it is essential to seek medical attention immediately and, if possible, bring a sample of the plant for identification.

A plant cell is defined as a type of eukaryotic cell that makes up the structural basis of plants and other forms of multicellular plant-like organisms, such as algae and mosses. These cells are typically characterized by their rigid cell walls, which provide support and protection, and their large vacuoles, which store nutrients and help maintain turgor pressure within the cell.

Plant cells also contain chloroplasts, organelles that carry out photosynthesis and give plants their green color. Other distinctive features of plant cells include a large central vacuole, a complex system of membranes called the endoplasmic reticulum, and numerous mitochondria, which provide energy to the cell through cellular respiration.

Plant cells are genetically distinct from animal cells, and they have unique structures and functions that allow them to carry out photosynthesis, grow and divide, and respond to their environment. Understanding the structure and function of plant cells is essential for understanding how plants grow, develop, and interact with their surroundings.

A plant stem is not typically defined in a medical context, but rather in the field of botany. However, I can certainly provide a general biological definition for you.

In plants, stems are organs that serve primarily as support structures, holding leaves, flowers, and fruits aloft where they can receive sunlight and exchange gases. They also act as conduits, transporting water, nutrients, and sugars made during photosynthesis between the roots and shoots of a plant.

The stem is usually composed of three main tissue systems: dermal, vascular, and ground. The dermal tissue system forms the outermost layer(s) of the stem, providing protection and sometimes participating in gas exchange. The vascular tissue system contains the xylem (which transports water and nutrients upward) and phloem (which transports sugars and other organic compounds downward). The ground tissue system, located between the dermal and vascular tissues, is responsible for food storage and support.

While not a direct medical definition, understanding the structure and function of plant stems can be relevant in fields such as nutrition, agriculture, and environmental science, which have implications for human health.

'Arabidopsis' is a genus of small flowering plants that are part of the mustard family (Brassicaceae). The most commonly studied species within this genus is 'Arabidopsis thaliana', which is often used as a model organism in plant biology and genetics research. This plant is native to Eurasia and Africa, and it has a small genome that has been fully sequenced. It is known for its short life cycle, self-fertilization, and ease of growth, making it an ideal subject for studying various aspects of plant biology, including development, metabolism, and response to environmental stresses.

A plant genome refers to the complete set of genetic material or DNA present in the cells of a plant. It contains all the hereditary information necessary for the development and functioning of the plant, including its structural and functional characteristics. The plant genome includes both coding regions that contain instructions for producing proteins and non-coding regions that have various regulatory functions.

The plant genome is composed of several types of DNA molecules, including chromosomes, which are located in the nucleus of the cell. Each chromosome contains one or more genes, which are segments of DNA that code for specific proteins or RNA molecules. Plants typically have multiple sets of chromosomes, with each set containing a complete copy of the genome.

The study of plant genomes is an active area of research in modern biology, with important applications in areas such as crop improvement, evolutionary biology, and medical research. Advances in DNA sequencing technologies have made it possible to determine the complete sequences of many plant genomes, providing valuable insights into their structure, function, and evolution.

Edible plants are those that can be safely consumed by humans and other animals as a source of nutrition. They have various parts (such as fruits, vegetables, seeds, roots, stems, and leaves) that can be used for food after being harvested and prepared properly. Some edible plants have been cultivated and domesticated for agricultural purposes, while others are gathered from the wild. It is important to note that not all plants are safe to eat, and some may even be toxic or deadly if consumed. Proper identification and knowledge of preparation methods are crucial before consuming any plant material.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Plant Structures" is not a medical term. It is a term used in the field of botany to refer to the different parts of a plant, such as roots, stems, leaves, flowers, and fruits. Each of these structures has specific functions that contribute to the overall growth, reproduction, and survival of the plant. If you have any questions related to biology or botany, I'd be happy to try and help answer them!

Pleural effusion is a medical condition characterized by the abnormal accumulation of fluid in the pleural space, which is the thin, fluid-filled space that surrounds the lungs and lines the inside of the chest wall. This space typically contains a small amount of fluid to allow for smooth movement of the lungs during breathing. However, when an excessive amount of fluid accumulates, it can cause symptoms such as shortness of breath, coughing, and chest pain.

Pleural effusions can be caused by various underlying medical conditions, including pneumonia, heart failure, cancer, pulmonary embolism, and autoimmune disorders. The fluid that accumulates in the pleural space can be transudative or exudative, depending on the cause of the effusion. Transudative effusions are caused by increased pressure in the blood vessels or decreased protein levels in the blood, while exudative effusions are caused by inflammation, infection, or cancer.

Diagnosis of pleural effusion typically involves a physical examination, chest X-ray, and analysis of the fluid in the pleural space. Treatment depends on the underlying cause of the effusion and may include medications, drainage of the fluid, or surgery.

Plant growth regulators (PGRs) are natural or synthetic chemical substances that, when present in low concentrations, can influence various physiological and biochemical processes in plants. These processes include cell division, elongation, and differentiation; flowering and fruiting; leaf senescence; and stress responses. PGRs can be classified into several categories based on their mode of action and chemical structure, including auxins, gibberellins, cytokinins, abscisic acid, ethylene, and others. They are widely used in agriculture to improve crop yield and quality, regulate plant growth and development, and enhance stress tolerance.

