Fur Seals: A group comprised of several species of eared seals found in two genera, in the family Otariidae. In comparison to SEA LIONS, they have an especially dense wooly undercoat.Seals, Earless: The family Phocidae, suborder PINNIPEDIA, order CARNIVORA, comprising the true seals. They lack external ears and are unable to use their hind flippers to walk. It includes over 18 species including the harp seal, probably the best known seal species in the world.Ear Auricle: The shell-like structure projects like a little wing (pinna) from the side of the head. Ear auricles collect sound from the environment.Pinnipedia: The suborder of aquatic CARNIVORA comprising the WALRUSES; FUR SEALS; SEA LIONS; and EARLESS SEALS. They have fusiform bodies with very short tails and are found on all sea coasts. The offspring are born on land.Ear, External: The outer part of the hearing system of the body. It includes the shell-like EAR AURICLE which collects sound, and the EXTERNAL EAR CANAL, the TYMPANIC MEMBRANE, and the EXTERNAL EAR CARTILAGES.Diving: An activity in which the organism plunges into water. It includes scuba and bell diving. Diving as natural behavior of animals goes here, as well as diving in decompression experiments with humans or animals.Atlantic Islands: Widely scattered islands in the Atlantic Ocean as far north as the AZORES and as far south as the South Sandwich Islands, with the greatest concentration found in the CARIBBEAN REGION. They include Annobon Island, Ascension, Canary Islands, Falkland Islands, Fernando Po (also called Isla de Bioko and Bioko), Gough Island, Madeira, Sao Tome and Principe, Saint Helena, and Tristan da Cunha.Euphausiacea: An order of pelagic, shrimplike CRUSTACEA. Many consume ZOOPLANKTON and a few are predacious. Many antarctic species, such as Euphausia superba, constitute the chief food of other animals.Sea Lions: A group comprised of several species of aquatic carnivores in different genera, in the family Otariidae. In comparison to FUR SEALS, they have shorter, less dense hair.Phoca: A genus in the family of EARLESS SEALS (Phocidae) and collectively the most abundant PINNIPEDS in the Northern Hemisphere.Embryo Implantation, Delayed: Delay in the attachment and implantation of BLASTOCYST to the uterine ENDOMETRIUM. The blastocyst remains unattached beyond the normal duration thus delaying embryonic development.Ear: The hearing and equilibrium system of the body. It consists of three parts: the EXTERNAL EAR, the MIDDLE EAR, and the INNER EAR. Sound waves are transmitted through this organ where vibration is transduced to nerve signals that pass through the ACOUSTIC NERVE to the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. The inner ear also contains the vestibular organ that maintains equilibrium by transducing signals to the VESTIBULAR NERVE.Sound Localization: Ability to determine the specific location of a sound source.Geography: The science dealing with the earth and its life, especially the description of land, sea, and air and the distribution of plant and animal life, including humanity and human industries with reference to the mutual relations of these elements. (From Webster, 3d ed)Nitrogen Isotopes: Stable nitrogen atoms that have the same atomic number as the element nitrogen, but differ in atomic weight. N-15 is a stable nitrogen isotope.Otologic Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the external, middle, or internal ear.Animals, Suckling: Young, unweaned mammals. Refers to nursing animals whether nourished by their biological mother, foster mother, or bottle fed.Maternal Behavior: The behavior patterns associated with or characteristic of a mother.Ear Cartilage: Cartilage of the EAR AURICLE and the EXTERNAL EAR CANAL.Otitis Externa: Inflammation of the OUTER EAR including the external EAR CANAL, cartilages of the auricle (EAR CARTILAGE), and the TYMPANIC MEMBRANE.Cerebral Decortication: Partial or total removal, ablation, or destruction of the cerebral cortex; may be chemical. It is not used with animals that do not possess a cortex, i.e., it is used only with mammals.Species Specificity: The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.Basal Metabolism: Heat production, or its measurement, of an organism at the lowest level of cell chemistry in an inactive, awake, fasting state. It may be determined directly by means of a calorimeter or indirectly by calculating the heat production from an analysis of the end products of oxidation within the organism or from the amount of oxygen utilized.Mimosa: A plant genus of the family FABACEAE that contains kukulkanin, a CHALCONE.Head: The upper part of the human body, or the front or upper part of the body of an animal, typically separated from the rest of the body by a neck, and containing the brain, mouth, and sense organs.Sound: A type of non-ionizing radiation in which energy is transmitted through solid, liquid, or gas as compression waves. Sound (acoustic or sonic) radiation with frequencies above the audible range is classified as ultrasonic. Sound radiation below the audible range is classified as infrasonic.Genetics, Population: The discipline studying genetic composition of populations and effects of factors such as GENETIC SELECTION, population size, MUTATION, migration, and GENETIC DRIFT on the frequencies of various GENOTYPES and PHENOTYPES using a variety of GENETIC TECHNIQUES.Apocrine Glands: Large, branched, specialized sweat glands that empty into the upper portion of a HAIR FOLLICLE instead of directly onto the SKIN.Sleep: A readily reversible suspension of sensorimotor interaction with the environment, usually associated with recumbency and immobility.Melanoma, Amelanotic: An unpigmented malignant melanoma. It is an anaplastic melanoma consisting of cells derived from