Ananas: A plant genus of the family BROMELIACEAE known for the edible fruit that is the source of BROMELAINS.Bromelains: Protein-digesting and milk-clotting enzymes found in PINEAPPLE fruit juice and stem tissue. Enzymes from the two sources are distinguished as fruit bromelain and stem bromelain. This enzyme was formerly listed as EC 3.4.22.4.Fruit: The fleshy or dry ripened ovary of a plant, enclosing the seed or seeds.Humic Substances: Organic matter in a state of advanced decay, after passing through the stages of COMPOST and PEAT and before becoming lignite (COAL). It is composed of a heterogenous mixture of compounds including phenolic radicals and acids that polymerize and are not easily separated nor analyzed. (E.A. Ghabbour & G. Davies, eds. Humic Substances, 2001).Zingiberales: This plant order includes 8 families, 66 genera, and about 1,800 species. These herbaceous perennials are mainly found in the wet tropics. Members include the banana family (MUSACEAE) and GINGER family (ZINGIBERACEAE).Fertilizers: Substances or mixtures that are added to the soil to supply nutrients or to make available nutrients already present in the soil, in order to increase plant growth and productivity.Germ Cells, Plant: The reproductive cells of plants.Refuse Disposal: The discarding or destroying of garbage, sewage, or other waste matter or its transformation into something useful or innocuous.Beverages: Liquids that are suitable for drinking. (From Merriam Webster Collegiate Dictionary, 10th ed)Povidone: A polyvinyl polymer of variable molecular weight; used as suspending and dispersing agent and vehicle for pharmaceuticals; also used as blood volume expander.ChitinaseExpressed Sequence Tags: Partial cDNA (DNA, COMPLEMENTARY) sequences that are unique to the cDNAs from which they were derived.MalatesOdors: The volatile portions of substances perceptible by the sense of smell. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Encyclopedias as Topic: Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Russia (Pre-1917)Suriname: A republic in the north of South America, bordered on the west by GUYANA (British Guiana) and on the east by FRENCH GUIANA. Its capital is Paramaribo. It was formerly called Netherlands Guiana or Dutch Guiana or Surinam. Suriname was first settled by the English in 1651 but was ceded to the Dutch by treaty in 1667. It became an autonomous territory under the Dutch crown in 1954 and gained independence in 1975. The country was named for the Surinam River but the meaning of that name is uncertain. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p1167 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p526)Colonialism: The aggregate of various economic, political, and social policies by which an imperial power maintains or extends its control over other areas or peoples. It includes the practice of or belief in acquiring and retaining colonies. The emphasis is less on its identity as an ideological political system than on its designation in a period of history. (Webster, 3d ed; from Dr. J. Cassedy, NLM History of Medicine Division)Gardening: Cultivation of PLANTS; (FRUIT; VEGETABLES; MEDICINAL HERBS) on small plots of ground or in containers.Bromeliaceae: A plant family of the order Bromeliales, subclass Zingiberidae, class Liliopsida (monocotyledons).Crassulaceae: The stonecrop plant family of the order ROSALES, subclass Rosidae, class Magnoliopsida that grow in warm, dry regions. The leaves are thick. The flower clusters are red, yellow, or white.Plants, Genetically Modified: PLANTS, or their progeny, whose GENOME has been altered by GENETIC ENGINEERING.Bromelia: A plant genus of the family BROMELIACEAE. Members contain karatasin and balansain (ENDOPEPTIDASES) and BROMELAINS.Parenteral Nutrition: The administering of nutrients for assimilation and utilization by a patient who cannot maintain adequate nutrition by enteral feeding alone. Nutrients are administered by a route other than the alimentary canal (e.g., intravenously, subcutaneously).Parenteral Nutrition, Total: The delivery of nutrients for assimilation and utilization by a patient whose sole source of nutrients is via solutions administered intravenously, subcutaneously, or by some other non-alimentary route. The basic components of TPN solutions are protein hydrolysates or free amino acid mixtures, monosaccharides, and electrolytes. Components are selected for their ability to reverse catabolism, promote anabolism, and build structural proteins.Enteral Nutrition: Nutritional support given via the alimentary canal or any route connected to the gastrointestinal system (i.e., the enteral route). This includes oral feeding, sip feeding, and tube feeding using nasogastric, gastrostomy, and jejunostomy tubes.Nutrition Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to the nutritional status of a human population within a given geographic area. Data from these surveys are used in preparing NUTRITION ASSESSMENTS.FloridaMuseumsBathing Beaches: Beaches, both natural and man-made, used for bathing and other activities.Hispanic Americans: Persons living in the United States of Mexican (MEXICAN AMERICANS), Puerto Rican, Cuban, Central or South American, or other Spanish culture or origin. The concept does not include