Physical Therapists: Persons trained in PHYSICAL THERAPY SPECIALTY to make use of PHYSICAL THERAPY MODALITIES to prevent, correct, and alleviate movement dysfunction.Physical Therapy Specialty: The auxiliary health profession which makes use of PHYSICAL THERAPY MODALITIES to prevent, correct, and alleviate movement dysfunction of anatomic or physiological origin.Physical Therapy Modalities: Therapeutic modalities frequently used in PHYSICAL THERAPY SPECIALTY by PHYSICAL THERAPISTS or physiotherapists to promote, maintain, or restore the physical and physiological well-being of an individual.Students, Health Occupations: Individuals enrolled in a school or formal educational program in the health occupations.Physical Therapy Department, Hospital: Hospital department which is responsible for the administration and provision of diagnostic and medical rehabilitation services to restore or improve the functional capacity of the patient.Education, Continuing: Educational programs designed to inform individuals of recent advances in their particular field of interest. They do not lead to any formal advanced standing.Hospital Restructuring: Reorganization of the hospital corporate structure.Role: The expected and characteristic pattern of behavior exhibited by an individual as a member of a particular social group.Practice Management: Business management of medical, dental and veterinary practices that may include capital financing, utilization management, and arrangement of capitation agreements with other parties.Occupational Therapy: Skilled treatment that helps individuals achieve independence in all facets of their lives. It assists in the development of skills needed for independent living.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Attitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.Societies: Organizations composed of members with common interests and whose professions may be similar.Professional Competence: The capability to perform the duties of one's profession generally, or to perform a particular professional task, with skill of an acceptable quality.Professional Role: The expected function of a member of a particular profession.Job Description: Statement of the position requirements, qualifications for the position, wage range, and any special conditions expected of the employee.Professional-Patient Relations: Interactions between health personnel and patients.Clinical Competence: The capability to perform acceptably those duties directly related to patient care.Ethics, Professional: The principles of proper conduct concerning the rights and duties of the professional, relations with patients or consumers and fellow practitioners, as well as actions of the professional and interpersonal relations with patient or consumer families. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Allied Health Personnel: Health care workers specially trained and licensed to assist and support the work of health professionals. Often used synonymously with paramedical personnel, the term generally refers to all health care workers who perform tasks which must otherwise be performed by a physician or other health professional.Psychophysiology: The study of the physiological basis of human and animal behavior.Disability Evaluation: Determination of the degree of a physical, mental, or emotional handicap. The diagnosis is applied to legal qualification for benefits and income under disability insurance and to eligibility for Social Security and workmen's compensation benefits.Musculoskeletal Diseases: Diseases of the muscles and their associated ligaments and other connective tissue and of the bones and cartilage viewed collectively.Physical Therapist Assistants: Persons who, under the supervision of licensed PHYSICAL THERAPISTS, provide patient treatment using various PHYSICAL THERAPY THECHNIQUES.Exercise Therapy: A regimen or plan of physical activities designed and prescribed for specific therapeutic goals. Its purpose is to restore normal musculoskeletal function or to reduce pain caused by diseases or injuries.Low Back Pain: Acute or chronic pain in the lumbar or sacral regions, which may be associated with musculo-ligamentous SPRAINS AND STRAINS; INTERVERTEBRAL DISK DISPLACEMENT; and other conditions.Respiratory Therapy: Care of patients with deficiencies and abnormalities associated with the cardiopulmonary system. It includes the therapeutic use of medical gases and their administrative apparatus, environmental control systems, humidification, aerosols, ventilatory support, bronchopulmonary drainage and exercise, respiratory rehabilitation, assistance with cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and maintenance of natural, artificial, and mechanical airways.Physical Examination: Systematic and thorough inspection of the patient for physical signs of disease or abnormality.Physical Fitness: The ability to carry out daily tasks and perform physical activities in a highly functional state, often as a result of physical conditioning.Dental Auxiliaries: Personnel whose work is prescribed and supervised by the dentist.Motor Activity: The physical activity of a human or an animal as a behavioral phenomenon.Ethical Analysis: The use of systematic methods of ethical examination, such as CASUISTRY or ETHICAL THEORY, in reasoning about moral problems.United StatesActivities of Daily Living: The performance of the basic activities of self care, such as dressing, ambulation, or eating.Exercise: Physical activity which is usually regular and done with the intention of improving or maintaining PHYSICAL FITNESS or HEALTH. Contrast with PHYSICAL EXERTION which is concerned largely with the physiologic and metabolic response to energy expenditure.Back Pain: Acute or chronic pain located in the posterior regions of the THORAX; LUMBOSACRAL REGION; or the adjacent regions.Manipulation, Orthopedic: The planned and carefully managed manual movement of the musculoskeletal system, extremities, and spine to produce increased motion. The term is sometimes used to denote a precise sequence of movements of a joint to determine the presence of disease or to reduce a dislocation. In the case of fractures, orthopedic manipulation can produce better position and alignment of the fracture. (From Blauvelt & Nelson, A Manual of Orthopaedic Terminology, 5th ed, p264)Personnel Management: Planning, organizing, and administering all activities related to personnel.Delphi Technique: An iterative questionnaire designed to measure consensus among individual responses. In the classic Delphi approach, there is no interaction between responder and interviewer.Professional Practice: The use of one's knowledge in a particular profession. It includes, in the case of the field of biomedicine, professional activities related to health care and the actual performance of the duties related to the provision of health care.Decision Making: The process of making a selective intellectual judgment when presented with several complex alternatives consisting of several variables, and usually defining a course of action or an idea.Psychoanalytic Therapy: A form of psychiatric treatment, based on Freudian principles, which seeks to eliminate or diminish the undesirable effects of unconscious conflicts by making the patient aware of their existence, origin, and inappropriate expression in current emotions and behavior.Identification (Psychology): A process by which an individual unconsciously endeavors to pattern himself after another. This process is also important in the development of the personality, particularly the superego or conscience, which is modeled largely on the behavior of adult significant others.Countertransference (Psychology): Conscious or unconscious emotional reaction of the therapist to the patient which may interfere with treatment. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed.)Education, Special: Education of the individual who markedly deviates intellectually, physically, socially, or emotionally from those considered to be normal, thus requiring special instruction.Career Mobility: The upward or downward mobility in an occupation or the change from one occupation to another.Evidence-Based Practice: A way of providing health care that is guided by a thoughtful integration of the best available scientific knowledge with clinical expertise. This approach allows the practitioner to critically assess research data, clinical guidelines, and other information resources in order to correctly identify the clinical problem, apply the most high-quality intervention, and re-evaluate the outcome for future improvement.Goals: The end-result or objective, which may be specified or required in advance.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Salaries and Fringe Benefits: The remuneration paid or benefits granted to an employee.Neuromuscular Diseases: A general term encompassing lower MOTOR NEURON DISEASE; PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES; and certain MUSCULAR DISEASES. Manifestations include MUSCLE WEAKNESS; FASCICULATION; muscle ATROPHY; SPASM; MYOKYMIA; MUSCLE HYPERTONIA, myalgias, and MUSCLE HYPOTONIA.Range of Motion, Articular: The distance and direction to which a bone joint can be extended. Range of motion is a function of the condition of the joints, muscles, and connective tissues involved. Joint flexibility can be improved through appropriate MUSCLE STRETCHING EXERCISES.Palpation: Application of fingers with light pressure to the surface of the body to determine consistence of parts beneath in physical diagnosis; includes palpation for determining the outlines of organs.Transference (Psychology): The unconscious transfer to others (including psychotherapists) of feelings and attitudes which were originally associated with important figures (parents, siblings, etc.) in one's early life.Codes of Ethics: Systematic statements of principles or rules of appropriate professional conduct, usually established by professional societies.Referral and Consultation: The practice of sending a patient to another program or practitioner for services or advice which the referring source is not prepared to provide.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Observer Variation: The failure by the observer to measure or identify a phenomenon accurately, which results in an error. Sources for this may be due to the observer's missing an abnormality, or to faulty technique resulting in incorrect test measurement, or to misinterpretation of the data. Two varieties are inter-observer variation (the amount observers vary from one another when reporting on the same material) and intra-observer variation (the amount one observer varies between observations when reporting more than once on the same material).Neck Pain: Discomfort or more intense forms of pain that are localized to the cervical region. This term generally refers to pain in the posterior or lateral regions of the neck.Disabled Persons: Persons with physical or mental disabilities that affect or limit their activities of daily living and that may require special accommodations.Schools, Health Occupations: Schools which offer training in the area of health.Pain Measurement: Scales, questionnaires, tests, and other methods used to assess pain severity and duration in patients or experimental animals to aid in diagnosis, therapy, and physiological studies.Q-Sort: A personality assessment technique in which the subject or observer indicates the degree to which a standardized set of descriptive statements actually describes the subject. The term reflects "sorting" procedures occasionally used with this technique.Movement: The act, process, or result of passing from one place or position to another. It differs from LOCOMOTION in that locomotion is restricted to the passing of the whole body from one place to another, while movement encompasses both locomotion but also a change of the position of the whole body or any of its parts. Movement may be used with reference to humans, vertebrate and invertebrate animals, and microorganisms. Differentiate also from MOTOR ACTIVITY, movement associated with behavior.Recovery of Function: A partial or complete return to the normal or proper physiologic activity of an organ or part following disease or trauma.Psychotherapy: A generic term for the treatment of mental illness or emotional disturbances primarily by verbal or nonverbal communication.Focus Groups: A method of data collection and a QUALITATIVE RESEARCH tool in which a small group of individuals are brought together and allowed to interact in a discussion of their opinions about topics, issues, or questions.Patient Care Planning: Usually a written medical and nursing care program designed for a particular patient.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Videotape Recording: Recording of visual and sometimes sound signals on magnetic tape.Workers' Compensation: Insurance coverage providing compensation and medical benefits to individuals because of work-connected injuries or disease.Self-Evaluation Programs: Educational programs structured in such a manner that the participating professionals, physicians, or students develop an increased awareness of their performance, usually on the basis of self-evaluation questionnaires.Philosophy: A love or pursuit of wisdom. A search for the underlying causes and principles of reality. (Webster, 3d ed)Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).Licensure: The legal authority or formal permission from authorities to carry on certain activities which by law or regulation require such permission. It may be applied to licensure of institutions as well as individuals.Motor Skills: Performance of complex motor acts.Early Ambulation: Procedure to accelerate the ability of a patient to walk or move about by reducing the time to AMBULATION. It is characterized by a shorter period of hospitalization or recumbency than is normally practiced.Volleyball: A team sport in which two teams hit an inflated ball back and forth over a high net using their hands.Musculoskeletal System: The MUSCLES, bones (BONE AND BONES), and CARTILAGE of the body.Documentation: Systematic organization, storage, retrieval, and dissemination of specialized information, especially of a scientific or technical nature (From ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983). It often involves authenticating or validating information.Gait: Manner or style of walking.Professional Autonomy: The quality or state of being independent and self-directing, especially in making decisions, enabling professionals to exercise judgment as they see fit during the performance of their jobs.Netherlands: Country located in EUROPE. It is bordered by the NORTH SEA, BELGIUM, and GERMANY. Constituent areas are Aruba, Curacao, Sint Maarten, formerly included in the NETHERLANDS ANTILLES.Joint DiseasesWalking: An activity in which the body advances at a slow to moderate pace by moving the feet in a coordinated fashion. This includes recreational walking, walking for fitness, and competitive race-walking.Health Personnel: Men and women working in the provision of health services, whether