... both positive and negative plant-plant and plant-microbe interactions. The physiological mechanism by which exudates are ... Root exudates are seen as key mediators in the interaction between plants and soil microbiota. Root exudates contain a wide ... Plant root exudates are fluids emitted through the roots of plants. These secretions influence the rhizosphere around the roots ... "The role of root exudates in rhizosphere interactions with plants and other organisms". Annual Review of Plant Biology. 57: 233 ...
Calophyllum bracteatum is a species of flowering plant in the Calophyllaceae family. It is found in Sri Lanka where it is known ... clear exudate. fruit - edible. Weaver, P. L. (1990). "Calophyllum calaba". In Burns, Russell M.; Honkala, Barbara H. (eds.). ...
Plant exudates include saps, gums, latex, and resin. Sometimes nectar is considered an exudate. Plant seeds exudate a variety ... An exudate is a fluid emitted by an organism through pores or a wound, a process known as exuding or exudation.Exudate is ... It is not clear if there is a distinction in the difference of transudates and exudates in plants. ... Catarrhal exudate is seen in the nose and throat and is characterized by a high content of mucus. Serous exudate (sometimes ...
This causes the plant to start slowly dying. This is due to fungal growth and plant defenses clogging the xylem, so the plant ... Root exudates cause the microsclerotia to germinate. Once the fungus has entered the root, it will produce hyphae to move ... Most plants can live with the disease based on the severity. Older plants, especially trees, will have an increased chance of ... Brown stripes on the Canola plant also become visible as it is produced. As the Canola plant matures, peeling the top layer ...
Bierdrzycki, M. (2010). "Root exudates mediate kin recognition in plants". Communicative & Integrative Biology. 3 (1): 28-35. ... can they mediate belowground plant-plant interactions?". Plant and Soil. 402 (1): 1-26. doi:10.1007/s11104-016-2823-3. ISSN ... But, in plants that recognize kin, the movement of resources in the plant has been shown to be affected by proximity to related ... Due to the nature of plant reproduction and growth, plants are more likely than animals to live in close proximity to family ...
One way to control this pathogen is planting clean seed. By planting clean seed and not infected seed, you are stopping the ... Sclerotia germinate in response to root exudates. Weather is also a factor of germination and hyphae growth. Mycelium grow ... The plant is now considered to be a noxious invasive species, as it is difficult to control or eradicate. S. cepivora is being ... Plants are stunted in growth with yellow and wilting foliage. The leaves eventually die and fall off with the older leaves ...
This would require exudates to be actively secreted by roots of one plant, and detected by roots of neighboring plants. The ... Rahman, Muhammad Khashi u; Zhou, Xingang; Wu, Fengzhi (5 Aug 2019). "The role of root exudates, CMNs, and VOCs in plant-plant ... shorter plants next to taller plants had access to more light than those surrounded by plants of similar height. The above ... However, because plants do not reliably germinate in close proximity to kin, it is thought that, within the plant kingdom, kin ...
Root exudates are another source of soil carbon. 5-20% of the total plant carbon fixed during photosynthesis is supplied as ... Mergel, A. (1998). "Role of plant root exudates in soil carbon and nitrogen transformation". In Box, J. Jr. (ed.). Root ... Detritus resulting from plant senescence is the major source of soil organic carbon. Plant materials, with cell walls high in ... It includes relatively available carbon as fresh plant remains and relatively inert carbon in materials derived from plant ...
Nussinovitch, Amos (21 December 2009). Plant Gum Exudates of the World: Sources, Distribution, Properties, and Applications. ... "Mabberley's plant-book. A portable dictionary of plants, their classification and uses , International Plant Names Index". www. ... "Senegalia modesta (Wall.) P.J.H.Hurter , Plants of the World Online , Kew Science". Plants of the World Online. "PlantFiles: ... The plant is drought tolerant. S. modesta`s tree grow in medium size (3 to almost 5 meters) deciduous form with rough surfaced ...
Plants contribute to chemical weathering through root exudates. Soils can be enriched by deposition of sediments on floodplains ... Plants hold soil against erosion, and accumulated plant material build soil humus levels. Plant root exudation supports ... Plants shade soils, keeping them cooler and slowing evaporation of soil moisture. Conversely, by way of transpiration, plants ... In the same way, plant roots penetrate soil horizons and open channels upon decomposition. Plants with deep taproots can ...
... that feed off the sweet exudates from the larva.[citation needed] A. mearnsii is used similarly as a larval host plant and food ... 584: 8. Ngunnawal Elders (2014) 'Ngunnawal Plant Use.' ACT Government: Canberra "Alien Invader Plants". 2002. Archived from the ... As a pioneer plant it quickly binds the erosion-prone soil following the bushfires that are common in its Australian habitats. ... Like other leguminous plants, it fixes the atmospheric nitrogen in the soil. Other woodland species can rapidly use these ...
... is a part of a wider secrete from plant roots known as root exudate. Plant roots secrete a variety of organic ... Baetz, Ulrike; Martinoia, Enrico (2014-02-01). "Root exudates: the hidden part of plant defense" (PDF). Trends in Plant Science ... which are plant-specific polysaccharides within the root mucilage of plants. Plants use up to 40% of their energy secreting ... The purpose of this is to maintain the plant's contact with the soil so that the plant can regulate the levels of water it can ...
Adult horse-flies feed on nectar and plant exudates; the males have weak mouthparts and only the females bite animals to obtain ... Adult tabanids feed on nectar and plant exudates, and some are important pollinators of certain specialised flowers; several ... Eggs are laid on stones or vegetation near water, in clusters of up to 1000, especially on emergent water plants. The eggs are ... The ancestral tabanids may have co-evolved with the angiosperm plants on which they fed. With a necessity for high-protein food ...
The Histiostomatoidea live in various wet substrates such as decaying plant tissue, dung, mud and tree holes, and feed on ... The Canestrinoidea are parasites feeding on exudates of beetles. The also-parasitic Sarcoptoidea live in mammal fur and skin. ... Many Acaroidea live in stored foods, but the superfamily also includes plant pests and inhabitants of vertebrate or insect ... Hemisarcoptes (Hemisarcoptidae) are parasites of armoured scale insects, which are plant pests. Astigmatina contains about 11 ...
This will make the plant structures produced from C4 plants more enriched in the heavier isotope and therefore root exudates ... C3 plants are best adapted to cool and wet conditions while C4 plants do well in hot and dry ecosystems. Due to the different ... The amount of carbon lost as exudates varies considerably between plant species. It has been demonstrated that up to 20% of ... In plants with bacterial symbionts, which fix atmospheric nitrogen, the energetic cost to the plant to acquire one molecule of ...
"Fontainea fugax". Australian Plant Name Index, IBIS database. Centre for Plant Biodiversity Research, Australian Government. ... Fontainea fugax is a dioecious shrub growing to 4 m. The stems have a clear exudate. New shoots have sparse, antrorse (upward ... with plants growing as understorey shrubs in a semi-evergreen vine thicket dominated by Backhousia kingii. The plant was first ... This plant is very like Fontainea rostrata, but differs in that the base of the petiole is not swollen; the male flowers are ...
Do Plant Exudates Shape the Root Microbiome?" (PDF). Trends in Plant Science. Elsevier BV. 23 (1): 25-41. doi:10.1016/j.tplants ... Different plant organs also have specific microbial communities depending on plant-associated factors (plant genotype, ... Do Plant Exudates Shape the Root Microbiome?" (PDF). Trends in Plant Science. 23 (1): 25-41. doi:10.1016/j.tplants.2017.09.003 ... "The Role of Root Exudates in Rhizosphere Interactions with Plants and Other Organisms". Annual Review of Plant Biology. 57: 233 ...
Exudates are also obtained by gouging holes in the bark. The winter food supply consists almost entirely of plant exudates. The ... In winter, it relies on plant exudates, such as sap and tree gum. The species lives in small family groups, marks its territory ... The Bengal slow loris feeds on plant exudates such as sap, gums, resins, and latexes, particularly those from the family ... but it has also been observed taking plant exudates from a number of families: Moraceae (Artocarpus), Magnoliaceae (Manglietia ...
Adults feed on flower nectar and other plant sap exudates. Adults emerge in summer, typically beginning around late June or ...
