Burnout, Professional: An excessive stress reaction to one's occupational or professional environment. It is manifested by feelings of emotional and physical exhaustion coupled with a sense of frustration and failure.Burn Units: Specialized hospital facilities which provide intensive care for burn patients.Burns: Injuries to tissues caused by contact with heat, steam, chemicals (BURNS, CHEMICAL), electricity (BURNS, ELECTRIC), or the like.Professional Role: The expected function of a member of a particular profession.Physical Fitness: The ability to carry out daily tasks and perform physical activities in a highly functional state, often as a result of physical conditioning.Professional Competence: The capability to perform the duties of one's profession generally, or to perform a particular professional task, with skill of an acceptable quality.Health Personnel: Men and women working in the provision of health services, whether as individual practitioners or employees of health institutions and programs, whether or not professionally trained, and whether or not subject to public regulation. (From A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, 1976)Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Physical Therapy Modalities: Therapeutic modalities frequently used in PHYSICAL THERAPY SPECIALTY by PHYSICAL THERAPISTS or physiotherapists to promote, maintain, or restore the physical and physiological well-being of an individual.Attitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.Motor Activity: The physical activity of a human or an animal as a behavioral phenomenon.Ethics, Professional: The principles of proper conduct concerning the rights and duties of the professional, relations with patients or consumers and fellow practitioners, as well as actions of the professional and interpersonal relations with patient or consumer families. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Professional Autonomy: The quality or state of being independent and self-directing, especially in making decisions, enabling professionals to exercise judgment as they see fit during the performance of their jobs.Professional Practice: The use of one's knowledge in a particular profession. It includes, in the case of the field of biomedicine, professional activities related to health care and the actual performance of the duties related to the provision of health care.Depersonalization: State in which an individual perceives or experiences a sensation of unreality concerning the self or the environment; it is seen in disorders such as schizophrenia, affection disorders, organic mental disorders, and personality disorders. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed.)Education, Professional: Formal education and training in preparation for the practice of a profession.Exercise: Physical activity which is usually regular and done with the intention of improving or maintaining PHYSICAL FITNESS or HEALTH. Contrast with PHYSICAL EXERTION which is concerned largely with the physiologic and metabolic response to energy expenditure.Physical Therapy Specialty: The auxiliary health profession which makes use of PHYSICAL THERAPY MODALITIES to prevent, correct, and alleviate movement dysfunction of anatomic or physiological origin.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Job Satisfaction: Personal satisfaction relative to the work situation.Physical Education and Training: Instructional programs in the care and development of the body, often in schools. The concept does not include prescribed exercises, which is EXERCISE THERAPY.United StatesPhysical Examination: Systematic and thorough inspection of the patient for physical signs of disease or abnormality.Physicians: Individuals licensed to practice medicine.Professional-Patient Relations: Interactions between health personnel and patients.Nurses: Professionals qualified by graduation from an accredited school of nursing and by passage of a national licensing examination to practice nursing. They provide services to patients requiring assistance in recovering or maintaining their physical or mental health.Interprofessional Relations: The reciprocal interaction of two or more professional individuals.Clinical Competence: The capability to perform acceptably those duties directly related to patient care.Health Occupations: Professions or other business activities directed to the cure and prevention of disease. For occupations of medical personnel who are not physicians but who are working in the fields of medical technology, physical therapy, etc., ALLIED HEALTH OCCUPATIONS is available.Qualitative Research: Any type of research that employs nonnumeric information to explore individual or group characteristics, producing findings not arrived at by statistical procedures or other quantitative means. (Qualitative Inquiry: A Dictionary of Terms Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 1997)Smoke Inhalation Injury: Pulmonary injury following the breathing in of toxic smoke from burning materials such as plastics, synthetics, building materials, etc. This injury is the most frequent cause of death in burn patients.Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).Physical Therapists: Persons trained in PHYSICAL THERAPY SPECIALTY to make use of PHYSICAL THERAPY MODALITIES to prevent, correct, and alleviate movement dysfunction.Physical Exertion: Expenditure of energy during PHYSICAL ACTIVITY. Intensity of exertion may be measured by rate of OXYGEN CONSUMPTION; HEAT produced, or HEART RATE. Perceived exertion, a psychological measure of exertion, is included.Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Wound Infection: Invasion of the site of trauma by pathogenic microorganisms.Allied Health Personnel: Health care workers specially trained and licensed to assist and support the work of health professionals. Often used synonymously with paramedical personnel, the term generally refers to all health care workers who perform tasks which must otherwise be performed by a physician or other health professional.Dentists: Individuals licensed to practice DENTISTRY.Burns, Inhalation: Burns of the respiratory tract caused by heat or inhaled chemicals.Burns, Electric: Burns produced by contact with electric current or from a sudden discharge of electricity.Education, Continuing: Educational programs designed to inform individuals of recent advances in their particular field of interest. They do not lead to any formal advanced standing.Professional Misconduct: Violation of laws, regulations, or professional standards.Focus Groups: A method of data collection and a QUALITATIVE RESEARCH tool in which a small group of individuals are brought together and allowed to interact in a discussion of their opinions about topics, issues, or questions.Great BritainRisk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Quality of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.Workload: The total amount of work to be performed by an individual, a department, or other group of workers in a period of time.Soccer: A game in which a round inflated ball is advanced by kicking or propelling with any part of the body except the hands or arms. The object of the game is to place the ball in opposite goals.Sports: Activities or games, usually involving physical effort or skill. Reasons for engagement in sports include pleasure, competition, and/or financial reward.Nursing: The field of nursing care concerned with the promotion, maintenance, and restoration of health.Curriculum: A course of study offered by an educational institution.Attitude to Health: Public attitudes toward health, disease, and the medical care system.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Communication: The exchange or transmission of ideas, attitudes, or beliefs between individuals or groups.Health Status: The level of health of the individual, group, or population as subjectively assessed by the individual or by more objective measures.Stress, Psychological: Stress wherein emotional factors predominate.Patient Care Team: Care of patients by a multidisciplinary team usually organized under the leadership of a physician; each member of the team has specific responsibilities and the whole team contributes to the care of the patient.Professional Practice Location: Geographic area in which a professional person practices; includes primarily physicians and dentists.Health Behavior: Behaviors expressed by individuals to protect, maintain or promote their health status. For example, proper diet, and appropriate exercise are activities perceived to influence health status. Life style is closely associated with health behavior and factors influencing life style are socioeconomic, educational, and cultural.Physician-Patient Relations: The interactions between physician and patient.