Brazilian Americans or Portuguese Americans.Osteotomy, Le Fort: Transverse sectioning and repositioning of the maxilla. There are three types: Le Fort I osteotomy for maxillary advancement or the treatment of maxillary fractures; Le Fort II osteotomy for the treatment of maxillary fractures; Le Fort III osteotomy for the treatment of maxillary fractures with fracture of one or more facial bones. Le Fort III is often used also to correct craniofacial dysostosis and related facial abnormalities. (From Dorland, 28th ed, p1203 & p662)Ginger: Deciduous plant rich in volatile oil (OILS, VOLATILE). It is used as a flavoring agent and has many other uses both internally and topically.Schizosaccharomyces pombe Proteins: Proteins obtained from the species Schizosaccharomyces pombe. The function of specific proteins from this organism are the subject of intense scientific interest and have been used to derive basic understanding of the functioning similar proteins in higher eukaryotes.Schizosaccharomyces: A genus of ascomycetous fungi of the family Schizosaccharomycetaceae, order Schizosaccharomycetales.CDC2 Protein Kinase: Phosphoprotein with protein kinase activity that functions in the G2/M phase transition of the CELL CYCLE. It is the catalytic subunit of the MATURATION-PROMOTING FACTOR and complexes with both CYCLIN A and CYCLIN B in mammalian cells. The maximal activity of cyclin-dependent kinase 1 is achieved when it is fully dephosphorylated.Carica: A plant genus of the family Caricaceae, order Violales, subclass Dilleniidae, class Magnoliopsida. It is the source of edible fruit and PAPAIN.Organizations, Nonprofit: Organizations which are not operated for a profit and may be supported by endowments or private contributions.Acridine Orange: A cationic cytochemical stain specific for cell nuclei, especially DNA. It is used as a supravital stain and in fluorescence cytochemistry. It may cause mutations in microorganisms.Voluntary Health Agencies: Non-profit organizations concerned with various aspects of health, e.g., education, promotion, treatment, services, etc.Salmon: Fish of the genera ONCORHYNCHUS and Salmo in the family SALMONIDAE. They are anadromous game fish, frequenting the coastal waters of both the North Atlantic and Pacific. They are known for their gameness as a sport fish and for the quality of their flesh as a table fish. (Webster, 3d ed).Salmo salar: A commercially important species of SALMON in the family SALMONIDAE, order SALMONIFORMES, which occurs in the North Atlantic.Oncorhynchus kisutch: An anadromous species of SALMON ranging from the Arctic and Pacific Oceans to Monterey Bay, California and inhabiting ocean and coastal streams. It is familiarly known as the coho or silver salmon. It is relatively small but its light-colored flesh is of good flavor.Fish Diseases: Diseases of freshwater, marine, hatchery or aquarium fish. This term includes diseases of both teleosts (true fish) and elasmobranchs (sharks, rays and skates).Oncorhynchus keta: An anadromous species of SALMON found in the streams of the Pacific coast from Sacramento north, and also common in Japan. It is used frequently in genetic and other medical research.Balsams: Resinous substances which most commonly originate from trees. In addition to resins, they contain oils, cinnamic acid and BENZOIC ACID.Pseudotsuga: A plant genus in the family PINACEAE, order Pinales, class Pinopsida, division Coniferophyta. They are coniferous evergreen trees with long, flat, spirally arranged needles that grow directly from the branch.Holidays: Days commemorating events. Holidays also include vacation periods.Micronesia: The collective name for islands of the Pacific Ocean east of the Philippines, including the Mariana, PALAU, Caroline, Marshall, and Kiribati Islands. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p761 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p350)Trees: Woody, usually tall, perennial higher plants (Angiosperms, Gymnosperms, and some Pterophyta) having usually a main stem and numerous branches.Beer: An alcoholic beverage usually made from malted cereal grain (as barley), flavored with hops, and brewed by slow fermentation.Wine: Fermented juice of fresh grapes or of other fruit or plant products used as a beverage.Fermentation: Anaerobic degradation of GLUCOSE or other organic nutrients to gain energy in the form of ATP. End products vary depending on organisms, substrates, and enzymatic pathways. Common fermentation products include ETHANOL and LACTIC ACID.Flocculation: The aggregation of suspended solids into larger clumps.
Duane P. Bartholomew (2009). "'MD-2' Pineapple Transforms the World's Pineapple Fresh Fruit Export Industry" (PDF). Pineapple ... Media related to Pineapples at Wikimedia Commons. *Pineapple Fruit Facts-information on pineapples from California Rare Fruit ... "Pineapple". Archived from the original on 18 July 2012.. *^ a b "Pineapple production in 2016, Crops/Regions/World list/ ... "Pineapple". Oxford Dictionaries, Oxford University Press. 2015. Retrieved 19 August 2015.. *^ "History of the Pineapple". Dole ...
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pineapple. 4.0. 6.0. Coffea arabica. Arabian coffee. 4.0. 7.5. Rhododendron arborescens. smooth azalea. 4.2. 5.7. ...