Additional sources of SOM include plant root exudates and charcoal. The water content of most vegetal detritus is in the range ... ISBN 0-02-313340-6. Mergel, A. (1998). "Role of Plant Root Exudates in Soil Carbon and Nitrogen Transformation". In Box, J. Jr ... Surface plant litter, i. e., fresh vegetal detritus, is generally excluded from SOM. The primary source of SOM is vegetal ... Soil organic matter (SOM) is the organic matter component of soil, consisting of plant and animal detritus at various stages of ...
Exudates from plant roots (mucilages and gums) are included here. Particulate organic matter (POM): is the organic matter that ... It is a source of food for both soil organisms and aquatic organisms and provides nutrients for plants. In water bodies, POM ... Nutrients not taken up by soil organisms may be available for plant uptake. The amount of nutrients released (mineralized) ... Resistant organic matter: has a high carbon content and includes charcoal, charred plant materials, graphite and coal. Turnover ...
This plant occurs in high mountain páramo habitat, taking hold in small accumulations of organic matter in rocky cracks and ... 2010). Foliar exudates of Blakiella bartsiifolia (S.F. Blake) Cuatrec. (Asteraceae, Astereae). A preliminary study of the ... The Plant List, Blakiella bartsiifolia (S.F.Blake) Cuatrec. Vargas, O. M. and S. Madrinán. (2012). Preliminary phylogeny of ... The leaves are coated in glandular trichomes that hold drops of sticky exudate, which is likely protective against solar ...
The role of root exudates and allelochemicals in the rhizosphere. Plant and soil 256, 67-83. LA Weston (1996) Utilization of ... Weston is 'a pioneer in the study and application of plant interactions with other plants, microbes and herbivores'. In her ... plant protection, invasion biology, herbicide discovery, metabolomics and plant toxicity. After her PhD and work in the USA, ... Leslie A. Weston FAA, is a plant biologist, who was awarded a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Science in 2023, for her work ...
... is a plant parasitic nematode that mainly infests the tobacco plant, but also plants in family Solanaceae. The tobacco cyst ... Hatching is often initiated by root exudate. Even though there are some disagreements among scientists on Globodera tabacum ... Plant Disease 71:1129-1132. Harrison, M. B., and L. I. Miller. 1969. Additional hosts of the tobacco cyst nematode. Plant ... Plant Dis. 90:527, 2006; published on-line as doi:10.1094/PD-90-0527B. Mota, M. M., and Eisenback, J. D., Morphology or second- ...
It is often covered in sticky exudate. The inflorescence is a cluster of several flower heads, each made up of about 20 golden ... The Plant List, Crepis monticola Coville Biota of North America Program 2014 county distribution map Calflora taxon report, ... Crepis monticola is a North American species of flowering plant in the family Asteraceae known by the common name mountain ... Plants described in 1896, Flora without expected TNC conservation status, All stub articles, Cichorieae stubs). ...
... , the droopy leaf or priyangu, is a species of plant in the family Meliaceae. It is a 10m tall tree found in ... White latex can be exudate. Leaves are compound, imparipinnate, alternate; lamina narrow-elliptic to oblanceolate; apex bluntly ... the Plant List". "Aglaia elaeagnoidea - Priyangu". "Aglaia elaeagnoidea (A. Jussieu) Bentham, Fl. Austral. 1: 383. 1863". www. ... "Aglaia elaeagnoidea". Australian Tropical Rainforest Plants. Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation ( ...
"Parkia bicolor". Useful Tropical Plants. Retrieved 10 October 2019. Nussinovitch, Amos (2009). Plant Gum Exudates of the World ... Parkia bicolor, the African locust-bean, is a species of flowering plant, a tree in the family Fabaceae. It is native to ... Louppe, Dominique (2008). Plant Resources of Tropical Africa (PROTA). PROTA. pp. 415-418. ISBN 978-90-5782-209-4. Fern, Ken. " ... Least concern plants, Taxa named by Auguste Chevalier). ...
Like many plant exudates, isobornyl acetate appears to have antifeedant properties. Panten, Johannes; Surburg, Horst (2015). " ...
The presence of plants and their communication with other community members fundamentally shapes the phytobiome. Root exudates ... The production of these exudates is heavily influenced by environmental factors and plant physiology and can alter the ... Nematodes also produce plant hormones such as cytokinins that aid in the establishment of association with plants. Perhaps even ... Rattlebox plants produce various alkaloid compounds that insects use as a precursor for sex pheromone synthesis. Many plant ...
Plant roots may exude 20-40% of the sugars and organic acids - photosynthetically fixed carbon. Plant root exudates, such as ... can establish beneficial interactions with plants, promoting plant growth and development, increasing the plant defense system ... "The Role of Root Exudates in Rhizosphere Interactions with Plants and Other Organisms". Annual Review of Plant Biology. 57 (1 ... Indeed, because of the chemical signals conveyed by nutrient-rich exudates released by the plant roots, a large variety of ...
... both positive and negative plant-plant and plant-microbe interactions. The physiological mechanism by which exudates are ... Root exudates are seen as key mediators in the interaction between plants and soil microbiota. Root exudates contain a wide ... Plant root exudates are fluids emitted through the roots of plants. These secretions influence the rhizosphere around the roots ... "The role of root exudates in rhizosphere interactions with plants and other organisms". Annual Review of Plant Biology. 57: 233 ...
... plant secretions and exudates , plant exudates. Plant Production, Gardening , botany , plant biology , plant anatomy , plant ... plant secretions and exudates , plant exudates. Fields of Study , botany , plant biology , plant anatomy , ... Fields of Study , anatomy and morphology , plant anatomy , ...
Root exudates shift how N mineralization and N fixation contribute to the plant-available N supply in low fertility soils. Soil ... Root exudates change with plant nutrient status, and are expected to affect the microbially-mediated N transformations (gross N ... By quantifying how different root exudates affect the contribution of N mineralization and N fixation to the plant-available N ... of the root exudate C was recovered in these pools in the sandy loam soil. This suggests that root exudate C may be adsorbed to ...
Root exudates were collected from plants grown in hydroponics under low- and high-P availability. Exudate components were ... Root exudates of sugar beet contain salicylic acid and citramalic acid, the latter of which has rarely been detected in plants ... These results provide the first assignment of a biological function to citramalic acid of plant origin. ... For plants without cluster roots, i.e., for most plant species, other root exudate compounds, in place of or together with ...
Microbiome and Exudates of the Root and Rhizosphere of Brachypodium distachyon, a Model for Wheat. Download Prime PubMed App to ... The rhizosphere microbiome is regulated by plant genotype, root exudates and environment. There is substantial interest in ... Plant host and soil origin influence fungal and bacterial assemblages in the roots of woody plants. ... The rhizosphere microbiome is regulated by plant genotype, root exudates and environment. There is substantial interest in ...
Root exudates of stressed plants stimulate and attract trichoderma soil fungi. N. Lombardi, S. Vitale, D. Turr À, M. Reverberi ...
Exudates: Are secretions from plant roots containing a range of organic compounds. ... Plant; and "remediation" L. able to cure) in the early 1990s. It is a general term that describes the process of using plants ... As an in-situ bioremediation technique, phytoremediation employ the inherent abilities of living plants. Over the years, ... In the rhizosphere, plants increase significantly the microbial activity by nutrient supplementation through root exudation ( ...
Stimulation of nitrogen removal in the rhizosphere of aquatic duckweed by root exudate components journal, November 2013 * Lu, ... The Plant Cell. Additional Journal Information: Journal Name: The Plant Cell Journal Volume: 33 Journal Issue: 10; Journal ID: ... Plant Biosystems - An International Journal Dealing with all Aspects of Plant Biology, Vol. 145, Issue 4 ... Convergent Loss of an EDS1/PAD4 Signaling Pathway in Several Plant Lineages Reveals Coevolved Components of Plant Immunity and ...
Plant exudates act as chemical signals for host specific bacteria to colonize.[63] Rhizobacteria colonization steps include ... Plant-beneficial microbes can be categorized as plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria.[59] These plant growth-promoters colonize ... "Plant responses to plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria". European Journal of Plant Pathology. 119 (3): 243-254. doi:10.1007/ ... Kloepper JW (1988). "Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacteria on Canola (Rapeseed)". Plant Disease. 72 (1): 42. doi:10.1094/pd-72- ...