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Education, Medical, Continuing: Educational programs designed to inform physicians of recent advances in their field.Physical Chromosome Mapping: Mapping of the linear order of genes on a chromosome with units indicating their distances by using methods other than genetic recombination. These methods include nucleotide sequencing, overlapping deletions in polytene chromosomes, and electron micrography of heteroduplex DNA. (From King & Stansfield, A Dictionary of Genetics, 5th ed)Physician's Role: The expected function of a member of the medical profession.Life Style: Typical way of life or manner of living characteristic of an individual or group. (From APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine: A medical specialty concerned with the use of physical agents, mechanical apparatus, and manipulation in rehabilitating physically diseased or injured patients.Primary Health Care: Care which provides integrated, accessible health care services by clinicians who are accountable for addressing a large majority of personal health care needs, developing a sustained partnership with patients, and practicing in the context of family and community. (JAMA 1995;273(3):192)Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Sedentary Lifestyle: Usual level of physical activity that is less than 30 minutes of moderate-intensity activity on most days of the week.Nursing Staff, Hospital: Personnel who provide nursing service to patients in a hospital.Education, Medical: Use for general articles concerning medical education.Activities of Daily Living: The performance of the basic activities of self care, such as dressing, ambulation, or eating.Netherlands: Country located in EUROPE. It is bordered by the NORTH SEA, BELGIUM, and GERMANY. Constituent areas are Aruba, Curacao, Sint Maarten, formerly included in the NETHERLANDS ANTILLES.Education, Nursing: Use for general articles concerning nursing education.Students, Health Occupations: Individuals enrolled in a school or formal educational program in the health occupations.Codes of Ethics: Systematic statements of principles or rules of appropriate professional conduct, usually established by professional societies.Program Evaluation: Studies designed to assess the efficacy of programs. They may include the evaluation of cost-effectiveness, the extent to which objectives are met, or impact.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Ethics, Medical: The principles of professional conduct concerning the rights and duties of the physician, relations with patients and fellow practitioners, as well as actions of the physician in patient care and interpersonal relations with patient families.Patient Education as Topic: The teaching or training of patients concerning their own health needs.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Societies: Organizations composed of members with common interests and whose professions may be similar.Social Support: Support systems that provide assistance and encouragement to individuals with physical or emotional disabilities in order that they may better cope. Informal social support is usually provided by friends, relatives, or peers, while formal assistance is provided by churches, groups, etc.Education, Public Health Professional: Education and training in PUBLIC HEALTH for the practice of the profession.Occupational Diseases: Diseases caused by factors involved in one's employment.Occupational Health: The promotion and maintenance of physical and mental health in the work environment.Staff Development: The process by which the employer promotes staff performance and efficiency consistent with management goals and objectives.Professional Impairment: The inability of a health professional to provide proper professional care of patients due to his or her physical and/or mental disability.Internet: A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.Canada: The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.Workplace: Place or physical location of work or employment.Social Responsibility: The obligations and accountability assumed in carrying out actions or ideas on behalf of others.Ethics, Dental: The principles of proper professional conduct concerning the rights and duties of the dentist, relations with patients and fellow practitioners, as well as actions of the dentist in patient care and interpersonal relations with patient families. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Australia: The smallest continent and an independent country, comprising six states and two territories. Its capital is Canberra.Career Mobility: The upward or downward mobility in an occupation or the change from one occupation to another.Ethics, Nursing: The principles of proper professional conduct concerning the rights and duties of nurses themselves, their patients, and their fellow practitioners, as well as their actions in the care of patients and in relations with their families.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Physician Impairment: The physician's inability to practice medicine with reasonable skill and safety to the patient due to the physician's disability. Common causes include alcohol and drug abuse, mental illness, physical disability, and senility.BrazilExercise Therapy: A regimen or plan of physical activities designed and prescribed for specific therapeutic goals. Its purpose is to restore normal musculoskeletal function or to reduce pain caused by diseases or injuries.Family Practice: A medical specialty concerned with the provision of continuing, comprehensive primary health care for the entire family.Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Recreation: Activity engaged in for pleasure.Cooperative Behavior: The interaction of two or more persons or organizations directed toward a common goal which is mutually beneficial. An act or instance of working or acting together for a common purpose or benefit, i.e., joint action. (From Random House Dictionary Unabridged, 2d ed)Personnel Turnover: A change or shift in personnel due to reorganization, resignation, or discharge.Pilot Projects: Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.Needs Assessment: Systematic identification of a population's needs or the assessment of individuals to determine the proper level of services needed.Health Education: Education that increases the awareness and favorably influences the attitudes and knowledge relating to the improvement of health on a personal or community basis.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Decision Making: The process of making a selective intellectual judgment when presented with several complex alternatives consisting of several variables, and usually defining a course of action or an idea.Patient Satisfaction: The degree to which the individual regards the health care service or product or the manner in which it is delivered by the provider as useful, effective, or beneficial.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Education, Graduate: Studies beyond the bachelor's degree at an institution having graduate programs for the purpose of preparing for entrance into a specific field, and obtaining a higher degree.Teaching: The educational process of instructing.Tennis: A game played by two or four players with rackets and an elastic ball on a level court divided by a low net.Rural Health Services: Health services, public or private, in rural areas. The services include the promotion of health and the delivery of health care.Faculty: The teaching staff and members of the administrative staff having academic rank in an educational institution.Program Development: The process of formulating, improving, and expanding educational, managerial, or service-oriented work plans (excluding computer program development).Physical Endurance: The time span between the beginning of physical activity by an individual and the termination because of exhaustion.Role: The expected and characteristic pattern of behavior exhibited by an individual as a member of a particular social group.Professional-Family Relations: The interactions between the professional person and the family.Quality of Health Care: The levels of excellence which characterize the health service or health care provided based on accepted standards of quality.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Physicians, Family: Those physicians who have completed the education requirements specified by the American Academy of Family Physicians.EnglandWalking: An activity in which the body advances at a slow to moderate pace by moving the feet in a coordinated fashion. This includes recreational walking, walking for fitness, and competitive race-walking.Public Health: Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.Nurse's Role: The expected function of a member of the nursing profession.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Mental Health: The state wherein the person is well adjusted.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Employment: The state of being engaged in an activity or service for wages or salary.Evidence-Based Medicine: An approach of practicing medicine with the goal to improve and evaluate patient care. It requires the judicious integration of best research evidence with the patient's values to make decisions about medical care. This method is to help physicians make proper diagnosis, devise best testing plan, choose best treatment and methods of disease prevention, as well as develop guidelines for large groups of patients with the same disease. (from JAMA 296 (9), 2006)Leadership: The function of directing or controlling the actions or attitudes of an individual or group with more or less willing acquiescence of the followers.Self Concept: A person's view of himself.Body Mass Index: An indicator of body density as determined by the relationship of BODY WEIGHT to BODY HEIGHT. BMI=weight (kg)/height squared (m2). BMI correlates with body fat (ADIPOSE TISSUE). Their relationship varies with age and gender. For adults, BMI falls into these categories: below 18.5 (underweight); 18.5-24.9 (normal); 25.0-29.9 (overweight); 30.0 and above (obese). (National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)Societies, Medical: Societies whose membership is limited to physicians.Obesity: A status with BODY WEIGHT that is grossly above the acceptable or desirable weight, usually due to accumulation of excess FATS in the body. The standards may vary with age, sex, genetic or cultural background. In the BODY MASS INDEX, a BMI greater than 30.0 kg/m2 is considered obese, and a BMI greater than 40.0 kg/m2 is considered morbidly obese (MORBID OBESITY).Longitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Personnel Loyalty: Dedication or commitment shown by employees to organizations or institutions where they work.Certification: Compliance with a set of standards defined by non-governmental organizations. Certification is applied for by individuals on a voluntary basis and represents a professional status when achieved, e.g., certification for a medical specialty.Adaptation, Psychological: A state of harmony between internal needs and external demands and the processes used in achieving this condition. (From APA Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)Health Care Surveys: Statistical measures of utilization and other aspects of the provision of health care services including hospitalization and ambulatory care.Moral Obligations: Duties that are based in ETHICS, rather than in law.Personnel, Hospital: The individuals employed by the hospital.