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The Taíno grew squash, beans, peppers, peanuts, and pineapples. Tobacco, calabashes (West Indian pumpkins) and cotton were ... Agriculture - products: sugarcane, coffee, pineapples, plantains, bananas; livestock products, chickens [9]. *Exports - ...
Pineapple Press. ISBN 0-910923-94-9. *Ferriter, Amy; Serbesoff-King, Kristina; Bodle, Mike; Goodyear, Carole; Doren, Bob; ... Pineapple Press, Inc. ISBN 978-1-56164-309-7. *Wilhelm, Chris, "Pragmatism, Seminoles, and Science: Opposition to Progressive ...
Pineapple tart - flaky pastries filled with or topped with pineapple jam.. *Ang koo kueh (Chinese: 紅龜粿) - a small round or oval ...
Pineapple Press. p. 63. ISBN 978-1-56164-453-7. Retrieved April 15, 2018.. .mw-parser-output cite.citation{font-style:inherit}. ...
Pineapple Press. p. 95.. *^ Spencer Tucker (21 November 2012). Almanac of American Military History. ABC-CLIO. p. 54. ISBN 978- ... Pineapple Press Inc. p. 127. ISBN 978-1-56164-235-9.. *^ Sidney Walter Martin (1 February 2010). Florida's Flagler. University ... Augustine, (1995), Sarasota, Florida: Pineapple Press.. *Porter, Kenneth W., The Black Seminoles: History of a Freedom-Seeking ... McCarthy, Kevin (editor), The Book Lover's Guide to Florida, (1992), Sarasota, Florida: Pineapple Press. ...
"Pineapple Pipeline". Kings Island. Retrieved March 29, 2013. "Pipeline Paradise". Kings Island. Retrieved March 29, 2013. " ...
Pineapple Press. p. 247. Sandra Wallus Sammons (2010). Marjory Stoneman Douglas and the Florida Everglades. Pineapple Press. p ... Pineapple Press. p. 49. Young Friends of the Everglades "Board of Directors, Friends of the Everglades". Everglades.org. ...
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商品情報 (in Japanese). Pink Pineapple. Retrieved 2009-07-31. "DVD" (in Japanese). Pink Pineapple. Retrieved 2009-07-31. Official ... Pink Pineapple released the OVAs on separate DVDs between September 26, 2008 and December 26, 2008. "(ピンクパイナップル) 初犬2 The ... was released as two original video animation episodes on their individual DVDs by Pink Pineapple between March 25, 2007 and ... Animation" (in Japanese). Pink Pineapple. Retrieved 2009-07-31. ストレンジ・カインドオブウーマン 上 (いずみコミックス) (アダルト) (コミック) (アダルト) (in Japanese ...
Pineapple Press). ISBN 9781561640072 Hepper, David J. (1994). British Warship Losses in the Age of Sail, 1650-1859. Rotherfield ...
Brown, R.C. (2008). Florida's Fossils: Guide to Location, Identification, and Enjoyment (third ed.). Pineapple Press. ISBN 1- ...
Pineapple Press. p. 216. ISBN 978-1-56164-135-2. Gaines, Jim (April 25, 2002). "Fort Nowhere". New Times Broward-Palm Beach. ...
Pineapple Press. ISBN 0-910923-94-9 Grunwald, Michael (2006). The Swamp: The Everglades, Florida, and the Politics of Paradise ...
Pineapple Press. Smith, N. B. (2002). American Reading Instruction. Newark, DE: International Reading Association. Tompkins, ...
Pineapple Press Inc. p. 19. ISBN 978-1-56164-300-4. David Nolan (1995). The Houses of St. Augustine. Pineapple Press Inc. p. 48 ... Pineapple Press Inc. p. 243. ISBN 978-1-56164-385-1. "The Heroic Stories of the St. Augustine Foot Soldiers Whose Brave ... Pineapple Press Inc. p. 16. ISBN 978-1-56164-467-4. Beth Rogero Bowen; The St. Augustine Historical Society (March 2012). St. ... Pineapple Press Inc. p. 13. ISBN 978-1-56164-031-7. Kevin M. McCarthy (1 January 2007). African American Sites in Florida. ...
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Pineapple Press. p. 13. ISBN 1-56164-096-4. Miller, p. 6 NPCA, p. 32 Skowronek, Russell K.; Vernon, Richard H.; Fischer, George ... In 1911 Jones bought 212-acre (86 ha) Totten Key, which had been used as a pineapple plantation, for a dollar an acre, selling ... The first settlements around Biscayne Bay were small farms on Elliott Key growing crops like key limes and pineapples. John ... clearing land to grow limes and pineapples. ...
Pineapple Press. ISBN 1-56164-409-9. Garcia; Frank A. Garcia; Donald S. Miller (1998). Discovering Fossils. Stackpole Books. p ...
