A group of enzymes removing the SERINE- or THREONINE-bound phosphate groups from a wide range of phosphoproteins, including a number of enzymes which have been phosphorylated under the action of a kinase. (Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992)
Phosphoproteins are proteins that have been post-translationally modified with the addition of a phosphate group, usually on serine, threonine or tyrosine residues, which can play a role in their regulation, function, interaction with other molecules, and localization within the cell.
An enzyme that deactivates glycogen phosphorylase a by releasing inorganic phosphate and phosphorylase b, the inactive form. EC 3.1.3.17.
A phosphoprotein phosphatase subtype that is comprised of a catalytic subunit and two different regulatory subunits. At least two genes encode isoforms of the protein phosphatase catalytic subunit, while several isoforms of regulatory subunits exist due to the presence of multiple genes and the alternative splicing of their mRNAs. Protein phosphatase 2 acts on a broad variety of cellular proteins and may play a role as a regulator of intracellular signaling processes.
A group of hydrolases which catalyze the hydrolysis of monophosphoric esters with the production of one mole of orthophosphate. EC 3.1.3.
A eukayrotic protein serine-threonine phosphatase subtype that dephosphorylates a wide variety of cellular proteins. The enzyme is comprised of a catalytic subunit and regulatory subunit. Several isoforms of the protein phosphatase catalytic subunit exist due to the presence of multiple genes and the alternative splicing of their mRNAs. A large number of proteins have been shown to act as regulatory subunits for this enzyme. Many of the regulatory subunits have additional cellular functions.
A specific inhibitor of phosphoserine/threonine protein phosphatase 1 and 2a. It is also a potent tumor promoter. (Thromb Res 1992;67(4):345-54 & Cancer Res 1993;53(2):239-41)
The introduction of a phosphoryl group into a compound through the formation of an ester bond between the compound and a phosphorus moiety.
A family of enzymes that catalyze the conversion of ATP and a protein to ADP and a phosphoprotein.
A compound that, along with its isomer, Cleland's reagent (DITHIOTHREITOL), is used for the protection of sulfhydryl groups against oxidation to disulfides and for the reduction of disulfides to sulfhydryl groups.
Compounds of the general formula R-O-R arranged in a ring or crown formation.
A trace element with atomic symbol Mn, atomic number 25, and atomic weight 54.94. It is concentrated in cell mitochondria, mostly in the pituitary gland, liver, pancreas, kidney, and bone, influences the synthesis of mucopolysaccharides, stimulates hepatic synthesis of cholesterol and fatty acids, and is a cofactor in many enzymes, including arginase and alkaline phosphatase in the liver. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual 1992, p2035)
An enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of an orthophosphoric monoester and water to an alcohol and orthophosphate. EC 3.1.3.2.
An enzyme group that specifically dephosphorylates phosphotyrosyl residues in selected proteins. Together with PROTEIN-TYROSINE KINASE, it regulates tyrosine phosphorylation and dephosphorylation in cellular signal transduction and may play a role in cell growth control and carcinogenesis.
A trihydroxy bile salt that is used as a digestive aid in dietary supplements. It is used in culture media and in conjunction with PAPAIN and PANCREATIN.
The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.
The sum of the weight of all the atoms in a molecule.
A class of glucosyltransferases that catalyzes the degradation of storage polysaccharides, such as glucose polymers, by phosphorolysis in animals (GLYCOGEN PHOSPHORYLASE) and in plants (STARCH PHOSPHORYLASE).
A toxic compound, isolated from the Spanish fly or blistering beetle (Lytta (Cantharis) vesicatoria) and other insects. It is a potent and specific inhibitor of protein phosphatases 1 (PP1) and 2A (PP2A). This compound can produce severe skin inflammation, and is extremely toxic if ingested orally.
Proteins which bind calmodulin. They are found in many tissues and have a variety of functions including F-actin cross-linking properties, inhibition of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase and calcium and magnesium ATPases.
Five-membered heterocyclic ring structures containing an oxygen in the 1-position and a nitrogen in the 3-position, in distinction from ISOXAZOLES where they are at the 1,2 positions.
Unstable isotopes of phosphorus that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. P atoms with atomic weights 28-34 except 31 are radioactive phosphorus isotopes.
A source of inorganic fluoride which is used topically to prevent dental caries.
Conversion of an inactive form of an enzyme to one possessing metabolic activity. It includes 1, activation by ions (activators); 2, activation by cofactors (coenzymes); and 3, conversion of an enzyme precursor (proenzyme or zymogen) to an active enzyme.
A metallic element that has the atomic symbol Mg, atomic number 12, and atomic weight 24.31. It is important for the activity of many enzymes, especially those involved in OXIDATIVE PHOSPHORYLATION.
Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.
The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.
A characteristic feature of enzyme activity in relation to the kind of substrate on which the enzyme or catalytic molecule reacts.
A phosphoprotein that was initially identified as a major target of DOPAMINE activated ADENYLYL CYCLASE in the CORPUS STRIATUM. It regulates the activities of PROTEIN PHOSPHATASE-1 and PROTEIN KINASE A, and it is a key mediator of the biochemical, electrophysiological, transcriptional, and behavioral effects of DOPAMINE.
**Mercaptoethanol, also known as β-mercaptoethanol or BME, is an organosulfur compound with the formula HOCH2CH2SH, functionally serving as a reducing agent and a sulfhydryl group protector in biochemical and molecular biology applications.**
The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.
Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.
An adenine nucleotide containing three phosphate groups esterified to the sugar moiety. In addition to its crucial roles in metabolism adenosine triphosphate is a neurotransmitter.
A CALCIUM and CALMODULIN-dependent serine/threonine protein phosphatase that is composed of the calcineurin A catalytic subunit and the calcineurin B regulatory subunit. Calcineurin has been shown to dephosphorylate a number of phosphoproteins including HISTONES; MYOSIN LIGHT CHAIN; and the regulatory subunits of CAMP-DEPENDENT PROTEIN KINASES. It is involved in the regulation of signal transduction and is the target of an important class of immunophilin-immunosuppressive drug complexes.
An enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of ATP and PHOSPHORYLASE B to ADP and PHOSPHORYLASE A.
Contractile tissue that produces movement in animals.
A phenothiazine with actions similar to CHLORPROMAZINE. It is used as an antipsychotic and an antiemetic.
The chemical and physical integrity of a pharmaceutical product.
An adenine nucleotide containing one phosphate group which is esterified to both the 3'- and 5'-positions of the sugar moiety. It is a second messenger and a key intracellular regulator, functioning as a mediator of activity for a number of hormones, including epinephrine, glucagon, and ACTH.
Electrophoresis in which a polyacrylamide gel is used as the diffusion medium.
Compounds and molecular complexes that consist of very large numbers of atoms and are generally over 500 kDa in size. In biological systems macromolecular substances usually can be visualized using ELECTRON MICROSCOPY and are distinguished from ORGANELLES by the lack of a membrane structure.
An enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of D-glucose 6-phosphate and water to D-glucose and orthophosphate. EC 3.1.3.9.
Enzymes that catalyze the reversible reduction of alpha-carboxyl group of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A to yield MEVALONIC ACID.
A large lobed glandular organ in the abdomen of vertebrates that is responsible for detoxification, metabolism, synthesis and storage of various substances.
Intracellular fluid from the cytoplasm after removal of ORGANELLES and other insoluble cytoplasmic components.
A heat-stable, low-molecular-weight activator protein found mainly in the brain and heart. The binding of calcium ions to this protein allows this protein to bind to cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases and to adenyl cyclase with subsequent activation. Thereby this protein modulates cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP levels.
Compounds or agents that combine with an enzyme in such a manner as to prevent the normal substrate-enzyme combination and the catalytic reaction.
Small chromosomal proteins (approx 12-20 kD) possessing an open, unfolded structure and attached to the DNA in cell nuclei by ionic linkages. Classification into the various types (designated histone I, histone II, etc.) is based on the relative amounts of arginine and lysine in each.
The normality of a solution with respect to HYDROGEN ions; H+. It is related to acidity measurements in most cases by pH = log 1/2[1/(H+)], where (H+) is the hydrogen ion concentration in gram equivalents per liter of solution. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)
Linear POLYPEPTIDES that are synthesized on RIBOSOMES and may be further modified, crosslinked, cleaved, or assembled into complex proteins with several subunits. The specific sequence of AMINO ACIDS determines the shape the polypeptide will take, during PROTEIN FOLDING, and the function of the protein.
Presence of warmth or heat or a temperature notably higher than an accustomed norm.
Genetically identical individuals developed from brother and sister matings which have been carried out for twenty or more generations or by parent x offspring matings carried out with certain restrictions. This also includes animals with a long history of closed colony breeding.
A subtype of non-receptor protein tyrosine phosphatases that contain two SRC HOMOLOGY DOMAINS. Mutations in the gene for protein tyrosine phosphatase, non-receptor type 11 are associated with NOONAN SYNDROME.
A sub-class of protein tyrosine phosphatases that contain an additional phosphatase activity which cleaves phosphate ester bonds on SERINE or THREONINE residues that are located on the same protein.
A subclass of dual specificity phosphatases that play a role in the progression of the CELL CYCLE. They dephosphorylate and activate CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASES.
A subtype of non-receptor protein tyrosine phosphatases that includes two distinctive targeting motifs; an N-terminal motif specific for the INSULIN RECEPTOR, and a C-terminal motif specific for the SH3 domain containing proteins. This subtype includes a hydrophobic domain which localizes it to the ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM.
A Src-homology domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase found in the CYTOSOL of hematopoietic cells. It plays a role in signal transduction by dephosphorylating signaling proteins that are activated or inactivated by PROTEIN-TYROSINE KINASES.
A phosphoprotein phosphatase that is specific for MYOSIN LIGHT CHAINS. It is composed of three subunits, which include a catalytic subunit, a myosin binding subunit, and a third subunit of unknown function.
The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.
The muscle tissue of the HEART. It is composed of striated, involuntary muscle cells (MYOCYTES, CARDIAC) connected to form the contractile pump to generate blood flow.
The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.
A subcategory of protein tyrosine phosphatases that occur in the CYTOPLASM. Many of the proteins in this category play a role in intracellular signal transduction.
Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.
A subclass of receptor-like protein tryosine phosphatases that contain multiple extracellular immunoglobulin G-like domains and fibronectin type III-like domains. An additional memprin-A5-mu domain is found on some members of this subclass.
The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.
Monomeric subunits of primarily globular ACTIN and found in the cytoplasmic matrix of almost all cells. They are often associated with microtubules and may play a role in cytoskeletal function and/or mediate movement of the cell or the organelles within the cell.
The process in which substances, either endogenous or exogenous, bind to proteins, peptides, enzymes, protein precursors, or allied compounds. Specific protein-binding measures are often used as assays in diagnostic assessments.
A phosphomonoesterase involved in the synthesis of triacylglycerols. It catalyzes the hydrolysis of phosphatidates with the formation of diacylglycerols and orthophosphate. EC 3.1.3.4.
Phosphopeptides are short peptide sequences that contain phosphorylated amino acid residues, typically serine, threonine or tyrosine, and play crucial roles in intracellular signaling transduction pathways by modulating protein-protein interactions and enzymatic activities.
A dual specificity phosphatase subtype that plays a role in intracellular signal transduction by inactivating MITOGEN-ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASES. It has specificity for P38 MITOGEN-ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASES and JNK MITOGEN-ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASES.
The phosphoric acid ester of serine.
The phosphoric acid ester of threonine. Used as an identifier in the analysis of peptides, proteins, and enzymes.
Inorganic salts of phosphoric acid.
A family of synaptic vesicle-associated proteins involved in the short-term regulation of NEUROTRANSMITTER release. Synapsin I, the predominant member of this family, links SYNAPTIC VESICLES to ACTIN FILAMENTS in the presynaptic nerve terminal. These interactions are modulated by the reversible PHOSPHORYLATION of synapsin I through various signal transduction pathways. The protein is also a substrate for cAMP- and CALCIUM-CALMODULIN-DEPENDENT PROTEIN KINASES. It is believed that these functional properties are also shared by synapsin II.
A non-essential amino acid. In animals it is synthesized from PHENYLALANINE. It is also the precursor of EPINEPHRINE; THYROID HORMONES; and melanin.
Structurally related forms of an enzyme. Each isoenzyme has the same mechanism and classification, but differs in its chemical, physical, or immunological characteristics.
A subclass of receptor-like protein tryosine phosphatases that contain a single cytosolic protein tyrosine phosphate domain and multiple extracellular fibronectin III-like domains.
The degree of similarity between sequences of amino acids. This information is useful for the analyzing genetic relatedness of proteins and species.
Proteins and peptides that are involved in SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION within the cell. Included here are peptides and proteins that regulate the activity of TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS and cellular processes in response to signals from CELL SURFACE RECEPTORS. Intracellular signaling peptide and proteins may be part of an enzymatic signaling cascade or act through binding to and modifying the action of other signaling factors.
The insertion of recombinant DNA molecules from prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic sources into a replicating vehicle, such as a plasmid or virus vector, and the introduction of the resultant hybrid molecules into recipient cells without altering the viability of those cells.
Oxyvanadium ions in various states of oxidation. They act primarily as ion transport inhibitors due to their inhibition of Na(+)-, K(+)-, and Ca(+)-ATPase transport systems. They also have insulin-like action, positive inotropic action on cardiac ventricular muscle, and other metabolic effects.
A subclass of receptor-like protein tryosine phosphatases that contain short highly glycosylated extracellular domains and two active cytosolic protein tyrosine phosphatase domains.
Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.
A non-essential amino acid occurring in natural form as the L-isomer. It is synthesized from GLYCINE or THREONINE. It is involved in the biosynthesis of PURINES; PYRIMIDINES; and other amino acids.
A subcategory of phosphohydrolases that are specific for MITOGEN-ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASES. They play a role in the inactivation of the MAP KINASE SIGNALING SYSTEM.
Proteins found in any species of virus.
A ubiquitous phosphoprotein that serves as an intracellular substrate for a variety of SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION PATHWAYS. PHOSPHORYLATION of stathmin occurs during CELL CYCLE progression, and stathmin functions as a microtubule-destabilizing protein that promotes MICROTUBULE depolymerization during INTERPHASE and late MITOSIS. Stathmin is expressed at very high levels in a variety of human CANCERS.
Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.
The parts of a macromolecule that directly participate in its specific combination with another molecule.
Recombinant proteins produced by the GENETIC TRANSLATION of fused genes formed by the combination of NUCLEIC ACID REGULATORY SEQUENCES of one or more genes with the protein coding sequences of one or more genes.
A group of enzymes that catalyzes the phosphorylation of serine or threonine residues in proteins, with ATP or other nucleotides as phosphate donors.
A subcategory of protein tyrosine phosphatases that contain SH2 type SRC HOMOLOGY DOMAINS. Many of the proteins in this class are recruited to specific cellular targets such as a cell surface receptor complexes via their SH2 domain.
An amino acid that occurs in endogenous proteins. Tyrosine phosphorylation and dephosphorylation plays a role in cellular signal transduction and possibly in cell growth control and carcinogenesis.
Proteins prepared by recombinant DNA technology.
Analysis of PEPTIDES that are generated from the digestion or fragmentation of a protein or mixture of PROTEINS, by ELECTROPHORESIS; CHROMATOGRAPHY; or MASS SPECTROMETRY. The resulting peptide fingerprints are analyzed for a variety of purposes including the identification of the proteins in a sample, GENETIC POLYMORPHISMS, patterns of gene expression, and patterns diagnostic for diseases.
A dual specificity phosphatase subtype that plays a role in intracellular signal transduction by inactivating MITOGEN-ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASES. It has specificity for EXTRACELLULAR SIGNAL-REGULATED MAP KINASES and is primarily localized to the CYTOSOL.
A subtype of non-receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase that is closely-related to PROTEIN TYROSINE PHOSPHATASE, NON-RECEPTOR TYPE 1. Alternative splicing of the mRNA for this phosphatase results in the production at two gene products, one of which includes a C-terminal nuclear localization domain that may be involved in the transport of the protein to the CELL NUCLEUS. Although initially referred to as T-cell protein tyrosine phosphatase the expression of this subtype occurs widely.
Serologic tests in which a positive reaction manifested by visible CHEMICAL PRECIPITATION occurs when a soluble ANTIGEN reacts with its precipitins, i.e., ANTIBODIES that can form a precipitate.
An egg yolk phosphoglycoprotein which contains about 90% of the yolk protein phosphorus. It is synthesized in the liver of the hen and transferred to the developing oocyte, where it is bound to lipoproteins within the yolk granules.
Proteins which are found in membranes including cellular and intracellular membranes. They consist of two types, peripheral and integral proteins. They include most membrane-associated enzymes, antigenic proteins, transport proteins, and drug, hormone, and lectin receptors.
Electrophoresis in which a second perpendicular electrophoretic transport is performed on the separate components resulting from the first electrophoresis. This technique is usually performed on polyacrylamide gels.
The level of protein structure in which combinations of secondary protein structures (alpha helices, beta sheets, loop regions, and motifs) pack together to form folded shapes called domains. Disulfide bridges between cysteines in two different parts of the polypeptide chain along with other interactions between the chains play a role in the formation and stabilization of tertiary structure. Small proteins usually consist of only one domain but larger proteins may contain a number of domains connected by segments of polypeptide chain which lack regular secondary structure.
Protein kinases that catalyze the PHOSPHORYLATION of TYROSINE residues in proteins with ATP or other nucleotides as phosphate donors.
Identification of proteins or peptides that have been electrophoretically separated by blot transferring from the electrophoresis gel to strips of nitrocellulose paper, followed by labeling with antibody probes.
Cyclic heptapeptides found in MICROCYSTIS and other CYANOBACTERIA. Hepatotoxic and carcinogenic effects have been noted. They are sometimes called cyanotoxins, which should not be confused with chemicals containing a cyano group (CN) which are toxic.
Tartrates are salts or esters of tartaric acid, primarily used in pharmaceutical industry as buffering agents, and in medical laboratories for the precipitation of proteins.
A negatively-charged extracellular matrix protein that plays a role in the regulation of BONE metabolism and a variety of other biological functions. Cell signaling by osteopontin may occur through a cell adhesion sequence that recognizes INTEGRIN ALPHA-V BETA-3.
A basic element found in nearly all organized tissues. It is a member of the alkaline earth family of metals with the atomic symbol Ca, atomic number 20, and atomic weight 40. Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the body and combines with phosphorus to form calcium phosphate in the bones and teeth. It is essential for the normal functioning of nerves and muscles and plays a role in blood coagulation (as factor IV) and in many enzymatic processes.
RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.
Proteins found in the nucleus of a cell. Do not confuse with NUCLEOPROTEINS which are proteins conjugated with nucleic acids, that are not necessarily present in the nucleus.
'Nerve tissue proteins' are specialized proteins found within the nervous system's biological tissue, including neurofilaments, neuronal cytoskeletal proteins, and neural cell adhesion molecules, which facilitate structural support, intracellular communication, and synaptic connectivity essential for proper neurological function.
The uptake of naked or purified DNA by CELLS, usually meaning the process as it occurs in eukaryotic cells. It is analogous to bacterial transformation (TRANSFORMATION, BACTERIAL) and both are routinely employed in GENE TRANSFER TECHNIQUES.
Within a eukaryotic cell, a membrane-limited body which contains chromosomes and one or more nucleoli (CELL NUCLEOLUS). The nuclear membrane consists of a double unit-type membrane which is perforated by a number of pores; the outermost membrane is continuous with the ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM. A cell may contain more than one nucleus. (From Singleton & Sainsbury, Dictionary of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, 2d ed)
Surface ligands, usually glycoproteins, that mediate cell-to-cell adhesion. Their functions include the assembly and interconnection of various vertebrate systems, as well as maintenance of tissue integration, wound healing, morphogenic movements, cellular migrations, and metastasis.
Proteins found in the microtubules.
A lipid phosphatase that acts on phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate to regulate various SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION PATHWAYS. It modulates CELL GROWTH PROCESSES; CELL MIGRATION; and APOPTOSIS. Mutations in PTEN are associated with COWDEN DISEASE and PROTEUS SYNDROME as well as NEOPLASTIC CELL TRANSFORMATION.
An essential amino acid occurring naturally in the L-form, which is the active form. It is found in eggs, milk, gelatin, and other proteins.
An enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of phosphorylated, inactive glycogen synthase D to active dephosphoglycogen synthase I. EC 3.1.3.42.
Transport proteins that carry specific substances in the blood or across cell membranes.
Any of various enzymatically catalyzed post-translational modifications of PEPTIDES or PROTEINS in the cell of origin. These modifications include carboxylation; HYDROXYLATION; ACETYLATION; PHOSPHORYLATION; METHYLATION; GLYCOSYLATION; ubiquitination; oxidation; proteolysis; and crosslinking and result in changes in molecular weight and electrophoretic motility.
Components of a cell produced by various separation techniques which, though they disrupt the delicate anatomy of a cell, preserve the structure and physiology of its functioning constituents for biochemical and ultrastructural analysis. (From Alberts et al., Molecular Biology of the Cell, 2d ed, p163)
The lipid- and protein-containing, selectively permeable membrane that surrounds the cytoplasm in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.
A group of enzymes that are dependent on CYCLIC AMP and catalyze the phosphorylation of SERINE or THREONINE residues on proteins. Included under this category are two cyclic-AMP-dependent protein kinase subtypes, each of which is defined by its subunit composition.
Glycoproteins which contain sialic acid as one of their carbohydrates. They are often found on or in the cell or tissue membranes and participate in a variety of biological activities.
A subclass of receptor-like protein tryosine phosphatases that contain an extracellular fibronectin III-like domain along with a carbonic anhydrase-like domain.
(Pyruvate dehydrogenase (lipoamide))-phosphate phosphohydrolase. A mitochondrial enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolytic removal of a phosphate on a specific seryl hydroxyl group of pyruvate dehydrogenase, reactivating the enzyme complex. EC 3.1.3.43.
A subtype of non-receptor protein tyrosine phosphatases that is characterized by the presence of a N-terminal catalytic domain and a large C-terminal domain that is enriched in PROLINE, GLUTAMIC ACID, SERINE, and THREONINE residues (PEST sequences). The phosphatase subtype is ubiquitously expressed and implicated in the regulation of a variety of biological processes such as CELL MOVEMENT; CYTOKINESIS; focal adhesion disassembly; and LYMPHOCYTE ACTIVATION.
Single-stranded complementary DNA synthesized from an RNA template by the action of RNA-dependent DNA polymerase. cDNA (i.e., complementary DNA, not circular DNA, not C-DNA) is used in a variety of molecular cloning experiments as well as serving as a specific hybridization probe.
A dual specificity phosphatase subtype that plays a role in intracellular signal transduction by inactivating MITOGEN-ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASES. It has specificity for EXTRACELLULAR SIGNAL-REGULATED MAP KINASES.
CELL LINES derived from the CV-1 cell line by transformation with a replication origin defective mutant of SV40 VIRUS, which codes for wild type large T antigen (ANTIGENS, POLYOMAVIRUS TRANSFORMING). They are used for transfection and cloning. (The CV-1 cell line was derived from the kidney of an adult male African green monkey (CERCOPITHECUS AETHIOPS).)
Cells grown in vitro from neoplastic tissue. If they can be established as a TUMOR CELL LINE, they can be propagated in cell culture indefinitely.
A ubiquitous casein kinase that is comprised of two distinct catalytic subunits and dimeric regulatory subunit. Casein kinase II has been shown to phosphorylate a large number of substrates, many of which are proteins involved in the regulation of gene expression.
The region of an enzyme that interacts with its substrate to cause the enzymatic reaction.
A broad category of carrier proteins that play a role in SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION. They generally contain several modular domains, each of which having its own binding activity, and act by forming complexes with other intracellular-signaling molecules. Signal-transducing adaptor proteins lack enzyme activity, however their activity can be modulated by other signal-transducing enzymes
An serine-threonine protein kinase that requires the presence of physiological concentrations of CALCIUM and membrane PHOSPHOLIPIDS. The additional presence of DIACYLGLYCEROLS markedly increases its sensitivity to both calcium and phospholipids. The sensitivity of the enzyme can also be increased by PHORBOL ESTERS and it is believed that protein kinase C is the receptor protein of tumor-promoting phorbol esters.
A subcategory of protein tyrosine phosphatases that are bound to the cell membrane. They contain cytoplasmic tyrosine phosphatase domains and extracellular protein domains that may play a role in cell-cell interactions by interacting with EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX components. They are considered receptor-like proteins in that they appear to lack specific ligands.
Immunologic method used for detecting or quantifying immunoreactive substances. The substance is identified by first immobilizing it by blotting onto a membrane and then tagging it with labeled antibodies.
The biosynthesis of RNA carried out on a template of DNA. The biosynthesis of DNA from an RNA template is called REVERSE TRANSCRIPTION.
Regions of AMINO ACID SEQUENCE similarity in the SRC-FAMILY TYROSINE KINASES that fold into specific functional tertiary structures. The SH1 domain is a CATALYTIC DOMAIN. SH2 and SH3 domains are protein interaction domains. SH2 usually binds PHOSPHOTYROSINE-containing proteins and SH3 interacts with CYTOSKELETAL PROTEINS.
A type of CELL NUCLEUS division by means of which the two daughter nuclei normally receive identical complements of the number of CHROMOSOMES of the somatic cells of the species.
A species of the genus SACCHAROMYCES, family Saccharomycetaceae, order Saccharomycetales, known as "baker's" or "brewer's" yeast. The dried form is used as a dietary supplement.
A subtype of non-receptor protein tyrosine phosphatases that is characterized by the presence of an amino-terminal FERM domain, an intervening region containing five different PDZ domains, and a carboxyl-terminal phosphatase domain. In addition to playing a role as a regulator of the FAS RECEPTOR activity this subtype interacts via its PDZ and FERM domains with a variety of INTRACELLULAR SIGNALING PROTEINS and CYTOSKELETAL PROTEINS.
The arrangement of two or more amino acid or base sequences from an organism or organisms in such a way as to align areas of the sequences sharing common properties. The degree of relatedness or homology between the sequences is predicted computationally or statistically based on weights assigned to the elements aligned between the sequences. This in turn can serve as a potential indicator of the genetic relatedness between the organisms.
A specialized CONNECTIVE TISSUE that is the main constituent of the SKELETON. The principle cellular component of bone is comprised of OSTEOBLASTS; OSTEOCYTES; and OSTEOCLASTS, while FIBRILLAR COLLAGENS and hydroxyapatite crystals form the BONE MATRIX.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
A subtype of non-receptor protein tyrosine phosphatases that is characterized by the presence of an amino-terminal FERM domain, an intervening region containing one or more PDZ domains, and a carboxyl-terminal phosphatase domain. Expression of this phosphatase subtype has been observed in BONE MARROW; fetal LIVER; LYMPH NODES; and T LYMPHOCYTES.
Proteins conjugated with nucleic acids.
Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in enzyme synthesis.
The part of a cell that contains the CYTOSOL and small structures excluding the CELL NUCLEUS; MITOCHONDRIA; and large VACUOLES. (Glick, Glossary of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 1990)
Short sequences (generally about 10 base pairs) of DNA that are complementary to sequences of messenger RNA and allow reverse transcriptases to start copying the adjacent sequences of mRNA. Primers are used extensively in genetic and molecular biology techniques.
A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria (GRAM-NEGATIVE FACULTATIVELY ANAEROBIC RODS) commonly found in the lower part of the intestine of warm-blooded animals. It is usually nonpathogenic, but some strains are known to produce DIARRHEA and pyogenic infections. Pathogenic strains (virotypes) are classified by their specific pathogenic mechanisms such as toxins (ENTEROTOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI), etc.
The type species of LYSSAVIRUS causing rabies in humans and other animals. Transmission is mostly by animal bites through saliva. The virus is neurotropic multiplying in neurons and myotubes of vertebrates.
Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.
Genetically engineered MUTAGENESIS at a specific site in the DNA molecule that introduces a base substitution, or an insertion or deletion.
Proteins that control the CELL DIVISION CYCLE. This family of proteins includes a wide variety of classes, including CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASES, mitogen-activated kinases, CYCLINS, and PHOSPHOPROTEIN PHOSPHATASES as well as their putative substrates such as chromatin-associated proteins, CYTOSKELETAL PROTEINS, and TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS.
Partial proteins formed by partial hydrolysis of complete proteins or generated through PROTEIN ENGINEERING techniques.
Separation technique in which the stationary phase consists of ion exchange resins. The resins contain loosely held small ions that easily exchange places with other small ions of like charge present in solutions washed over the resins.
A species of CERCOPITHECUS containing three subspecies: C. tantalus, C. pygerythrus, and C. sabeus. They are found in the forests and savannah of Africa. The African green monkey (C. pygerythrus) is the natural host of SIMIAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUS and is used in AIDS research.
An enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of nitrophenyl phosphates to nitrophenols. At acid pH it is probably ACID PHOSPHATASE (EC 3.1.3.2); at alkaline pH it is probably ALKALINE PHOSPHATASE (EC 3.1.3.1). EC 3.1.3.41.
Chromatography on non-ionic gels without regard to the mechanism of solute discrimination.