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Physical Therapy Department, Hospital: Hospital department which is responsible for the administration and provision of diagnostic and medical rehabilitation services to restore or improve the functional capacity of the patient.Occupations: Crafts, trades, professions, or other means of earning a living.Lawyers: Persons whose profession is to give legal advice and assistance to clients and represent them in legal matters. (American Heritage Dictionary, 3d ed)Referral and Consultation: The practice of sending a patient to another program or practitioner for services or advice which the referring source is not prepared to provide.Motivation: Those factors which cause an organism to behave or act in either a goal-seeking or satisfying manner. They may be influenced by physiological drives or by external stimuli.Practice Guidelines as Topic: Directions or principles presenting current or future rules of policy for assisting health care practitioners in patient care decisions regarding diagnosis, therapy, or related clinical circumstances. The guidelines may be developed by government agencies at any level, institutions, professional societies, governing boards, or by the convening of expert panels. The guidelines form a basis for the evaluation of all aspects of health care and delivery.Personal Autonomy: Self-directing freedom and especially moral independence. An ethical principle holds that the autonomy of persons ought to be respected. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Students, Medical: Individuals enrolled in a school of medicine or a formal educational program in medicine.Perception: The process by which the nature and meaning of sensory stimuli are recognized and interpreted.Disability Evaluation: Determination of the degree of a physical, mental, or emotional handicap. The diagnosis is applied to legal qualification for benefits and income under disability insurance and to eligibility for Social Security and workmen's compensation benefits.Health Manpower: The availability of HEALTH PERSONNEL. It includes the demand and recruitment of both professional and allied health personnel, their present and future supply and distribution, and their assignment and utilization.Accelerometry: Qualitative and quantitative measurement of MOVEMENT patterns.Disabled Persons: Persons with physical or mental disabilities that affect or limit their activities of daily living and that may require special accommodations.Parents: Persons functioning as natural, adoptive, or substitute parents. The heading includes the concept of parenthood as well as preparation for becoming a parent.Career Choice: Selection of a type of occupation or profession.Students, Nursing: Individuals enrolled in a school of nursing or a formal educational program leading to a degree in nursing.Counseling: The giving of advice and assistance to individuals with educational or personal problems.Health Services Accessibility: The degree to which individuals are inhibited or facilitated in their ability to gain entry to and to receive care and services from the health care system. Factors influencing this ability include geographic, architectural, transportational, and financial considerations, among others.Interdisciplinary Communication: Communication, in the sense of cross-fertilization of ideas, involving two or more academic disciplines (such as the disciplines that comprise the cross-disciplinary field of bioethics, including the health and biological sciences, the humanities, and the social sciences and law). Also includes problems in communication stemming from differences in patterns of language usage in different academic or medical disciplines.Sports Medicine: The field of medicine concerned with physical fitness and the diagnosis and treatment of injuries sustained in exercise and sports activities.Patient Rights: Fundamental claims of patients, as expressed in statutes, declarations, or generally accepted moral principles. (Bioethics Thesaurus) The term is used for discussions of patient rights as a group of many rights, as in a hospital's posting of a list of patient rights.Educational Measurement: The assessing of academic or educational achievement. It includes all aspects of testing and test construction.Social Values: Abstract standards or empirical variables in social life which are believed to be important and/or desirable.General Practitioners: Physicians whose practice is not restricted to a specific field of MEDICINE.Environment Design: The structuring of the environment to permit or promote specific patterns of behavior.Health Services Needs and Demand: Health services required by a population or community as well as the health services that the population or community is able and willing to pay for.Schools: Educational institutions.Physician's Practice Patterns: Patterns of practice related to diagnosis and treatment as especially influenced by cost of the service requested and provided.Athletes: Individuals who have developed skills, physical stamina and strength or participants in SPORTS or other physical activities.Pharmacists: Those persons legally qualified by education and training to engage in the practice of pharmacy.Models, Educational: Theoretical models which propose methods of learning or teaching as a basis or adjunct to changes in attitude or behavior. These educational interventions are usually applied in the fields of health and patient education but are not restricted to patient care.Inservice Training: On the job training programs for personnel carried out within an institution or agency. It includes orientation programs.Guidelines as Topic: A systematic statement of policy rules or principles. Guidelines may be developed by government agencies at any level, institutions, professional societies, governing boards, or by convening expert panels. The text may be cursive or in outline form but is generally a comprehensive guide to problems and approaches in any field of activity. For guidelines in the field of health care and clinical medicine, PRACTICE GUIDELINES AS TOPIC is available.Boxing: A two-person sport in which the fists are skillfully used to attack and defend.Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Psychiatry: The medical science that deals with the origin, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of mental disorders.Medical Staff, Hospital: Professional medical personnel approved to provide care to patients in a hospital.Self Efficacy: Cognitive mechanism based on expectations or beliefs about one's ability to perform actions necessary to produce a given effect. It is also a theoretical component of behavior change in various therapeutic treatments. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 1994)Personnel Selection: The process of choosing employees for specific types of employment. The concept includes recruitment.Mentors: Senior professionals who provide guidance, direction and support to those persons desirous of improvement in academic positions, administrative positions or other career development situations.Psychometrics: Assessment of psychological variables by the application of mathematical procedures.Social Work: The use of community resources, individual case work, or group work to promote the adaptive capacities of individuals in relation to their social and economic environments. It includes social service agencies.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Primary Care Nursing: Techniques or methods of patient care used by nurses as primary careproviders.Education, Nursing, Continuing: Educational programs designed to inform nurses of recent advances in their fields.Occupational Medicine: Medical specialty concerned with the promotion and maintenance of the physical and mental health of employees in occupational settings.Caregivers: Persons who provide care to those who need supervision or assistance in illness or disability. They may provide the care in the home, in a hospital, or in an institution. Although caregivers include trained medical, nursing, and other health personnel, the concept also refers to parents, spouses, or other family members, friends, members of the clergy, teachers, social workers, fellow patients.Attitude: An enduring, learned predisposition to behave in a consistent way toward a given class of objects, or a persistent mental and/or neural state of readiness to react to a certain class of objects, not as they are but as they are conceived to be.Athletic Injuries: Injuries incurred during participation in competitive or non-competitive sports.Nursing Staff: Personnel who provide nursing service to patients in an organized facility, institution, or agency.Patient Advocacy: Promotion and protection of the rights of patients, frequently through a legal process.Self Care: Performance of activities or tasks traditionally performed by professional health care providers. The concept includes care of oneself or one's family and friends.Information Services: Organized services to provide information on any questions an individual might have using databases and other sources. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)History, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.