Duane P. Bartholomew (2009). "MD-2 Pineapple Transforms the Worlds Pineapple Fresh Fruit Export Industry" (PDF). Pineapple ... Media related to Pineapples at Wikimedia Commons. *Pineapple Fruit Facts-information on pineapples from California Rare Fruit ... "Pineapple". Archived from the original on 18 July 2012.. *^ a b "Pineapple production in 2016, Crops/Regions/World list/ ... "Pineapple". Oxford Dictionaries, Oxford University Press. 2015. Retrieved 19 August 2015.. *^ "History of the Pineapple". Dole ...
Wikimedia Commons has media related to Pineapples.. *Pineapple Fruit Facts-information on pineapples from California Rare Fruit ... Duane P. Bartholomew (2009). "MD-2 Pineapple Transforms the Worlds Pineapple Fresh Fruit Export Industry" (PDF). Pineapple ... The pineapple (Ananas comosus) is a tropical plant with an edible fruit, also called a pineapple,[2][3] and the most ... Traditional dishes that use pineapple include hamonado, afritada, kaeng som pla, and Hawaiian haystack. Crushed pineapple is ...
pineapple: (Ananas comosus), fruit-bearing plant of the family Bromeliaceae, native to tropical and subtropical America but ... pineapple - Student Encyclopedia (Ages 11 and up). Once a rare delicacy, the pineapple has become a familiar fruit in many ... pineapple - Childrens Encyclopedia (Ages 8-11). Pineapples are sweet, juicy fruits. They grow on a plant with the scientific ... Pineapple, (Ananas comosus), fruit-bearing plant of the family Bromeliaceae, native to tropical and subtropical America but ...
This article looks at the history of pineapple, and at some of the conditions it might help. Pineapple is a very versatile food ... Discover the potential health benefits of pineapple, a source of essential vitamins and minerals, such as thiamin, riboflavin, ... Add some pineapple slices to your salad at lunch or dinner. Compliment the pineapple with walnuts or pecans, a crumbled cheese ... Add pineapple to your favorite kebabs. Try shrimp, chicken, or steak kebabs with red onions, pineapple, and cherry tomatoes. ...
The rice is cooked in pineapple juice. A very good beginning. And then its added to a wok-full of tofu, mushrooms, soy sauce, ... Garnish with crushed pineapple and strips of cooked egg. Yumm! ... Back to Pineapple Fried Rice All Reviews for Pineapple Fried ... In a medium saucepan, combine the liquid from the can of crushed pineapple with 3 cups water, bring to a boil. Add rice. Bring ... A version of fried rice using tofu and pineapple. Light, tasty, and easy. Serve with hot sauce or extra soy sauce. ...
This turned into a pan of pineapple-ish sludge. Perhaps if the receipe was more specific (ie. what size can of pineapple, and ... I added 12 oz of pineapple with the juice squeezed out and I used heavy whipping cream for rich flavo... ... I added 12 oz of pineapple with the juice squeezed out and I used heavy whipping cream for rich flavo... ... Stir in drained crushed pineapple and cook over medium heat to soft ball stage, 236 degrees (113 degrees C), stirring ...
Slice pineapple skin off the pineapple, creating thick planks roughly the same size as the chicken breasts. ... Tip: Save the rest of the pineapple to whip up an easy pineapple salsa to serve alongside your chicken. ... The result is an incredibly juicy chicken infused with the sweet notes of pineapple and balanced by a smoky marinade with a ... Grill the chicken directly on the pineapple planks. Be sure to cook both sides and allow extra cooking time, since the chicken ...
The industrial production of pineapple in Hawaii a century ago made pineapple a popular fruit worldwide because of its ... The pineapple, the tropical fruit enjoyed by people worldwide in slices, chunks, juice, upside-down cakes, jam, tarts, ice ... Pineapples, domesticated about 6,000 years ago in what is now southwest Brazil and eastern Paraguay and currently grown in ... Pineapples are the most economically important crop that uses a type of photosynthesis called CAM, or crassulacean acid ...
... also known as dwarf pineapple (Ananas nanus), a novelty item sure to attract attention with its spiky foliage and small, palm- ... Miniature pineapples, like full-sized pineapples, can take a long time to mature and produce fruit. A mature plant can produce ... Grow a miniature pineapples, also known as dwarf pineapple (Ananas nanus), a novelty item sure to attract attention with its ... Miniature pineapples are a cultivar of full-size pineapple plants and thrive in USDA zones 10 through 11. Because of these ...
Made of oven-dried pineapple, these edible embellishments add sweetness, crunch, and color to a dessert thats already vibrant ... 2. Peel pineapples. Using a small melon baller, remove and discard "eyes." Slice pineapple very thinly; place slices on baking ... Martha pinched the center of each pineapple slice to shape into a cone, and let cool in a clean egg carton to form flowers. ... Two tips to making pretty pineapple flowers slice them a little larger then 1/8 then lay them flat on a cutting board and ...