Inducible NO synthase: role in cellular signalling. (1/5093)

The discovery of endothelium-derived relaxing factor and its identification as nitric oxide (NO) was one of the most exciting discoveries of biomedical research in the 1980s. Besides its potent vasodilatory effects, NO was found under certain circumstances to be responsible for the killing of microorganisms and tumour cells by activated macrophages and to act as a novel, unconventional type of neurotransmitter. In 1992, Science picked NO as the 'Molecule of the Year', and over the past years NO has become established as a universal intercellular messenger that acutely affects important signalling pathways and, on a more long-term scale, modulates gene expression in target cells. These actions will form the focus of the present review.  (+info)

Activation of Src in human breast tumor cell lines: elevated levels of phosphotyrosine phosphatase activity that preferentially recognizes the Src carboxy terminal negative regulatory tyrosine 530. (2/5093)

Elevated levels of Src kinase activity have been reported in a number of human cancers, including colon and breast cancer. We have analysed four human breast tumor cell lines that exhibit high levels of Src kinase activity, and have determined that these cell lines also exhibit a high level of a phosphotyrosine phosphatase activity that recognizes the Src carboxy-terminal P-Tyr530 negative regulatory site. Total Src kinase activity in these cell lines is elevated as much as 30-fold over activity in normal control cells and specific activity is elevated as much as 5.6-fold. When the breast tumor cells were grown in the presence of the tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor vanadate, Src kinase activity was reduced in all four breast tumor cell lines, suggesting that Src was being activated by a phosphatase which could recognize the Tyr530 negative regulatory site. In fractionated cell extracts from the breast tumor cells, we found elevated levels of a membrane associated tyrosine phosphatase activity that preferentially dephosphorylated a Src family carboxy-terminal phosphopeptide containing the regulatory tyrosine 530 site. Src was hypophosphorylated in vivo at tyrosine 530 in at least two of the tumor cell lines, further suggesting that Src was being activated by a phosphatase in these cells. In preliminary immunoprecipitation and antibody depletion experiments, we were unable to correlate the major portion of this phosphatase activity with several known phosphatases.  (+info)

The MAP kinase ERK2 inhibits the cyclic AMP-specific phosphodiesterase HSPDE4D3 by phosphorylating it at Ser579. (3/5093)

The extracellular receptor stimulated kinase ERK2 (p42(MAPK))-phosphorylated human cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase PDE4D3 at Ser579 and profoundly reduced ( approximately 75%) its activity. These effects could be reversed by the action of protein phosphatase PP1. The inhibitory state of PDE4D3, engendered by ERK2 phosphorylation, was mimicked by the Ser579-->Asp mutant form of PDE4D3. In COS1 cells transfected to express PDE4D3, challenge with epidermal growth factor (EGF) caused the phosphorylation and inhibition of PDE4D3. This effect was blocked by the MEK inhibitor PD98059 and was not apparent using the Ser579-->Ala mutant form of PDE4D3. Challenge of HEK293 and F442A cells with EGF led to the PD98059-ablatable inhibition of endogenous PDE4D3 and PDE4D5 activities. EGF challenge of COS1 cells transfected to express PDE4D3 increased cAMP levels through a process ablated by PD98059. The activity of the Ser579-->Asp mutant form of PDE4D3 was increased by PKA phosphorylation. The transient form of the EGF-induced inhibition of PDE4D3 is thus suggested to be due to feedback regulation by PKA causing the ablation of the ERK2-induced inhibition of PDE4D3. We identify a novel means of cross-talk between the cAMP and ERK signalling pathways whereby cell stimuli that lead to ERK2 activation may modulate cAMP signalling.  (+info)

All-trans-retinoic acid inhibits Jun N-terminal kinase by increasing dual-specificity phosphatase activity. (4/5093)

Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs) are serine-threonine kinases that play a critical role in the regulation of cell growth and differentiation. We previously observed that JNK activity is suppressed by all-trans-retinoic acid (t-RA), a ligand for retinoic acid nuclear receptors (RARs), in normal human bronchial epithelial cells, which are growth inhibited by t-RA. In this study, we investigated the mechanism by which t-RA inhibits JNK and the possibility that this signaling event is blocked in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. Virtually all NSCLC cell lines are resistant to the growth-inhibitory effects of t-RA, and a subset of them have a transcriptional defect specific to retinoid nuclear receptors. We found that in NSCLC cells expressing functional retinoid receptors, serum-induced JNK phosphorylation and activity were inhibited by t-RA in a bimodal pattern, transiently within 30 min and in a sustained fashion beginning at 12 h. Retinoid receptor transcriptional activation was required for the late, but not the early, suppression of JNK activity. t-RA inhibited serum-induced JNK activity by blocking mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase kinase 4-induced signaling events. This effect of t-RA was phosphatase dependent and involved an increase in the expression of the dual-specificity MAP kinase phosphatase 1 (MKP-1). t-RA did not activate MKP-1 expression or inhibit JNK activity in a NSCLC cell line with retinoid receptors that are refractory to ligand-induced transcriptional activation. These findings provide the first evidence that t-RA suppresses JNK activity by inhibiting JNK phosphorylation. Retinoid receptor transcriptional activation was necessary for the sustained inhibition of JNK activity by t-RA, and this signaling event was disrupted in NSCLC cells with retinoid receptors that are refractory to ligand-induced transcriptional activation.  (+info)

The yeast ser/thr phosphatases sit4 and ppz1 play opposite roles in regulation of the cell cycle. (5/5093)

Yeast cells overexpressing the Ser/Thr protein phosphatase Ppz1 display a slow-growth phenotype. These cells recover slowly from alpha-factor or nutrient depletion-induced G1 arrest, showing a considerable delay in bud emergence as well as in the expression of the G1 cyclins Cln2 and Clb5. Therefore, an excess of the Ppz1 phosphatase interferes with the normal transition from G1 to S phase. The growth defect is rescued by overexpression of the HAL3/SIS2 gene, encoding a negative regulator of Ppz1. High-copy-number expression of HAL3/SIS2 has been reported to improve cell growth and to increase expression of G1 cyclins in sit4 phosphatase mutants. We show here that the described effects of HAL3/SIS2 on sit4 mutants are fully mediated by the Ppz1 phosphatase. The growth defect caused by overexpression of PPZ1 is intensified in strains with low G1 cyclin levels (such as bck2Delta or cln3Delta mutants), whereas mutation of PPZ1 rescues the synthetic lethal phenotype of sit4 cln3 mutants. These results reveal a role for Ppz1 as a regulatory component of the yeast cell cycle, reinforce the notion that Hal3/Sis2 serves as a negative modulator of the biological functions of Ppz1, and indicate that the Sit4 and Ppz1 Ser/Thr phosphatases play opposite roles in control of the G1/S transition.  (+info)

Purification and identification of a novel subunit of protein serine/threonine phosphatase 4. (6/5093)

The catalytic subunit of protein serine/threonine phosphatase 4 (PP4C) has greater than 65% amino acid identity to the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2AC). Despite this high homology, PP4 does not appear to associate with known PP2A regulatory subunits. As a first step toward characterization of PP4 holoenzymes and identification of putative PP4 regulatory subunits, PP4 was purified from bovine testis soluble extracts. PP4 existed in two complexes of approximately 270-300 and 400-450 kDa as determined by gel filtration chromatography. The smaller PP4 complex was purified by sequential phenyl-Sepharose, Source 15Q, DEAE2, and Superdex 200 gel filtration chromatographies. The final product contained two major proteins: the PP4 catalytic subunit plus a protein that migrated as a doublet of 120-125 kDa on SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The associated protein, termed PP4R1, and PP4C also bound to microcystin-Sepharose. Mass spectrometry analysis of the purified complex revealed two major peaks, at 35 (PP4C) and 105 kDa (PP4R1). Amino acid sequence information of several peptides derived from the 105 kDa protein was utilized to isolate a human cDNA clone. Analysis of the predicted amino acid sequence revealed 13 nonidentical repeats similar to repeats found in the A subunit of PP2A (PP2AA). The PP4R1 cDNA clone engineered with an N-terminal Myc tag was expressed in COS M6 cells and PP4C co-immunoprecipitated with Myc-tagged PP4R1. These data indicate that one form of PP4 is similar to the core complex of PP2A in that it consists of a catalytic subunit and a "PP2AA-like" structural subunit.  (+info)

Caffeine can override the S-M checkpoint in fission yeast. (7/5093)

The replication checkpoint (or 'S-M checkpoint') control prevents progression into mitosis when DNA replication is incomplete. Caffeine has been known for some time to have the capacity to override the S-M checkpoint in animal cells. We show here that caffeine also disrupts the S-M checkpoint in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. By contrast, no comparable effects of caffeine on the S. pombe DNA damage checkpoint were seen. S. pombe cells arrested in early S phase and then exposed to caffeine lost viability rapidly as they attempted to enter mitosis, which was accompanied by tyrosine dephosphorylation of Cdc2. Despite this, the caffeine-induced loss of viability was not blocked in a temperature-sensitive cdc2 mutant incubated at the restrictive temperature, although catastrophic mitosis was prevented under these conditions. This suggests that, in addition to S-M checkpoint control, a caffeine-sensitive function may be important for maintenance of cell viability during S phase arrest. The lethality of a combination of caffeine with the DNA replication inhibitor hydroxyurea was suppressed by overexpression of Cds1 or Chk1, protein kinases previously implicated in S-M checkpoint control and recovery from S phase arrest. In addition, the same combination of drugs was specifically tolerated in cells overexpressing either of two novel S. pombe genes isolated in a cDNA library screen. These findings should allow further molecular investigation of the regulation of S phase arrest, and may provide a useful system with which to identify novel drugs that specifically abrogate the checkpoint control.  (+info)

Activation of myosin phosphatase targeting subunit by mitosis-specific phosphorylation. (8/5093)

It has been demonstrated previously that during mitosis the sites of myosin phosphorylation are switched between the inhibitory sites, Ser 1/2, and the activation sites, Ser 19/Thr 18 (Yamakita, Y., S. Yamashiro, and F. Matsumura. 1994. J. Cell Biol. 124:129- 137; Satterwhite, L.L., M.J. Lohka, K.L. Wilson, T.Y. Scherson, L.J. Cisek, J.L. Corden, and T.D. Pollard. 1992. J. Cell Biol. 118:595-605), suggesting a regulatory role of myosin phosphorylation in cell division. To explore the function of myosin phosphatase in cell division, the possibility that myosin phosphatase activity may be altered during cell division was examined. We have found that the myosin phosphatase targeting subunit (MYPT) undergoes mitosis-specific phosphorylation and that the phosphorylation is reversed during cytokinesis. MYPT phosphorylated either in vivo or in vitro in the mitosis-specific way showed higher binding to myosin II (two- to threefold) compared to MYPT from cells in interphase. Furthermore, the activity of myosin phosphatase was increased more than twice and it is suggested this reflected the increased affinity of myosin binding. These results indicate the presence of a unique positive regulatory mechanism for myosin phosphatase in cell division. The activation of myosin phosphatase during mitosis would enhance dephosphorylation of the myosin regulatory light chain, thereby leading to the disassembly of stress fibers during prophase. The mitosis-specific effect of phosphorylation is lost on exit from mitosis, and the resultant increase in myosin phosphorylation may act as a signal to activate cytokinesis.  (+info)

Phosphoprotein phosphatases (PPPs) are a family of enzymes that play a crucial role in the regulation of various cellular processes by removing phosphate groups from serine, threonine, and tyrosine residues on proteins. Phosphorylation is a post-translational modification that regulates protein function, localization, and stability, and dephosphorylation by PPPs is essential for maintaining the balance of this regulation.

The PPP family includes several subfamilies, such as PP1, PP2A, PP2B (also known as calcineurin), PP4, PP5, and PP6. Each subfamily has distinct substrate specificities and regulatory mechanisms. For example, PP1 and PP2A are involved in the regulation of metabolism, signal transduction, and cell cycle progression, while PP2B is involved in immune response and calcium signaling.

Dysregulation of PPPs has been implicated in various diseases, including cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, and cardiovascular disease. Therefore, understanding the function and regulation of PPPs is important for developing therapeutic strategies to target these diseases.

Phosphoproteins are proteins that have been post-translationally modified by the addition of a phosphate group (-PO3H2) onto specific amino acid residues, most commonly serine, threonine, or tyrosine. This process is known as phosphorylation and is mediated by enzymes called kinases. Phosphoproteins play crucial roles in various cellular processes such as signal transduction, cell cycle regulation, metabolism, and gene expression. The addition or removal of a phosphate group can activate or inhibit the function of a protein, thereby serving as a switch to control its activity. Phosphoproteins can be detected and quantified using techniques such as Western blotting, mass spectrometry, and immunofluorescence.

Phosphorylase phosphatase is an enzyme that plays a role in the regulation of glycogen metabolism. It works by removing phosphate groups from glycogen phosphorylase, which is an enzyme that breaks down glycogen into glucose-1-phosphate. The dephosphorylation of glycogen phosphorylase by phosphorylase phosphatase leads to the inactivation of the enzyme and therefore slows down the breakdown of glycogen. Phosphorylase phosphatase is itself regulated by various hormones and signaling molecules, allowing for fine-tuning of glycogen metabolism in response to changes in energy demand.

Protein Phosphatase 2 (PP2A) is a type of serine/threonine protein phosphatase that plays a crucial role in the regulation of various cellular processes, including signal transduction, cell cycle progression, and metabolism. PP2A is a heterotrimeric enzyme composed of a catalytic subunit (C), a regulatory subunit A (A), and a variable regulatory subunit B (B). The different combinations of the B subunits confer specificity to PP2A, allowing it to regulate a diverse array of cellular targets.

PP2A is responsible for dephosphorylating many proteins that have been previously phosphorylated by protein kinases. This function is essential for maintaining the balance of phosphorylation and dephosphorylation in cells, which is necessary for proper protein function and cell signaling. Dysregulation of PP2A has been implicated in various diseases, including cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, and cardiovascular disease.

Phosphoric monoester hydrolases are a class of enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of phosphoric monoesters into alcohol and phosphate. This class of enzymes includes several specific enzymes, such as phosphatases and nucleotidases, which play important roles in various biological processes, including metabolism, signal transduction, and regulation of cellular processes.

Phosphoric monoester hydrolases are classified under the EC number 3.1.3 by the Nomenclature Committee of the International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (IUBMB). The enzymes in this class share a common mechanism of action, which involves the nucleophilic attack on the phosphorus atom of the substrate by a serine or cysteine residue in the active site of the enzyme. This results in the formation of a covalent intermediate, which is then hydrolyzed to release the products.

Phosphoric monoester hydrolases are important therapeutic targets for the development of drugs that can modulate their activity. For example, inhibitors of phosphoric monoester hydrolases have been developed as potential treatments for various diseases, including cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, and infectious diseases.

Protein Phosphatase 1 (PP1) is a type of serine/threonine protein phosphatase that plays a crucial role in the regulation of various cellular processes, including metabolism, signal transduction, and cell cycle progression. PP1 functions by removing phosphate groups from specific serine and threonine residues on target proteins, thereby reversing the effects of protein kinases and controlling protein activity, localization, and stability.

PP1 is a highly conserved enzyme found in eukaryotic cells and is composed of a catalytic subunit associated with one or more regulatory subunits that determine its substrate specificity, subcellular localization, and regulation. The human genome encodes several isoforms of the PP1 catalytic subunit, including PP1α, PP1β/δ, and PP1γ, which share a high degree of sequence similarity and functional redundancy.

PP1 has been implicated in various physiological processes, such as muscle contraction, glycogen metabolism, DNA replication, transcription, and RNA processing. Dysregulation of PP1 activity has been associated with several pathological conditions, including neurodegenerative diseases, cancer, and diabetes. Therefore, understanding the molecular mechanisms that regulate PP1 function is essential for developing novel therapeutic strategies to treat these disorders.

Okadaic acid is a type of toxin that is produced by certain species of marine algae, including Dinophysis and Prorocentrum. It is a potent inhibitor of protein phosphatases 1 and 2A, which are important enzymes that help regulate cellular processes in the body.

Okadaic acid can accumulate in shellfish that feed on these algae, and consumption of contaminated seafood can lead to a serious illness known as diarrhetic shellfish poisoning (DSP). Symptoms of DSP include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and abdominal cramps. In severe cases, it can also cause neurological symptoms such as dizziness, disorientation, and tingling or numbness in the lips, tongue, and fingers.

It is important to note that okadaic acid is not only a marine toxin but also used in scientific research as a tool to study the role of protein phosphatases in cellular processes. However, exposure to this compound should be avoided due to its toxic effects.

Phosphorylation is the process of adding a phosphate group (a molecule consisting of one phosphorus atom and four oxygen atoms) to a protein or other organic molecule, which is usually done by enzymes called kinases. This post-translational modification can change the function, localization, or activity of the target molecule, playing a crucial role in various cellular processes such as signal transduction, metabolism, and regulation of gene expression. Phosphorylation is reversible, and the removal of the phosphate group is facilitated by enzymes called phosphatases.

Protein kinases are a group of enzymes that play a crucial role in many cellular processes by adding phosphate groups to other proteins, a process known as phosphorylation. This modification can activate or deactivate the target protein's function, thereby regulating various signaling pathways within the cell. Protein kinases are essential for numerous biological functions, including metabolism, signal transduction, cell cycle progression, and apoptosis (programmed cell death). Abnormal regulation of protein kinases has been implicated in several diseases, such as cancer, diabetes, and neurological disorders.

Dithioerythritol is a chemical compound with the formula (HOCH₂)₂SS(CHOH)₂. It is a colorless, viscous liquid that is used as a reducing agent and antioxidant in various industrial and laboratory applications. In the medical field, it has been studied for its potential use as an anti-inflammatory and antiviral agent, although it is not currently approved for use as a drug. It may also be used as a reagent in diagnostic tests and as a solvent in pharmaceutical preparations.

Cyclic ethers are a type of organic compound that contain an ether functional group (-O-) within a cyclic (ring-shaped) structure. In a cyclic ether, one or more oxygen atoms are part of the ring, which can consist of various numbers of carbon atoms. The simplest example of a cyclic ether is oxirane, also known as ethylene oxide, which contains a three-membered ring with two carbon atoms and one oxygen atom.

Cyclic ethers have diverse applications in the chemical industry, including their use as building blocks for the synthesis of other chemicals, pharmaceuticals, and materials. Some cyclic ethers, like tetrahydrofuran (THF), are common solvents due to their ability to dissolve a wide range of organic compounds. However, some cyclic ethers can be hazardous or toxic, so they must be handled with care during laboratory work and industrial processes.

Manganese is not a medical condition, but it's an essential trace element that is vital for human health. Here is the medical definition of Manganese:

Manganese (Mn) is a trace mineral that is present in tiny amounts in the body. It is found mainly in bones, the liver, kidneys, and pancreas. Manganese helps the body form connective tissue, bones, blood clotting factors, and sex hormones. It also plays a role in fat and carbohydrate metabolism, calcium absorption, and blood sugar regulation. Manganese is also necessary for normal brain and nerve function.

The recommended dietary allowance (RDA) for manganese is 2.3 mg per day for adult men and 1.8 mg per day for adult women. Good food sources of manganese include nuts, seeds, legumes, whole grains, green leafy vegetables, and tea.

In some cases, exposure to high levels of manganese can cause neurological symptoms similar to Parkinson's disease, a condition known as manganism. However, this is rare and usually occurs in people who are occupationally exposed to manganese dust or fumes, such as welders.

Acid phosphatase is a type of enzyme that is found in various tissues and organs throughout the body, including the prostate gland, red blood cells, bone, liver, spleen, and kidneys. This enzyme plays a role in several biological processes, such as bone metabolism and the breakdown of molecules like nucleotides and proteins.

Acid phosphatase is classified based on its optimum pH level for activity. Acid phosphatases have an optimal activity at acidic pH levels (below 7.0), while alkaline phosphatases have an optimal activity at basic or alkaline pH levels (above 7.0).