... and ameliorating physical, emotional, or cognitive problems. The MBI-HSS scales are Emotional Exhaustion, Depersonalization, ... Assess professional burnout in human service, education, business, and government professions. Assess and validate the three- ... Each scale measures its own unique dimension of burnout. Scales should not be combined to form a single burnout scale. Scales ... among Spanish professionals. Revista de Saude Publica, 39(1): 1-8. Maslach, C. & Jackson, S. E. (1982). Burnout in health ...
In another conceptualization, burnout is thought to comprise emotional exhaustion, physical fatigue, and cognitive weariness. A ... Research shows that intervention actually may worsen the professional efficacy of one who originally had low professional ... Cognitive dispositional factors implicated in depression have also been found to be implicated in burnout. One cause of burnout ... Burnout prevention programs have traditionally focused on cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), cognitive restructuring, didactic ...
... burnout is thought to comprise emotional exhaustion, physical fatigue, and cognitive weariness.[5] A third conceptualization ... Research shows that intervention actually may worsen the professional efficacy of one who originally had low professional ... Burnout prevention programs have traditionally focused on cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), cognitive restructuring, didactic ... The job demands-resources model has implications for burnout, as measured by the Oldenburg Burnout Inventory (OLBI). Physical ...
Objectives include maintaining professional conduct, productivity, and altruism, in addition to preventing burnout, depression ... and of cognitive-social learning models as well, such as the cognitive-social learning model of relapse prevention by Marlatt. ... and also in the maintenance of an optimal level of physical and mental health. Obstacles to effective communication include ... Doctors started including a cognitive component to pain, leading to the gate control theory and the discovery of the placebo ...
... general physical and cognitive immaturity, dietary imbalance and inadequate physical fitness. Among young athletes, common ... Coaches and parents can put a lot of pressure on a youth athlete which can cause injury, burnout, over-scheduling, and the ... there has been a longstanding association between repetitive head injuries and subsequent brain damage amongst professional ... Of these athletes, 11% are at risk for a mental disorder, while 40% risk delayed physical maturation. An issue unique to youth ...
Cognitive behavioral therapy can help patients learn to live better by teaching techniques that can help patients live better. ... Examples of topics include avoiding caregiver burnout, managing conflict, dealing with grief and loss in everyday life, ... These services include direct programs to help Parkinson's families with counseling, physical and voice therapies. The national ... Over 38,000 subscribers, including 17,000 medical professionals across the United States, read news articles, scientific ...
... sport practice can improve general cognitive abilities. When requiring sufficient cognitive demands, physical activity seems to ... Burnout is studied in many different athletic populations (e.g., coaches), but it is a major problem in youth sports and ... Coaches have become more open to the idea of having a good professional athlete -coach relationship. This relationship will be ... College of Physical Education) by Robert Werner Schulte in 1920. The lab measured physical abilities and aptitude in sport, and ...
Common selection tools include ability tests (e.g., cognitive, physical, or psycho-motor), knowledge tests, personality tests, ... I/O psychology is one of the 15 recognized specialties in professional psychology in the United States. It is represented by ... Research on job changing indicates that mobility between, but not within, organizations is associated with burnout. I/O ... Learning outcomes can be organized into three broad categories: cognitive, skill-based, and affective outcomes. Cognitive ...
"Effect of heartfulness meditation on burnout, emotional wellness, and telomere length in health care professionals". Journal ... Physical Activity[edit]. Physical activity is a very good way to help improve your mental health as well as your physical ... "Social Cognitive & Affective Neuroscience. 8 (1): 1-3. doi:10.1093/scan/nss104. PMC 3541496.. ... They benefited in aspects of burnouts and emotional wellness. People with anxiety disorders participated in a stress-reduction ...
... s, like other professionals, may have to, or choose to, continue their education after they qualify, a process known as ... Teachers are also at high risk for occupational burnout. A 2000 study found that 42% of UK teachers experienced occupational ... Hartmut, J. (1978). Supportive dimensions of teacher behavior in relationship to pupil emotional cognitive processes. ... spanking or paddling or caning or strapping or birching the student in order to cause physical pain) was one of the most common ...
3.2 Occupational stress and physical health *3.2.1 Cardiovascular disease. *3.2.2 Job-related burnout and cardiovascular health ... 331-338). Sarasota, FL: Professional Resource Exchange. *^ Society for Occupational Health Psychology. Field of OHP. What is ... Cognitive behavioral interventions have tended to have greatest impact on stress reduction.[133] ... Job-related burnout and cardiovascular health[edit]. Main article: Occupational burnout. There is evidence from a prospective ...
Professionals and homemakers viewed their job as a calling, while clerical workers were the least likely to do so. Clerical ... Depression is a well-documented enemy of zest, and its toll on productivity and physical health is enormous. The prevention or ... It is suggested that cultivating zest in school teachers could help combat teacher burnout. Overall, zest is said to be one ... This possibly reflects the influence of social and cognitive maturation and certain needs during different developmental ...
... physical and mental health and well-being music performance anxiety (MPA, or stage fright) motivation, burnout, and depression ... Cognitive musicology can be differentiated from the fields of music cognition and cognitive neuroscience of music by a ... "Cortical activations in primary and secondary motor areas for complex bimanual movements in professional pianists". Brain Res. ... Cognitive musicology is a branch of cognitive science concerned with computationally modeling musical knowledge with the goal ...
Job demands: the physical, psychological, social, or organizational aspects of a job that require sustained physical and/or ... Cognitive load Industrial and organizational psychology Kick the cat Kiss up kick down Occupational health psychology ... The lack of trade and professional unions in the workplace. Inter-company rivalries caused by the efforts of companies to ... Demerouti, E.; Bakker, A. B.; Nachreiner, F.; Schaufeli, W. B. (2001). "The job demands-resources model of burnout". Journal of ...