as individual practitioners or employees of health institutions and programs, whether or not professionally trained, and whether or not subject to public regulation. (From A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, 1976)Private Practice: Practice of a health profession by an individual, offering services on a person-to-person basis, as opposed to group or partnership practice.Empathy: An individual's objective and insightful awareness of the feelings and behavior of another person. It should be distinguished from sympathy, which is usually nonobjective and noncritical. It includes caring, which is the demonstration of an awareness of and a concern for the good of others. (From Bioethics Thesaurus, 1992)Arthrometry, Articular: Measurements of joint flexibility (RANGE OF MOTION, ARTICULAR), usually by employing an angle-measuring device (arthrometer). Arthrometry is used to measure ligamentous laxity and stability. It is often used to evaluate the outcome of ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT replacement surgery.Rehabilitation: Restoration of human functions to the maximum degree possible in a person or persons suffering from disease or injury.Morale: The prevailing temper or spirit of an individual or group in relation to the tasks or functions which are expected.Posture: The position or attitude of the body.Evidence-Based Medicine: An approach of practicing medicine with the goal to improve and evaluate patient care. It requires the judicious integration of best research evidence with the patient's values to make decisions about medical care. This method is to help physicians make proper diagnosis, devise best testing plan, choose best treatment and methods of disease prevention, as well as develop guidelines for large groups of patients with the same disease. (from JAMA 296 (9), 2006)Compensation and Redress: Payment, or other means of making amends, for a wrong or injury.Ethical Theory: A philosophically coherent set of propositions (for example, utilitarianism) which attempts to provide general norms for the guidance and evaluation of moral conduct. (from Beauchamp and Childress, Principles of Biomedical Ethics, 4th ed)Occupational Diseases: Diseases caused by factors involved in one's employment.Cerebral Palsy: A heterogeneous group of nonprogressive motor disorders caused by chronic brain injuries that originate in the prenatal period, perinatal period, or first few years of life. The four major subtypes are spastic, athetoid, ataxic, and mixed cerebral palsy, with spastic forms being the most common. The motor disorder may range from difficulties with fine motor control to severe spasticity (see MUSCLE SPASTICITY) in all limbs. Spastic diplegia (Little disease) is the most common subtype, and is characterized by spasticity that is more prominent in the legs than in the arms. Pathologically, this condition may be associated with LEUKOMALACIA, PERIVENTRICULAR. (From Dev Med Child Neurol 1998 Aug;40(8):520-7)Administrative Personnel: Individuals responsible for the development of policy and supervision of the execution of plans and functional operations.Guideline Adherence: Conformity in fulfilling or following official, recognized, or institutional requirements, guidelines, recommendations, protocols, pathways, or other standards.Sexual Harassment: A form of discrimination in the workplace which violates the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Sexual harassment takes two forms: quid pro quo, where the employee must submit to sexual advances in exchange for job benefits or be penalized for refusing; or a hostile environment, where the atmosphere of the workplace is offensive and affects the employee's well-being. Offensive sexual conduct may include unwelcome advances, comments, touching, questions about marital status and sex practices, etc. Both men and women may be aggressors or victims. (Slee and Slee, Health Care Terms, 2d ed, p.404). While civil rights legislation deals with sexual harassment in the workplace, the behavior is not restricted to this; it may take place outside the work environment: in schools and colleges, athletics, and other social milieus and activities.Pain Management: A form of therapy that employs a coordinated and interdisciplinary approach for easing the suffering and improving the quality of life of those experiencing pain.Self Concept: A person's view of himself.Rehabilitation Centers: Facilities which provide programs for rehabilitating the mentally or physically disabled individuals.Musculoskeletal Manipulations: Various manipulations of body tissues, muscles and bones by hands or equipment to improve health and circulation, relieve fatigue, promote healing.Interprofessional Relations: The reciprocal interaction of two or more professional individuals.Catastrophization: Cognitive and emotional processes encompassing magnification of pain-related stimuli, feelings of helplessness, and a generally pessimistic orientation.Burnout, Professional: An excessive stress reaction to one's occupational or professional environment. It is manifested by feelings of emotional and physical exhaustion coupled with a sense of frustration and failure.Ultrasonic Therapy: The use of focused, high-frequency sound waves to produce local hyperthermia in certain diseased or injured parts of the body or to destroy the diseased tissue.Return to Work: Resumption of normal work routine following a hiatus or period of absence due to injury, disability, or other reasons.Patient Care Team: Care of patients by a multidisciplinary team usually organized under the leadership of a physician; each member of the team has specific responsibilities and the whole team contributes to the care of the patient.Education, Graduate: Studies beyond the bachelor's degree at an institution having graduate programs for the purpose of preparing for entrance into a specific field, and obtaining a higher degree.Motor Skills Disorders: Marked impairments in the development of motor coordination such that the impairment interferes with activities of daily living. (From DSM-V)Qualitative Research: Any type of research that employs nonnumeric information to explore individual or group characteristics, producing findings not arrived at by statistical procedures or other quantitative means. (Qualitative Inquiry: A Dictionary of Terms Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 1997)Pain: An unpleasant sensation induced by noxious stimuli which are detected by NERVE ENDINGS of NOCICEPTIVE NEURONS.Postural Balance: A POSTURE in which an ideal body mass distribution is achieved. Postural balance provides the body carriage stability and conditions for normal functions in stationary position or in movement, such as sitting, standing, or walking.Disabled Children: Children with mental or physical disabilities that interfere with usual activities of daily living and that may require accommodation or intervention.Morals: Standards of conduct that distinguish right from wrong.Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Job Satisfaction: Personal satisfaction relative to the work situation.Episode of Care: An interval of care by a health care facility or provider for a specific medical problem or condition. It may be continuous or it may consist of a series of intervals marked by one or more brief separations from care, and can also identify the sequence of care (e.g., emergency, inpatient, outpatient), thus serving as one measure of health care provided.Manipulation, Spinal: Adjustment and manipulation of the vertebral column.Auscultation: Act of listening for sounds within the body.Health Facility Environment: Physical surroundings or conditions of a hospital or other health facility and influence of these factors on patients and staff.