Fresh pineapple brings a sweet and sassy flavor to this chicken fajita main-dish recipe that can be prepared in less than 30 ... Chicken-Pineapple Fajitas. Fresh pineapple brings a sweet and sassy flavor to this chicken fajita main-dish recipe that can be ... 5 stars, delicious---restaurant-quality! There are NEVER any leftovers! To save time & money instead of a whole pineapple I ... Core and chop pineapple. Serve with chicken, tortillas, cilantro, and lime. Makes 4 servings. ...
This glazed chicken has a double dose of pineapple with preserves in the glaze and wedges on the side. Add a savory touch with ... Pineapple-Glazed Chicken. This glazed chicken has a double dose of pineapple with preserves in the glaze and wedges on the side ... Grill chicken and pineapple as above.). *Serve chicken with pineapple wedges. If desired, sprinkle chicken with cilantro. Makes ... Stir in pineapple preserves, soy sauce, chili sauce, lemon peel, and lemon juice. Cook and stir over low heat just until ...
... pineapple Nutrition - BellaOnline Nutrition Database - BellaOnline is committed to helping our visitors become healthy and ... Toppings, pineapple. Food Group: Sweets. Long Description: Toppings, pineapple. Short Description: TOPPINGS,PINEAPPLE. Common ... Toppings, pineapple Nutrition. This page is all about the nutrition of Toppings, pineapple. Learn about the carbs, calories, ... Toppings, pineapple Nutrition Information - Full Details. All values shown in the detailed view below are per 100g of material ...
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Pineapple Jam Auction & Dinner March 31. The event, taking place at 335 SE Sixth Ave., Fort Lauderdale, will begin at 6 p.m. ... The Historic Stranahan House Museum will host its "Pineapple Jam Auction & Dinner" March 31. The event, taking place at 335 SE ...
A ribbon of pineapple spreadable fruit winds through the center of this crumb-topped yeast coffee cake. Use any flavor of ... Back to pineapple crumb buns All Reviews for pineapple crumb buns ... A ribbon of pineapple spreadable fruit winds through the center of this crumb-topped yeast coffee cake. Use any flavor of ...
Biting into the pineapple genome. Posted by Brooke LaFlamme , The genome sequences of cultivated pineapple (Ananas comosus) and ... This months cover image is related to the pineapple genome paper, but is also a celebration of all things genome. The cover ... The image shows a pineapple outline with genome tracks or chromosomes contained within the scales of the outer fruit, all set ... In the future, studies that use the pineapple genome have the potential to lead to innovations in engineering drought resistant ...
... you can grow your own pineapple in 24 months. Tickled Red has step-by-step instructions. Have you ... If you chop off the top of a pineapple and plant it, ... If you chop off the top of a pineapple and plant it, you can ... grow your own pineapple in 24 months. Tickled Red has step-by-step instructions.. Have you tried planting a pineapple before? ...
Use the rum-soaked pineapple as a drink garnish or to top boozy desserts. ... 1. In a 2-quart glass jar with a lid, combine pineapple, ginger, and rum. Refrigerate 1 to 2 weeks, gently shaking jar each day ... 1 pineapple (4 pounds), peeled and cut lengthwise into 1-inch-thick slices ... Use the rum-soaked pineapple as a drink garnish or to top boozy desserts. ...
... In depth nutrient analysis:. Pineapple, Orange, Papaya Salad. (Note: "--" indicates data is ...
... - BellaOnline Nutrition Database - BellaOnline is committed to helping our ... Pineapple, frozen, chunks, sweetened. Food Group: Fruits and Fruit Juices. Long Description: Pineapple, frozen, chunks, ... Pineapple, frozen, chunks, sweetened Nutrition. This page is all about the nutrition of Pineapple, frozen, chunks, sweetened. ... Pineapple, frozen, chunks, sweetened Nutrition Information - Full Details. All values shown in the detailed view below are per ...
Fluff with a fork and fold in the pineapple, jalapeños and cilantro. ...
Pineapple Christmas Trees. Pineapple Christmas Trees Are the Hottest Holiday Trend - and For Good Reason December 23, 2017 by ... Its a fruit: pineapple. This holiday season, the exotic pineapple is going from on-trend jack-o-lantern to stylish Christmas ... Unlike traditional Christmas trees, pineapples are small, which means you can decorate them quickly (a few ornaments and maybe ... Pineapple Christmas Trees Are the Hottest Holiday Trend - and For Good Reason ...
Make foods like pineapple part of your plan for heart healthful eating. Our Promise: Our Food You Feel Good About yellow banner ... Were proud of our pineapple and we hope youll agree. Remember, your satisfaction is always guaranteed with Wegmans brand ...