... professional burnout, bereavement, and negotiating stressful situations. Often considered synonymous, the terms "consultation" ... adaptation and adjustment to chronic illness or physical disability, concerns regarding the psychological factors in physical ... Other coping interventions include cognitive-behavioral and strength-building interventions, operant reward programs, ... This need to address physical, mental, and social needs (among many others) lead to health psychology, and from this the field ...
... similar to later developments in physical therapy. The earliest documented origins of actual physical therapy as a professional ... In a Polish study, job burnout among the physical therapists was manifested by increased emotional exhaustion and decreased ... strength and endurance as well as cognitive and sensory processing/integration. Physical therapists are closely involved in the ... Most U.S. states have physical therapy practice acts that recognize both physical therapists (PT) and physical therapist ...
"Effect of heartfulness meditation on burnout, emotional wellness, and telomere length in health care professionals". Journal ... Physical activityEdit. For some people, physical exercise can improve mental as well as physical health. Playing sports, ... "Social Cognitive & Affective Neuroscience. 8 (1): 1-3. doi:10.1093/scan/nss104. PMC 3541496. PMID 22956677.. ... The Lancet Global Health[142] acknowledges that there are well over 1,000 published articles covering physical health in Africa ...
Professionals who have struggled with the affliction include authors such as F. Scott Fitzgerald and Joseph Mitchell, comic ... Writing portal Burnout (psychology) Analysis paralysis Process theory of composition Clark, Irene. "Invention." Concepts in ... physical illness, depression, the end of a relationship, financial pressures, or a sense of failure.[citation needed] The ... his concentration on right brain techniques speaks to cognitive theory approach similar to Rico's and a more practical advice ...
Riproduci file multimediale Occupational stress and occupational burnout are highly prevalent among health professionals. Some ... There is some evidence that cognitive-behavioral therapy, relaxation training and therapy (including meditation and massage), ... physical rehabilitation therapists, athletic trainers, physiotherapy technicians, orthotic technicians, prosthetic technicians ... Health care professionals are also likely to experience sleep deprivation due to their jobs. Many health care professionals are ...
Cognitive analytic therapy (CAT) combines cognitive and psychoanalytic approaches and has been adapted for use with individuals ... These teams have several important functions including reducing therapist burnout, providing therapy for the therapists, ... exercise and physical fitness, including team sports; occupational therapy techniques, including creative arts; having ... DBT grew dramatically in popularity among mental health professionals following the publication of Linehan's treatment manuals ...
Further studies have linked professional burnout to neuroticism, and extraversion to enduring positive work experience. When it ... Trofimova, I.N.; Sulis, W (2016). "Benefits of distinguishing between physical and social-verbal aspects of behaviour: an ... and cognitive ability for predicting important life outcomes" (PDF). Perspectives on Psychological Science. 2 (4): 313-345. doi ... "IPIP Home". Costa, P. T., & McCrae, R. R. (1992). Neo PI-R professional manual. Odessa, FL: Psychological. "Research Reports on ...
Tips for avoiding burnout are to know the signs and have a plan in place to combat the burnout. Some signs: Anger or Annoyance ... This is despite the fact that the group that relied on round the clock migrant home care workers had lower physical functioning ... At follow-up, those who were caregivers throughout the study had the highest scores for both cognitive functions but also the ... has also found that most family caregivers said they had not received training about medication management from a professional ...
Physical support may also be used and is manifested through the use of touch. Patients described feelings of connection when ... Hem, Marit Helene; Heggen, Kristin (2003). "Being professional and being human: One nurse's relationship with a psychiatric ... Limit setting also protects the nurse from "burnout", preserving personal stability-thus promoting a quality relationship. ... These include psychotherapy interventions, such as cognitive behavioural therapy, family therapy, and less commonly other ...
... poorer pre-illness physical fitness, attributing symptoms to physical illness, belief that a long recovery time is needed, as ... Cognitive symptoms are mainly from deficits in attention, memory, and reaction time. The deficits are in the range of 0.5 to ... Historically, many professionals within the medical community were unfamiliar with CFS, or did not recognize it as a real ... Reflecting a stereotype that CFS mainly affected yuppies, the implication was that CFS was a form of burnout. Use of the term ...
Enlisting professional tutors was an option available only to the wealthy. Homeschooling declined in the 19th and 20th ... and Homeschool Burnout.[citation needed] Simultaneously, other authors published books questioning the premises and efficacy of ... unit studies are supported to varying degrees by research by constructivist learning theories and situated cognitive theories.[ ... studies by other researchers and a review of over 8,000 studies bearing on early childhood education and the physical and ...
Examples include depression and burnout seen in healthcare professionals, an unhealthy focus on others to the detriment of ... A major characteristic of Jain belief is the emphasis on the consequences of not only physical but also mental behaviors. One's ... Selective investment theory proposes that close social bonds, and associated emotional, cognitive, and neurohormonal mechanisms ... but physical health and longevity as well, attributable to the activity and social integration it encourages.[31][34][35][36] ...
Professional and social demands in todays hectic society can easily lead to burnout. And although it is gender-neutral, the ... Experts say emotional exhaustion and physical and cognitive fatigue are both signs of burnout. These symptoms are often caused ... Professional and social demands in todays hectic society can easily lead to burnout. And although it is gender-neutral, the ... Home » News » Changing Face of Burnout In Middle-Aged Women. Changing Face of Burnout In Middle-Aged Women. By Rick Nauert PhD ...
Working in health care has some peculiarities that place a heavy burden of physical, cognitive and emotional demands on ... Cherniss C. Professional burnout in the human service organizations. New York: Praeger; 1980. [ Links ]. 34. Schulz R, Greenley ... Investigation of factors influencing burnout levels in professional and private lives of nurses. Int J Nurs Stud. 2003;40:807- ... Lent J. The impact of work setting, demographic factors, and personality factors on burnout of professional counselors [ ...
Explain the physical, emotional, and cognitive responses to humor.. • Initiate mindfulness-based therapy for children and ... Recognize the personal, professional, and financial effects of clinician burnout.. • Elaborate on the health effects of ... Tax Benefits The entire cost of your subscription may be tax-deductible when used for professional purposes. Please consult ... Our Topical Collections take an interdisciplinary team-based approach to key topics by offering healthcare professionals access ...
... mental and physical health, performance, and interactions with citizens. Mental health at the workplace has become a concern ... Mental health at the workplace has become a concern due to the costs of depression, anxiety, burnout, and even suicide, which ... To ameliorate occupational health, it is therefore crucial to identify stress and burnout levels on a regular basis. However, ... This study aims to: (i) conduct a literature review to identify questionnaires used to assess occupational stress and burnout ...