In clinical settings, measuring the level of acid phosphatase in the blood can be useful as a tumor marker for prostate cancer. Elevated acid phosphatase levels may indicate the presence of metastatic prostate cancer or disease progression. However, it is important to note that acid phosphatase is not specific to prostate cancer and can also be elevated in other conditions, such as bone diseases, liver disorders, and some benign conditions. Therefore, acid phosphatase should be interpreted in conjunction with other diagnostic tests and clinical findings for a more accurate diagnosis.

Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases (PTPs) are a group of enzymes that play a crucial role in the regulation of various cellular processes, including cell growth, differentiation, and signal transduction. PTPs function by removing phosphate groups from tyrosine residues on proteins, thereby counteracting the effects of tyrosine kinases, which add phosphate groups to tyrosine residues to activate proteins.

PTPs are classified into several subfamilies based on their structure and function, including classical PTPs, dual-specificity PTPs (DSPs), and low molecular weight PTPs (LMW-PTPs). Each subfamily has distinct substrate specificities and regulatory mechanisms.

Classical PTPs are further divided into receptor-like PTPs (RPTPs) and non-receptor PTPs (NRPTPs). RPTPs contain a transmembrane domain and extracellular regions that mediate cell-cell interactions, while NRPTPs are soluble enzymes located in the cytoplasm.

DSPs can dephosphorylate both tyrosine and serine/threonine residues on proteins and play a critical role in regulating various signaling pathways, including the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway.

LMW-PTPs are a group of small molecular weight PTPs that localize to different cellular compartments, such as the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria, and regulate various cellular processes, including protein folding and apoptosis.

Overall, PTPs play a critical role in maintaining the balance of phosphorylation and dephosphorylation events in cells, and dysregulation of PTP activity has been implicated in various diseases, including cancer, diabetes, and neurological disorders.

I believe there might be a slight confusion in your question. Sodium cholate is not a medical term, but it is related to the field of biochemistry and physiology. Sodium cholate is a type of bile salt, which is a surfactant that helps in the digestion and absorption of fats in the body.

To provide a more detailed definition:

Sodium cholate (also known as sodium deoxycholate) is a conjugated bile salt, formed from the bacterial modification of primary bile acids (cholic acid) in the intestine. It is a sodium salt of deoxycholic acid, which is a secondary bile acid produced by intestinal bacteria. Bile salts like sodium cholate play an essential role in emulsifying dietary lipids, facilitating their breakdown by enzymes and subsequent absorption in the small intestine.

While not a medical definition per se, understanding bile salts like sodium cholate is important for comprehending various physiological processes, including digestion and liver function.

In the context of medicine and pharmacology, "kinetics" refers to the study of how a drug moves throughout the body, including its absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (often abbreviated as ADME). This field is called "pharmacokinetics."

1. Absorption: This is the process of a drug moving from its site of administration into the bloodstream. Factors such as the route of administration (e.g., oral, intravenous, etc.), formulation, and individual physiological differences can affect absorption.

2. Distribution: Once a drug is in the bloodstream, it gets distributed throughout the body to various tissues and organs. This process is influenced by factors like blood flow, protein binding, and lipid solubility of the drug.

3. Metabolism: Drugs are often chemically modified in the body, typically in the liver, through processes known as metabolism. These changes can lead to the formation of active or inactive metabolites, which may then be further distributed, excreted, or undergo additional metabolic transformations.

4. Excretion: This is the process by which drugs and their metabolites are eliminated from the body, primarily through the kidneys (urine) and the liver (bile).

Understanding the kinetics of a drug is crucial for determining its optimal dosing regimen, potential interactions with other medications or foods, and any necessary adjustments for special populations like pediatric or geriatric patients, or those with impaired renal or hepatic function.

Molecular weight, also known as molecular mass, is the mass of a molecule. It is expressed in units of atomic mass units (amu) or daltons (Da). Molecular weight is calculated by adding up the atomic weights of each atom in a molecule. It is a useful property in chemistry and biology, as it can be used to determine the concentration of a substance in a solution, or to calculate the amount of a substance that will react with another in a chemical reaction.

Phosphorylases are enzymes that catalyze the phosphorolytic cleavage of a bond, often a glycosidic bond, in a carbohydrate molecule, releasing a sugar moiety and a phosphate group. This reaction is important in metabolic pathways such as glycogenolysis, where glycogen is broken down into glucose-1-phosphate by the action of glycogen phosphorylase. The resulting glucose-1-phosphate can then be further metabolized to produce energy. Phosphorylases are widely found in nature and play a crucial role in various biological processes, including energy metabolism and signal transduction.

Cantharidin is a toxic substance that is produced by several species of beetles, including the blister beetle. It has been used in medicine as a topical vesicant or blistering agent to treat warts and other skin conditions. Cantharidin works by causing irritation and inflammation of the skin, which leads to the formation of a blister. This can help to remove the affected skin and promote healing.

It is important to note that cantharidin is a potent toxic substance and should only be used under the supervision of a qualified healthcare professional. It can cause serious side effects if it is not used properly, including severe burns, scarring, and allergic reactions. Cantharidin is not approved for use in the United States, and its use is generally discouraged due to the risks associated with it.

Calmodulin-binding proteins are a diverse group of proteins that have the ability to bind to calmodulin, a ubiquitous calcium-binding protein found in eukaryotic cells. Calmodulin plays a critical role in various cellular processes by regulating the activity of its target proteins in a calcium-dependent manner.

Calmodulin-binding proteins contain specific domains or motifs that enable them to interact with calmodulin. These domains can be classified into two main categories: IQ motifs and CaM motifs. The IQ motif is a short amino acid sequence that contains the consensus sequence IQXXXRGXXR, where X represents any amino acid. This motif binds to the C-lobe of calmodulin in a calcium-dependent manner. On the other hand, CaM motifs are longer sequences that can bind to both lobes of calmodulin with high affinity and in a calcium-dependent manner.

Calmodulin-binding proteins play crucial roles in various cellular functions, including signal transduction, gene regulation, cytoskeleton organization, and ion channel regulation. For example, calmodulin-binding proteins such as calcineurin and CaM kinases are involved in the regulation of immune responses, learning, and memory. Similarly, myosin regulatory light chains, which contain IQ motifs, play a critical role in muscle contraction by regulating the interaction between actin and myosin filaments.

In summary, calmodulin-binding proteins are a diverse group of proteins that interact with calmodulin to regulate various cellular processes. They contain specific domains or motifs that enable them to bind to calmodulin in a calcium-dependent manner, thereby modulating the activity of their target proteins.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Oxazoles" is not a medical term, it is a chemical term. Oxazoles are heterocyclic aromatic organic compounds that contain a five-membered ring made up of one nitrogen atom, one oxygen atom, and three carbon atoms. They have the molecular formula C4H4NO.

Oxazoles do not have specific medical relevance, but they can be found in some natural and synthetic substances, including certain drugs and bioactive molecules. Some oxazole-containing compounds have been studied for their potential medicinal properties, such as anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, and anticancer activities. However, these studies are primarily within the field of chemistry and pharmacology, not medicine itself.

Phosphorus radioisotopes are radioactive isotopes or variants of the element phosphorus that emit radiation. Phosphorus has several radioisotopes, with the most common ones being phosphorus-32 (^32P) and phosphorus-33 (^33P). These radioisotopes are used in various medical applications such as cancer treatment and diagnostic procedures.

Phosphorus-32 has a half-life of approximately 14.3 days and emits beta particles, making it useful for treating certain types of cancer, such as leukemia and lymphoma. It can also be used in brachytherapy, a type of radiation therapy that involves placing a radioactive source close to the tumor.

Phosphorus-33 has a shorter half-life of approximately 25.4 days and emits both beta particles and gamma rays. This makes it useful for diagnostic procedures, such as positron emission tomography (PET) scans, where the gamma rays can be detected and used to create images of the body's internal structures.

It is important to note that handling and using radioisotopes requires specialized training and equipment to ensure safety and prevent radiation exposure.

Sodium fluoride is an inorganic compound with the chemical formula NaF. Medically, it is commonly used as a dental treatment to prevent tooth decay, as it is absorbed into the structure of teeth and helps to harden the enamel, making it more resistant to acid attacks from bacteria. It can also reduce the ability of bacteria to produce acid. Sodium fluoride is often found in toothpastes, mouth rinses, and various dental treatments. However, excessive consumption can lead to dental fluorosis and skeletal fluorosis, which cause changes in bone structure and might negatively affect health.

Enzyme activation refers to the process by which an enzyme becomes biologically active and capable of carrying out its specific chemical or biological reaction. This is often achieved through various post-translational modifications, such as proteolytic cleavage, phosphorylation, or addition of cofactors or prosthetic groups to the enzyme molecule. These modifications can change the conformation or structure of the enzyme, exposing or creating a binding site for the substrate and allowing the enzymatic reaction to occur.

For example, in the case of proteolytic cleavage, an inactive precursor enzyme, known as a zymogen, is cleaved into its active form by a specific protease. This is seen in enzymes such as trypsin and chymotrypsin, which are initially produced in the pancreas as inactive precursors called trypsinogen and chymotrypsinogen, respectively. Once they reach the small intestine, they are activated by enteropeptidase, a protease that cleaves a specific peptide bond, releasing the active enzyme.

Phosphorylation is another common mechanism of enzyme activation, where a phosphate group is added to a specific serine, threonine, or tyrosine residue on the enzyme by a protein kinase. This modification can alter the conformation of the enzyme and create a binding site for the substrate, allowing the enzymatic reaction to occur.

Enzyme activation is a crucial process in many biological pathways, as it allows for precise control over when and where specific reactions take place. It also provides a mechanism for regulating enzyme activity in response to various signals and stimuli, such as hormones, neurotransmitters, or changes in the intracellular environment.

Magnesium is an essential mineral that plays a crucial role in various biological processes in the human body. It is the fourth most abundant cation in the body and is involved in over 300 enzymatic reactions, including protein synthesis, muscle and nerve function, blood glucose control, and blood pressure regulation. Magnesium also contributes to the structural development of bones and teeth.

In medical terms, magnesium deficiency can lead to several health issues, such as muscle cramps, weakness, heart arrhythmias, and seizures. On the other hand, excessive magnesium levels can cause symptoms like diarrhea, nausea, and muscle weakness. Magnesium supplements or magnesium-rich foods are often recommended to maintain optimal magnesium levels in the body.

Some common dietary sources of magnesium include leafy green vegetables, nuts, seeds, legumes, whole grains, and dairy products. Magnesium is also available in various forms as a dietary supplement, including magnesium oxide, magnesium citrate, magnesium chloride, and magnesium glycinate.

Molecular sequence data refers to the specific arrangement of molecules, most commonly nucleotides in DNA or RNA, or amino acids in proteins, that make up a biological macromolecule. This data is generated through laboratory techniques such as sequencing, and provides information about the exact order of the constituent molecules. This data is crucial in various fields of biology, including genetics, evolution, and molecular biology, allowing for comparisons between different organisms, identification of genetic variations, and studies of gene function and regulation.

An amino acid sequence is the specific order of amino acids in a protein or peptide molecule, formed by the linking of the amino group (-NH2) of one amino acid to the carboxyl group (-COOH) of another amino acid through a peptide bond. The sequence is determined by the genetic code and is unique to each type of protein or peptide. It plays a crucial role in determining the three-dimensional structure and function of proteins.

Substrate specificity in the context of medical biochemistry and enzymology refers to the ability of an enzyme to selectively bind and catalyze a chemical reaction with a particular substrate (or a group of similar substrates) while discriminating against other molecules that are not substrates. This specificity arises from the three-dimensional structure of the enzyme, which has evolved to match the shape, charge distribution, and functional groups of its physiological substrate(s).

Substrate specificity is a fundamental property of enzymes that enables them to carry out highly selective chemical transformations in the complex cellular environment. The active site of an enzyme, where the catalysis takes place, has a unique conformation that complements the shape and charge distribution of its substrate(s). This ensures efficient recognition, binding, and conversion of the substrate into the desired product while minimizing unwanted side reactions with other molecules.

Substrate specificity can be categorized as:

1. Absolute specificity: An enzyme that can only act on a single substrate or a very narrow group of structurally related substrates, showing no activity towards any other molecule.
2. Group specificity: An enzyme that prefers to act on a particular functional group or class of compounds but can still accommodate minor structural variations within the substrate.
3. Broad or promiscuous specificity: An enzyme that can act on a wide range of structurally diverse substrates, albeit with varying catalytic efficiencies.

Understanding substrate specificity is crucial for elucidating enzymatic mechanisms, designing drugs that target specific enzymes or pathways, and developing biotechnological applications that rely on the controlled manipulation of enzyme activities.

Dopamine and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein 32 (DARPP-32) is a protein that plays a crucial role in the regulation of signal transduction pathways in the brain. It is primarily expressed in neurons of the striatum, a region involved in movement control, motivation, and reward processing.

DARPP-32 acts as a molecular switch in response to various neurotransmitters, including dopamine and glutamate. When phosphorylated by protein kinase A (PKA), DARPP-32 inhibits protein phosphatase-1 (PP-1), thereby enhancing the effects of PKA and promoting long-term changes in synaptic plasticity. Conversely, when phosphorylated by other kinases such as cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) or protein kinase C (PKC), DARPP-32 inhibits PKA, counteracting its effects.

Dysregulation of DARPP-32 has been implicated in several neurological and psychiatric disorders, including drug addiction, Parkinson's disease, and schizophrenia. Therefore, understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying DARPP-32 function is essential for developing novel therapeutic strategies to treat these conditions.

Mercaptoethanol, also known as β-mercaptoethanol or BME, is not a medical term itself but is commonly used in laboratories including medical research. It is a reducing agent and a powerful antioxidant with the chemical formula HOCH2CH2SH.

Medical Definition:
Mercaptoethanol (β-mercaptoethanol) is a colorless liquid with an unpleasant odor, used as a reducing agent in biochemical research and laboratory experiments. It functions by breaking disulfide bonds between cysteine residues in proteins, allowing them to unfold and denature. This property makes it useful for various applications such as protein purification, enzyme assays, and cell culture.

However, it is important to note that Mercaptoethanol has a high toxicity level and should be handled with caution in the laboratory setting.

I believe there may be some confusion in your question. "Rabbits" is a common name used to refer to the Lagomorpha species, particularly members of the family Leporidae. They are small mammals known for their long ears, strong legs, and quick reproduction.

However, if you're referring to "rabbits" in a medical context, there is a term called "rabbit syndrome," which is a rare movement disorder characterized by repetitive, involuntary movements of the fingers, resembling those of a rabbit chewing. It is also known as "finger-chewing chorea." This condition is usually associated with certain medications, particularly antipsychotics, and typically resolves when the medication is stopped or adjusted.

"Cattle" is a term used in the agricultural and veterinary fields to refer to domesticated animals of the genus *Bos*, primarily *Bos taurus* (European cattle) and *Bos indicus* (Zebu). These animals are often raised for meat, milk, leather, and labor. They are also known as bovines or cows (for females), bulls (intact males), and steers/bullocks (castrated males). However, in a strict medical definition, "cattle" does not apply to humans or other animals.

Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP) is a high-energy molecule that stores and transports energy within cells. It is the main source of energy for most cellular processes, including muscle contraction, nerve impulse transmission, and protein synthesis. ATP is composed of a base (adenine), a sugar (ribose), and three phosphate groups. The bonds between these phosphate groups contain a significant amount of energy, which can be released when the bond between the second and third phosphate group is broken, resulting in the formation of adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and inorganic phosphate. This process is known as hydrolysis and can be catalyzed by various enzymes to drive a wide range of cellular functions. ATP can also be regenerated from ADP through various metabolic pathways, such as oxidative phosphorylation or substrate-level phosphorylation, allowing for the continuous supply of energy to cells.

Calcineurin is a calcium-calmodulin-activated serine/threonine protein phosphatase that plays a crucial role in signal transduction pathways involved in immune response and neuronal development. It consists of two subunits: the catalytic A subunit (calcineurin A) and the regulatory B subunit (calcineurin B). Calcineurin is responsible for dephosphorylating various substrates, including transcription factors, which leads to changes in their activity and ultimately affects gene expression. In the immune system, calcineurin plays a critical role in T-cell activation by dephosphorylating the nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT), allowing it to translocate into the nucleus and induce the expression of cytokines and other genes involved in the immune response. Inhibitors of calcineurin, such as cyclosporine A and tacrolimus, are commonly used as immunosuppressive drugs to prevent organ rejection after transplantation.