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  • The pineapple ( Ananas comosus ) is a tropical plant with an edible fruit, also called a pineapple, and the most economically significant plant in the family Bromeliaceae . (wikipedia.org)
  • Pineapples may be cultivated from the offset produced at the top of the fruit, possibly flowering in five to ten months and fruiting in the following six months. (wikipedia.org)
  • When European explorers encountered this tropical fruit in the Americas, they called them "pineapples" (first referenced in 1664, for resemblance to pine cones). (wikipedia.org)
  • The fruit of a pineapple is arranged in two interlocking helices , eight in one direction, 13 in the other, each being a Fibonacci number . (wikipedia.org)
  • Since the 1820s pineapple has been commercially grown in greenhouses and many troplcal plantations and it is the third most important tropical fruit in world production. (wikipedia.org)
  • The first reference in English to the pineapple fruit was the 1568 translation from the French of André Thevet 's The New Found World, or Antarctike where he refers to a Hoyriri , a fruit cultivated and eaten by the Tupinambá people, living near modern Rio de Janeiro, and now believed to be a pineapple . (wikipedia.org)
  • Pineapple , ( Ananas comosus ), fruit-bearing plant of the family Bromeliaceae , native to tropical and subtropical America but introduced elsewhere. (britannica.com)
  • The originally separate light purple flowers, together with their bracts, each attached to a central axis core, become fleshy and fuse to form the pineapple fruit, which ripens five to six months after flowering begins. (britannica.com)
  • Once a rare delicacy, the pineapple has become a familiar fruit in many parts of the world. (britannica.com)
  • Pineapple is a tropical fruit available in any grocery store and a staple in many homes around the world. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Pineapples became known as an extravagant and exotic fruit, served only at the most lavish of banquets. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • The industrial production of pineapple in Hawaii a century ago made pineapple a popular fruit worldwide because of its extraordinary flavor and aroma,' Ming said. (voanews.com)
  • Miniature pineapples, like full-sized pineapples, can take a long time to mature and produce fruit. (ehow.com)
  • If you are planting from slips, pups or the top of a mature miniature pineapple fruit, however, it can take more than two and-a-half years for the plant to reach maturity. (ehow.com)
  • Force a fully mature miniature pineapple plant to set fruit by adding products that generate acetylene or ethylene gas. (ehow.com)
  • This method is less reliable, however, and may not cause the pineapple plant to set fruit. (ehow.com)
  • A ribbon of pineapple spreadable fruit winds through the center of this crumb-topped yeast coffee cake. (parents.com)
  • The image shows a pineapple outline with genome tracks or chromosomes contained within the scales of the outer fruit, all set on a background reminiscent of outer space. (nature.com)
  • It's a fruit: pineapple. (popsugar.com)
  • These dried pineapple flowers are the perfect kind of dried fruit you'd be happy to display on a wedding cake or any other special occasion cake. (wikihow.com)
  • Whether eaten sliced or as a pizza topping, pineapple is a delicious and versatile tropical fruit that ranks third in worldwide popularity behind the banana and mango. (usda.gov)
  • And even though bromelain is extracted from pineapples, the enzymes in bromelain are only a small fraction of all the chemicals found in the popular fruit. (livestrong.com)
  • With its rough and textured skin and a crown of spiky green leaves, the pineapple doesn't appear to be a very appealing fruit from the outside. (livestrong.com)
  • Although the fruit is bursting with healthy nutrition, too much pineapple can produce unpleasant side effects. (livestrong.com)
  • With just over 1 gram of fiber per 100 g of fruit, pineapple can also help maintain a healthy digestive system. (livestrong.com)
  • Pineapple is also an excellent source of vitamin C, with approximately 100 mg of vitamin C in just two slices of the fruit. (livestrong.com)
  • Eating the fruit or drinking the juice of an unripe pineapple can be extremely dangerous. (livestrong.com)
  • Pineapples may be cultivated from a crown cutting of the fruit, possibly flowering in 5-10 months and fruiting in the following six months. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ananas Sativus (Pineapple) Fruit Extract is an extract of the fruit of the pineapple, Ananassativus. (ewg.org)
  • Most of the usual signs of ripe fruit don't mean much on a pineapple. (wikihow.com)
  • If the pineapple does have a little starch left to convert to sugar, this will be in the base of the fruit. (wikihow.com)
  • A delicious blend of pineapples, apples & carrots, made with crushed fruit & veg and pure juice. (tesco.com)
  • Here's a fruit we associate with summer, or at least the leisure of sunny days spent by the beach: pineapple. (healthcastle.com)
  • Pineapple stops ripening as soon as the fruit is picked. (healthcastle.com)
  • The sweet fruit of pineapple is rich in citric acid, potassium, and vitamin C. With a relatively shallow root system, the pineapple plant relies on a complete fertilizing program to supply the necessary nutrients for successful growth and production. (gardenguides.com)