melanoblasts but not forming melanin. (Dorland, 27th ed; Stedman, 25th ed)Ear Diseases: Pathological processes of the ear, the hearing, and the equilibrium system of the body.Ecosystem: A functional system which includes the organisms of a natural community together with their environment. (McGraw Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Iron: A metallic element with atomic symbol Fe, atomic number 26, and atomic weight 55.85. It is an essential constituent of HEMOGLOBINS; CYTOCHROMES; and IRON-BINDING PROTEINS. It plays a role in cellular redox reactions and in the transport of OXYGEN.Acoustic Stimulation: Use of sound to elicit a response in the nervous system.Adaptation, Physiological: The non-genetic biological changes of an organism in response to challenges in its ENVIRONMENT.Chinchilla: A genus of the family Chinchillidae which consists of three species: C. brevicaudata, C. lanigera, and C. villidera. They are used extensively in biomedical research.Cats: The domestic cat, Felis catus, of the carnivore family FELIDAE, comprising over 30 different breeds. The domestic cat is descended primarily from the wild cat of Africa and extreme southwestern Asia. Though probably present in towns in Palestine as long ago as 7000 years, actual domestication occurred in Egypt about 4000 years ago. (From Walker's Mammals of the World, 6th ed, p801)Sequence Analysis, DNA: A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.Sebaceous Glands: Small, sacculated organs found within the DERMIS. Each gland has a single duct that emerges from a cluster of oval alveoli. Each alveolus consists of a transparent BASEMENT MEMBRANE enclosing epithelial cells. The ducts from most sebaceous glands open into a HAIR FOLLICLE, but some open on the general surface of the SKIN. Sebaceous glands secrete SEBUM.Skin Diseases, Viral: Skin diseases caused by viruses.Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Bacterial Proteins: Proteins found in any species of bacterium.Distemper Virus, Phocine: A species of MORBILLIVIRUS causing distemper in seals.Tympanic Membrane: An oval semitransparent membrane separating the external EAR CANAL from the tympanic cavity (EAR, MIDDLE). It contains three layers: the skin of the external ear canal; the core of radially and circularly arranged collagen fibers; and the MUCOSA of the middle ear.Electroencephalography: Recording of electric currents developed in the brain by means of electrodes applied to the scalp, to the surface of the brain, or placed within the substance of the brain.Antarctic Regions: The continent lying around the South Pole and the southern waters of the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans. It includes the Falkland Islands Dependencies. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p55)Mite Infestations: Infestations with arthropods of the subclass ACARI, superorder Acariformes.Genetic Variation: Genotypic differences observed among individuals in a population.Cues: Signals for an action; that specific portion of a perceptual field or pattern of stimuli to which a subject has learned to respond.Sound Spectrography: The graphic registration of the frequency and intensity of sounds, such as speech, infant crying, and animal vocalizations.Psychoacoustics: The science pertaining to the interrelationship of psychologic phenomena and the individual's response to the physical properties of sound.Chiroptera: Order of mammals whose members are adapted for flight. It includes bats, flying foxes, and fruit bats.Audiometry: The testing of the acuity of the sense of hearing to determine the thresholds of the lowest intensity levels at which an individual can hear a set of tones. The frequencies between 125 and 8000 Hz are used to test air conduction thresholds and the frequencies between 250 and 4000 Hz are used to test bone conduction thresholds.Injections, Intradermal: The forcing into the skin of liquid medication, nutrient, or other fluid through a hollow needle, piercing the top skin layer.Skin: The outer covering of the body that protects it from the environment. It is composed of the DERMIS and the EPIDERMIS.Hearing: The ability or act of sensing and transducing ACOUSTIC STIMULATION to the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. It is also called audition.Peas: A variable annual leguminous vine (Pisum sativum) that is cultivated for its rounded smooth or wrinkled edible protein-rich seeds, the seed of the pea, and the immature pods with their included seeds. (From Webster's New Collegiate Dictionary, 1973)Auditory Perception: The process whereby auditory stimuli are selected, organized, and interpreted by the organism.Pressure: A type of stress exerted uniformly in all directions. Its measure is the force exerted per unit area. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Speech Intelligibility: Ability to make speech sounds that are recognizable.Goals: The end-result or objective, which may be specified or required in advance.Siderophores: Low-molecular-weight compounds produced by microorganisms that aid in the transport and sequestration of ferric iron. (The Encyclopedia of Molecular Biology, 1994)Acoustics: The branch of physics that deals with sound and sound waves. In medicine it is often applied in procedures in speech and hearing studies. With regard to the environment, it refers to the characteristics of a room, auditorium, theatre, building, etc. that determines the audibility or fidelity of sounds in it. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Herpes Simplex: A group of acute infections caused by herpes simplex virus type 1 or type 2 that is characterized by the development of one or more small fluid-filled vesicles with a raised erythematous base on the skin or mucous membrane. It occurs as a primary infection or recurs due to a reactivation of a latent infection. (Dorland, 27th ed.)Hair: A filament-like structure consisting of a shaft which projects to the surface of the SKIN from a root which is softer than the shaft and lodges in the cavity of a HAIR FOLLICLE. It is found on most surfaces of the body.North SeaRegulon: In eukaryotes, a genetic unit consisting of a noncontiguous group of genes under the control of a single regulator gene. In bacteria, regulons are global regulatory systems involved in the interplay of pleiotropic regulatory domains and consist of several OPERONS.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Auditory Threshold: The audibility limit of discriminating sound intensity and pitch.Hypersensitivity, Delayed: An increased reactivity to specific antigens mediated not by antibodies but by cells.Bays: An area of water mostly surrounded by land, usually smaller than a gulf, and affording access to the sea.Plant Leaves: Expanded structures, usually green, of vascular plants, characteristically consisting of a bladelike expansion attached to a stem, and functioning as the principal organ of photosynthesis and transpiration. (American Heritage Dictionary, 2d ed)Mice, Inbred BALB CNucleotide Transport Proteins: Proteins involved in the transport of NUCLEOTIDES across cellular membranes.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Dental Leakage: The seepage of fluids, debris, and micro-organisms between the walls of a prepared dental cavity and the restoration.Porpoises: Mammals of the family Phocoenidae comprising four genera found in the North Pacific Ocean and both sides of the North Atlantic Ocean and in various other seas. They differ from DOLPHINS in that porpoises have a blunt snout and a rather stocky body while dolphins have a beak-like snout and a slender, streamlined body. They usually travel in small groups. (From Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, pp1003-4)Anoplura: An order of insects comprising the sucking lice, which are blood-sucking ectoparasites of mammals. Recognized families include: Echinphthiriidae, Haematopinidae, and Pediculidae. The latter contains the medically important genera affecting humans: PEDICULUS and PHTHIRUS.Distemper: A name for several highly contagious viral diseases of animals, especially canine distemper. In dogs, it is caused by the canine distemper virus (DISTEMPER VIRUS, CANINE). It is characterized by a diphasic fever, leukopenia, gastrointestinal and respiratory inflammation and sometimes, neurologic complications. In cats it is known as FELINE PANLEUKOPENIA.Laryngeal Masks: A type of oropharyngeal airway that provides an alternative to endotracheal intubation and standard mask anesthesia in certain patients. It is introduced into the hypopharynx to form a seal around the larynx thus permitting spontaneous or positive pressure ventilation without penetration of the larynx or esophagus. It is used in place of a facemask in routine anesthesia. The advantages over standard mask anesthesia are better airway control, minimal anesthetic gas leakage, a secure airway during patient transport to the recovery area, and minimal postoperative problems.Dolphins: Mammals of the families Delphinidae (ocean dolphins), Iniidae, Lipotidae, Pontoporiidae, and Platanistidae (all river dolphins). Among the most well-known species are the BOTTLE-NOSED DOLPHIN and the KILLER WHALE (a dolphin). The common name dolphin is applied to small cetaceans having a beaklike snout and a slender, streamlined body, whereas PORPOISES are small cetaceans with a blunt snout and rather stocky body. (From Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, pp978-9)Bradyrhizobium: A genus of gram-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped bacteria usually containing granules of poly-beta-hydroxybutyrate. They characteristically invade the root hairs of leguminous plants and act as intracellular symbionts.Movement: The act, process, or result of passing from one place or position to another. It differs from LOCOMOTION in that locomotion is restricted to the passing of the whole body from one place to another, while movement encompasses both locomotion but also a change of the position of the whole body or any of its parts. Movement may be used with reference to humans, vertebrate and invertebrate animals, and microorganisms. Differentiate also from MOTOR ACTIVITY, movement associated with behavior.Morbillivirus: A genus of the family PARAMYXOVIRIDAE (subfamily PARAMYXOVIRINAE) where the virions of most members have hemagglutinin but not neuraminidase activity. All members produce both cytoplasmic and intranuclear inclusion bodies. MEASLES VIRUS is the type species.Genes, Bacterial: The functional hereditary units of BACTERIA.Pacific OceanOceans and Seas: A great expanse of continuous bodies of salt water which together cover more than 70 percent of the earth's surface. Seas may be partially or entirely enclosed by land, and are smaller than the five oceans (Atlantic, Pacific, Indian, Arctic, and Antarctic).DNA, Bacterial: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.Operator Regions, Genetic: The regulatory elements of an OPERON to which activators or repressors bind thereby effecting the transcription of GENES in the operon.
Exploited species included harp seals, hooded seals, Caspian seals, elephant seals, walruses and all species of fur seal. The ... Otariids are also known as eared seals due to the presence of pinnae. These animals rely on their well-developed fore-flippers ... Galápagos fur seal, Australian sea lion, Caspian seal and Galápagos sea lion), and "Vulnerable" (northern fur seal, hooded seal ... Species commonly entangled include California sea lions, Hawaiian monk seals, northern fur seals and brown fur seals. Pinnipeds ...