Phosphorylase Kinase (PhK) is a key enzyme in the regulation of glycogen metabolism, primarily involved in the breakdown of glycogen to glucose-1-phosphate. It is a serine/threonine protein kinase that catalyzes the phosphorylation of glycogen phosphorylase b, an isoform of glycogen phosphorylase, converting it into its active form, glycogen phosphorylase a.

PhK is composed of four different subunits: α, β, γ, and δ. The γ subunit contains the catalytic site, while the other subunits play regulatory roles. PhK itself can be activated by calcium ions (Ca2+) and protein kinase A (PKA)-mediated phosphorylation.

Phosphorylase Kinase is primarily located in the sarcoplasmic reticulum of muscle cells, where it plays a crucial role in regulating energy production during muscle contraction and relaxation. Dysregulation or mutations in PhK have been implicated in several genetic disorders, such as Debré-akaki syndrome, which is characterized by muscle weakness and cardiac abnormalities.

A muscle is a soft tissue in our body that contracts to produce force and motion. It is composed mainly of specialized cells called muscle fibers, which are bound together by connective tissue. There are three types of muscles: skeletal (voluntary), smooth (involuntary), and cardiac. Skeletal muscles attach to bones and help in movement, while smooth muscles are found within the walls of organs and blood vessels, helping with functions like digestion and circulation. Cardiac muscle is the specific type that makes up the heart, allowing it to pump blood throughout the body.

Trifluoperazine is an antipsychotic medication that belongs to the class of drugs called phenothiazines. It works by blocking the action of dopamine, a neurotransmitter in the brain, and helps to reduce symptoms of schizophrenia such as hallucinations, delusions, paranoia, and disordered thought. Trifluoperazine may also be used to manage anxiety or agitation in certain medical conditions. It is available in the form of tablets for oral administration. As with any medication, trifluoperazine should be taken under the supervision of a healthcare provider due to potential side effects and risks associated with its use.

Drug stability refers to the ability of a pharmaceutical drug product to maintain its physical, chemical, and biological properties during storage and use, under specified conditions. A stable drug product retains its desired quality, purity, strength, and performance throughout its shelf life. Factors that can affect drug stability include temperature, humidity, light exposure, and container compatibility. Maintaining drug stability is crucial to ensure the safety and efficacy of medications for patients.

Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is a key secondary messenger in many biological processes, including the regulation of metabolism, gene expression, and cellular excitability. It is synthesized from adenosine triphosphate (ATP) by the enzyme adenylyl cyclase and is degraded by the enzyme phosphodiesterase.

In the body, cAMP plays a crucial role in mediating the effects of hormones and neurotransmitters on target cells. For example, when a hormone binds to its receptor on the surface of a cell, it can activate a G protein, which in turn activates adenylyl cyclase to produce cAMP. The increased levels of cAMP then activate various effector proteins, such as protein kinases, which go on to regulate various cellular processes.

Overall, the regulation of cAMP levels is critical for maintaining proper cellular function and homeostasis, and abnormalities in cAMP signaling have been implicated in a variety of diseases, including cancer, diabetes, and neurological disorders.

Electrophoresis, polyacrylamide gel (EPG) is a laboratory technique used to separate and analyze complex mixtures of proteins or nucleic acids (DNA or RNA) based on their size and electrical charge. This technique utilizes a matrix made of cross-linked polyacrylamide, a type of gel, which provides a stable and uniform environment for the separation of molecules.

In this process:

1. The polyacrylamide gel is prepared by mixing acrylamide monomers with a cross-linking agent (bis-acrylamide) and a catalyst (ammonium persulfate) in the presence of a buffer solution.
2. The gel is then poured into a mold and allowed to polymerize, forming a solid matrix with uniform pore sizes that depend on the concentration of acrylamide used. Higher concentrations result in smaller pores, providing better resolution for separating smaller molecules.
3. Once the gel has set, it is placed in an electrophoresis apparatus containing a buffer solution. Samples containing the mixture of proteins or nucleic acids are loaded into wells on the top of the gel.
4. An electric field is applied across the gel, causing the negatively charged molecules to migrate towards the positive electrode (anode) while positively charged molecules move toward the negative electrode (cathode). The rate of migration depends on the size, charge, and shape of the molecules.
5. Smaller molecules move faster through the gel matrix and will migrate farther from the origin compared to larger molecules, resulting in separation based on size. Proteins and nucleic acids can be selectively stained after electrophoresis to visualize the separated bands.

EPG is widely used in various research fields, including molecular biology, genetics, proteomics, and forensic science, for applications such as protein characterization, DNA fragment analysis, cloning, mutation detection, and quality control of nucleic acid or protein samples.

Macromolecular substances, also known as macromolecules, are large, complex molecules made up of repeating subunits called monomers. These substances are formed through polymerization, a process in which many small molecules combine to form a larger one. Macromolecular substances can be naturally occurring, such as proteins, DNA, and carbohydrates, or synthetic, such as plastics and synthetic fibers.

In the context of medicine, macromolecular substances are often used in the development of drugs and medical devices. For example, some drugs are designed to bind to specific macromolecules in the body, such as proteins or DNA, in order to alter their function and produce a therapeutic effect. Additionally, macromolecular substances may be used in the creation of medical implants, such as artificial joints and heart valves, due to their strength and durability.

It is important for healthcare professionals to have an understanding of macromolecular substances and how they function in the body, as this knowledge can inform the development and use of medical treatments.

Glucose-6-phosphatase is an enzyme that plays a crucial role in the regulation of glucose metabolism. It is primarily located in the endoplasmic reticulum of cells in liver, kidney, and intestinal mucosa. The main function of this enzyme is to remove the phosphate group from glucose-6-phosphate (G6P), converting it into free glucose, which can then be released into the bloodstream and used as a source of energy by cells throughout the body.

The reaction catalyzed by glucose-6-phosphatase is as follows:

Glucose-6-phosphate + H2O → Glucose + Pi (inorganic phosphate)

This enzyme is essential for maintaining normal blood glucose levels, particularly during periods of fasting or starvation. In these situations, the body needs to break down stored glycogen in the liver and convert it into glucose to supply energy to the brain and other vital organs. Glucose-6-phosphatase is a key enzyme in this process, allowing for the release of free glucose into the bloodstream.

Deficiencies or mutations in the gene encoding glucose-6-phosphatase can lead to several metabolic disorders, such as glycogen storage disease type I (von Gierke's disease) and other related conditions. These disorders are characterized by an accumulation of glycogen and/or fat in various organs, leading to impaired glucose metabolism, growth retardation, and increased risk of infection and liver dysfunction.

Hydroxymethylglutaryl CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase is an enzyme that plays a crucial role in the synthesis of cholesterol in the body. It is found in the endoplasmic reticulum of cells and catalyzes the conversion of HMG-CoA to mevalonic acid, which is a key rate-limiting step in the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway.

The reaction catalyzed by HMG-CoA reductase is as follows:

HMG-CoA + 2 NADPH + 2 H+ → mevalonic acid + CoA + 2 NADP+

This enzyme is the target of statin drugs, which are commonly prescribed to lower cholesterol levels in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Statins work by inhibiting HMG-CoA reductase, thereby reducing the production of cholesterol in the body.

The liver is a large, solid organ located in the upper right portion of the abdomen, beneath the diaphragm and above the stomach. It plays a vital role in several bodily functions, including:

1. Metabolism: The liver helps to metabolize carbohydrates, fats, and proteins from the food we eat into energy and nutrients that our bodies can use.
2. Detoxification: The liver detoxifies harmful substances in the body by breaking them down into less toxic forms or excreting them through bile.
3. Synthesis: The liver synthesizes important proteins, such as albumin and clotting factors, that are necessary for proper bodily function.
4. Storage: The liver stores glucose, vitamins, and minerals that can be released when the body needs them.
5. Bile production: The liver produces bile, a digestive juice that helps to break down fats in the small intestine.
6. Immune function: The liver plays a role in the immune system by filtering out bacteria and other harmful substances from the blood.

Overall, the liver is an essential organ that plays a critical role in maintaining overall health and well-being.

Cytosol refers to the liquid portion of the cytoplasm found within a eukaryotic cell, excluding the organelles and structures suspended in it. It is the site of various metabolic activities and contains a variety of ions, small molecules, and enzymes. The cytosol is where many biochemical reactions take place, including glycolysis, protein synthesis, and the regulation of cellular pH. It is also where some organelles, such as ribosomes and vesicles, are located. In contrast to the cytosol, the term "cytoplasm" refers to the entire contents of a cell, including both the cytosol and the organelles suspended within it.

Calmodulin is a small, ubiquitous calcium-binding protein that plays a critical role in various intracellular signaling pathways. It functions as a calcium sensor, binding to and regulating the activity of numerous target proteins upon calcium ion (Ca^2+^) binding. Calmodulin is expressed in all eukaryotic cells and participates in many cellular processes, including muscle contraction, neurotransmitter release, gene expression, metabolism, and cell cycle progression.

The protein contains four EF-hand motifs that can bind Ca^2+^ ions. Upon calcium binding, conformational changes occur in the calmodulin structure, exposing hydrophobic surfaces that facilitate its interaction with target proteins. Calmodulin's targets include enzymes (such as protein kinases and phosphatases), ion channels, transporters, and cytoskeletal components. By modulating the activity of these proteins, calmodulin helps regulate essential cellular functions in response to changes in intracellular Ca^2+^ concentrations.

Calmodulin's molecular weight is approximately 17 kDa, and it consists of a single polypeptide chain with 148-150 amino acid residues. The protein can be found in both the cytoplasm and the nucleus of cells. In addition to its role as a calcium sensor, calmodulin has been implicated in various pathological conditions, including cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, and cardiovascular disorders.

Enzyme inhibitors are substances that bind to an enzyme and decrease its activity, preventing it from catalyzing a chemical reaction in the body. They can work by several mechanisms, including blocking the active site where the substrate binds, or binding to another site on the enzyme to change its shape and prevent substrate binding. Enzyme inhibitors are often used as drugs to treat various medical conditions, such as high blood pressure, abnormal heart rhythms, and bacterial infections. They can also be found naturally in some foods and plants, and can be used in research to understand enzyme function and regulation.

Histones are highly alkaline proteins found in the chromatin of eukaryotic cells. They are rich in basic amino acid residues, such as arginine and lysine, which give them their positive charge. Histones play a crucial role in packaging DNA into a more compact structure within the nucleus by forming a complex with it called a nucleosome. Each nucleosome contains about 146 base pairs of DNA wrapped around an octamer of eight histone proteins (two each of H2A, H2B, H3, and H4). The N-terminal tails of these histones are subject to various post-translational modifications, such as methylation, acetylation, and phosphorylation, which can influence chromatin structure and gene expression. Histone variants also exist, which can contribute to the regulation of specific genes and other nuclear processes.

Hydrogen-ion concentration, also known as pH, is a measure of the acidity or basicity of a solution. It is defined as the negative logarithm (to the base 10) of the hydrogen ion activity in a solution. The standard unit of measurement is the pH unit. A pH of 7 is neutral, less than 7 is acidic, and greater than 7 is basic.

In medical terms, hydrogen-ion concentration is important for maintaining homeostasis within the body. For example, in the stomach, a high hydrogen-ion concentration (low pH) is necessary for the digestion of food. However, in other parts of the body such as blood, a high hydrogen-ion concentration can be harmful and lead to acidosis. Conversely, a low hydrogen-ion concentration (high pH) in the blood can lead to alkalosis. Both acidosis and alkalosis can have serious consequences on various organ systems if not corrected.

Proteins are complex, large molecules that play critical roles in the body's functions. They are made up of amino acids, which are organic compounds that are the building blocks of proteins. Proteins are required for the structure, function, and regulation of the body's tissues and organs. They are essential for the growth, repair, and maintenance of body tissues, and they play a crucial role in many biological processes, including metabolism, immune response, and cellular signaling. Proteins can be classified into different types based on their structure and function, such as enzymes, hormones, antibodies, and structural proteins. They are found in various foods, especially animal-derived products like meat, dairy, and eggs, as well as plant-based sources like beans, nuts, and grains.

In a medical context, "hot temperature" is not a standard medical term with a specific definition. However, it is often used in relation to fever, which is a common symptom of illness. A fever is typically defined as a body temperature that is higher than normal, usually above 38°C (100.4°F) for adults and above 37.5-38°C (99.5-101.3°F) for children, depending on the source.

Therefore, when a medical professional talks about "hot temperature," they may be referring to a body temperature that is higher than normal due to fever or other causes. It's important to note that a high environmental temperature can also contribute to an elevated body temperature, so it's essential to consider both the body temperature and the environmental temperature when assessing a patient's condition.

"Inbred strains of rats" are genetically identical rodents that have been produced through many generations of brother-sister mating. This results in a high degree of homozygosity, where the genes at any particular locus in the genome are identical in all members of the strain.

Inbred strains of rats are widely used in biomedical research because they provide a consistent and reproducible genetic background for studying various biological phenomena, including the effects of drugs, environmental factors, and genetic mutations on health and disease. Additionally, inbred strains can be used to create genetically modified models of human diseases by introducing specific mutations into their genomes.

Some commonly used inbred strains of rats include the Wistar Kyoto (WKY), Sprague-Dawley (SD), and Fischer 344 (F344) rat strains. Each strain has its own unique genetic characteristics, making them suitable for different types of research.

Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase, Non-Receptor Type 11 (PTPN11) is a gene that encodes for the protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP-2. This enzyme regulates various cellular processes, including cell growth, differentiation, and migration, by controlling the balance of phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of proteins involved in signal transduction pathways. Mutations in PTPN11 have been associated with several human diseases, most notably Noonan syndrome and its related disorders, as well as certain types of leukemia.

Dual-specificity phosphatases (DUSPs) are a group of enzymes that regulate various cellular processes by removing phosphate groups from specific proteins. They are called "dual-specificity" because they can remove phosphates from both tyrosine and serine/threonine residues on their target proteins, whereas most other protein phosphatases can only remove phosphates from one or the other.

DUSPs play important roles in regulating signal transduction pathways that are involved in various cellular functions such as proliferation, differentiation, survival, and apoptosis. They act as negative regulators of these pathways by dephosphorylating and inactivating key signaling molecules, including mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs).

There are several subfamilies of DUSPs, each with distinct substrate specificities and cellular localizations. Some DUSPs are primarily cytoplasmic, while others are nuclear or associated with the plasma membrane. Dysregulation of DUSP activity has been implicated in various diseases, including cancer, diabetes, and neurodegenerative disorders. Therefore, understanding the function and regulation of DUSPs is important for developing new therapeutic strategies for these diseases.

CDC25 phosphatases are a group of enzymes that play crucial roles in the regulation of the cell cycle, which is the series of events that cells undergo as they grow and divide. Specifically, CDC25 phosphatases function to remove inhibitory phosphates from certain cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), thereby activating them and allowing the cell cycle to progress.

There are three main types of CDC25 phosphatases in humans, known as CDC25A, CDC25B, and CDC25C. These enzymes are named after the original yeast homolog, called Cdc25, which was discovered to be essential for cell cycle progression.

CDC25 phosphatases are tightly regulated during the cell cycle, with their activity being controlled by various mechanisms such as phosphorylation, protein-protein interactions, and subcellular localization. Dysregulation of CDC25 phosphatases has been implicated in several human diseases, including cancer, where they can contribute to uncontrolled cell growth and division. Therefore, understanding the functions and regulation of CDC25 phosphatases is an important area of research in molecular biology and medicine.

Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase, Non-Receptor Type 1 (PTPN1) is a type of enzyme that belongs to the protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) family. PTPs play crucial roles in regulating various cellular processes by removing phosphate groups from phosphorylated tyrosine residues on proteins, thereby controlling the activity of many proteins involved in signal transduction pathways.

PTPN1, also known as PTP1B, is a non-receptor type PTP that is localized to the endoplasmic reticulum and cytosol of cells. It has been extensively studied due to its important role in regulating various cellular signaling pathways, including those involved in metabolism, cell growth, differentiation, and survival.

PTPN1 dephosphorylates several key signaling molecules, such as the insulin receptor, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), and Janus kinase 2 (JAK2). By negatively regulating these signaling pathways, PTPN1 acts as a tumor suppressor and plays a role in preventing excessive cell growth and survival. However, dysregulation of PTPN1 has been implicated in various diseases, including diabetes, obesity, and cancer.

Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase, Non-Receptor Type 6 (PTPN6) is a protein encoded by the PTPN6 gene in humans. It belongs to the family of protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs), which are enzymes that remove phosphate groups from phosphorylated tyrosine residues on proteins. This regulation of protein phosphorylation is critical for various cellular processes, including signal transduction, cell growth, and differentiation.