Therefore, I have changed my topics to Plant Exudates, Microbial Communities, and Mycorrhizal Fungi. Please let me know if you ... Grammar note: "The plant roots which the rhizosphere is associated with can effect the physical environment of the rhizosphere ... Grammar note: "The plant roots which the rhizosphere is associated with can effect the physical environment of the rhizosphere ... You may not need so much detail under the root exudates: all that could be included under just one major heading. ...
Soils under exotic plants had increased temperatures, enhanced infiltration during rainfall events, and decreased water ... Here, we investigated the effects of extreme drought and exotic plants, two of the most significant threats to Mediterranean- ... Higher peaks and more seasonally variable microbial activity were found under exotic plants and, like drought periods, the ... Soil microbial community responses to drought and exotic plants could potentially impact ecosystem C storage by producing a ...
Asteracantha Longifolia Whole Plant. Dosage Information: The daily dosage of ProSolution Plus is two tablets with a glass of ... Shilajit (Asphaltum Exudate). *Kali Musli (Curculigo Orchioides Root). *Tribulus Terrestris Fruit. *Mucuna Pruriens Seed ... Plant-based products are equally powerful as synthetic medicines, and combining these two can lead to undesirable consequences. ...
Organic acids in root exudates and soil solutions. Importance to calcicole and calcifuge behaviour of plants. Lena Ström (1998 ... Plant and microbial uptake and allocation of organic and inorganic nitrogen related to plant growth forms and soil conditions ... Vascular plant controls on carbon cycling and greenhouse gas fluxes in wetlands. Lena Ström, Torben Christensen (2003) ... Plant species from mesotrophic wetlands cause relatively high methane emissions from peat soil Albert Koelbener, Lena Ström, ...
Study reveals the impact of microbial interactions and plant exudates on rhizosphere dynamics. Discover eco-friendly methods to ... Enhance soil ecosystem and plant productivity by understanding soil rhizosphere ecology. ... Research in Plant Biology, 1, 48-62. [11] Motsara, M. and Roy, R.N. (2008) Guide to Laboratory Establishment for Plant Nutrient ... Furthermore, the presence of plant exudates and microbial interation can change the rhizosphere dynamic. In the current study, ...
... plants actively signal to AM fungi via root exudates to increase mycorrhizal colonization, to increase plant P concentration [ ... of plant P to host plants in ecosystems with reduced soil P availability; their contributions of plant nitrogen (N) are less ... Isotope studies [5] have shown that flax plants received up to 90% of plant N and P through mycorrhizal network with little ... Inoculate seeds and plant seedlings with mycorrhizal fungi species that are compatible with host plant species. Benefits to ...
Plants exhibit increased synthesis of polyphenols such as phenolic acids and flavonoids under abiotic stress conditions, which ... Phenolics are produced under optimal and suboptimal conditions in plants and play key roles in developmental processes like ... help the plant to cope with environmental constraints. Phenylpropanoid biosynthetic pathway is activated under abiotic stress ... mechanisms related to the activation of phenylpropanoid metabolism and we describe phenolic-mediated stress tolerance in plants ...
Perhaps its roots exert some effect (exudates?) as well, since the bindweed just didnt seem to come up at all in that spot. ... But expensive to get all the trees and plants and animals and fences to begin with. I cant plant the trees and plants until I ... expensive to get all the trees and plants and animals and fences to begin with. ... I cant plant the trees and plants until I ... Plant two trees. Mulch around them. If (when) weeds climb them, pull the weeds off. Next year, plant two more trees...or 1, or ...
Successful biocontrol is based on the perception of signals derived from both the plant symbiont and the fungal prey. Here, we ... Successful biocontrol is based on the perception of signals derived from both the plant symbiont and the fungal prey. Here we ... Our results show that germlings respond preferentially to compounds secreted by plant roots and T. atroviride itself than to ... Our results show that germlings respond preferentially to compounds secreted by plant roots and T. atroviride itself than to ...
The neighbor plants his tomatoes in April. His last frost date is Memorial Day. If the plants freeze he hoses them off in the ... But these root exudates, as theyre called, arent limited to just carbon. They put other substances into the soil which ... By planting six plant families in every bed, youll be growing amazing soil and that soil will grow nutritious, pest and ... What I learned from Christine is that at least six different plant families need to be planted together. Although I had say ...
Female parasitoids are deterred from searching for host eggs by trichomes and trichome exudates on the plant surface. High ... chilonis on chickpea leaves was affected by trichomes and the acidic trichome exudates secreted on all green parts of the plant ... The parasitoids spent a longer time on chickpea leaves where th acidic trichome exudates had been washed off than on unwashed ... When placed on unwashed chickpea leaves, 6.8% of the parasitoids were trapped an killed by the exudates. In a filter paper ...
An exudate is a fluid emitted by an organism through pores or a wound a process known as exuding or exudation.1 Exudate is ... Plant exudates. Plant exudates include saps, gums, latex, and resin. Sometimes nectar is considered an exudate.[12] Plant seeds ... An exudate is a fluid emitted by an organism through pores or a wound, a process known as exuding or exudation.[1] Exudate is ... It is not clear if there is a distinction in the difference of transudates and exudates in plants. ...
PLANT RESOURCES OF SOUTH-EAST ASIA No 18 - PLANTS PRODUCING EXUDATES Prosea Foundation / Backhuys Publishers (2000). 189 pp + ... PLANT RESOURCES OF SOUTH-EAST ASIA No 3 - DYE AND TANNIN-PRODUCING PLANTS Pudoc Scientific Publishers (1991). 195 pp + map, ... AMERICAN MEDICINAL PLANTS - An illustrated and descriptive guide to plants indigenous to and naturalized in the Unoited Staes ... PLANT RESOURCES OF SOUTH-EAST ASIA No 6 - RATTANS (meer info) Pudoc Scientific Publishers (1993). 137 pp + map, blue hardcovers ...
... root exudates help to suppress nematodes; plant at least 60 days prior to frost. ... Species with a taproot that can reach a depth of 6; root exudates help to suppress nematodes; plant at least 60 days prior to ... Planting Guides. Ernst Blog. Ordering Information. Terms & Conditions. Shipping Information. Returns & Cancellations ...
Hashish is the resinous exudate of the cannabis or hemp plant (Cannabis sativa). Heroin is a semisynthetic derivative of ... Marijuana is the dried leaf of the cannabis or hemp plant (Cannabis sativa). Methaqualone is a pharmaceutical depressant, ... Cannabis (Cannabis sativa) is the common hemp plant, which provides hallucinogens with some sedative properties, and includes ...
Plants, an international, peer-reviewed Open Access journal. ... including the root exudates, that are used by the bacteria as ... Part of it has been attributed to the plant genotypic variation, including the root exudates, that are used by the bacteria as ... Under all possible plant pairings between heather, broom, mānuka, and Dracophylum, the impact of neighbouring plant identity on ... Scientific plant names were updated using The World Checklist of Vascular Plants (WCVP) website. Informant Consensus Factor ( ...
Extension Plant Pathologist Pathogen Gosss bacterial wilt and leaf blight was first identified in three fields in Dawson ... When dried the exudate may glisten and appear shiny on the leaf surface similar to varnish (photo). The disease can also have a ... Nebraska plant pathology specialists, their focus areas, and contact information:. Robert Harveson. Phone: (308) 632-1239. ... nebraskensis and is one of only several plant diseases caused by a Gram positive bacterium. The pathogen can cause two major ...
... growth conditions and plant species. Here we review recent advances in the study of Al in plants at physiological, biochemical ... growth conditions and plant species. Here we review recent advances in the study of Al in plants at physiological, biochemical ... In plants and other organisms, Al can have a beneficial or toxic effect, depending on factors such as, metal concentration, the ... we discuss the possible mechanisms involved in improving the growth of plants cultivated in soils with acid pH, as well as ...