... job burnout concerns physical, intellectual, emotional, social, and spiritual health of professionals. At the physical level, ... some evidences suggest that daily spiritual experiences might mitigate physical, cognitive, and emotional forms of burnout in ... Measurement of Burnout and Its Prevalence Among Health Care Professionals. The level of burnout measured by the Maslach Burnout ... Burnout Among Health Professionals. Health professionals are at high risk of belonging to vulnerable groups prone to burnout, ...
... and ameliorating physical, emotional, or cognitive problems. The MBI-HSS scales are Emotional Exhaustion, Depersonalization, ... Assess professional burnout in human service, education, business, and government professions. Assess and validate the three- ... Each scale measures its own unique dimension of burnout. Scales should not be combined to form a single burnout scale. Scales ... among Spanish professionals. Revista de Saude Publica, 39(1): 1-8. Maslach, C. & Jackson, S. E. (1982). Burnout in health ...
Burnout is not just a state of mind. Psychological research shows it to be a condition that leads to distinctive changes in the ... mounting scientific evidence shows that burnout takes a profound physical toll that cascades well beyond our professional lives ... Cognitive Costs. Beyond changes to the brains anatomy, scientists are beginning to understand how burnout can affect peoples ... Burnout and the Brain. Cover Story. Burnout and the Brain. Alexandra Michel ...
The Maslach Burnout Inventory and Areas of Worklife Survey psychological assessments combine to measure burnout in the worklife ... Use the gold standard for measuring occupational burnout. ... and treating physical, emotional or cognitive problems. ... Uses of the Maslach Burnout Toolkit. *Assess professional burnout in human services, education, business, government, and other ... Maslach Burnout Inventory Translations. Areas of Worklife Translations. About Burnout. Burnout is a syndrome of emotional ...
Social Work Professional Development * Certificates * Addictions * Child and Youth Mental Health * Cognitive Behaviour Therapy ... memories or physical sensations. Its goal is the development of psychological flexibility, achieved through the use of ... improve clinical outcomes and reduce burnout. ... Mindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy: Core Concepts and Practice ... Acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) is a psychotherapy model considered to be a more modern version of cognitive behaviour ...
Professional sexual misconduct. Physical illness. Neurologic disorders and other problems related to physician health and well- ... Physical illness. Stress management (support) Cognitive impairment. Physician health and well-being. ... Physical illness. Stress, burnout, and other occupational health problems. Malpractice litigation (support). ... Physical illness. Neurological disorders with problems related to physical health and well-being ...
Third, health and wellbeing measures, including physical, mental, cognitive, and affective outcomes were eligible. We included ... professionals suggest that cultivating resilience and mindfulness may assist in preventing psychological distress burnout and ... evaluating physical, mental, cognitive, affective, and interpersonal outcomes. ... Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT). In addition to mindfulness meditation, MBCT encourages acceptant non-judgmental ...
... implications for physical and cognitive performance ... How to measure coach burnout? - An evaluation of three burnout ... An interpretative phenomenological analysis of how professional dance teachers implement psychological skills training in ... Examining Perceptions of Teammates Burnout and Training Hours in Athlete Burnout. Ralph Appleby, Paul Davis, Louise Davis, ... Usefulness of the Athlete Burnout Questionnaire (ABQ) as a screening tool for the detection of clinically relevant burnout ...
Consequences of Brain Burnout. Unhealthy habits have dire consequences for long-term brain health, function and cognitive ... Failing to maximise our cognitive performance carries a high personal and professional economic burden as well. ... Just like physical health, investing in your brain health as early and as long as possible will increase your ability to build ... Myth 2: Cognitive function decline is inevitable.. Until recently, cognitive decline in healthy adults was viewed as an ...
burnout: a state of physical, emotional, psychological, and spiritual exhaustion. resulting from occupational stress. For ... Newell, J.M. & MacNeil, G.A. (2010). Professional burnout, vicarious trauma, secondary traumatic stress, and compassion fatigue ... particularly cognitive behavioral and mindfulness based approaches which are emerging as best practice.. SELF CARE GROUPS. : ... BURNOUT. and COMPASSION FATIGUE. BURNOUT. is a progressive state that occurs cumulatively over time. It is related to ...
In another conceptualization, burnout is thought to comprise emotional exhaustion, physical fatigue, and cognitive weariness. A ... Research shows that intervention actually may worsen the professional efficacy of one who originally had low professional ... Cognitive dispositional factors implicated in depression have also been found to be implicated in burnout. One cause of burnout ... Burnout prevention programs have traditionally focused on cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), cognitive restructuring, didactic ...
... burnout is thought to comprise emotional exhaustion, physical fatigue, and cognitive weariness.[5] A third conceptualization ... Research shows that intervention actually may worsen the professional efficacy of one who originally had low professional ... Burnout prevention programs have traditionally focused on cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), cognitive restructuring, didactic ... The job demands-resources model has implications for burnout, as measured by the Oldenburg Burnout Inventory (OLBI). Physical ...
Although she does not support mandatory cognitive testing, she said professional evaluations - which include case reviews, as ... could serve as the basis for determining whether physical examination, visual testing or cognitive skills assessments are ... Physician burnout also should factor into retirement decisions, Ullman said.. "Historically, people have retired when they felt ... Although she does not support mandatory cognitive testing, she said professional evaluations - which include case reviews, as ...
... explores the theme of rumination from work in intensive care professionals in the latest edition of the Journal of Intensive ... The study also showed that 32 per cent of the sample felt their mental and physical health were deteriorating, an incidence ... Almost 100 doctors and nurses from four NHS ICUs in the United Kingdom completed a questionnaire on burnout, ICU-related stress ... By identifying those who had a tendency to worry, NHS trusts could develop cognitive behavioural therapies and relaxation ...
Do cognitive stimulation activities with your loved one. Listening to music, word puzzles and memory games can easily be done ... Maintain your own physical and mental health. Exercise, respite and other activities can reduce stress. Seek medical help if ... Avoid caregiver burnout. Make time for yourself. Join caregiver support groups. Pursue interests beyond your caregiving role, ... Hugs, hand massage and other gentle physical contact will help your loved one feel connected and loved. ...
burnout is a combination of physical fatigue, emotional exhaustion and cognitive weariness. It is also conceptualised as a ... For 60 years, AIIC has represented professional interpreters worldwide and set standards for the practice of the profession... ... Cognitive fatigue was the index with the lowest value. Staff interpreters reported more burnout and mental/physical exhaustion ... Physical Parameters. The aims of this part of the study were to characterise the physical conditions under which simultaneous ...