PTPN6, also known as SHP-1 (Src Homology 2 domain-containing Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase-1), is a non-receptor type PTP, meaning it does not have a transmembrane domain and is found in the cytosol. It contains two SH2 domains at its N-terminus, which allow it to bind to specific phosphotyrosine-containing motifs on target proteins, and a catalytic PTP domain at its C-terminus, responsible for its enzymatic activity.

PTPN6 plays essential roles in hematopoiesis, immune responses, and cancer. It negatively regulates various signaling pathways, including those downstream of cytokine receptors, growth factor receptors, and T-cell receptors. Dysregulation of PTPN6 has been implicated in several diseases, such as leukemia, lymphoma, and autoimmune disorders.

Myosin-Light-Chain Phosphatase (MLCP) is an enzyme complex that plays a crucial role in the regulation of muscle contraction and relaxation. It is responsible for dephosphorylating the myosin light chains, which are key regulatory components of the contractile apparatus in muscles.

The phosphorylation state of the myosin light chains regulates the interaction between actin and myosin filaments, which is necessary for muscle contraction. When the myosin light chains are phosphorylated, they bind more strongly to actin, leading to increased contractile force. Conversely, when the myosin light chains are dephosphorylated by MLCP, the interaction between actin and myosin is weakened, allowing for muscle relaxation.

MLCP is composed of three subunits: a catalytic subunit (PP1cδ), a regulatory subunit (MYPT1), and a small subunit (M20). The regulatory subunit contains binding sites for various signaling molecules that can modulate the activity of MLCP, such as calcium/calmodulin, protein kinase C, and Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK). Dysregulation of MLCP has been implicated in various muscle disorders, including hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, dilated cardiomyopathy, and muscle atrophy.

The brain is the central organ of the nervous system, responsible for receiving and processing sensory information, regulating vital functions, and controlling behavior, movement, and cognition. It is divided into several distinct regions, each with specific functions:

1. Cerebrum: The largest part of the brain, responsible for higher cognitive functions such as thinking, learning, memory, language, and perception. It is divided into two hemispheres, each controlling the opposite side of the body.
2. Cerebellum: Located at the back of the brain, it is responsible for coordinating muscle movements, maintaining balance, and fine-tuning motor skills.
3. Brainstem: Connects the cerebrum and cerebellum to the spinal cord, controlling vital functions such as breathing, heart rate, and blood pressure. It also serves as a relay center for sensory information and motor commands between the brain and the rest of the body.
4. Diencephalon: A region that includes the thalamus (a major sensory relay station) and hypothalamus (regulates hormones, temperature, hunger, thirst, and sleep).
5. Limbic system: A group of structures involved in emotional processing, memory formation, and motivation, including the hippocampus, amygdala, and cingulate gyrus.

The brain is composed of billions of interconnected neurons that communicate through electrical and chemical signals. It is protected by the skull and surrounded by three layers of membranes called meninges, as well as cerebrospinal fluid that provides cushioning and nutrients.

The myocardium is the middle layer of the heart wall, composed of specialized cardiac muscle cells that are responsible for pumping blood throughout the body. It forms the thickest part of the heart wall and is divided into two sections: the left ventricle, which pumps oxygenated blood to the rest of the body, and the right ventricle, which pumps deoxygenated blood to the lungs.

The myocardium contains several types of cells, including cardiac muscle fibers, connective tissue, nerves, and blood vessels. The muscle fibers are arranged in a highly organized pattern that allows them to contract in a coordinated manner, generating the force necessary to pump blood through the heart and circulatory system.

Damage to the myocardium can occur due to various factors such as ischemia (reduced blood flow), infection, inflammation, or genetic disorders. This damage can lead to several cardiac conditions, including heart failure, arrhythmias, and cardiomyopathy.

Signal transduction is the process by which a cell converts an extracellular signal, such as a hormone or neurotransmitter, into an intracellular response. This involves a series of molecular events that transmit the signal from the cell surface to the interior of the cell, ultimately resulting in changes in gene expression, protein activity, or metabolism.

The process typically begins with the binding of the extracellular signal to a receptor located on the cell membrane. This binding event activates the receptor, which then triggers a cascade of intracellular signaling molecules, such as second messengers, protein kinases, and ion channels. These molecules amplify and propagate the signal, ultimately leading to the activation or inhibition of specific cellular responses.

Signal transduction pathways are highly regulated and can be modulated by various factors, including other signaling molecules, post-translational modifications, and feedback mechanisms. Dysregulation of these pathways has been implicated in a variety of diseases, including cancer, diabetes, and neurological disorders.

Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases, Non-Receptor (PTPNs) are a type of enzymes that play a crucial role in the regulation of various cellular processes by removing phosphate groups from tyrosine residues of proteins. Unlike receptor protein tyrosine phosphatases, PTPNs do not have a transmembrane domain and are located in the cytoplasm. They are involved in several signaling pathways that control cell growth, differentiation, migration, and survival. Dysregulation of PTPN function has been implicated in various diseases, including cancer, diabetes, and neurological disorders.

A cell line is a culture of cells that are grown in a laboratory for use in research. These cells are usually taken from a single cell or group of cells, and they are able to divide and grow continuously in the lab. Cell lines can come from many different sources, including animals, plants, and humans. They are often used in scientific research to study cellular processes, disease mechanisms, and to test new drugs or treatments. Some common types of human cell lines include HeLa cells (which come from a cancer patient named Henrietta Lacks), HEK293 cells (which come from embryonic kidney cells), and HUVEC cells (which come from umbilical vein endothelial cells). It is important to note that cell lines are not the same as primary cells, which are cells that are taken directly from a living organism and have not been grown in the lab.

Receptor-like protein tyrosine phosphatases, class 2 (RPTPs-Class 2) are a subfamily of receptor-like protein tyrosine phosphatases that play crucial roles in various cellular processes, including cell growth, differentiation, and migration. These transmembrane enzymes are characterized by the presence of two extracellular fibronectin type III domains, a single membrane-spanning region, and one or two intracellular protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) domains.

RPTPs-Class 2 include four members in humans: PTPRD, PTPRF, PTPRG, and PTPRH. These enzymes can dephosphorylate and modulate the activity of various proteins involved in signal transduction pathways by removing phosphate groups from tyrosine residues. By doing so, RPTPs-Class 2 help regulate the balance between kinase-mediated phosphorylation and phosphatase-mediated dephosphorylation events, which is essential for proper cellular function.

Mutations in RPTPs-Class 2 genes have been associated with various human diseases, including cancer, neurological disorders, and developmental abnormalities. Therefore, understanding the structure, regulation, and functions of these enzymes can provide valuable insights into disease mechanisms and potential therapeutic strategies.

A base sequence in the context of molecular biology refers to the specific order of nucleotides in a DNA or RNA molecule. In DNA, these nucleotides are adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), and thymine (T). In RNA, uracil (U) takes the place of thymine. The base sequence contains genetic information that is transcribed into RNA and ultimately translated into proteins. It is the exact order of these bases that determines the genetic code and thus the function of the DNA or RNA molecule.

Microfilament proteins are a type of structural protein that form part of the cytoskeleton in eukaryotic cells. They are made up of actin monomers, which polymerize to form long, thin filaments. These filaments are involved in various cellular processes such as muscle contraction, cell division, and cell motility. Microfilament proteins also interact with other cytoskeletal components like intermediate filaments and microtubules to maintain the overall shape and integrity of the cell. Additionally, they play a crucial role in the formation of cell-cell junctions and cell-matrix adhesions, which are essential for tissue structure and function.

Protein binding, in the context of medical and biological sciences, refers to the interaction between a protein and another molecule (known as the ligand) that results in a stable complex. This process is often reversible and can be influenced by various factors such as pH, temperature, and concentration of the involved molecules.

In clinical chemistry, protein binding is particularly important when it comes to drugs, as many of them bind to proteins (especially albumin) in the bloodstream. The degree of protein binding can affect a drug's distribution, metabolism, and excretion, which in turn influence its therapeutic effectiveness and potential side effects.

Protein-bound drugs may be less available for interaction with their target tissues, as only the unbound or "free" fraction of the drug is active. Therefore, understanding protein binding can help optimize dosing regimens and minimize adverse reactions.

Phosphatidate phosphatase is an enzyme that plays a crucial role in the metabolism of lipids, particularly in the synthesis of glycerophospholipids, which are key components of cell membranes.

The term "phosphatidate" refers to a type of lipid molecule known as a diacylglycerol phosphate. This molecule contains two fatty acid chains attached to a glycerol backbone, with a phosphate group also attached to the glycerol.

Phosphatidate phosphatase functions to remove the phosphate group from phosphatidate, converting it into diacylglycerol (DAG). This reaction is an important step in the biosynthesis of glycerophospholipids, as DAG can be further metabolized to produce various types of these lipids, including phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, and phosphatidylinositol.

There are two main types of phosphatidate phosphatase enzymes: type 1 and type 2. Type 1 phosphatidate phosphatase is primarily located in the cytosol and is involved in the synthesis of triacylglycerols, which are stored as energy reserves in cells. Type 2 phosphatidate phosphatase, on the other hand, is found on the endoplasmic reticulum membrane and plays a key role in the biosynthesis of glycerophospholipids.

Deficiencies or mutations in phosphatidate phosphatase enzymes can lead to various metabolic disorders, including some forms of lipodystrophy, which are characterized by abnormalities in fat metabolism and distribution.

Phosphopeptides are short peptide sequences that contain one or more phosphorylated amino acid residues, most commonly serine, threonine, or tyrosine. Phosphorylation is a post-translational modification that plays a crucial role in regulating various cellular processes such as signal transduction, protein-protein interactions, enzyme activity, and protein degradation. The addition of a phosphate group to a peptide can alter its charge, conformation, stability, and interaction with other molecules, thereby modulating its function in the cell. Phosphopeptides are often generated by proteolytic digestion of phosphorylated proteins and are used as biomarkers or probes to study protein phosphorylation and signaling pathways in various biological systems.

Dual Specificity Phosphatase 1 (DUSP1), also known as MAP Kinase Phosphatase 1 (MKP-1), is a protein that plays a crucial role in the negative regulation of cell signaling pathways. It is a member of the dual specificity phosphatase family, which can dephosphorylate both tyrosine and serine/threonine residues on its target proteins.

DUSP1 specifically dephosphorylates and inactivates members of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family, including extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs), c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs), and p38 MAPKs. These MAPK signaling pathways are involved in various cellular processes such as proliferation, differentiation, survival, and apoptosis.

DUSP1 is rapidly induced in response to various stimuli, including growth factors, cytokines, and stress signals. Its expression helps maintain the balance of MAPK signaling, preventing excessive or prolonged activation that could lead to cellular dysfunction and diseases such as cancer, inflammation, and neurodegeneration.

In summary, Dual Specificity Phosphatase 1 (DUSP1) is a protein that negatively regulates MAPK signaling pathways by dephosphorylating and inactivating ERKs, JNKs, and p38 MAPKs. Its expression is critical for maintaining the proper balance of cell signaling and preventing the development of various diseases.

Phosphoserine is not a medical term per se, but rather a biochemical term. It refers to a post-translationally modified amino acid called serine that has a phosphate group attached to its side chain. This modification plays a crucial role in various cellular processes, including signal transduction and regulation of protein function. In medical contexts, abnormalities in the regulation of phosphorylation (the addition of a phosphate group) and dephosphorylation (the removal of a phosphate group) have been implicated in several diseases, such as cancer and neurological disorders.

Phosphothreonine is not a medical term per se, but rather a biochemical term that refers to a specific post-translational modification of the amino acid threonine. In this modification, a phosphate group is added to the hydroxyl side chain of threonine, which can affect the function and regulation of proteins in which it occurs.

In medical or clinical contexts, phosphothreonine may be mentioned in relation to various disease processes or signaling pathways that involve protein kinases, enzymes that add phosphate groups to specific amino acids (including threonine) in proteins. For example, abnormal regulation of protein kinases and phosphatases (enzymes that remove phosphate groups) can contribute to the development of cancer, neurological disorders, and other diseases.

Phosphates, in a medical context, refer to the salts or esters of phosphoric acid. Phosphates play crucial roles in various biological processes within the human body. They are essential components of bones and teeth, where they combine with calcium to form hydroxyapatite crystals. Phosphates also participate in energy transfer reactions as phosphate groups attached to adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Additionally, they contribute to buffer systems that help maintain normal pH levels in the body.

Abnormal levels of phosphates in the blood can indicate certain medical conditions. High phosphate levels (hyperphosphatemia) may be associated with kidney dysfunction, hyperparathyroidism, or excessive intake of phosphate-containing products. Low phosphate levels (hypophosphatemia) might result from malnutrition, vitamin D deficiency, or certain diseases affecting the small intestine or kidneys. Both hypophosphatemia and hyperphosphatemia can have significant impacts on various organ systems and may require medical intervention.

Synapsins are a family of proteins found in the presynaptic terminals of neurons. They play a crucial role in the regulation of neurotransmitter release and synaptic plasticity, which is the ability of synapses to strengthen or weaken over time in response to increases or decreases in their activity.

Synapsins are associated with the cytoskeleton of presynaptic terminals and help to tether vesicles containing neurotransmitters to the cytoskeleton. This allows for the rapid mobilization of vesicles to the active zone of the synapse, where they can be released in response to an action potential.

Synapsins are also involved in the regulation of vesicle pool size and the clustering of calcium channels at the active zone. They have been implicated in various neurological disorders, including epilepsy, fragile X syndrome, and Alzheimer's disease.

Tyrosine is an non-essential amino acid, which means that it can be synthesized by the human body from another amino acid called phenylalanine. Its name is derived from the Greek word "tyros," which means cheese, as it was first isolated from casein, a protein found in cheese.

Tyrosine plays a crucial role in the production of several important substances in the body, including neurotransmitters such as dopamine, norepinephrine, and epinephrine, which are involved in various physiological processes, including mood regulation, stress response, and cognitive functions. It also serves as a precursor to melanin, the pigment responsible for skin, hair, and eye color.

In addition, tyrosine is involved in the structure of proteins and is essential for normal growth and development. Some individuals may require tyrosine supplementation if they have a genetic disorder that affects tyrosine metabolism or if they are phenylketonurics (PKU), who cannot metabolize phenylalanine, which can lead to elevated tyrosine levels in the blood. However, it is important to consult with a healthcare professional before starting any supplementation regimen.

Isoenzymes, also known as isoforms, are multiple forms of an enzyme that catalyze the same chemical reaction but differ in their amino acid sequence, structure, and/or kinetic properties. They are encoded by different genes or alternative splicing of the same gene. Isoenzymes can be found in various tissues and organs, and they play a crucial role in biological processes such as metabolism, detoxification, and cell signaling. Measurement of isoenzyme levels in body fluids (such as blood) can provide valuable diagnostic information for certain medical conditions, including tissue damage, inflammation, and various diseases.

Receptor-like protein tyrosine phosphatases, class 3 (RPTPs, Class 3) are a subfamily of receptor-like protein tyrosine phosphatases that play crucial roles in various cellular processes, including cell growth, differentiation, and migration. These transmembrane enzymes are characterized by the presence of two extracellular carbonic anhydrase-like domains (CA domains), a single transmembrane region, and one or two intracellular protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) domains.

The RPTPs, Class 3 subfamily includes three members: PTPRG (also known as RPTPγ), PTPRD (RPTPδ), and PTPRS (RPTPσ). These proteins have been implicated in the regulation of neuronal development, synaptic plasticity, and tumorigenesis. They are involved in cell-cell adhesion and signaling through homophilic interactions between their extracellular CA domains and heterophilic interactions with various ligands, such as semaphorins, plexins, and collapsin response mediator proteins (CRMPs).

Upon activation, the intracellular PTP domains of RPTPs, Class 3 dephosphorylate specific tyrosine residues on their target proteins, thereby modulating various signaling pathways. Dysregulation of these phosphatases has been associated with several neurological disorders and cancers.

Sequence homology, amino acid, refers to the similarity in the order of amino acids in a protein or a portion of a protein between two or more species. This similarity can be used to infer evolutionary relationships and functional similarities between proteins. The higher the degree of sequence homology, the more likely it is that the proteins are related and have similar functions. Sequence homology can be determined through various methods such as pairwise alignment or multiple sequence alignment, which compare the sequences and calculate a score based on the number and type of matching amino acids.