In the absence of plant roots, which would produce root exudates, microbes do not have access to adequate food supplies and ... Free-living nitrogen-fixing bacteria live adjacent to plant roots, surviving off root exudates and serving as a source of ... Increase the diversity of plant material throughout the landscape, including the lawn. A more diverse plant community will be ... These animals may consume organic matter or plant roots or feed on other organisms that feed on plant roots. ...
Responses of Heterodera glycines and Meloidogyne incognita infective juveniles to root tissues, root exudates, and root ... extracts from three plant species - (Peer Reviewed Journal) Wang, C., Masler, E.P., Rogers, S.T. 2018. Responses of Heterodera ... glycines and Meloidogyne incognita infective juveniles to root tissues, root exudates, and root extracts from three plant ...
Influence of Seeds and Roots Extracts and Exudates of Bean Plant on Growth of Some Pathogenic Fungi (Articles) ...
  • These secretions influence the rhizosphere around the roots to inhibit harmful microbes and promote the growth of self and kin plants. (wikipedia.org)
  • This secretion allows plants to largely influence the rhizosphere as well as the organisms that exist within it. (wikipedia.org)
  • By quantifying how different root exudates affect the contribution of N mineralization and N fixation to the plant-available N pool in low fertility soils, this study enhances our understanding of the "C for N" exchange in the plant rhizosphere. (msu.edu)
  • This mobilization is most likely due to chemical modification of the rhizosphere by root exudates. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Plants exude up to 30% of assimilated carbon into the rhizosphere [ 3 - 5 ]. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The rhizosphere microbiome is regulated by plant genotype, root exudates and environment. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • We characterized the rhizosphere microbiome and root exudates of Brachypodium distachyon, to develop it as a rhizosphere model for cereal species like wheat. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • The Brachypodium rhizosphere microbiota and root exudate profiles were similar to those reported for wheat rhizospheres, and different to Arabidopsis. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • Grammar note: "The plant roots which the rhizosphere is associated with can effect the physical environment of the rhizosphere. (kenyon.edu)
  • should be "the plant roots with which the rhizosphere is associated can affect (NOT EFFECT! (kenyon.edu)
  • Understanding the ecology of soil rhizosphere is essential to enhancing soil ecosystem and plants productivity. (scirp.org)
  • Poor-soil properties can limit rhizosphere microbial composition, interactions and plants productivity. (scirp.org)
  • Furthermore, the presence of plant exudates and microbial interation can change the rhizosphere dynamic. (scirp.org)
  • The rhizosphere is the borderline between plant and microorganisms, within biological systems and soil. (scirp.org)
  • The rhizosphere is the borderline where interactions affect ecosystem and plant growth and productivity. (scirp.org)
  • Soil rhizosphere interactions involve soil microorganism and plant roots exudates. (scirp.org)
  • They live on the surface of the epidermal cells of the plant roots forming dense hyphae covering and branch out to the rhizosphere, but never enter the cell walls. (rodaleinstitute.org)
  • These root exudates, released in the rhizosphere (the area of soil immediately surrounding the roots), supply the soil microbes with food, and the microbes in turn supply the plant with nutrients such as nitrogen or phosphorus. (ufl.edu)
  • It is a key mechanism by which plants and soil microbes interact in the rhizosphere. (researchgate.net)
  • Root exudates are complex mixtures making up a chemical language for recruiting and establishing beneficial rhizosphere microbes. (unl.edu)
  • Rhizosphere microbes, in turn, help maintain the long-term health of the plant. (unl.edu)
  • The rhizosphere contains a complex microbiota, where some microbes can colonize plant roots and support growth and stress tolerance. (cas.cz)
  • We use microbial genetics, microbiome metagenomics, computational modelling and molecular plant biology to identify microbial rhizosphere competence and root microbiome traits that affect rhizosphere competence of plant probiotics and the mechanisms through which root exudates affect plant-beneficial microbe interactions. (uu.nl)
  • Current evidence indicates that symbiotic competitiveness for nodule occupancy is a complex phenomenon, and that early processes in the rhizosphere are determinant to define which strains will finally associate with the host plant. (conicet.gov.ar)
  • Plant root exudates are fluids emitted through the roots of plants. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is a densely populated area in which the roots compete with invading root systems of neighboring plant species for space, water, and mineral nutrients as well as form positive and negative relationships with soil-borne microorganisms such as bacteria, fungi and insects. (wikipedia.org)
  • They act as a signaling messenger that allows for communication between soil microbes and plant roots. (wikipedia.org)
  • and potassium (K). The biological systems included two types of plants roots: sorghum bicolor and Setaria italica. (scirp.org)
  • A mycorrhiza (from the Greek mykes for "fungus" and rhiza, for "root") is a symbiotic association in which the fungus forms with plant roots. (rodaleinstitute.org)
  • Endomycorrhizas are the only type of mycorrhiza that associate with herbaceous roots (including vegetables), living inside the host's plant root cells, forming densely branched structures called arbuscules (See Photo 1), and thus are known as arbuscular mycorrhizal ( AM ) fungi. (rodaleinstitute.org)
  • Our results show that germlings respond preferentially to compounds secreted by plant roots and T. atroviride itself than to compounds secreted by prey fungi. (frontiersin.org)
  • Soil food webs are comprised of a variety of organisms including invertebrates, plant roots, and microbial organisms. (ufl.edu)
  • Plants, when growing in areas without external resource inputs (i.e., fertilizers, water, etc.) supplied by humans, will share some of their carbohydrates/sugars with the microbial community by releasing them from their roots to attract soil microbes. (ufl.edu)
  • Another important group of fungi are the mycorrhizae, which form a beneficial relationship with plant roots. (ufl.edu)
  • Mycorrhizae fungi can be divided into endomycorrhizae, which send their hyphae (branching microscopic filaments produced by a fungus) into the cells of the plant roots, and ectomycorrhizae, which form a protective cover around the roots. (ufl.edu)
  • Trim away any affected roots, allow the plant to dry out, and repot it in fresh, well-draining soil. (arizonaguide.com)
  • Roots secrete a vast array of low molecular weight compounds into the soil broadly referred to as root exudates. (researchgate.net)
  • When removing plant remains at the end of the growing season, it is best to only remove the aerial parts of the plant, leaving the roots in the ground to decay and release their nitrogen. (pfaf.org)
  • Euan James demonstrated how to check visually for nitrogen-fixing nodules on the roots of pea plants. (hutton.ac.uk)
  • We find that individual bacterial strains have distinct phenotypes in the context of plant roots and these behaviors can be explained by genetic factors. (k-state.edu)
  • These metabolites exit cells in the form of exudates through transporters that vary depending on the chemical structure of the metabolites. (wikipedia.org)
  • Phenolic compounds are an important class of plant secondary metabolites which play crucial physiological roles throughout the plant life cycle. (mdpi.com)
  • A new research program led by Rebecca Bart, PhD , member, Donald Danforth Plant Science Center and Doug Allen PhD , member and USDA research scientist will build on previous foundational research within the Danforth Center's Subterranean Influences on Nitrogen and Carbon (SINC) Center to better understand the key metabolites that encourage plant-bacterial nutrient exchanges. (danforthcenter.org)
  • By developing and deploying new methods of forming robust, stable and productive synthetic communities that can be used as inoculants, we will generate foundational knowledge on the key metabolites that encourage plant-bacterial nutrient exchanges. (danforthcenter.org)
  • As plant exudates may contain plant secondary metabolites (PSM), which are considered unpalatable in high concentrations, differences in PSM composition may drive feeding preferences. (bvsalud.org)
  • Responses of Heterodera glycines and Meloidogyne incognita infective juveniles to root tissues, root exudates, and root extracts from three plant species. (usda.gov)
  • Extracts of plants or their by-products contain some exclusive compounds that can be effective as chemotherapists and vaccines. (aquaculturemag.com)
  • Several plant extracts are reported to stimulate appetite and promote weight gain when they are administered to cultured fish. (aquaculturemag.com)