... southern elephant seal). Phocids are found throughout the world's oceans. Family Otariidae (eared seals, sea lions, fur seals) ... The 15 species (divided into seven genera) of otariids are distinguished from phocids by visible external ears (pinnae), more ... Pinnipedia (seals, sea lions, and walruses clade) is a widely distributed and diverse group of semiaquatic marine mammals which ... "Phocid seal leptin: Tertiary structure and hydrophobic receptor binding site preservation during distinct leptin gene evolution ...
They are much more closely related to sea lions than true seals, and share with them external ears (pinnae), relatively long ... townsendi Juan Fernández fur seal, A. philippii New Zealand fur seal or southern fur seal, A. forsteri South American fur seal ... Many populations, notably the Guadalupe fur seal, northern fur seal, and Cape fur seal, suffered dramatic declines and are ... Subfamily Arctocephalinae Genus Arctocephalus Antarctic fur seal, A. gazella Brown fur seal, A. pusillus South African fur seal ...
The ear pinnae are long and conspicuous, and naked of dark fur at the tips in older animals. The mystacial vibrissae can be ... other fur seal found in the Northern Hemisphere is the Guadalupe fur seal which overlaps slightly with the northern fur seal's ... This trade led to a decline in fur seal numbers. Restrictions were first placed on fur seal harvest on the Pribilof Islands by ... Behavior and Ecology of the Northern Fur Seal. Princeton University Press, 1998 ISBN 0-691-03345-5 "North Pacific Fur Seal ...
They have external ear flaps (pinnae) and their whiskers (vibrissae) are long, and may extend backward past the pinnae, ... also known as the Cape fur seal, South African fur seal and the Australian fur seal is a species of fur seal. The brown fur ... South African and Australian Fur Seals. Seal Conservation Society. Accessed 7 February 2013. Photos of brown fur seals at Cape ... When at sea, fur seals travel in small feeding groups. Brown fur seals begin to breed in the middle of October, when males haul ...
The ear pinnae are long and prominent, and the vibrissae of adults are creamy white and of relatively short length. Adult males ... Marine Mammals > Species: Arctocephalus australis (South American fur seal) South American Fur Seal, Arctocephalus australis at ... The South American fur seal has a dark grey coat of fur. The males of the species are almost entirely this color, though they ... The South American fur seal is found on neotropical ocean coasts from the Paracas Peninsula of southern Peru south to Cape Horn ...
... pinnae) and their whiskers (vibrissae) are long, and may extend backward past the pinnae, especially in adult males. The fore ... The brown fur seal (Arctocephalus pusillus), also known as the Cape fur seal, South African fur seal, and Australian fur seal, ... Eared seals). (includes fur seals. and sea lions). (Pinniped inclusive). Arctocephalus. *South American fur seal (A. australis) ... The brown fur seal is the largest and most robust fur seal. It has a large and broad head with a pointed snout that may be flat ...
Upon being born, the offspring have no fur, the incisors and claws are visible, but the eyes, pinnae of the ear and digits are ... all sealed. After a period of three days, the whiskers become visible and after five days, the first dorsal hairs develop. The ... Sowerby, Arthur de Clare (1914). Fur and feather in North China. University of California Libraries: Tientsin Press. p. 68. ... sandy coloration of fur and its lack of a dorsal stripe. When observed from behind, the neurocranium is rounded and does not ...
... fur seals) Genus Arctocephalus Antarctic fur seal, A. gazella Guadalupe fur seal, A. townsendi Juan Fernández fur seal, A. ... pinnae), which distinguishes them from the phocids. Along with the Phocidae and Odobenidae, the two other members of Pinnipedia ... pusillus South African fur seal, A. pusillus pusillus Australian fur seal, A. pusillus doriferus New Zealand fur seal (or ... forsteri Subantarctic fur seal, A. tropicalis South American fur seal, A. australis Genus Callorhinus Northern fur seal, C. ...
... the seal. The foreflippers have a short fur extending from the wrist to the middle of the dorsal fin surface, but other than ... Another characteristic that defines the sea lion are their external ear-like pinnae flaps which distinguish them from their ...
Its fur is dense and soft. The color ranges from dark gray to a sooty bluish-black. Its tail is about half the length of its ... It also has no ear pinnae, which is the external part of the ear. These features reduce drag when it digs and when it moves ... The fact that males lack a scrotum and the female's vagina is sealed, makes it difficult to determine the sex of shrew-moles ... In females, the vagina remains sealed until follicles appear in the ovaries. In males, they lack a scrotum, but the testes and ...
Unlike its relative the naked mole-rat, the Cape dune species has a thick pelt of soft fur over its entire body. It is cinnamon ... The burrows are entirely sealed, with no access to the surface, and stretch for between 50 and 420 metres (160 and 1,380 ft), ... there are no pinnae or scrotum, and the penis retracts into a concealed sheath. Lip-like flaps of skin are able to close behind ...