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Nonverbal Communication: Transmission of emotions, ideas, and attitudes between individuals in ways other than the spoken language.Outcome Assessment (Health Care): Research aimed at assessing the quality and effectiveness of health care as measured by the attainment of a specified end result or outcome. Measures include parameters such as improved health, lowered morbidity or mortality, and improvement of abnormal states (such as elevated blood pressure).Respiratory Therapy Department, Hospital: Hospital department which is responsible for the administration of diagnostic pulmonary function tests and of procedures to restore optimum pulmonary ventilation.Burn Units: Specialized hospital facilities which provide intensive care for burn patients.Biomechanical Phenomena: The properties, processes, and behavior of biological systems under the action of mechanical forces.Evaluation Studies as Topic: Studies determining the effectiveness or value of processes, personnel, and equipment, or the material on conducting such studies. For drugs and devices, CLINICAL TRIALS AS TOPIC; DRUG EVALUATION; and DRUG EVALUATION, PRECLINICAL are available.New England: The geographic area of New England in general and when the specific state or states are not indicated. States usually included in this region are Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Connecticut, and Rhode Island.Practice Guidelines as Topic: Directions or principles presenting current or future rules of policy for assisting health care practitioners in patient care decisions regarding diagnosis, therapy, or related clinical circumstances. The guidelines may be developed by government agencies at any level, institutions, professional societies, governing boards, or by the convening of expert panels. The guidelines form a basis for the evaluation of all aspects of health care and delivery.Self Efficacy: Cognitive mechanism based on expectations or beliefs about one's ability to perform actions necessary to produce a given effect. It is also a theoretical component of behavior change in various therapeutic treatments. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 1994)Physical Education and Training: Instructional programs in the care and development of the body, often in schools. The concept does not include prescribed exercises, which is EXERCISE THERAPY.Orthotic Devices: Apparatus used to support, align, prevent, or correct deformities or to improve the function of movable parts of the body.Employment: The state of being engaged in an activity or service for wages or salary.Mainstreaming (Education): Most frequently refers to the integration of a physically or mentally disabled child into the regular class of normal peers and provision of the appropriately determined educational program.Pilot Projects: Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.Paternalism: Interference with the FREEDOM or PERSONAL AUTONOMY of another person, with justifications referring to the promotion of the person's good or the prevention of harm to the person. (from Cambridge Dictionary of Philosophy, 1995); more generally, not allowing a person to make decisions on his or her own behalf.Quality of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.Physical Exertion: Expenditure of energy during PHYSICAL ACTIVITY. Intensity of exertion may be measured by rate of OXYGEN CONSUMPTION; HEAT produced, or HEART RATE. Perceived exertion, a psychological measure of exertion, is included.Psychometrics: Assessment of psychological variables by the application of mathematical procedures.Orthopedics: A surgical specialty which utilizes medical, surgical, and physical methods to treat and correct deformities, diseases, and injuries to the skeletal system, its articulations, and associated structures.Models, Organizational: Theoretical representations and constructs that describe or explain the structure and hierarchy of relationships and interactions within or between formal organizational entities or informal social groups.Health Care Surveys: Statistical measures of utilization and other aspects of the provision of health care services including hospitalization and ambulatory care.Factor Analysis, Statistical: A set of statistical methods for analyzing the correlations among several variables in order to estimate the number of fundamental dimensions that underlie the observed data and to describe and measure those dimensions. It is used frequently in the development of scoring systems for rating scales and questionnaires.Research: Critical and exhaustive investigation or experimentation, having for its aim the discovery of new facts and their correct interpretation, the revision of accepted conclusions, theories, or laws in the light of newly discovered facts, or the practical application of such new or revised conclusions, theories, or laws. (Webster, 3d ed)Teaching: The educational process of instructing.Foot Deformities, Acquired: Distortion or disfigurement of the foot, or a part of the foot, acquired through disease or injury after birth.Psychotherapeutic Processes: Experiential, attitudinal, emotional, or behavioral phenomena occurring during the course of treatment. They apply to the patient or therapist (i.e., nurse, doctor, etc.) individually or to their interaction. (American Psychological Association: Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 1994)Discriminant Analysis: A statistical analytic technique used with discrete dependent variables, concerned with separating sets of observed values and allocating new values. It is sometimes used instead of regression analysis.Educational Measurement: The assessing of academic or educational achievement. It includes all aspects of testing and test construction.Social Values: Abstract standards or empirical variables in social life which are believed to be important and/or desirable.Physician's Practice Patterns: Patterns of practice related to diagnosis and treatment as especially influenced by cost of the service requested and provided.Patient Education as Topic: The teaching or training of patients concerning their own health needs.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Curriculum: A course of study offered by an educational institution.Certification: Compliance with a set of standards defined by non-governmental organizations. Certification is applied for by individuals on a voluntary basis and represents a professional status when achieved, e.g., certification for a medical specialty.Men: Human males as cultural, psychological, sociological, political, and economic entities.Spinal DiseasesStroke: A group of pathological conditions characterized by sudden, non-convulsive loss of neurological function due to BRAIN ISCHEMIA or INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES. Stroke is classified by the type of tissue NECROSIS, such as the anatomic location, vasculature involved, etiology, age of the affected individual, and hemorrhagic vs. non-hemorrhagic nature. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp777-810)Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Speech Therapy: Treatment for individuals with speech defects and disorders that involves counseling and use of various exercises and aids to help the development of new speech habits.Thinking: Mental activity, not predominantly perceptual, by which one apprehends some aspect of an object or situation based on past learning and experience.International Classification of Diseases: A system of categories to which morbid entries are assigned according to established criteria. Included is the entire range of conditions in a manageable number of categories, grouped to facilitate mortality reporting. It is produced by the World Health Organization (From ICD-10, p1). The Clinical Modifications, produced by the UNITED STATES DEPT. OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES, are larger extensions used for morbidity and general epidemiological purposes, primarily in the U.S.Moving and Lifting Patients: Moving or repositioning patients within their beds, from bed to bed, bed to chair, or otherwise from one posture or surface to another.Ontario: A province of Canada lying between the provinces of Manitoba and Quebec. Its capital is Toronto. It takes its name from Lake Ontario which is said to represent the Iroquois oniatariio, beautiful lake. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p892 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p391)Clinical Protocols: Precise and detailed plans for the study of a medical or biomedical problem and/or plans for a regimen of therapy.Upper Extremity: The region of the upper limb in animals, extending from the deltoid region to the HAND, and including the ARM; AXILLA; and SHOULDER.CaliforniaObservation: The act of regarding attentively and studying facts and occurrences, gathering data through analyzing, measuring, and drawing conclusions, with the purpose of applying the observed information to theoretical assumptions. Observation as a scientific method in the acquisition of knowledge began in classical antiquity; in modern science and medicine its greatest application is facilitated by modern technology. Observation is one of the components of the research process.Communication: The exchange or transmission of ideas, attitudes, or beliefs between individuals or groups.Research Design: A plan for collecting and utilizing data so that desired information can be obtained with sufficient precision or so that an hypothesis can be tested properly.Organizational Innovation: Introduction of changes which are new to the organization and are created by management.Linear Models: Statistical models in which the value of a parameter for a given value of a factor is assumed to be equal to a + bx, where a and b are constants. The models predict a linear regression.Canada: The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.Developmental Disabilities: Disorders in which there is a delay in development based on that expected for a given age level or stage of development. These impairments or disabilities originate before age 18, may be expected to continue indefinitely, and constitute a substantial impairment. Biological and nonbiological factors are involved in these disorders. (From American Psychiatric Glossary, 6th ed)Workload: The total amount of work to be performed by an individual, a department, or other group of workers in a period of time.Hemiplegia: Severe or complete loss of motor function on one side of the body. This condition is usually caused by BRAIN DISEASES that are localized to the cerebral hemisphere opposite to the side of weakness. Less frequently, BRAIN STEM lesions; cervical SPINAL CORD DISEASES; PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES; and other conditions may manifest as hemiplegia. The term hemiparesis (see PARESIS) refers to mild to moderate weakness involving one side of the body.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Ethics, Clinical: The identification, analysis, and resolution of moral problems that arise in the care of patients. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Motivation: Those factors which cause an organism to behave or act in either a goal-seeking or satisfying manner. They may be influenced by physiological drives or by external stimuli.Health Behavior: Behaviors expressed by individuals to protect, maintain or promote their health status. For example, proper diet, and appropriate exercise are activities perceived to influence health status. Life style is closely associated with health behavior and factors influencing life style are socioeconomic, educational, and cultural.Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care): Evaluation procedures that focus on both the outcome or status (OUTCOMES ASSESSMENT) of the patient at the end of an episode of care - presence of symptoms, level of activity, and mortality; and the process (ASSESSMENT, PROCESS) - what is done for the patient diagnostically and therapeutically.Mandatory Programs: Programs in which participation is required.Electric Stimulation Therapy: Application of electric current in treatment without the generation of perceptible heat. It includes electric stimulation of nerves or muscles, passage of current into the body, or use of interrupted current of low intensity to raise the threshold of the skin to pain.Power (Psychology): The exertion of a strong influence or control over others in a variety of settings--administrative, social, academic, etc.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Muscular Diseases: Acquired, familial, and congenital disorders of SKELETAL MUSCLE and SMOOTH MUSCLE.Movement Disorders: Syndromes which feature DYSKINESIAS as a cardinal manifestation of the disease process. Included in this category are degenerative, hereditary, post-infectious, medication-induced, post-inflammatory, and post-traumatic conditions.IllinoisSampling Studies: Studies in which a number of subjects are selected from all subjects in a defined population. Conclusions based on sample results may be attributed only to the population sampled.Home Care Services: Community health and NURSING SERVICES providing coordinated multiple services to the patient at the patient's homes. These home-care services are provided by a visiting nurse, home health agencies, HOSPITALS, or organized community groups using professional staff for care delivery. It differs from HOME NURSING which is provided by non-professionals.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Task Performance and Analysis: The detailed examination of observable activity or behavior associated with the execution or completion of a required function or unit of work.Cognitive Therapy: A direct form of psychotherapy based on the interpretation of situations (cognitive structure of experiences) that determine how an individual feels and behaves. It is based on the premise that cognition, the process of acquiring knowledge and forming beliefs, is a primary determinant of mood and behavior. The therapy uses behavioral and verbal techniques to identify and correct negative thinking that is at the root of the aberrant behavior.Biofeedback, Psychology: The therapy technique of providing the status of one's own AUTONOMIC NERVOUS SYSTEM function (e.g., skin temperature, heartbeats, brain waves) as visual or auditory feedback in order to self-control related conditions (e.g., hypertension, migraine headaches).Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Longitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.
Guide to Physical Therapist Practice 3.0. Alexandria, VA: American Physical Therapy Association; 2014. ... Guide to Physical Therapist Practice 3.0. Alexandria, VA: American Physical Therapy Association; 2014. ... The APTA Guide to Physical Therapist Practice defines mobilization/manipulation as "a manual therapy technique comprised of a ...