  • Heat stress drastically affects anther tissues resulting in poor plant fertility, necessitating an urgent need to determine the key proteome regulation associated with mature anther in response to heat stress. (researchgate.net)
  • The Impact of Metabolic Scion-Rootstock Interactions in Different Grapevine Tissues and Phloem Exudates. (mpg.de)
  • Acute necrotizing foci stippled with karyorrhexis and fibrin exudates and small plasmacytic infiltrates were found in myocardium, peripheral nerves and perineural tissues, liver, spleen, and lungs. (cdc.gov)
  • or it can move systemically through the tissues of the plant from infected blossoms or shoots. (missouri.edu)
  • Root exudates are seen as key mediators in the interaction between plants and soil microbiota. (wikipedia.org)
  • Root exudation impacts microbial activities as well as the diversity of active microbiota involved in root exudate assimilation. (wikipedia.org)
  • The plant family (Asteraceae, Brassicaceae, Fabaceae, and Poaceae) is the most important source of variation in exudation rates and microbial community structure between plant species. (wikipedia.org)
  • Analysis of the C recovery in measured pools revealed that root exudates C inputs were nearly equivalent to the DOC , microbial biomass carbon ( MBC ), and soil respiration in sandy soil, but only 45-74% of the root exudate C was recovered in these pools in the sandy loam soil. (msu.edu)
  • Therefore, I have changed my topics to Plant Exudates, Microbial Communities, and Mycorrhizal Fungi. (kenyon.edu)
  • Here, we investigated the effects of extreme drought and exotic plants, two of the most significant threats to Mediterranean-type ecosystems, on soil microbial community composition and carbon metabolic genes within a four-year field rainfall manipulation experiment. (nature.com)
  • Higher peaks and more seasonally variable microbial activity were found under exotic plants and, like drought periods, the microbial community shifted towards osmotic stress life-strategies. (nature.com)
  • Relationships found between microbial taxonomic groups and carbon metabolic genes support the interpretation that exotic plants change microbial carbon cycling by altering the soil microclimate and supplying easily decomposed high-quality litter. (nature.com)
  • Soil microbial community responses to drought and exotic plants could potentially impact ecosystem C storage by producing a smaller, more vulnerable C pool of microbial biomass that is prone to increased pulses of heterotrophic respiration. (nature.com)
  • The two types of soil were inoculated with five microbial combinations using plant growth promoting bacteria (PGPB, Pseudomonas fluorescens ) and mycorrhiza, and planted with two-day-old sorghum bicolor and Setaria italica (Foxtail millet) seedlings. (scirp.org)
  • We used plant growth promoting bacteria (PGPB) Pseudomonas fluorescens obtained from microbial laboratories. (scirp.org)
  • Plant rhizospheres enrich for a complex, and often consistent, subset of the bulk soil microbial reservoir. (k-state.edu)
  • In addition to host control through root exudates and immune responses, microbial interspecies interactions also influence the structure and function of the root-associated microbiome. (k-state.edu)
  • We aim to identify specific plant and microbial factors mediating plant-microbe and microbe-microbe interactions at the root interface. (k-state.edu)
  • However, current scientific knowledge of how plant exudates affect colonization and persistence is too limited to be translated into improved performance of microbial products. (danforthcenter.org)
  • Previous work has confirmed that under resource limited conditions, plants cultivate interactions with microbial collaborators - exchanging carbon for nutrients. (danforthcenter.org)
  • To harness the power of microbial interactions in modern day agriculture, we must develop methods of cultivating beneficial interactions, without starving our crop plants of nutrients and causing yield reductions," said Bart. (danforthcenter.org)
  • We use microbial synthetic communities built from different environments and host plants to identify the genetic traits underlying host specificity in Arabidopsis, Barley and Lotus. (uu.nl)
  • citation needed] Exudates influence several factors within the soil such as nutrient availability, soil pH, and recruitment of bacteria and fungi. (wikipedia.org)
  • Plants establish these mutualistic relationships with bacteria and fungi by modulating the composition of the root exudates. (wikipedia.org)
  • I would add more information regarding the mutualistic relationship between plants and the fungi. (kenyon.edu)
  • the mycorrhizal fungi scavenge and transport otherwise unavailable nutrients to their host plants in return for carbohydrates produced through photosynthesis. (rodaleinstitute.org)
  • Almost all plants growing in a wide range of ecosystems, from deserts to forests to arable land, form a symbiotic association with mycorrhizal fungi. (rodaleinstitute.org)
  • The richness and composition of AM fungi communities depend on the host plant, climate, and soil conditions. (rodaleinstitute.org)
  • Research has shown that plants allocate between 10 and 20% of their photosynthates to AM fungi, while up to 20% and sometimes up to 50% of assimilates (organic substances made by the plant) can be allocated to ECM fungi and ericoid mycorrhizal fungi [1,2] . (rodaleinstitute.org)
  • On the other hand, ECM fungi can acquire and immobilize significant amounts of organically bound N and P in the hyphae, representing up to 80% of plant N and P. (rodaleinstitute.org)
  • Saprophytic fungi decompose dead wood and other plant matter, thereby adding organic matter to the soil. (ufl.edu)
  • The mycorrhizal fungi provide the plant with nutrients, primarily phosphorous, in addition to water. (ufl.edu)
  • Mycorrhizal fungi also play a large role in creating soil structure and moving nutrients and water throughout the soil, as mycorrhizal fungi are capable of spreading throughout the soil and joining the root systems of every plant in an entire forest together. (ufl.edu)
  • As a postdoc at the VIB Plant Systems Biology department, I studied the genomes of plant pathogenic fungi. (uu.nl)
  • Root exudates contain a wide variety of molecules released by the plant into the soil. (wikipedia.org)
  • At sufficient concentrations, exudates are capable of mediating[clarification needed] both positive and negative plant-plant and plant-microbe interactions. (wikipedia.org)
  • While positive relationships like this do exist, it is worth noting that most microbes have incompatible interactions with plants. (wikipedia.org)
  • Here, we applied three different chemotropic assays to study the chemosensing capacity of T. atroviride toward compounds known or suspected to play a role in the mycoparasite/plant or host/prey fungal interactions and to cover the complete spectrum of T. atroviride developmental stages. (frontiersin.org)
  • 2009. Fluorescence lifetime imaging of interactions between Golgi tethering factors and small GTPases in plants . (hutton.ac.uk)
  • These interactions can increase plant health, but do not fully compensate for a lack of exogenously applied nutrients. (danforthcenter.org)
  • Cross disciplinary teams of scientists at the SINC Center are using state-of-the-art instrumentation at the Danforth Center to reveal new nitrogen uptake and use efficiency traits as well as novel symbiotic reactions to optimize plant genetics that promote beneficial microbe-plant interactions, and to develop new technologies and better cover crops. (danforthcenter.org)
  • Together with Prof. Guido van den Ackerveken (Plant-Microbe Interactions and Translational Plant Biology) and Dr. Michael Seidl (Theoretical Biology and Bioinformatics) and spinach breeders across the Netherlands we investigate the evolution of spinach downy mildew virulence with an emphasis on effector. (uu.nl)
  • Together with PhD candidates Petros Skiadas at TBB and Melanie Mendel at Plant-Microbe Interactions and Translational Plant Biology. (uu.nl)
  • The bacteria can also create an exudate or 'ooze' on the surfaces of the leaf which is the second identifiable characteristic. (unl.edu)
  • The disease can also have a systemic wilt phase in which the bacteria infect the vascular system and move within the plant. (unl.edu)
  • Buttercups growing nearby depress the growth of the nitrogen bacteria by means of a root exudate[201]. (pfaf.org)
  • Coccoid bacteria and plant fragments were often associated with crusts. (cdc.gov)
  • The bacteria commonly overwinter in cankers (sunken diseased areas) on the tree, which produce a sticky exudate in early spring (Figure 1). (missouri.edu)
  • Together, these approaches will yield new synthetic communities of bacteria with plant growth promoting abilities and greater knowledge of how plant root exudates affect the colonization and persistence of the synthetic communities. (danforthcenter.org)