... the underside and short tail are also covered in fur. Colouration of the fur and spines varies with geographic location. For ... The pinnae are obscured and covered by hair, so predators cannot grab them in an attack, and prey or foreign material cannot ... laboratory testing has revealed the echidna's cardiovascular system is similar to that of the seal. Following the devastation ... The echidna's fur may be infested with what is said to be the world's largest flea, Bradiopsylla echidnae, which is about 4 mm ...
The young-up to this point they are pink-start to grow fur at 49 days and have a full coat by 90 days. The fur growing process ... The pinnae were free on day 36, and eyes opened later, on days 115-121. In general, females tend to retain more stress after ... The vast majority of deaths occurred in the sealed portion of the road, believed to be due to an increase in speeds. It was ... The fur is usually black, often with irregular white patches on the chest and rump (although approximately 16% of wild devils ...
... fur of tropical animals and seals, whaling... but mainly ivory, black slaves, gold and hardwoods. They maintaining trade ports ... ISBN 0-415-14405-1. Martinez VP, Bellomo C, San Juan J, Pinna D, Forlenza R, Elder M, Padula PJ (2005). "Person-to-person ... The Basques were fur trading, fishing cod and whaling in Terranova (Labrador and Newfoundland) in 1520, and in Iceland by at ...
These species can regrow hair follicles, skin, sweat glands, fur and cartilage.[74] In addition to these two species, ... Following amputation, most annelids are capable of sealing their body via rapid muscular contraction. Constriction of body ... subsequent studies demonstrated that Acomys cahirinus could regenerate skin and excised tissue in the ear pinna.[75][76] ... Archiv Fur Entwicklungsmechanik Der Organismen. 173 (4): 263-282. doi:10.1007/BF00575834. PMID 28304797.. ...
Eared seals). (includes fur seals. and sea lions). (Pinniped inclusive). Arctocephalus. *South American fur seal (A. australis) ... As with other true seals, there is no pinna (ear flap). An ear canal may be visible behind the eye. Including the head and ... The harbor (or harbour) seal (Phoca vitulina), also known as the common seal, is a true seal found along temperate and Arctic ... "Common seal" redirects here. For the common seal of a company, see company seal. ...
Australian fur seal (Lady Julia Percy Island, Victoria, to Seal Rocks, New South Wales, and around Tasmania. Also southern ... Pinna bicolor Razor clam, razorfish (Gmelin, 1791) (Tropical Australia around the southwest to Gulf St Vincents, South ... Migrates to North Pacific.) Arctocephalus forsteri (Lesson, 1828) New Zealand fur seal (Albany, Western Australia, to eastern ... 138.517 Seal Rocks, New South Wales32°25′13″S 152°30′27″E / 32.42028°S 152.50750°E / -32.42028; 152.50750 Shark Bay, Western ...
The Weird Sisters in Shakespeare's Macbeth used the fur of a bat in their brew.[257] In Western culture, the bat is often a ... K., Roman (2009). "Model predicts bat pinna ridges focus high frequencies to form narrow sensitivity beams". The Journal of the ... and licking their fur to promote evaporative cooling; this is sufficient to dissipate twice their metabolic heat production.[ ... as pollen gets attached to their fur while they are feeding. Around 500 species of flowering plant rely on bat pollination and ...
The males pelt is brown in colour, and includes a mane of shoulder fur. The external ears (pinnae) of a seal are also seen ... This seal ranges throughout the Southern Ocean that surrounds Antarctica, feeding mainly on krill in shallow waters at night. ... Antarctic fur seal (Arctocephalus gazella) male opening its mouth. The male is much larger than the female, reaching a length ... eared seal, fauna, fur, fur coat, fur seal, furry, gape, growl, growling, head, island, islands, male, male fur seal, mammal, ...
The ear pinnae are long and conspicuous, and naked of dark fur at the tips in older animals. The mystacial vibrissae can be ... other fur seal found in the Northern Hemisphere is the Guadalupe fur seal which overlaps slightly with the northern fur seals ... This trade led to a decline in fur seal numbers. Restrictions were first placed on fur seal harvest on the Pribilof Islands by ... Behavior and Ecology of the Northern Fur Seal. Princeton University Press, 1998 ISBN 0-691-03345-5 "North Pacific Fur Seal ...
The ear pinnae are long and prominent, and the vibrissae of adults are creamy white and of relatively short length. Adult males ... Marine Mammals > Species: Arctocephalus australis (South American fur seal) South American Fur Seal, Arctocephalus australis at ... The South American fur seal has a dark grey coat of fur. The males of the species are almost entirely this color, though they ... The South American fur seal is found on neotropical ocean coasts from the Paracas Peninsula of southern Peru south to Cape Horn ...