  • As the pineapple plant matures, nitrogen will help increase the fruit size. (gardenguides.com)
  • Feeding added magnesium to your pineapple plant will promote carbohydrate and sugar supply to the forming fruit, thus increasing the taste and size. (gardenguides.com)
  • Pineapple requires high amounts of potassium before the flower forms to aid in the development of fruit size, plant growth and flavor. (gardenguides.com)
  • Fill the jars to the top with vodka, submerging the pineapple (you may need to weight the pineapple with a small saucer or other weighty object if the fruit floats up). (chowhound.com)
  • Benin produces 400 to 450 thousand tons of pineapples a year, which makes the fruit its third most important agricultural produce. (iaea.org)
  • Aloe Barbadensis (Organic Aloe) Leaf Juice, Hydroxyethyl Cellulose (plant derived), Glycerin, Carica Papaya (Organic Papaya) Fruit Extract, Pineapple Natural Melange, Citrus Aurantium var. (sephora.com)
  • Amara, Carica Papaya (Organic Papaya) Leaf Extract, Ananas Comosus (Organic Pineapple) Fruit Extract, Brazilian Micronized Tourmaline Gemstone Powder, Oryza Sativa (Rice) Powder, Leucidal (Radish Root Ferment). (sephora.com)
  • Pineapple was named as the healthiest fruit in the world and for some seriously important reasons. (lifehack.org)
  • It seems pineapple core is better for implantation thn the actual fruit. (medhelp.org)
  • I am sure many will disagree with me on this one, but I didn't even drink fruit juice with pineapple in it just to be on the safe side. (medhelp.org)
  • You might want to skip partaking of the pineapple itself, though: all its sugar and flavor go into the vodka, so eating it is like "chewing on alcohol. (chowhound.com)
  • A common source of exposure is eating pineapple or taking bromelain supplements. (livestrong.com)
  • The University of Maryland Medical Center recommends consulting your physician before eating pineapple or taking bromelain supplements if you are currently taking antibiotics, anticoagulants, anticonvulsants, barbiturates, benzodiazepines, blood thinners, insomnia drugs and tricyclic antidepressants. (livestrong.com)
  • Grow a miniature pineapples, also known as dwarf pineapple (Ananas nanus), a novelty item sure to attract attention with its spiky foliage and small, palm-sized fruits. (ehow.com)
  • The genome sequences of cultivated pineapple (Ananas comosus) and a related wild species (Ananas bracteatus) were published last week by Ming et al. (nature.com)
  • The GI registration specifies the specialties of this product thus: "Vazhakulam pineapple locally known as 'Kannarachakka' comes under the species Ananas comosus. (wikipedia.org)
  • The pineapple plant resembles the agave or some yuccas in general appearance. (britannica.com)
  • Many studies have suggested that increasing consumption of plant foods like pineapples decreases the risk of obesity , overall mortality, diabetes , and heart disease . (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Miniature pineapples grown indoors as an ornamental plant need to be kept in a humid environment free of drafts and breezes. (ehow.com)
  • A close-up of a young pineapple plant. (ehow.com)
  • If you chop off the top of a pineapple and plant it, you can grow your own pineapple in 24 months. (makezine.com)
  • The plant I bought already has a pinneapple growing in it, is this the ONLY pineapple that this tree will produce, or will it produce others (one at a time) after the pineapple has been removed? (garden.org)
  • What you have is an ornamental pineapple plant. (garden.org)
  • If you want another pineapple plant you can start it by using the crown, slips, shoots, and suckers, off of the mother plant. (garden.org)
  • The ARS collection represents a treasure of genetic resources for identifying and improving important traits in commercial pineapples as well as for research to understand the basic biology and evolution of different plant processes. (usda.gov)
  • New ACC synthase genes from pineapple are disclosed which have utility as targets for the generation of transgenic plants in which the expression of ACC synthase is substantially controlled to effect the regulation of plant development, and, in particular, initiation of natural flowering. (google.ca)
  • 9. The isolated nucleotide sequence of any one of claims 5 , 6 , 7 and 8 , wherein said isolated nucleotide sequence is obtained from a cell or tissue of a pineapple plant. (google.ca)
  • 11. The isolated nucleotide sequence of any one of claims 5 , 6 , 7 and 8 , wherein said isolated nucleotide sequence is obtained from a cell or tissue of a basal white portion of a D leaf of a pineapple plant. (google.ca)
  • The health supplement bromelain refers to a mixture of enzymes extracted from the stem and juice of the pineapple plant. (livestrong.com)
  • Present in all parts of the pineapple plant, bromelain is a mixture of proteolytic enzymes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Pineapple plants can be grown as an attractive tropical indoor plant, or in U.S. Department of Agriculture plant hardiness zones 10 and 11 outdoors. (gardenguides.com)
  • The nutrient nitrogen is essential food for any green plant, but particularly true for young pineapple plants. (gardenguides.com)
  • Magnesium is an essential nutrient for healthy pineapple growth and helps balance the large amount of potassium the pineapple plant requires. (gardenguides.com)
  • Depending on your soil, which should be tested prior to planting pineapple for nutritional content, you may need to supplement the nutritional needs of your plant. (gardenguides.com)