OCCUPATIONAL BURNOUT AND ITS OVERLAPPING EFFECT WITH DEPRESSION AND ANXIETY.(ORIGINAL PAPER, Report) by International Journal ... It should be emphasized that burnout is linked to impairments in cognitive functioning [9] and impacts the mental and physical ... sense of professional inefficacy, which is related to evaluation of an employees own professional competences (6 items); -- ... Burnout Burnout was measured using the Polish version of the Maslach Burnout Inventory--General Scale (MBI-GS) [35] and the ...
Historical and conceptual development of burnout. In: Schaufeli WB, Maslach C, Marek T, eds. Professional burnout: recent ... Cognitive appraisal as a mediator in the relationship between stress and burnout. Work Stress2013;27:351-67.doi:10.1080/ ... whereas others suffer significant physical and psychological health symptoms, including burn-out.43 Our work is in line with ... The final component of burn-out reported by some of the participants was a diminished sense of their own personal, professional ...
... and reduces medical errors and professional burnout. Physicians are the therapy they deliver. The empathetic physician is to ... Empathy is the cognitive attribute that facilitates understanding of patient experiences, concerns, and perspectives, combined ... The nature of suffering: physical, psychological, social, and spiritual aspects. NLN Publ. 1992;1-10. ... Clinicians often do not recognize the signs and symptoms of dying, chief among which are cognitive dysfunction, anorexia, ...
The professional experience and the physical and cognitive skills also presented themselves as mediators of productivity j . ... burnout, and health in general 1 , 5 , 7 , 14 , 24 , 27 . A mediocre psychosocial environment was a risk factor for the ... This deterioration manifests itself in increased levels of physiological stress and cognitive stress 1 , 9 , 11 , 15 on workers ... Age was a risk factor for the performance of tasks with heavier physical loads 15 and also a resistance and increased ...
The friendly professional caregiver can energize your aging parent. This person is trained to support the emotional, physical ... Dont risk exposing yourself to dangerous burnout. Instead, a professional caregiver has the training to offer daily assistance ... As your elderly loved one ages, its essential to keep stimulating his or her cognitive and social abilities. ... A professional caregiver provides non-medical support for your aging parent. This person is a fully-trained professional. ...
  • Just as the impact of burnout stifles healthy professional growth, emerging research shows that the chronic psychosocial stress that characterizes burnout not only impairs people's personal and social functioning, it also can overwhelm their cognitive skills and neuroendocrine systems - eventually leading to distinctive changes in the anatomy and functioning of the brain. (psychologicalscience.org)
  • Bowen, Preventing School Failure ABSTRACT: Students who have sustained a traumatic brain injury (TBI) return to the school setting with a range of cognitive, psychosocial, and physical deficits that can significantly affect their academic functioning. (pearltrees.com)
  • 13 of the 17 studies are dealing with the efficacy of psychotherapy and psychosocial interventions for the reduction of burnout (partly in combination with other techniques). (egms.de)
  • AIIC commissioned a Workload Study on interpreter stress and burnout which was completed in December 2001. (aiic.net)
  • Other causes include time pressure, workload, poor school ethos, interpersonal relationships with faculty members, the physical environment and lack of prospects. (questia.com)
  • The New York Times reported some research on burnout and found that burnout with kids relates to their workload, along with their parents' propensity to experience it. (lifehack.org)
  • A previous study demonstrated that brush cutters handle a heavy physical workload and that they must have good cardiorespiratory capacity to do it safely. (ilo.org)
  • There is a risk of burnout when a discrepancy prevails between the expectations of a motivated employee and the reality of an unfavourable work situation. (oshwiki.eu)
  • They discovered some middle-aged women had high levels of burnout followed by recovery, whereas others had increasing, decreasing, or stable levels over the research period. (psychcentral.com)
  • Several research studies have aimed to study different aspects of burnout (e.g., stages, volume, etc.) and identified holistic approaches to cope with emerging challenges. (springer.com)
  • There is no order of importance among the several identified environmental and personal factors related to aspects of burnout. (questia.com)
  • Using cognitive behavioral therapy and psychodynamic techniques, Janine has made it her life's goal to help individuals, couples, and families have more joy-filled relationships with themselves and with those they love. (meierclinics.com)
  • Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is a type of talk psychotherapy that's designed to change the ingrained, negative thought patterns that could be affecting your reaction to certain stressful situations. (squareup.com)
  • A good choice for building coping skills is to work with someone trained in cognitive-behavioral therapy. (webmd.com)
  • In addition, dedicated mindfulness practice by practitioners has been shown to increase compassion, improve clinical outcomes and reduce burnout. (wlu.ca)
  • Moreover, longitudinal research has shown that different patterns of scores at a given time may predict organizational outcomes and burnout rates a year later . (thefreelibrary.com)
  • Furthermore, numerous studies show that despite the efforts of the family and the medical professionals, the outcomes of rehabilitation programs are not satisfactory [ 7 , 8 ]. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Most of the research on the relationship between burnout and patient safety outcomes has used self-reported perceptions of patient safety, an important but relatively weak outcome measure. (ahrq.gov)
  • These findings support previous studies showing a relationship between burnout and poorer perceptions of safety and represent the strongest evidence to date demonstrating a link between clinician burnout and patient safety outcomes. (ahrq.gov)
  • The work demands of critical care can be a major cause of stress in intensive care unit (ICU) professionals and lead to poor health outcomes. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Majority of admissions into ICU are unplanned emergencies where ICU professionals are often required to rapidly attend to complex situations of uncertain outcomes. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Due to the lack of consensus on a universal definition of burnout and the assessment criteria, the prevalence estimates for burnout are not comparable across countries and studies. (oshwiki.eu)
  • Until recently, estimates for the prevalence of burnout ranged from 10%-70% among nurses and 30%-50% among physicians, nurse practitioners, and physician assistants. (ahrq.gov)
  • The genetic factors that cause increased sleep problems during times of stress seem to be the same as those that make people with intrusive and ruminative thoughts have a higher prevalence of insomnia, according to a research abstract that will be presented on Tuesday, June 9, at SLEEP 2009, the 23rd Annual Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies. (news-medical.net)
  • This important study expands our understanding of burnout in working women, in terms of both patterns of development and relation to various stressors and individual factors," said Susan G. Kornstein, M.D., editor-in-chief of Journal of Women's Health . (psychcentral.com)
  • One cause of burnout includes stressors that a person is unable to cope with fully. (wikipedia.org)
  • The 6-item Professional Efficacy scale measures feelings of competence and successful achievement in one's work. (wikipedia.org)
  • Professional efficacy consists of feelings of competence, successful achievement, and accomplishment in one's work, which diminishes as burnout develops. (oshwiki.eu)