They have a small external ear (pinna). Adult males are much larger than females (in northern fur seals, males can reach 320 kg ... Eared Seals. Description Eared seals in Canadian seas are the northern fur seal (Callorhinus ursinus), the northern (or ... Earless Seals. Description The ears of earless seals are openings on the side of the head with no pinna (external ear). They ... Eared seals in Canadian waters are confined to the Pacific Ocean. The northern fur seal breeds on Pribilof and Bogoslof islands ...
Antarctic Fur Seal (Arctocephalus gazella) · Guadalupe Fur Seal (Arctocephalus townsendi) · Juan Fernandez Fur Seal ( ... As otariids, seal lions also are characterized by presence of a pinna (external part of ear). Traditionally, sea lions were ... Cape Fur Seal (Arctocephalus pusillus) · New Zealand Fur Seal (Arctocephalus forsteri) · Subantarctic Fur Seal (Arctocephalus ... the genus of the Northern fur seal, is more closely related to some sea lion species than to the fur seal genus Arctocephalus ...
... pinnae) and their whiskers (vibrissae) are long, and may extend backward past the pinnae, especially in adult males. The fore ... The brown fur seal (Arctocephalus pusillus), also known as the Cape fur seal, South African fur seal, and Australian fur seal, ... Eared seals). (includes fur seals. and sea lions). (Pinniped inclusive). Arctocephalus. *South American fur seal (A. australis) ... The brown fur seal is the largest and most robust fur seal. It has a large and broad head with a pointed snout that may be flat ...
Grey Seal, Harbor Seal, Harp Seal, Greenland Seal, Saddleback Seal and Hooded Seal. ... Learn about ocean Seals including the California Sea Lion, ... Fur seals and sea lions (having external ear pinna (flaps) have ... Harp Seal, Greenland Seal, Saddleback Seal (Pagophilus groenlandicus). H. arp Seals get their name from the dark harp-shaped ... Harp Seal, Greenland Seal, Saddleback Seal (Pagophilus groenlandicus). H. arp Seals get their name from the dark harp-shaped ...
Such animals will have enlarged incisors with the fur and skin closing behind them. - Seals incisors off from oral cavity ... Reduced pinnae. - Large front feet with big claws. - Short, broad head. - Reduced or absent tail. - Tend to have short hair, ... Pinnae (external ear). - Epiphyses of the long bones. - Flexible neck (typically 7 cervical vertebrae). - Two occipital ... Biggest issue is reducing drag, which can be done by making the body torpedo-shaped and reducing limbs and fur ...
Like fur seals, sea lions are characterized by the presence of external ear pinnae or flaps, long front flippers, and the ... Cape Fur Seal or Australian Fur Seal, Arctocephalus pusillus. *New Zealand Fur Seal or Southern Fur Seal, Arctocephalus ... Fur seals are generally smaller than sea lions.. All fur seals except the northern and Guadalupe fur seals are found in the ... The eared seals (or walking seals), family Otariidae, are the fur seals and the sea lions. These are barrel-shaped marine ...
Coloration of Guadalupe and northern fur seals is similar. Guadalupe fur seals have fur on the dorsum of the fore flipper ... The ear pinnae are long and conspicuous, and naked of dark fur at the tips in older animals. The mystacial vibrissae can be ... Other fur seal species of the genus Arctocephalus use this posture, so it is possible that Guadalupe fur seals use it as well, ... Guadalupe fur seals will rest in a posture characteristic of fur seals of the genus Arctocephalus with the head down and both ...
They are much more closely related to sea lions than true seals, and share with them external ears (pinnae), relatively long ... Many populations, notably the Guadalupe fur seal, northern fur seal, and Cape fur seal, suffered dramatic declines and are ... Fur seals are generally smaller than sea lions. At under 1 m (3 ft 3 in), the Galápagos fur seal is the smallest of all ... Fur seals feed on moderately sized fish, squid, and krill. Several species of the southern fur seal also have sea birds, ...
Kurle CM (2002) Stable-isotope ratios of blood components from captive northern fur seals (Callorhinus ursinus) and their diet ... Moniello G, Bovera F, Solinas IL, Piccolo G, Pinna W, Nizza A (2005) Effect of age and blood collection site on the metabolic ...
Exploited species included harp seals, hooded seals, Caspian seals, elephant seals, walruses and all species of fur seal.[153] ... Otariids are also known as eared seals due to the presence of pinnae. These animals rely on their well-developed fore-flippers ... Galápagos fur seal, Australian sea lion, Caspian seal and Galápagos sea lion), and "Vulnerable" (northern fur seal, hooded seal ... Other species protected are southern elephant seals, Ross seals and Antarctic fur seals.[153] The Government of Canada permits ...
Prepare the surgical area at the ventral surface of the neck using clippers to remove the fur. Clean the skin with povidone ... Ensure that no obstacles are between the speaker and the ear and that the pinna is completely opened. ... Seal the bullostomy with 1-2 drops of tissue adhesive. ... in the parotid region below the pinna, and iii) the ground ... in the parotid region below the pinna (reference, negative) and in the back (ground). The free-field speaker is placed at a ...