  • There are two other minor fungal types that associate themselves with orchids and ericoid plants (such as blueberry, cranberry, rhododendron, and azalea). (rodaleinstitute.org)
  • Trichoderma atroviride is a mycoparasitic fungus used as biological control agent to protect plants against fungal pathogens. (frontiersin.org)
  • Successful biocontrol is based on the perception of signals derived from both the plant symbiont and the fungal prey. (frontiersin.org)
  • Purified compounds, including nutrients, the fungal secondary metabolite 6-amyl-α-pyrone (6-pentyl-α-pyrone, 6-PP) and the plant oxylipin 13-(s)-HODE, as well as culture supernatants derived from fungal preys, including Rhizoctonia solani , Botrytis cinerea and Fusarium oxysporum , were used to evaluate chemotropic responses of conidial germlings, microcolonies and fully differentiated mycelia. (frontiersin.org)
  • Together these findings suggest that chemotropic sensing during germling development is focused on plant association and colony network formation, while fungal prey recognition develops later in mature hyphae of fully differentiated mycelium. (frontiersin.org)
  • Furthermore, the morphological alterations of T. atroviride in response to plant host and fungal prey compounds suggest the presence of both positive and negative chemotropism. (frontiersin.org)
  • Biocontrol by competition for resources describes the more effective mobilization and absorption of nutrients from the soil by Trichoderma than by fungal plant pathogens inhabiting the same space ( Chet and Inbar, 1994 ). (frontiersin.org)
  • 2009. Rheological stabilisation of wet soils by model root and fungal exudates depends on clay mineralogy . (hutton.ac.uk)
  • Here I studied the role and evolution of fungal effectors during plant pathogenesis under the supervision of Prof. Pierre de Wit and Dr. Bart Thomma (current chair Phytopathology Wageningen UR). (uu.nl)
  • Mycorrhizae are known to promote plant growth and increase water use efficiency. (wikipedia.org)
  • This is important as a plants' habitat is crucial towards their growth as it dictates energy, water intake, nutrient intake and others [1]. (wikipedia.org)
  • Their tiny size, rapid growth by clonal propagation, and facile uptake of labeled compounds from the media were attractive features that made them a well-known model for plant biology from 1950 to 1990. (osti.gov)
  • These nutrients include but are not limited to phosphates, nitrates, zinc, copper, as well as organically bound nutrients (attached to carbon in large molecules that plants can't use) that are important for plant growth. (rodaleinstitute.org)
  • In plants and other organisms, Al can have a beneficial or toxic effect, depending on factors such as, metal concentration, the chemical form of Al, growth conditions and plant species. (frontiersin.org)
  • Here we review recent advances in the study of Al in plants at physiological, biochemical and molecular levels, focusing mainly on the beneficial effect of Al in plants (stimulation of root growth, increased nutrient uptake, the increase in enzyme activity, and others). (frontiersin.org)
  • In addition, we discuss the possible mechanisms involved in improving the growth of plants cultivated in soils with acid pH, as well as mechanisms of tolerance to the toxic effect of Al. (frontiersin.org)
  • Mealybugs can weaken the plant, stunt its growth, and make it susceptible to other diseases. (arizonaguide.com)
  • Soft nodal stem segments were inoculated on MS medium supplemented with desired concentrations plant growth regulator such as cytokinins (BAP/Kinetin) and different antioxidants. (ijcmas.com)
  • The plant growth promotion effect by UCMB5113 did not appear to depend on jasmonic acid in contrast to the disease suppression effect in plants. (cas.cz)
  • UCMB5113 exudates inhibited primary root growth, while a semi-purified lipopeptide fraction did not and resulted in the overall growth promotion indicating an interplay of many different bacterial compounds that affect the root growth of the host plant. (cas.cz)
  • Affected mutants could be grouped according to their growth in reach medium, minimal medium, and root exudates. (conicet.gov.ar)
  • One example of root exudation occurs when plants sense elicitors and prime[clarification needed] for a stress or defense response. (wikipedia.org)
  • An exudate is a fluid emitted by an organism through pores or a wound, a process known as exuding or exudation . (atozwiki.com)
  • Root exudates change with plant nutrient status, and are expected to affect the microbially-mediated N transformations (gross N mineralization vs N fixation) in low fertility soil (low soil organic matter). (msu.edu)
  • These beneficial microbes carry out nutrient cycling (where nutrients are continually made available to the plants by the activities of the microbes), out-compete pathogenic microbes for resources and/or prey on pathogens, help in the production of organic matter, and improve soil structure. (ufl.edu)
  • Fibrinous exudate is composed mainly of fibrinogen and fibrin . (atozwiki.com)
  • Fibrinous inflammation is often difficult to resolve due to blood vessels growing into the exudate and filling space that was occupied by fibrin. (atozwiki.com)
  • The composition of root exudates is complex and includes high molecular weight (HMW) and low molecular weight (LMW) molecules. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Such molecules find their way into soil and water bodies in the form of acid rain, causing acidification of soils and the release of Al ions in a form easily absorbed by the plant root system, which is extremely toxic. (frontiersin.org)
  • Nitrogen (N) availability is a primary constraint to plant productivity, especially in marginal lands with inherently low fertility. (msu.edu)
  • their contributions of plant nitrogen (N) are less pronounced and often depend on soil type, water content, and pH [3,4] . (rodaleinstitute.org)
  • Some of this nitrogen is utilized by the growing plant but some can also be used by other plants growing nearby[200]. (pfaf.org)
  • The main topics of the Technical Day were soil (its condition, testing and management), plant nutrition (mainly nitrogen and phosphorus) and Integrated Farm Management at Balruddery's Centre for Sustainable Cropping. (hutton.ac.uk)
  • The nodules fix nitrogen gas from the air into plant matter. (hutton.ac.uk)
  • Soil nitrogen (N) fertility and supply: N cycling and balanced N supply for plant uptake. (jic.ac.uk)
  • The differences in root system development and cell wall chemistry between monocotyledons and eudicots may also influence the microorganism composition of these major plant types. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • Many recent studies implicate plant root exudates as a major factor that determines the colonization and persistence (C&P) phenotypes of exogenously supplied microbes. (danforthcenter.org)
  • Genome-wide identification of rhizobial genes associated to the colonization of plant rhizospheres using signature-tagged mutagenesis (STM) and high through put DNA sequencing. (conicet.gov.ar)
  • These symbiotic associations are tightly regulated, and rhizobial strains compete in soil for the colonization of the limited symbiotic niche (i.e. the final number of nodules/plant is controlled by the host plant). (conicet.gov.ar)
  • Finally, the comparison of the gene sets required for the colonization of homologous vs. heterologous plants allowed us to draw out general conclusions about the evolutionary origin of the main genetic markers and functions associated with the specific colonization of the host-plant root. (conicet.gov.ar)
  • 500 Plants for Temperate Food Forests and Permaculture Gardens. (pfaf.org)
  • Search over 900 plants ideal for food forests and permaculture gardens. (pfaf.org)
  • The plants selected are the plants in our book 'Plants For Your Food Forest: 500 Plants for Temperate Food Forests and Permaculture Gardens, as well as plants chosen for our forthcoming related books for Tropical/Hot Wet Climates and Mediterranean/Hot Dry Climates. (pfaf.org)
  • Exudate may ooze from cuts or from areas of infection or inflammation. (atozwiki.com)
  • As a result, the plant may ooze a white or yellowish liquid. (arizonaguide.com)
  • Sarah Lebeis, assistant professor in the department of microbiology and molecular genetics at Michigan State University, will present "Unraveling Plant and Bacterial Metabolite Exchange During Microbiome Assembly" as part of the Division of Biology Seminar Series at 3:30 p.m. Monday, Nov. 7, in 221 Ackert Hall. (k-state.edu)
  • Together with Dr. Giannis Stringlis we study the role of plant processes in plant-beneficial root microbiome assembly. (uu.nl)
  • High concentrations of malic and oxalic acids, the major components of the acid exudates, deterred female parasitoids. (usda.gov)
  • In a filter paper bioassay, female T. chilonis wer deterred by high concentrations of malic and oxalic acids, the major components of the trichome exudates. (usda.gov)