  • However, authors have postulated that diminished professional efficacy may be a separate but related entity . (oshwiki.eu)
  • and 3) reduced professional efficacy," the WHO explained the term's definition. (foxbusiness.com)
  • This study examines the role of Perceived Emotional Intelligence (PEI) (measured by the Spanish version of the Trait Meta-Mood Scale) and general self-efficacy as predictors of burnout and engagement dimensions. (psicothema.com)
  • The unique contribution of PEI dimensions on the burnout and engagement scores is explored, controlling the influence of demographics characteristics, perceived stress and self-efficacy. (psicothema.com)
  • Results indicate the relevance of PEI as an individual resource and support the hypothesis that this construct accounted for non-overlapping variance on academic burnout and engagement above and beyond classic constructs predicting these criterion measures such as perceived stress and general self-efficacy. (psicothema.com)
  • and, using the PSQ-Op and other questionnaires, (iii) to identify operational stress, burnout, and distress levels among Portuguese police officers. (frontiersin.org)
  • Factorial analysis revealed two dimensions defined as social and work issues, which were associated with measures of distress and burnout. (frontiersin.org)
  • Traumatic stress differs in a number of ways, including the event being unexpected, causing distress, possibly overwhelming coping capacity, and having the potential to alter the way one views the world, found K. Lewis in "Surviving the Trenches: The Impact of Trauma Exposure on Correctional Professionals. (ca.gov)
  • The physical data measured was booth size, CO 2 and oxygen levels, relative humidity, temperature, lighting intensity, ventilation and fresh air flow, covering a sample of 47 booths (23 mobile, 24 permanent) in which the subjects in the physiological survey were working. (aiic.net)
  • They linked up with the Israeli National Institute for Occupational and Environmental Health for certain aspects of the AIIC study, in particular measurement of the physical and physiological data. (aiic.net)
  • I aim to respond effectively to your needs at whatever level is required, be it conscious or subconscious, feeling, cognitive, behavioural, physiological or spiritual. (hypnotherapy-directory.org.uk)
  • The 1976 publication of Maslach's article "Burned-Out," published in the magazine Human Behavior , generated a huge public response - popularizing the concept of burnout within the popular press. (psychologicalscience.org)
  • In his landmark book, Beyond Burnout (Routledge), Cary Cherniss used intensive case study research to identify factors most likely to lead to teacher burnout: Lack of adequate preparation for dealing with the kinds of learning and behavior problems that teachers face in the classroom. (pearltrees.com)
  • In the study, published in late 2014, the investigators propose that the linkage between burnout and safety is driven by both a lack of motivation or energy and impaired cognitive function. (ahrq.gov)
  • The relationship of clergy burnout to self-compassion and other personality dimensions. (kspope.com)
  • Increasing self-compassion may prevent clergy burnout. (kspope.com)
  • Excerpt: ' A training programme was developed for trainee cognitive-behavioural therapists using adapted versions of compassion-focused therapy interventions. (kspope.com)
  • The analysis identified six super-ordinate themes: (1) the varied nature of the supervisor image, (2) blocks and their overcoming, (3) increased compassion and regulation of emotion, (4) impact on cognitive processes, (5) internalization and integration, and (6) professional and personal benefit. (kspope.com)
  • Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. (psychcentral.com)
  • Clinical psychologist Rosalind Kalb, vice president of the professional resource center at the National Multiple Sclerosis Society, says, "Even in the best marriages, it's hard. (webmd.com)
  • I am absolutely dedicated to on-going excellence in my clinical practice, so you can be sure that I am continuing on-going professional training, utilising up-to-date theory and practice, and subjecting myself to regular review. (hypnotherapy-directory.org.uk)
  • A study published in the Annals of Internal Medicine Monday showed physician burnout is costing the U.S. an estimated $4.6 billion on average every year due to factors such as turnover rate and productivity decrease, according to U.S. News & Report . (foxbusiness.com)
  • Physician burnout is known to be associated with increased physician turnover and reduced productivity,' said Joel Goh, an assistant professor at the National University of Singapore who was a co-author of the study. (foxbusiness.com)
  • Researchers said employers should consider addressing physician burnout and implement protocols to prevent and treat it. (foxbusiness.com)
  • Physician burnout has been shown to influence patient care, patient satisfaction and patient safety, and burnout is positively correlated with a physician self-reporting suboptimal care. (npsf.org)
  • Physician burnout is a persistent problem that can have serious effects on safe practice. (ahrq.gov)
  • The most widely used definition of burnout is the one provided by Schaufeli et al. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • Therefore the dimensional definition of burnout has been criticized for lacking a theoretical basis in its grouping of different concepts . (oshwiki.eu)
  • Evidence suggests that the etiology of burnout is multifactorial, with dispositional factors playing an important, long-overlooked role. (wikipedia.org)
  • An extensive body of research shows a substantial list of antecedents of burnout and divides them into 2 separate groups of situational and individual factors . (thefreelibrary.com)
  • According to research, environmental sources of burnout include societal expectations and institute factors, which are beyond the direct control of the teacher or the educational establishment. (questia.com)
  • The estimated cost did not include other burnout-related factors, such as malpractice lawsuits or a decrease in patient care quality. (foxbusiness.com)
  • Recognize at least 2 ways in which stress impairs healthcare provision, including provider-based (e.g., burnout, myopic focus) and patient-based (e.g., non-adherence, underutilization of services, inefficient use of healthcare encounters) factors. (pennmedicine.org)
  • This workshop is designed to help identify the risk factors related to professional interactions. (cpduk.co.uk)
  • Use the combined MBI + AWS Toolkit to measure both the extent and likely cause of burnout. (mindgarden.com)
  • Burnout contributes to decreased well-being, lower retention rates, higher staff turnover, low morale, and a lack of cohesiveness in the organization as a whole. (npsf.org)
  • Constant worrying, loss of humor, forgetfulness, lack of creativity, and trouble thinking clearly are some cognitive symptoms of stress. (chsrcw.com)
  • Lack of autonomy Teachers think of themselves as professionals, and they resent interference from administrators, parents, board members, and others who usually have little idea about what it's like to teach today. (pearltrees.com)
  • Stephen Rath details current research and Traditional Chinese Medicine theory to show how Qigong practice can support cognitive functioning, as well as emotional and physical wellbeing, in people with dementia. (jkp.com)
  • With varying definitions of the term, all researchers generally agree that teachers who have trouble coping with the stress of the job experience burnout. (questia.com)
  • It appears that teachers with an external focus of control are more likely to experience burnout, compared to those with an internal focus of control. (questia.com)
  • Clearly this requires a certain personal hardiness to deal with but eventually even the most hardened professional will experience burnout and be affected by what they see and hear at work. (wedorecover.com)