Rockso's real name is Leonard Rockstein; the hyperactive son of a physical therapist. Rockso began his music career as the lead ... He has since returned as a therapist for Mordhaus with new robotic arms. Voiced by: Tommy Blacha Dethklok meets a certain ... Johnathan Twinkletits (pronounced twink-LET-its, deliberately avoiding the obvious pronunciation) is an insane band therapist, ... from their drastic physical changes to their poverty in later life (with the exception of Pickles). In season 3 the former ...
Goodman, Catherine C.; Fuller, Kenda S. (2011). Pathology for the Physical Therapist Assistant - E-Book. Elsevier Health ... Niedermaier, T; Behrens, G; Schmid, D; Schlecht, I; Fischer, B; Leitzmann, MF (16 September 2015). "Body mass index, physical ...
The staff consists of licensed physical, occupational and speech therapists. Life Therapies clinics focus on the patient ... It was determined that creating the new Life Therapies service line would allow therapists and physicians to better treat ... A faith-based hospital, Saint Thomas Midtown encourages spiritual healing in addition to physical health. Hospital leaders ... In addition to joint replacement, other orthopedic services include sports medicine (including sports physicals), ...
Physical Therapy department started under supervision of a registered therapist.. *Personnel department established. ...
"Physical therapists, chiropractors square off over bill". The Seattle Times. Archived from the original on 2010-09-22. ... prohibit physical therapists from performing SM,[70] some states allow them to do it only if they have completed advanced ... and that physical therapists emphasize machinery and exercise.[18] Chiropractic diagnosis may involve a range of methods ... physical therapists work alongside and cooperate with mainstream medicine, and osteopathic medicine in the U.S. has merged with ...
... and they are opposed by physical therapist organizations. Two U.S. states (Washington and Arkansas) prohibit physical ... Anderson, Chantal (2009-01-22). "Physical therapists, chiropractors square off over bill". The Seattle Times. Archived from the ... chiropractors have expressed concern that orthodox medical physicians and physical therapists could "steal" SM procedures from ... Homola, Samuel (2006). "Can Chiropractors and Evidence-Based Manual Therapists Work Together? An Opinion From a Veteran ...
ISBN 978-0-7360-5583-3. Springhouse Corporation (2000). Physical therapist's clinical companion. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins ... Acute muscle soreness is the pain felt in muscles during and immediately after strenuous physical exercise. The pain appears ... Basic Science and Clinical Aspects of Sports Injury and Physical Activity. John Wiley and Sons. p. 722. ISBN 978-1-4051-4057-7 ...
Such treatment is usually given by a chiropractor, osteopath or physical therapist. Thiele applied this treatment to a series ... Physical rectal examination, high resolution x-rays and MRI scans can rule out various causes unrelated to the coccyx, such as ...
He works with doctors and physical therapists to help improve his condition.[21] ...
"Physical Therapist (PT) Education Overview". American Physical Therapy Association. Retrieved 19 September 2013. ... "What's the Difference Between a Personal Trainer, Athletic Trainer and Physical Therapist?". ACE Fitness. Retrieved 19 ... or licensure as a physical therapist requires that you attend and graduate from a masters or doctoral program in physical ... Physical fitness Personal trainer Accredited Organizations Offering Fitness Certifications., OrangeCountyFitness.org, 2010 ...
Physical therapist Nikki Kimball explained a way to make the bath more endurable: Over those years, I've discovered tricks to ... Nikki Kimball; physical therapist (August 1, 2008). "Ice Baths: Cold Therapy - Ice baths are one of the most effective ways to ... Ascensão A, Leite M, Rebelo AN, Magalhäes S, Magalhäes J (2011). "Effects of cold water immersion on the recovery of physical ... the internal physical processes are not well understood and remain elusive. Generally research into the health effects of cold ...
"Physical therapist fulfills lifelong dream". Altus (OK) Times. June 7, 1987. p. 2. Retrieved January 28, 2013. "Seventh-day ...
He is a physical therapist. Inducted into the Tennessee State Gymnastics Hall of Fame in 2007. Inducted into the Blount County ...
Affiliate members are allied healthcare professionals (e.g., hand therapists; occupational therapists; physical therapists; ...
Physical Therapist and Physicians Assistant, and (previously) assistant to MDs in cardiovascular research. As a former ... After a stint as a professional massage therapist completed a PhD on the philosophy and implications of mind-body techniques. ... The listed links are physical remedies, but how about natural remedies? For example, what natural remedy can we take instead of ...
Jacobson's progressive relaxation has remained popular with modern physical therapists.[4] Although many institutions and ... They are meant to reduce physical tension and interrupt the racing thought processes that affect sleep.[5] A common ... The instructions begin by telling the person to relax and just let go, detaching from thoughts or physical distractions or ...
Orthopaedics for the physical therapist assistant. Page 187 Bad Ragaz ring method. Jones & Bartlett Learning. ISBN 978- ... In particular, on land the therapist moves around the patient and controls resistance; whereas in water, the therapist acts as ... and subsequently PNF became a widely accepted technique used extensively by physical therapists, other health professionals, ... Physical agents: theory and practice, 2nd edition. Chapter 5. Aquatics and hydrotherapy. pp 82-89. F.A. Davis Co. ISBN 978- ...
Orthopaedics for the physical therapist assistant. Jones & Bartlett Learning. p 187. (Watsu) ISBN 978-0763797553. Schoedinger, ... By the late 1980s and early 1990s, physical therapists and other healthcare providers began applying Watsu to treat diverse ... In the early years, massage therapists were the main practitioners of Watsu, offering sessions as a new category of aquatic ... While Watsu's roots in Shiatsu and the close physical contact led to some early resistance among those trained in conventional ...
The three forms of diathermy employed by physical therapists are ultrasound, short wave and microwave. The application of ... Dielectric heating Heat therapy Pulsed electromagnetic field therapy TDP lamp Mark Dutton (11 May 2011). Physical Therapist ... The physical characteristics of most of the devices used clinically to heat tissues have been proved to be inefficient to reach ... It exerts physical effects and elicits a spectrum of physiological responses. The same techniques are also used to create ...