  • A healthy soil food web living in fertile soil, with the proper amounts of all nutrients, allows the soil to grow optimally healthy and nutritious plants to support healthy animals (including humans). (ufl.edu)
  • Root architecture plays a crucial role for plants to ensure uptake of water, minerals and nutrients and to provide anchorage in the soil. (cas.cz)
  • Regular (also known as chemical, conventional, or synthetic) fertilizers will supply necessary nutrients to plants, but they are not as beneficial to the soil itself. (gardeningchannel.com)
  • Plant root systems can grow to be complex due to a variety of species and microorganisms existing in a common soil. (wikipedia.org)
  • The species of the plant as well as its developmental stage can also influence the chemical mixture that is released through exudates. (wikipedia.org)
  • The higher P influx of sugar beet compared to other plant species cannot solely be due to a more efficient uptake physiology. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Information looks good, however i heard that mychorrizae can increase the disease resistance of some plant species, if true you may want to incorporate that into the page. (kenyon.edu)
  • While this is normal for certain cactus species, it can be mistaken for an issue if the plant is not known to produce exudate. (arizonaguide.com)
  • Catharanthus roseus is a perennial species of flowering plant in the family Apocynaceae. (stuartxchange.org)
  • The physiological mechanism by which exudates are released is not entirely understood and varies depending on the stimulus as well as the contents of the secreted exudate. (wikipedia.org)
  • It focuses on the attributes of plants suitable for food forests, what each can contribute to a food forest ecosystem, including carbon sequestration, and the kinds of foods they yield. (pfaf.org)
  • Knowledge of the chemical characteristics of the plant exudates that Javan slow lorises consume is limited, especially with respect to those that they feed on in natural forests. (bvsalud.org)
  • Infection may cause discoloration of the water-conducting elements (photo) and eventually a slimy stalk rot that can lead to wilting and plant death (photo). (unl.edu)
  • This photo shows fluffy white exudate on the tongue of a child with HIV infection. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Various types of root cells have been suggested to sense microbes or compounds in the soil and secrete exudates accordingly. (wikipedia.org)
  • With the progression of colony development, host plant cues and self-generated signaling compounds remained the strongest chemoattractants. (frontiersin.org)
  • HMW exudates include secreted enzymes and mucilage, which consists mainly of polysaccharides. (biomedcentral.com)
  • 6 ] showed that HMW exudates can increase P availability for plants, probably because carboxyl groups of polysaccharides interact with P-binding sites in the soil, which releases P into the soil solution. (biomedcentral.com)
  • In a two-week lab incubation, we quantified the effect of different root exudates on gross N mineralization and N fixation by adding simulated root exudates (carbohydrates, organic acids) at a rate of 100 μg C g−1 day−1. (msu.edu)
  • Gross N mineralization produced more plant-available N than N fixation, as evidenced by higher inorganic N concentration in soils receiving organic acids than carbohydrates. (msu.edu)
  • Organic acids, especially citrate, malate, and oxalate, are the root exudates most frequently investigated with regard to P mobilization. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Examples of such practices include reducing soil disturbance, keeping the soil covered with living plants or mulches, growing a variety of plants throughout the year to preserve the organic matter, and protecting the soil food web by minimizing chemical inputs to the soil. (ufl.edu)
  • One of the best ways to avoid fire blight is to avoid planting cultivars that are susceptible. (missouri.edu)
  • Comments on history and agronomy were adapted from their entries in the Register of Australian Herbage Plant Cultivars . (erowid.org)
  • Heritable transgene-free genome editing in plants by grafting of wild-type shoots to transgenic donor rootstocks. (mpg.de)
  • Its leaf sheaths contain a pink red pigment which give a colored exudate if young shoots are cut near their base (stem base of young seedlings is pink). (erowid.org)
  • Superstition also crept in, but in certain periods, like the Neolithic, humans were remarkably innovative in domesticating and probably discovering medicinal plants. (penn.museum)
  • Root exudates of sugar beet contain salicylic acid and citramalic acid, the latter of which has rarely been detected in plants so far. (biomedcentral.com)
  • These results provide the first assignment of a biological function to citramalic acid of plant origin. (biomedcentral.com)
  • UCMB5113 produced cytokinins and indole-3-acetic acid, and the formation of the latter was stimulated by root exudates and tryptophan. (cas.cz)
  • Avoid using around acid-loving plants or in alkaline soil. (gardeningchannel.com)
  • 2022. Root exudates shift how N mineralization and N fixation contribute to the plant-available N supply in low fertility soils. (msu.edu)
  • Soils under exotic plants had increased temperatures, enhanced infiltration during rainfall events, and decreased water retention and labile carbon in comparison to soils under native plants. (nature.com)
  • The project will screen two collections of wheat for root morphological parameters and root exudates. (jic.ac.uk)
  • The sero-purulent exudates containing "sulfur lesion had become painful with time, so he granules" [4]. (who.int)
  • This review details the anatomy, development, physiology, and molecular characteristics of the Lemnaceae to introduce them to the broader plant research community. (osti.gov)
  • which is also available in published form in Molecular Plant as of 2023 here . (uu.nl)
  • Plants have adapted to respond to the soil conditions and presence of microbes through various mechanisms, one of which is the secretion of root exudates. (wikipedia.org)
  • Plants have developed various advantageous mechanisms to manipulate their habitats. (wikipedia.org)
  • The regulation of plant thiol metabolism highlights nature's ability to engineer pathways that respond to multiple inputs and cellular demands using mechanisms that range from the simple to the elaborate. (unl.edu)
  • Secondary benefits of the mycorrhizal relationship with the host plant also include increased resistance to diseases, drought, and salinity. (rodaleinstitute.org)
  • The Critically Endangered Javan slow loris (Nycticebus javanicus) was previously found to prefer Acacia decurrens exudate in an anthropogenically disturbed site, while its feeding habits in secondary natural forest remain unknown. (bvsalud.org)
  • Quantifying how much photosynthetically fixed carbon is transferred to soil via plant root exudates is difficult, but 5% can be considered a rough estimate. (wikipedia.org)
  • This suggests that root exudate C may be adsorbed to mineral particles in the sandy loam soil. (msu.edu)
  • The long chains of polygalacturonate in HMW exudates may also cover soil particles and reduce the re-adsorption of phosphate [ 7 ]. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Purulent or suppurative exudate consists of plasma with both active and dead neutrophils , fibrinogen , and necrotic parenchymal cells . (atozwiki.com)
  • Book titles include Edible Plants , Edible Perennials , Edible Trees , and Woodland Gardening . (pfaf.org)
  • Soil health is defined by the United States Department of Agriculture-Natural Resources Conservation Service (USDA-NRCS) as the capacity of the soil to function as a vital living ecosystem that can sustain plants and animals, including humans. (ufl.edu)
  • Soil is an ecosystem, and a sustainable way to produce healthy plants is to focus on soil health and adopt practices to encourage a healthy soil environment. (ufl.edu)
  • This study illustrates that beneficial microbes interact with plants in root development via classic and novel signals. (cas.cz)
  • however, in practice, these products display highly variable results and current data suggest that this is tightly linked to the ability of the beneficial microbes to colonize and persist with their plant hosts. (danforthcenter.org)
  • The key to success will be discovering the fundamental rules that govern C&P of beneficial microbes with their plant hosts. (danforthcenter.org)
  • We used root cell-type specific gene expression analysis following beneficial bacterium application to uncover a role for root hairs and the endodermis in establishing an optimal plant-beneficial bacterium association. (uu.nl)
  • In this image, linear streaking on an extremity suggests plant contact (eg, poison ivy or poison sumac). (msdmanuals.com)
  • Root exudates play a major role in root-soil contact, the exact purpose of the exudates and the reactions they cause are still poorly understood. (wikipedia.org)