The pups of Fur Seals are susceptible to hypothermia as they are not born with dense and insulated fur coat. During their first ... Otariidae ("eared" seals). Otariids have visible external ear flaps (pinnae) and an elongate neck. They swim using their long ... A large body with less fur differentiates Sea Lions from the Fur Seals. ... Seals are quieter, vocalizing via soft grunts.. Fourth, while both species spend time both in and out of the water, Seals are ...
... fur seals, sea lions, walruses and seals) and the sirenians (dugongs and manatees). Through convergent evolution, each of these ... the loss of fur and external ear pinnae, a layer of subcutaneous blubber around the body to remain warm in the marine ... fur seals, sea lions, walruses and seals) and the sirenians (dugongs and […] Continue Reading... ... Between January-March volunteers assisted biologists with six boat-based counts of Cape fur seals that haul out on Robberg ...
Land mammals: Most land mammals respond to cold by raising their furs thereby trapping the thicker layer of still air and it ... Marine mammals; Marine mammals such as whales and seals inhabit much colder water than their body temperature have a very thick ... It forms external pinnae (outer ear) of ear and epiglottis.. Filed Under: BIOLOGY Tagged With: DEFINITION OF SKELETON, SKELETON ... Structural adaptations: These may be long-term changes in subdermal fatty layer insulation or pelage (the fur, hair, wool, etc ...
... and theres another one for the tufts of fur that grow on the interior of cats pinnae-theyre called "ear furnishings" by cat ... Strain says cats are born with their ear canals sealed and their auditory systems immature. "They respond to sounds as soon as ... The pinnas job is to capture sound waves and funnel them down the ear canal to the middle ear. Cats pinnae are mobile, and ... 6. Some cats have four ears (or at least four outer ears, with extra pinnae behind their normal pinnae). The additional ears ...
The fur was clipped and shaved on the abdomen and at the base of the tail. Injection sites were prepped with 70% ethanol prior ... The greatest mean thickness was observed for the pinna (36.3 μm), while the mean VED thickness for the abdomen and BoT ranged ... The vials were sealed, crimped, and stored at room temperature until further use. ... 1a). The best colocalization of Hap particles within the viable epidermis was observed for pinna injections with a MPD of 53.7 ...
He assisted ber into the carriage, gave a few hasty dir ctions to the driver, and took his seal beside bis fair companion, when ... leut advertiaameata meat b. paid fur befur. Inertir . fnne rrpn.ra! nrllhrinlea ua:uirLntt iih tlitfl "liun. euil Ilall ... ami pnWio feelinj which tho ljsl.it of living under the pinna i;o vert: meat r.:u! in the same stae of civiiizut.nn has ... He assisted ber into the carriage, gave a few hasty dir ctions to the driver, and took his seal beside bis fair companion, when ...
Term pinna Sapt, ll. J i iiw., i-or Calendari.flto,, addreM advance. COLUMBIAN i ol.l.KHK. er anil the Montreal Fatnil and ... Tenders nre to lie sealed, endorsed Tender for Packing Sup* piles. nml tiddresxed to Ihe undersigned. Forms of tender and ... Sm €& %^€^€^€^€^€^§^ ] N THE MATTED of an application I fur Duplicate Certificate uf Title to Lots 11 anil 12, Block 31, Map 35 ...
These species can regrow hair follicles, skin, sweat glands, fur and cartilage.[74] In addition to these two species, ... Following amputation, most annelids are capable of sealing their body via rapid muscular contraction. Constriction of body ... subsequent studies demonstrated that Acomys cahirinus could regenerate skin and excised tissue in the ear pinna.[75][76] ... Archiv Fur Entwicklungsmechanik Der Organismen. 173 (4): 263-282. doi:10.1007/BF00575834. PMID 28304797.. ...
C. Listrophorus gibbus - fur mite 1. Etiology: L. gibbus is a small, nonburrowing mite present at low to moderate incidence in ... 2. Clinical Signs: Scratching at ears with hind feet and the presence of crusty exudate in the pinnas with an underlying moist ... yang unik nya warna seal itu tergantung oleh suhu.. semakin diungin suhu maka point itu akan semakin pekat warnanya. http://www ... B. Cheyletiella parasitovorax - fur mite 1. Etiology: C. parasitovorax is a small, noninvasive mite, with a low to moderate ...
Gunnell, Y., Calvet, M., Meyer, B., Pinna-Jamme, R., Bour, I., Gautheron, C., ...Dimitrov, D. (2017). Cenozoic landforms and ... Neues Jahrbuch fur Geologie und Palaontologie - Abhandlungen, 284 (1), 57-64. doi:10.1127/njgpa/2017/0650 ... Experimental postseismic recovery of fractured rocks assisted by calcite sealing. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, 44 (14), 7228- ... Recanati, A., Gautheron, C., Barbarand, J., Missenard, Y., Pinna-Jamme, R., Tassan-Got, L., ...Pagel, M. (2017). Helium ...
eetie ol fur lho oilier sale of tbe International boundary line. Having dispersed one nainan Kennedy lurniid bis alten* linn ... and seal nf ofllco al Victoria, Provinco of Rritfoh Columbia, this 20th day of Octobor ono thousand oighi hundrod and nlnoiy- ... pinna bnve been ex •ctited in Ibe Hulil Metropole in this -in, lining compliled recently, is very slgulttciinl Indeed,- ... It will be eilher an inlltienco fur evil or all influence for good. Nuth- ittg whicli enters the system, in no iiii-itlf- bow ...