Prinz is a trained physical therapist. In 2010, she graduated with her master's degree in psychology from the Goethe University ...
ISBN 978-81-8448-744-2. Goodman, Catherine C.; Fuller, Kenda S. (2011-02-14). Pathology for the Physical Therapist Assistant. ... Frontera, Walter R.; Silver, Julie K.; Jr, Thomas D. Rizzo (2014-09-05). Essentials of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. ... Physical therapy or occupational therapy Surgery(depending on the specific area and extent of damage) Tendon transfer (the ... American Journal of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation. 90 (4): 342-343. doi:10.1097/PHM.0b013e3181e29daa. ISSN 0894-9115. PMC ...
Orthopaedics for the physical therapist assistant. p 187 Halliwick Concept. Jones & Bartlett Learning. ISBN 978-0763797553. ... According to the Halliwick Concept, physical properties of water form the basis for therapeutic intervention: Turbulence, Flow ... for example involving selective activation of muscles and stabilization of specific joints by the therapist. Halliwick Aquatic ...
Sergei is a physical therapist. Sergei Kotov at the International Skating Union. ...
"CAPTE Accredited Physical Therapist Education Programs". CAPTE website. American Physical Therapy Association. Retrieved 4 June ... "Physical therapy and executive MBA programs rank high in U.S. News & World Report". Marquette University News Briefs. 19 March ... "Physical Therapy Rankings". U.S.News & World Report. U.S.News & World Report LP. Retrieved 5 June 2012. "Best Physician ... In 2012, US News and World Report ranked Marquette's physical therapy program at 12th among all programs nationwide. In the ...
Placebos do not have a physical effect on diseases or improve overall outcomes, but patients may report improvements in ... has created the opening into which alternative therapists have stepped. "People are told lies. There are 40 million websites ... such as those which include all physical activity under the umbrella of "alternative medicine". ...
Patients underwent physical therapy (PT) after surgery and until hospital discharge. Physical therapists blinded to patients ... However, the physical therapists who mobilized patients and recorded ambulation data were blinded to the study and its ... 15 Transfusions impede physical therapy and affect hospitalization costs. ...
While it may be physical in nature, it can also refer to teasing, taunting or making sexualized comments that are directed ...
Find information about Ohio Wesleyan University physical therapist assistant program. Browse our medical job listings, which ... Physical therapist assistants (PTA) and physical therapist aides work under the supervision of physical therapists, helping ... All states require physical therapist assistants to have an associates degree from an accredited physical therapist assistant ... administered by the Federation of State Boards of Physical Therapy. Physical therapist aides, on the other hand, are not ...
A103 PHYSICAL THERAPISTS. Exclude Therapy Assistants (K446).. Plan and administer medically prescribed physical therapy ... Administer treatments involving application of physical agents, such as light, heat, water and electricity using equipment such ...
Education for the advancement of practicing physical therapists is termed postprofessional). All PTs must receive a graduate ... degree from an accredited physical therapist program before taking the national licensure examination that allows them to ... professional education refers to the education that prepares graduates for entry into practice of physical therapy. ( ... To practice as a physical therapist in the US, you must earn a physical therapist degree from a CAPTE- accredited physical ...
... Nursing facility for short-term and long-term residents. Southeastern U.S. region. ...
KORT Physical Therapists says headache sufferers should look to their necks. Persistent headaches are one of the most frequent ... Physicians and physical therapists can help to diagnose cervicogenic headache by feeling muscles and joints of the neck and ... However, according to KORT physical therapist Emily Nicklies, PT, DPT, one often overlooked source is the neck, or cervical ... According to Nicklies, there are many ways Physical Therapists treat cervicogenic headache: ...
Physical Therapy reviews, phone number, address and map. Find the best Physical Therapist in Madison, NE ... Physical Therapist Info. Physical Therapist Summary: Find the top physical therapists in your area for chronic pain management ... Physical Therapist FAQs: What Can I Expect from My First Appointment with a Local Physical Therapist?. Because physical ... Physical Therapist Related Terms: physical therapy, physical therapist, rehabilitation, rehab, build muscle, regain faculties, ...
Physical Therapist. What is a physical therapist?. Physical therapy focuses on the evaluation, management, and prevention of ... Physical therapists have either a masters degree or doctorate from a school accredited by the American Physical Therapy ... Physical therapists, or PTs, are important members of the rehabilitation team. They evaluate and provide treatment for persons ... Physical therapy treatments and services focus on restoring the individuals mobility (movement) and function, and preventing ...
... MIT-Manus, a robot that may speed up clinical trials, could ... As the software became more sophisticated, researchers wondered whether MIT-Manus could serve not only as a physical therapist ... While stroke researchers have historically relied on a similar scoring system, with human physical therapists doing the scoring ... MIT-Manus began its career as a physical therapy robot. Patients manipulated its mechanical arm like a joystick and played ...
Current and unencumbered license to practice as a physical therapist assistant specific to the state the therapist is assigned ... You will work in tandem with a full team of healthcare professionals including physical therapists, nurses, other therapists ... Collaborate with the physical therapist in assisting the physician in assessing the patients functional level by applying ... As a home health physical therapist assistant, you will provide one on one therapeutic treatment and care to patients in their ...
Physical Therapist eSPAN Healthcare, Inc. , Dunwoody, GA 1 week ago Physical Therapist Home Recovery , Arlington, VA 2 weeks ... What does a physical therapist make? It depends on where they live and their experience. Physical therapists earn an average ... Job outlook for physical therapists. Projected growth. The BLS projects a 34 percent rate of growth for the physical therapy ... To become an effective physical therapist, youll need a diverse array of skills, including:. *Physical abilities: You must ...