  • Snore no more with Asda's new bedroom aid - a pineapple plant. (montrealgazette.com)
  • But that is a moot point, since a pineapple plant cannot contribute more than a trace amount of oxygen. (montrealgazette.com)
  • The pineapple plant is one that follows CAM photosynthesis, so it is true that it does release oxygen at night. (montrealgazette.com)
  • Meanwhile, cook pineapple and bell pepper over medium-high heat in a large skillet for 3-4 minutes, stirring occasionally. (hy-vee.com)
  • Arrange a single layer of pineapple in the skillet, fitting close together. (dispatch.com)
  • Sprinkle the mint sugar over the plate of pineapple - making sure you don't let anyone nick any pineapple before you sprinkle the sugar over. (jamieoliver.com)
  • Sprinkle the pineapple into a greased deep-dish 9-in. (tasteofhome.com)
  • In 2016, Costa Rica, Brazil, and the Philippines accounted for nearly one-third of the world's production of pineapples. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the 20th century, Hawaii was a dominant producer of pineapples, especially for the US, but by 2016, Costa Rica, Brazil, and the Philippines accounted for nearly one-third of the world's production of pineapples. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, it remains home to one of the world's largest and most genetically diverse pineapple collections. (usda.gov)
  • Estimated to supply 35 percent of the world's pineapple crop only a few years ago, Costa Rica's contribution surged to an estimated 60 percent of global production last year. (triplepundit.com)
  • If you're lucky, your "unripe" pineapple will be sweet and delicious. (wikihow.com)
  • The pineapple has become a characteristic ingredient in the meat, vegetable, fish, and rice dishes of what is loosely termed Polynesian cuisine , a blend of various Oriental styles of cooking. (britannica.com)
  • A version of fried rice using tofu and pineapple. (allrecipes.com)
  • Mindful of global climate change forecasts, the researchers said understanding the pineapple genome may help to engineer drought tolerance into other crops and even engineer C3 photosynthesis crops like rice and wheat to use CAM photosynthesis. (voanews.com)
  • Return to heat, add rice, edamame and pineapple, toss gently and cook until liquid is absorbed and rice is hot throughout, 3 to 5 minutes more. (wholefoodsmarket.com)
  • Pineapple is a good source of calcium, potassium, vitamin A and folate. (livestrong.com)
  • Pineapple also contains potassium, which is important in the maintenance of healthy blood pressure. (healthcastle.com)
  • This can be applied in a balanced NPK (nitrogen-phosphorus-potassium) formulated fertilizer that is either worked into the surrounding soil or sprayed in the foliage of the pineapple. (gardenguides.com)
  • The fertilizer formula for mature, before flowering, a pineapple should contain twice as much potassium as nitrogen. (gardenguides.com)
  • Phosphorus is not as high a nutritional requirement for pineapple as nitrogen and potassium. (gardenguides.com)
  • Therefore, apply a balanced fertilizer of nitrogen, potassium and phosphorus as directed, then supplement your pineapple feeding with additional nitrogen and potassium feedings. (gardenguides.com)
  • Among other vitamins and minerals, pineapples contain a great deal of potassium. (lifehack.org)
  • Along with its many nutrients, pineapple also contains bromelain, an enzyme that digests protein. (livestrong.com)
  • The flesh and juice of the pineapple are used in cuisines around the world. (wikipedia.org)
  • The juice of the pineapple is served as a beverage, and it is also the main ingredient in cocktails such as the piña colada and in the drink tepache. (wikipedia.org)
  • 3. Whizz the pineapple and plain, cool lime syrup in a blender until completely smooth. (waitrose.com)
  • Serve scoops of the pineapple snow in glasses with the lime and chilli syrup poured over. (waitrose.com)
  • The idea of adding fennel to the sugar coating for the pineapple comes, of course, from chef Phillip Searle's famous chequerboard ice-cream of the late 1980s. (smh.com.au)
  • 2. Mix the brown sugar, fennel and salt together on a plate (it needs to be large enough to fit long pineapple spears), then set aside. (smh.com.au)
  • Once that source is cut off, the pineapple cannot make more sugar on its own. (wikihow.com)
  • In theory, the sugar might spread better if you keep the pineapple upside down. (wikihow.com)
  • The country's pineapple industry in particular has surged in recent years. (triplepundit.com)
  • Over the next five years, this coalition will tackle a bevy of problems that have beset Costa Rica's pineapple production: Solutions for agriculture runoff, new farming best practices that will benefit the country's small farmers, and more equitable labor policies are a few of the improvements this group promises. (triplepundit.com)
  • Pineapples, domesticated about 6,000 years ago in what is now southwest Brazil and eastern Paraguay and currently grown in tropical and subtropical regions worldwide, are big business. (voanews.com)
  • And how long does it generally take to grown another pineapple after I removed the current one (does it start to reproduce right away)? (garden.org)
  • You may associate the pineapple with the state of Hawaii, but in recent years the bulk of the pineapple crop consumed globally has been grown elsewhere. (healthcastle.com)