Intracellular signaling peptides and proteins are molecules that play a crucial role in transmitting signals within cells, which ultimately lead to changes in cell behavior or function. These signals can originate from outside the cell (extracellular) or within the cell itself. Intracellular signaling molecules include various types of peptides and proteins, such as:

1. G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs): These are seven-transmembrane domain receptors that bind to extracellular signaling molecules like hormones, neurotransmitters, or chemokines. Upon activation, they initiate a cascade of intracellular signals through G proteins and secondary messengers.
2. Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs): These are transmembrane receptors that bind to growth factors, cytokines, or hormones. Activation of RTKs leads to autophosphorylation of specific tyrosine residues, creating binding sites for intracellular signaling proteins such as adapter proteins, phosphatases, and enzymes like Ras, PI3K, and Src family kinases.
3. Second messenger systems: Intracellular second messengers are small molecules that amplify and propagate signals within the cell. Examples include cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), diacylglycerol (DAG), inositol triphosphate (IP3), calcium ions (Ca2+), and nitric oxide (NO). These second messengers activate or inhibit various downstream effectors, leading to changes in cellular responses.
4. Signal transduction cascades: Intracellular signaling proteins often form complex networks of interacting molecules that relay signals from the plasma membrane to the nucleus. These cascades involve kinases (protein kinases A, B, C, etc.), phosphatases, and adapter proteins, which ultimately regulate gene expression, cell cycle progression, metabolism, and other cellular processes.
5. Ubiquitination and proteasome degradation: Intracellular signaling pathways can also control protein stability by modulating ubiquitin-proteasome degradation. E3 ubiquitin ligases recognize specific substrates and conjugate them with ubiquitin molecules, targeting them for proteasomal degradation. This process regulates the abundance of key signaling proteins and contributes to signal termination or amplification.

In summary, intracellular signaling pathways involve a complex network of interacting proteins that relay signals from the plasma membrane to various cellular compartments, ultimately regulating gene expression, metabolism, and other cellular processes. Dysregulation of these pathways can contribute to disease development and progression, making them attractive targets for therapeutic intervention.

Molecular cloning is a laboratory technique used to create multiple copies of a specific DNA sequence. This process involves several steps:

1. Isolation: The first step in molecular cloning is to isolate the DNA sequence of interest from the rest of the genomic DNA. This can be done using various methods such as PCR (polymerase chain reaction), restriction enzymes, or hybridization.
2. Vector construction: Once the DNA sequence of interest has been isolated, it must be inserted into a vector, which is a small circular DNA molecule that can replicate independently in a host cell. Common vectors used in molecular cloning include plasmids and phages.
3. Transformation: The constructed vector is then introduced into a host cell, usually a bacterial or yeast cell, through a process called transformation. This can be done using various methods such as electroporation or chemical transformation.
4. Selection: After transformation, the host cells are grown in selective media that allow only those cells containing the vector to grow. This ensures that the DNA sequence of interest has been successfully cloned into the vector.
5. Amplification: Once the host cells have been selected, they can be grown in large quantities to amplify the number of copies of the cloned DNA sequence.

Molecular cloning is a powerful tool in molecular biology and has numerous applications, including the production of recombinant proteins, gene therapy, functional analysis of genes, and genetic engineering.

Vanadates are salts or esters of vanadic acid (HVO3), which contains the vanadium(V) ion. They contain the vanadate ion (VO3-), which consists of one vanadium atom and three oxygen atoms. Vanadates have been studied for their potential insulin-mimetic and antidiabetic effects, as well as their possible cardiovascular benefits. However, more research is needed to fully understand their mechanisms of action and potential therapeutic uses in medicine.

Receptor-like protein tyrosine phosphatases, class 4 (RPTPs, Class 4) are a subfamily of transmembrane receptor proteins that possess tyrosine-specific phosphatase activity. They play crucial roles in various cellular processes, including cell growth, differentiation, and migration, by regulating the balance of protein tyrosine phosphorylation.

Class 4 RPTPs are characterized by the presence of two extracellular carbonic anhydrase-like domains (CA domains), a single transmembrane region, and one intracellular catalytic domain with tyrosine phosphatase activity. The extracellular CA domains are involved in mediating protein-protein interactions, while the intracellular domain regulates signaling pathways through dephosphorylation of specific tyrosine residues on target proteins.

There are four members in this class: RPTP-μ (PTPRM), RPTP-π (PTPRS), RPTP-ε (PTPRE), and RPTP-δ (PTPRD). Mutations in these genes have been associated with various human diseases, including neurological disorders, cancer, and immune dysfunction.

In summary, Receptor-like protein tyrosine phosphatases, class 4 are a group of transmembrane receptors that regulate cellular signaling through tyrosine dephosphorylation, with important roles in various physiological processes and disease states.

"Cells, cultured" is a medical term that refers to cells that have been removed from an organism and grown in controlled laboratory conditions outside of the body. This process is called cell culture and it allows scientists to study cells in a more controlled and accessible environment than they would have inside the body. Cultured cells can be derived from a variety of sources, including tissues, organs, or fluids from humans, animals, or cell lines that have been previously established in the laboratory.

Cell culture involves several steps, including isolation of the cells from the tissue, purification and characterization of the cells, and maintenance of the cells in appropriate growth conditions. The cells are typically grown in specialized media that contain nutrients, growth factors, and other components necessary for their survival and proliferation. Cultured cells can be used for a variety of purposes, including basic research, drug development and testing, and production of biological products such as vaccines and gene therapies.

It is important to note that cultured cells may behave differently than they do in the body, and results obtained from cell culture studies may not always translate directly to human physiology or disease. Therefore, it is essential to validate findings from cell culture experiments using additional models and ultimately in clinical trials involving human subjects.

Serine is an amino acid, which is a building block of proteins. More specifically, it is a non-essential amino acid, meaning that the body can produce it from other compounds, and it does not need to be obtained through diet. Serine plays important roles in the body, such as contributing to the formation of the protective covering of nerve fibers (myelin sheath), helping to synthesize another amino acid called tryptophan, and taking part in the metabolism of fatty acids. It is also involved in the production of muscle tissues, the immune system, and the forming of cell structures. Serine can be found in various foods such as soy, eggs, cheese, meat, peanuts, lentils, and many others.

Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Phosphatases (MAPK Phosphatases or MAPKPs) are a group of enzymes that play a crucial role in the regulation of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways. MAPKs are serine/threonine protein kinases involved in various cellular processes, including proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis.

MAPK Phosphatases dephosphorylate and inactivate both the threonine and tyrosine residues of MAPKs, thereby acting as negative regulators of MAPK signaling cascades. There are three major subfamilies of MAPK Phosphatases:

1. DUSPs (Dual Specificity Phosphatases) - also known as MKPs (MAP Kinase Phosphatases)
2. CDC14s
3. PTENs (Phosphatase and Tensin Homologs)

Each subfamily has distinct substrate specificities, cellular localizations, and regulatory mechanisms. Dysregulation of MAPK Phosphatases can lead to various pathological conditions, such as cancer, inflammation, and neurodegenerative diseases. Therefore, understanding the function and regulation of MAPK Phosphatases is essential for developing novel therapeutic strategies targeting MAPK signaling pathways.

Viral proteins are the proteins that are encoded by the viral genome and are essential for the viral life cycle. These proteins can be structural or non-structural and play various roles in the virus's replication, infection, and assembly process. Structural proteins make up the physical structure of the virus, including the capsid (the protein shell that surrounds the viral genome) and any envelope proteins (that may be present on enveloped viruses). Non-structural proteins are involved in the replication of the viral genome and modulation of the host cell environment to favor viral replication. Overall, a thorough understanding of viral proteins is crucial for developing antiviral therapies and vaccines.

Stathmin, also known as oncoprotein 18 or OP18, is a microtubule-associated protein that plays a crucial role in the regulation of microtubule dynamics. It is involved in the destabilization of microtubules by promoting the depolymerization and inhibiting the polymerization of tubulin dimers. Stathmin has been found to be overexpressed in various types of cancer, making it a potential target for cancer therapy. Additionally, stathmin has been implicated in the regulation of cell division, differentiation, and motility, as well as in neuronal development and plasticity.

A mutation is a permanent change in the DNA sequence of an organism's genome. Mutations can occur spontaneously or be caused by environmental factors such as exposure to radiation, chemicals, or viruses. They may have various effects on the organism, ranging from benign to harmful, depending on where they occur and whether they alter the function of essential proteins. In some cases, mutations can increase an individual's susceptibility to certain diseases or disorders, while in others, they may confer a survival advantage. Mutations are the driving force behind evolution, as they introduce new genetic variability into populations, which can then be acted upon by natural selection.

In the context of medical and biological sciences, a "binding site" refers to a specific location on a protein, molecule, or cell where another molecule can attach or bind. This binding interaction can lead to various functional changes in the original protein or molecule. The other molecule that binds to the binding site is often referred to as a ligand, which can be a small molecule, ion, or even another protein.

The binding between a ligand and its target binding site can be specific and selective, meaning that only certain ligands can bind to particular binding sites with high affinity. This specificity plays a crucial role in various biological processes, such as signal transduction, enzyme catalysis, or drug action.

In the case of drug development, understanding the location and properties of binding sites on target proteins is essential for designing drugs that can selectively bind to these sites and modulate protein function. This knowledge can help create more effective and safer therapeutic options for various diseases.

Recombinant fusion proteins are artificially created biomolecules that combine the functional domains or properties of two or more different proteins into a single protein entity. They are generated through recombinant DNA technology, where the genes encoding the desired protein domains are linked together and expressed as a single, chimeric gene in a host organism, such as bacteria, yeast, or mammalian cells.

The resulting fusion protein retains the functional properties of its individual constituent proteins, allowing for novel applications in research, diagnostics, and therapeutics. For instance, recombinant fusion proteins can be designed to enhance protein stability, solubility, or immunogenicity, making them valuable tools for studying protein-protein interactions, developing targeted therapies, or generating vaccines against infectious diseases or cancer.

Examples of recombinant fusion proteins include:

1. Etaglunatide (ABT-523): A soluble Fc fusion protein that combines the heavy chain fragment crystallizable region (Fc) of an immunoglobulin with the extracellular domain of the human interleukin-6 receptor (IL-6R). This fusion protein functions as a decoy receptor, neutralizing IL-6 and its downstream signaling pathways in rheumatoid arthritis.
2. Etanercept (Enbrel): A soluble TNF receptor p75 Fc fusion protein that binds to tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and inhibits its proinflammatory activity, making it a valuable therapeutic option for treating autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and psoriasis.
3. Abatacept (Orencia): A fusion protein consisting of the extracellular domain of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) linked to the Fc region of an immunoglobulin, which downregulates T-cell activation and proliferation in autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis.
4. Belimumab (Benlysta): A monoclonal antibody that targets B-lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS) protein, preventing its interaction with the B-cell surface receptor and inhibiting B-cell activation in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).
5. Romiplostim (Nplate): A fusion protein consisting of a thrombopoietin receptor agonist peptide linked to an immunoglobulin Fc region, which stimulates platelet production in patients with chronic immune thrombocytopenia (ITP).
6. Darbepoetin alfa (Aranesp): A hyperglycosylated erythropoiesis-stimulating protein that functions as a longer-acting form of recombinant human erythropoietin, used to treat anemia in patients with chronic kidney disease or cancer.
7. Palivizumab (Synagis): A monoclonal antibody directed against the F protein of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), which prevents RSV infection and is administered prophylactically to high-risk infants during the RSV season.
8. Ranibizumab (Lucentis): A recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody fragment that binds and inhibits vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A), used in the treatment of age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, and other ocular disorders.
9. Cetuximab (Erbitux): A chimeric monoclonal antibody that binds to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), used in the treatment of colorectal cancer and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.
10. Adalimumab (Humira): A fully humanized monoclonal antibody that targets tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), used in the treatment of various inflammatory diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, and Crohn's disease.
11. Bevacizumab (Avastin): A recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody that binds to VEGF-A, used in the treatment of various cancers, including colorectal, lung, breast, and kidney cancer.
12. Trastuzumab (Herceptin): A humanized monoclonal antibody that targets HER2/neu receptor, used in the treatment of breast cancer.
13. Rituximab (Rituxan): A chimeric monoclonal antibody that binds to CD20 antigen on B cells, used in the treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and rheumatoid arthritis.
14. Palivizumab (Synagis): A humanized monoclonal antibody that binds to the F protein of respiratory syncytial virus, used in the prevention of respiratory syncytial virus infection in high-risk infants.
15. Infliximab (Remicade): A chimeric monoclonal antibody that targets TNF-α, used in the treatment of various inflammatory diseases, including Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, rheumatoid arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis.
16. Natalizumab (Tysabri): A humanized monoclonal antibody that binds to α4β1 integrin, used in the treatment of multiple sclerosis and Crohn's disease.
17. Adalimumab (Humira): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets TNF-α, used in the treatment of various inflammatory diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, Crohn's disease, and ulcerative colitis.
18. Golimumab (Simponi): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets TNF-α, used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and ulcerative colitis.
19. Certolizumab pegol (Cimzia): A PEGylated Fab' fragment of a humanized monoclonal antibody that targets TNF-α, used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and Crohn's disease.
20. Ustekinumab (Stelara): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets IL-12 and IL-23, used in the treatment of psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, and Crohn's disease.
21. Secukinumab (Cosentyx): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets IL-17A, used in the treatment of psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis.
22. Ixekizumab (Taltz): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets IL-17A, used in the treatment of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis.
23. Brodalumab (Siliq): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets IL-17 receptor A, used in the treatment of psoriasis.
24. Sarilumab (Kevzara): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets the IL-6 receptor, used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.
25. Tocilizumab (Actemra): A humanized monoclonal antibody that targets the IL-6 receptor, used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis, polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis, giant cell arteritis, and chimeric antigen receptor T-cell-induced cytokine release syndrome.
26. Siltuximab (Sylvant): A chimeric monoclonal antibody that targets IL-6, used in the treatment of multicentric Castleman disease.
27. Satralizumab (Enspryng): A humanized monoclonal antibody that targets IL-6 receptor alpha, used in the treatment of neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder.
28. Sirukumab (Plivensia): A human monoclonal antibody that targets IL-6, used in the treatment

Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases (PSTKs) are a type of protein kinase that catalyzes the transfer of a phosphate group from ATP to the hydroxyl side chains of serine or threonine residues on target proteins. This phosphorylation process plays a crucial role in various cellular signaling pathways, including regulation of metabolism, gene expression, cell cycle progression, and apoptosis. PSTKs are involved in many physiological and pathological processes, and their dysregulation has been implicated in several diseases, such as cancer, diabetes, and neurodegenerative disorders.

SH2 (Src homology 2) domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are a family of enzymes that play crucial roles in regulating various cellular processes, including cell growth, differentiation, and survival. These enzymes are characterized by the presence of SH2 domains, which bind to specific phosphorylated tyrosine residues on other proteins, and protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) domains, which catalyze the removal of phosphate groups from tyrosine residues.

SH2 domain-containing PTPs can be further divided into two subfamilies: the SH2 domain-containing PTP1 (PTP1B) family and the SH2 domain-containing PTP2 (SHP) family. The PTP1B family includes PTP1B, TCPTP (T-cell protein tyrosine phosphatase), and MEG2 (Megakaryocyte-associated tyrosine phosphatase). These enzymes primarily function as negative regulators of various signaling pathways by dephosphorylating activated receptor tyrosine kinases, such as the insulin receptor and epidermal growth factor receptor.

The SHP family includes SHP1 (PTPN6) and SHP2 (PTPN11). These enzymes contain two SH2 domains and a PTP domain. They play essential roles in regulating various signaling pathways, including those involved in hematopoiesis, immune cell function, and cancer. Unlike the PTP1B family members, SHP1 and SHP2 can act as both positive and negative regulators of signaling pathways, depending on the context.

Dysregulation of SH2 domain-containing PTPs has been implicated in various diseases, including diabetes, cancer, and immune disorders. Therefore, these enzymes represent potential targets for therapeutic intervention.

Phosphotyrosine is not a medical term per se, but rather a biochemical term used in the field of medicine and life sciences.

Phosphotyrosine is a post-translational modification of tyrosine residues in proteins, where a phosphate group is added to the hydroxyl side chain of tyrosine by protein kinases. This modification plays a crucial role in intracellular signaling pathways and regulates various cellular processes such as cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis. Abnormalities in phosphotyrosine-mediated signaling have been implicated in several diseases, including cancer and diabetes.