Assistants help physical therapists maintain therapy facilities and monitor patient progress, while also helping patients by ... Physical therapist assistants (PTAs) work as part of a dynamic healthcare team. ... Physical therapist assistants (PTAs) work as part of a dynamic healthcare team. Assistants help physical therapists maintain ... Become-a-Physical-Therapist-Assistant-Step-1-Version-2.jpg\/v4-460px-Become-a-Physical-Therapist-Assistant-Step-1-Version-2.jpg ...
Physical therapists play a key role in helping patients regain mobility and strength to lead a community life. They help ... What Does a Physical Therapist Do?. Physical therapists examine, evaluate and treat the root cause of physical impairments ... In a reputable physical therapy center, a physical therapist works in a team along with occupational therapists, neurologists, ... Where One Can Get the Service of Physical Therapists. Different healthcare settings such as hospitals, specialized physical ...
Physical Therapist Aide (PTA), Physical Therapist Technician (Physical Therapy Tech), Physical Therapy Aide (PTA), Physical ... 31-2022.00 - Physical Therapist Aides. Under close supervision of a physical therapist or physical therapy assistant, perform ... 31-2022.00 - Physical Therapist Aides by U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration is licensed under a ... Physical Proximity - To what extent does this job require the worker to perform job tasks in close physical proximity to other ...
Physical therapists will also be needed to have several history in math-intensive topics such because statistics as well as ... Very Interesting! Physical therapists are a much under appreciated bunch. Voted up. PS. You have an extra M in the title. ... Being an actual physical therapist provides the possibility to manage a lot regarding your work natural environment without ... Carrying on with educations courses can be picked out among numerous specialized classes physical therapists possess a fair ...
Information about Humboldt State University physical therapist assistant program. Study our website, in order to locate ... Physical therapist assistants (PTA) and physical therapist aides work under the supervision of physical therapists, helping ... All states require physical therapist assistants to have an associates degree from an accredited physical therapist assistant ... administered by the Federation of State Boards of Physical Therapy. Physical therapist aides, on the other hand, are not ...
The Physical Therapist Assistant assists the Physical Therapist in providing physical therapy treatments and procedures. ... Valid Physical Therapist Assistant License, in good standing Skills and Abilities:. Knowledge of current Physical Therapy ... Notifies evaluating physical therapist of any matters pertaining to the care of the patient as needed Ensures that the ... Ensures patient is scheduled with evaluating physical therapist as per regulatory guidelines Completes required documentation ...
... physical therapist assistant. Physical Therapist Assistant. The physical therapist assistant (PTA) is a skilled health care ... The Physical Therapist Assistant Program at Illinois Central College is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation in ... Getting Started: Apply to ICC , Apply to Health Careers , Paying for College , Career Information: Physical Therapist , Student ... The mission of the Physical Therapist Assistant (PTA) Program is to provide the knowledge and skills and develop attitudes ...
Physical Therapist - Eleanor 5th hour by eleanor bigelow , This newsletter was created with Smore, an online tool for creating ... The yearly salary of a physical therapist in Arkansas is $45,860 to $109,010. But you have to get a masters degree to become a ... physical therapist. Some classes that you have to take clinic based corse and many science corses. ... Plan, prepare, or carry out individually designed programs of physical treatment. -Record prognosis, treatment, response, and ...
Students may enter the college as physical therapist assistant majors. However, admission into the advanced courses is ... letter of recommendation from a physical therapist working in the exposure facility, and submit a writing sample on an assigned ... In addition to completing the pre-requisite courses, student must complete a minimum of 25 hours of exposure to physical ...
After many years of being treated for various physical complaints. Abdominal pain, back pain, joint pain, acid reflux, UTIs I ... How can I reduce physical pain?. Asked by on 2018-05-8. with 1 answer:. Q. Stuck in physical pain: After many years of being ... psychcentral.com/ask-the-therapist/2007/04/30/how-can-i-reduce-physical-pain/ ... treated for various physical complaints. Abdominal pain, back pain, joint pain, acid reflux, UTIs I have been diagnosed with ...
This physical therapist position is full time, primarily Monday through Friday. Work is performed at the CNS clinic(s) with ... The Staff Physical Therapist is responsible for duties including patient evaluation, program development, program ... Physical intervention and restraints can include calling for help, lifting, standing, walking, running, stooping, bending, ... Conducts in house training sessions regarding Physical Therapy when needed.. Assists in the establishment of department ...
... is a Physical Therapist in Tyler, TX who treats back pain. Research her practice, specializations, and request an appointment. ... Carol McFarland is a physical therapist with New Dimensions Rehabilitation.. New Dimensions Rehabilitation is a physical ... Orthopedic Clinical Specialist in Physical Therapy through the American Board of Physical Therapist Specialties ...
Physical Therapist, Mrs. Tina Hall, located in Cheronnac. Bodymatters is run by Tina Hall and is a small personal practice with ...
  • My physical therapist came as a recommendation from my sports medicine doctor-I'd previously always chosen one through a cursory Google search, but I didn't know what to look for and what each certification after a therapist's name actually meant. (self.com)
  • however, the standards for accreditation have changed and a D.P.T. degree is now required to become a physical therapist," he says. (self.com)
  • The PTA collects and reports various tests and measurements and carries out interventions that improve an individual's overall physical performance and wellness by managing pain, increasing strength, re-educating neuromuscular activity, and improving endurance, balance, and coordination. (allegany.edu)
  • These interventions may include the use of various physical agents to help heal tissue, manage pain, and re-educate muscle performance. (allegany.edu)
  • Employees with Physical Therapist (PT) in their job title in San Diego, California earn an average of 6.4% more than the national average. (payscale.com)
  • The national average cost for a physical therapist is $60 to $80 , although it will cost more if the patient is paying for services out of pocket rather than through insurance. (thumbtack.com)
  • Patients who are paying directly for services can often contact the physical therapist directly. (thumbtack.com)