  • The brown fur seal's main predator is the great white shark , although they are also preyed upon by various other animals, such as killer whales and vagrant southern elephant seals . (wikipedia.org)
  • Phocids breed in the water, on shore, or on ice, but (except for Elephant Seals) don't breed on rookeries. (otlibrary.com)
  • Henry's pocket is a pretty great anatomical term, and there's another one for the tufts of fur that grow on the interior of cat's pinnae-they're called "ear furnishings" by cat fanciers and breeders. (petmd.com)
  • The sand cat's fur is of a pale sandy ochreous color. (theinfolist.com)
  • Recent evidence from stable isotope analysis of Holocene fur seal bone collagen (δ13C and δ15N) indicates that before the maritime fur trade, it was more common for these animals to breed at local rookeries in British Columbia, California, and likely along much of the northwest coast of North America. (wikipedia.org)
  • Western Atlantic common seals, P. v. concolor ( DeKay , 1842), inhabit eastern North America. (orange.com)
  • Pacific common seals, P. v. richardsi (Gray, 1864), are located in western North America. (orange.com)
  • This failure of owls to evolve ear pinnae is even more surprising considering that certain species - particularly in the subfamily Striginae - do actually possess an auricle of sorts, which is called a pre-aural flap . (explorebioedge.com)
  • Leopard seals are pagophilic ("ice-loving") seals, which primarily inhabit the Antarctic pack ice between 50˚S and 80˚S. Sightings of vagrant leopard seals have been recorded on the coasts of Australia, New Zealand (where individuals have been seen even on the foreshores of major cities such as Auckland and Dunedin ), South America, and South Africa. (marinemammalscience.org)
  • Higher densities of leopard seals are seen in the Western Antarctic than in other regions. (marinemammalscience.org)
  • Although there is an abundance of leopard seals in the Antarctic, they are difficult to survey by traditional visual techniques because they spend long periods of time vocalizing under the water during the austral spring and summer, when visual surveys are carried out. (marinemammalscience.org)
  • The harbor (or harbour ) seal ( Phoca vitulina ), also known as the common seal , is a true seal found along temperate and Arctic marine coastlines of the Northern Hemisphere . (orange.com)
  • Insular seals, Phoca vitulina stejnegeri ( J. A. Allen , 1902), are in eastern Asia. (orange.com)
  • We can't just assume that dinosaurs - the ancestors of birds - and pterosaurs all lacked ear pinnae, whether these are called auricles (made of skin and cartilage) or true pinnae (made of adjustable tufts of feathers). (explorebioedge.com)
  • The South American fur seal is found on neotropical ocean coasts from the Paracas Peninsula of southern Peru south to Cape Horn on the Pacific coast, and northward to southern Brazil on the Atlantic coast. (wikipedia.org)
  • The African fur seal lives around the southern and southwestern coast of Africa from Cape Cross in Namibia and around the Cape of Good Hope to Black Rocks near Port Elizabeth in the Eastern Cape province. (wikipedia.org)
  • Although protected by the laws of many countries, seals are facing threats due to a number of anthropogenic factors, include overhunting, overfishing of seal prey, pollution (such as oil slicks, plastics, lost fishing nets), and loss of habitat. (newworldencyclopedia.org)
  • The remainder of the year, fur seals lead a largely pelagic existence in the open sea, pursuing their prey wherever it is abundant. (kiddle.co)
  • This seal ranges throughout the Southern Ocean that surrounds Antarctica, feeding mainly on krill in shallow waters at night. (sciencephoto.com)
  • Beginning in the 1790s, the ports of Stonington and New Haven , Connecticut, were leaders of the American fur seal trade, which primarily entailed clubbing fur seals to death on uninhabited South Pacific islands, skinning them, and selling the hides in China . (kiddle.co)
  • Species that fast during lactation, such as hibernating bears, some seals, and some whales, produce milks that are low in water (30 65%) and thus do not impose a heavy water demand on lactating females. (barnardhealth.us)
  • The northern fur seal breeds on Pribilof and Bogoslof islands off Alaska, San Miguel Island off California and Robben Island, the Kuril Islands and the Commander Islands off Russia.In winter, it is found along the British Columbian coast. (thecanadianencyclopedia.com)
  • The dental formula of the adult is 3.1.4.22.1.4.1 The northern fur seal is found in the north Pacific - its southernmost reach is a line that runs roughly from the southern tip of Japan to the southern tip of the Baja California Peninsula, the Sea of Okhotsk, and the Bering Sea. (wikipedia.org)