Recombinant proteins are artificially created proteins produced through the use of recombinant DNA technology. This process involves combining DNA molecules from different sources to create a new set of genes that encode for a specific protein. The resulting recombinant protein can then be expressed, purified, and used for various applications in research, medicine, and industry.

Recombinant proteins are widely used in biomedical research to study protein function, structure, and interactions. They are also used in the development of diagnostic tests, vaccines, and therapeutic drugs. For example, recombinant insulin is a common treatment for diabetes, while recombinant human growth hormone is used to treat growth disorders.

The production of recombinant proteins typically involves the use of host cells, such as bacteria, yeast, or mammalian cells, which are engineered to express the desired protein. The host cells are transformed with a plasmid vector containing the gene of interest, along with regulatory elements that control its expression. Once the host cells are cultured and the protein is expressed, it can be purified using various chromatography techniques.

Overall, recombinant proteins have revolutionized many areas of biology and medicine, enabling researchers to study and manipulate proteins in ways that were previously impossible.

Peptide mapping is a technique used in proteomics and analytical chemistry to analyze and identify the sequence and structure of peptides or proteins. This method involves breaking down a protein into smaller peptide fragments using enzymatic or chemical digestion, followed by separation and identification of these fragments through various analytical techniques such as liquid chromatography (LC) and mass spectrometry (MS).

The resulting peptide map serves as a "fingerprint" of the protein, providing information about its sequence, modifications, and structure. Peptide mapping can be used for a variety of applications, including protein identification, characterization of post-translational modifications, and monitoring of protein degradation or cleavage.

In summary, peptide mapping is a powerful tool in proteomics that enables the analysis and identification of proteins and their modifications at the peptide level.

Dual specificity phosphatase 6 (DUSP6), also known as MAP kinase phosphatase 3 (MKP3), is a type of enzyme that belongs to the dual specificity phosphatase family. These enzymes are capable of removing phosphate groups from both tyrosine and threonine/serine residues on their target proteins, including mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs).

DUSP6 specifically dephosphorylates and inactivates extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2), which are MAPKs that play crucial roles in various cellular processes such as proliferation, differentiation, and survival. By negatively regulating ERK1/2 signaling, DUSP6 helps maintain the balance of this pathway and prevents excessive or aberrant activation, which can contribute to diseases like cancer.

DUSP6 is primarily localized in the nucleus and is involved in various cellular responses, including the negative feedback regulation of ERK1/2 signaling upon growth factor stimulation. Dysregulation of DUSP6 has been implicated in several pathological conditions, including cancer and neurological disorders.

Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase, Non-Receptor Type 2 (PTPN2) is a type of enzyme that belongs to the protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) family. PTPs play a crucial role in regulating various cellular processes by removing phosphate groups from phosphorylated tyrosine residues on proteins, thereby controlling their activity.

PTPN2 is a non-receptor type of PTP, meaning it does not have a transmembrane domain and is found in the cytoplasm of cells. It specifically dephosphorylates and regulates the activity of various signaling proteins, including receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), JAK kinases, and STAT transcription factors.

PTPN2 has been implicated in several cellular processes, such as regulation of immune responses, insulin signaling, and cell growth and differentiation. Mutations in the PTPN2 gene have been associated with various diseases, including autoimmune disorders, cancer, and diabetes.

A precipitin test is a type of immunodiagnostic test used to detect and measure the presence of specific antibodies or antigens in a patient's serum. The test is based on the principle of antigen-antibody interaction, where the addition of an antigen to a solution containing its corresponding antibody results in the formation of an insoluble immune complex known as a precipitin.

In this test, a small amount of the patient's serum is added to a solution containing a known antigen or antibody. If the patient has antibodies or antigens that correspond to the added reagent, they will bind and form a visible precipitate. The size and density of the precipitate can be used to quantify the amount of antibody or antigen present in the sample.

Precipitin tests are commonly used in the diagnosis of various infectious diseases, autoimmune disorders, and allergies. They can also be used in forensic science to identify biological samples. However, they have largely been replaced by more modern immunological techniques such as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) and radioimmunoassays (RIAs).

Phosvitin is not a medical term, but it is a protein found in egg yolk. It is a highly phosphorylated protein, meaning that many of its amino acids are bound to phosphate groups. This gives phosvitin a high negative charge and makes it an excellent chelator of positively charged ions such as calcium and iron.

Phosvitin is known for its ability to bind and store minerals, particularly iron, in the egg yolk. It plays a role in the development and nutrition of growing embryos in birds. In addition to its nutritional role, phosvitin has been studied for its potential health benefits due to its antioxidant properties and ability to bind heavy metals.

While not a medical term itself, phosvitin may be relevant to certain medical fields such as nutrition, biochemistry, and food science.

Membrane proteins are a type of protein that are embedded in the lipid bilayer of biological membranes, such as the plasma membrane of cells or the inner membrane of mitochondria. These proteins play crucial roles in various cellular processes, including:

1. Cell-cell recognition and signaling
2. Transport of molecules across the membrane (selective permeability)
3. Enzymatic reactions at the membrane surface
4. Energy transduction and conversion
5. Mechanosensation and signal transduction

Membrane proteins can be classified into two main categories: integral membrane proteins, which are permanently associated with the lipid bilayer, and peripheral membrane proteins, which are temporarily or loosely attached to the membrane surface. Integral membrane proteins can further be divided into three subcategories based on their topology:

1. Transmembrane proteins, which span the entire width of the lipid bilayer with one or more alpha-helices or beta-barrels.
2. Lipid-anchored proteins, which are covalently attached to lipids in the membrane via a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor or other lipid modifications.
3. Monotopic proteins, which are partially embedded in the membrane and have one or more domains exposed to either side of the bilayer.

Membrane proteins are essential for maintaining cellular homeostasis and are targets for various therapeutic interventions, including drug development and gene therapy. However, their structural complexity and hydrophobicity make them challenging to study using traditional biochemical methods, requiring specialized techniques such as X-ray crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and single-particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM).

Two-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis is a type of electrophoretic technique used in the separation and analysis of complex protein mixtures. This method combines two types of electrophoresis – isoelectric focusing (IEF) and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) – to separate proteins based on their unique physical and chemical properties in two dimensions.

In the first dimension, IEF separates proteins according to their isoelectric points (pI), which is the pH at which a protein carries no net electrical charge. The proteins are focused into narrow zones along a pH gradient established within a gel strip. In the second dimension, SDS-PAGE separates the proteins based on their molecular weights by applying an electric field perpendicular to the first dimension.

The separated proteins form distinct spots on the 2D gel, which can be visualized using various staining techniques. The resulting protein pattern provides valuable information about the composition and modifications of the protein mixture, enabling researchers to identify and compare different proteins in various samples. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis is widely used in proteomics research, biomarker discovery, and quality control in protein production.

Tertiary protein structure refers to the three-dimensional arrangement of all the elements (polypeptide chains) of a single protein molecule. It is the highest level of structural organization and results from interactions between various side chains (R groups) of the amino acids that make up the protein. These interactions, which include hydrogen bonds, ionic bonds, van der Waals forces, and disulfide bridges, give the protein its unique shape and stability, which in turn determines its function. The tertiary structure of a protein can be stabilized by various factors such as temperature, pH, and the presence of certain ions. Any changes in these factors can lead to denaturation, where the protein loses its tertiary structure and thus its function.

Protein-Tyrosine Kinases (PTKs) are a type of enzyme that plays a crucial role in various cellular functions, including signal transduction, cell growth, differentiation, and metabolism. They catalyze the transfer of a phosphate group from ATP to the tyrosine residues of proteins, thereby modifying their activity, localization, or interaction with other molecules.

PTKs can be divided into two main categories: receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) and non-receptor tyrosine kinases (NRTKs). RTKs are transmembrane proteins that become activated upon binding to specific ligands, such as growth factors or hormones. NRTKs, on the other hand, are intracellular enzymes that can be activated by various signals, including receptor-mediated signaling and intracellular messengers.

Dysregulation of PTK activity has been implicated in several diseases, such as cancer, diabetes, and inflammatory disorders. Therefore, PTKs are important targets for drug development and therapy.

Western blotting is a laboratory technique used in molecular biology to detect and quantify specific proteins in a mixture of many different proteins. This technique is commonly used to confirm the expression of a protein of interest, determine its size, and investigate its post-translational modifications. The name "Western" blotting distinguishes this technique from Southern blotting (for DNA) and Northern blotting (for RNA).

The Western blotting procedure involves several steps:

1. Protein extraction: The sample containing the proteins of interest is first extracted, often by breaking open cells or tissues and using a buffer to extract the proteins.
2. Separation of proteins by electrophoresis: The extracted proteins are then separated based on their size by loading them onto a polyacrylamide gel and running an electric current through the gel (a process called sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis or SDS-PAGE). This separates the proteins according to their molecular weight, with smaller proteins migrating faster than larger ones.
3. Transfer of proteins to a membrane: After separation, the proteins are transferred from the gel onto a nitrocellulose or polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membrane using an electric current in a process called blotting. This creates a replica of the protein pattern on the gel but now immobilized on the membrane for further analysis.
4. Blocking: The membrane is then blocked with a blocking agent, such as non-fat dry milk or bovine serum albumin (BSA), to prevent non-specific binding of antibodies in subsequent steps.
5. Primary antibody incubation: A primary antibody that specifically recognizes the protein of interest is added and allowed to bind to its target protein on the membrane. This step may be performed at room temperature or 4°C overnight, depending on the antibody's properties.
6. Washing: The membrane is washed with a buffer to remove unbound primary antibodies.
7. Secondary antibody incubation: A secondary antibody that recognizes the primary antibody (often coupled to an enzyme or fluorophore) is added and allowed to bind to the primary antibody. This step may involve using a horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-conjugated or alkaline phosphatase (AP)-conjugated secondary antibody, depending on the detection method used later.
8. Washing: The membrane is washed again to remove unbound secondary antibodies.
9. Detection: A detection reagent is added to visualize the protein of interest by detecting the signal generated from the enzyme-conjugated or fluorophore-conjugated secondary antibody. This can be done using chemiluminescent, colorimetric, or fluorescent methods.
10. Analysis: The resulting image is analyzed to determine the presence and quantity of the protein of interest in the sample.

Western blotting is a powerful technique for identifying and quantifying specific proteins within complex mixtures. It can be used to study protein expression, post-translational modifications, protein-protein interactions, and more. However, it requires careful optimization and validation to ensure accurate and reproducible results.

Microcystins are a type of toxin produced by certain species of blue-green algae (cyanobacteria) that can contaminate freshwater bodies. They are cyclic peptides consisting of seven amino acids, and their structure varies among different microcystin variants. These toxins can have negative effects on the liver and other organs in humans and animals upon exposure through ingestion, inhalation, or skin contact with contaminated water. They are a concern for both public health and environmental safety, particularly in relation to drinking water supplies, recreational water use, and aquatic ecosystems.

Tartrates are salts or esters of tartaric acid, a naturally occurring organic acid found in many fruits, particularly grapes. In a medical context, potassium bitartrate (also known as cream of tartar) is sometimes used as a mild laxative or to treat acidosis by helping to restore the body's normal pH balance. Additionally, sodium tartrate has been historically used as an antidote for lead poisoning. However, these uses are not common in modern medicine.

Osteopontin (OPN) is a phosphorylated glycoprotein that is widely distributed in many tissues, including bone, teeth, and mineralized tissues. It plays important roles in various biological processes such as bone remodeling, immune response, wound healing, and tissue repair. In the skeletal system, osteopontin is involved in the regulation of bone formation and resorption by modulating the activity of osteoclasts and osteoblasts. It also plays a role in the development of chronic inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, atherosclerosis, and cancer metastasis to bones. Osteopontin is considered a potential biomarker for various disease states, including bone turnover, cardiovascular disease, and cancer progression.

Calcium is an essential mineral that is vital for various physiological processes in the human body. The medical definition of calcium is as follows:

Calcium (Ca2+) is a crucial cation and the most abundant mineral in the human body, with approximately 99% of it found in bones and teeth. It plays a vital role in maintaining structural integrity, nerve impulse transmission, muscle contraction, hormonal secretion, blood coagulation, and enzyme activation.

Calcium homeostasis is tightly regulated through the interplay of several hormones, including parathyroid hormone (PTH), calcitonin, and vitamin D. Dietary calcium intake, absorption, and excretion are also critical factors in maintaining optimal calcium levels in the body.

Hypocalcemia refers to low serum calcium levels, while hypercalcemia indicates high serum calcium levels. Both conditions can have detrimental effects on various organ systems and require medical intervention to correct.

Messenger RNA (mRNA) is a type of RNA (ribonucleic acid) that carries genetic information copied from DNA in the form of a series of three-base code "words," each of which specifies a particular amino acid. This information is used by the cell's machinery to construct proteins, a process known as translation. After being transcribed from DNA, mRNA travels out of the nucleus to the ribosomes in the cytoplasm where protein synthesis occurs. Once the protein has been synthesized, the mRNA may be degraded and recycled. Post-transcriptional modifications can also occur to mRNA, such as alternative splicing and addition of a 5' cap and a poly(A) tail, which can affect its stability, localization, and translation efficiency.

Nuclear proteins are a category of proteins that are primarily found in the nucleus of a eukaryotic cell. They play crucial roles in various nuclear functions, such as DNA replication, transcription, repair, and RNA processing. This group includes structural proteins like lamins, which form the nuclear lamina, and regulatory proteins, such as histones and transcription factors, that are involved in gene expression. Nuclear localization signals (NLS) often help target these proteins to the nucleus by interacting with importin proteins during active transport across the nuclear membrane.

Nerve tissue proteins are specialized proteins found in the nervous system that provide structural and functional support to nerve cells, also known as neurons. These proteins include:

1. Neurofilaments: These are type IV intermediate filaments that provide structural support to neurons and help maintain their shape and size. They are composed of three subunits - NFL (light), NFM (medium), and NFH (heavy).

2. Neuronal Cytoskeletal Proteins: These include tubulins, actins, and spectrins that provide structural support to the neuronal cytoskeleton and help maintain its integrity.

3. Neurotransmitter Receptors: These are specialized proteins located on the postsynaptic membrane of neurons that bind neurotransmitters released by presynaptic neurons, triggering a response in the target cell.

4. Ion Channels: These are transmembrane proteins that regulate the flow of ions across the neuronal membrane and play a crucial role in generating and transmitting electrical signals in neurons.

5. Signaling Proteins: These include enzymes, receptors, and adaptor proteins that mediate intracellular signaling pathways involved in neuronal development, differentiation, survival, and death.

6. Adhesion Proteins: These are cell surface proteins that mediate cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions, playing a crucial role in the formation and maintenance of neural circuits.

7. Extracellular Matrix Proteins: These include proteoglycans, laminins, and collagens that provide structural support to nerve tissue and regulate neuronal migration, differentiation, and survival.

Transfection is a term used in molecular biology that refers to the process of deliberately introducing foreign genetic material (DNA, RNA or artificial gene constructs) into cells. This is typically done using chemical or physical methods, such as lipofection or electroporation. Transfection is widely used in research and medical settings for various purposes, including studying gene function, producing proteins, developing gene therapies, and creating genetically modified organisms. It's important to note that transfection is different from transduction, which is the process of introducing genetic material into cells using viruses as vectors.

The cell nucleus is a membrane-bound organelle found in the eukaryotic cells (cells with a true nucleus). It contains most of the cell's genetic material, organized as DNA molecules in complex with proteins, RNA molecules, and histones to form chromosomes.

The primary function of the cell nucleus is to regulate and control the activities of the cell, including growth, metabolism, protein synthesis, and reproduction. It also plays a crucial role in the process of mitosis (cell division) by separating and protecting the genetic material during this process. The nuclear membrane, or nuclear envelope, surrounding the nucleus is composed of two lipid bilayers with numerous pores that allow for the selective transport of molecules between the nucleoplasm (nucleus interior) and the cytoplasm (cell exterior).

The cell nucleus is a vital structure in eukaryotic cells, and its dysfunction can lead to various diseases, including cancer and genetic disorders.

Cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) are a type of protein found on the surface of cells that mediate the attachment or adhesion of cells to either other cells or to the extracellular matrix (ECM), which is the network of proteins and carbohydrates that provides structural and biochemical support to surrounding cells.

CAMs play crucial roles in various biological processes, including tissue development, differentiation, repair, and maintenance of tissue architecture and function. They are also involved in cell signaling, migration, and regulation of the immune response.

There are several types of CAMs, classified based on their structure and function, such as immunoglobulin-like CAMs (IgCAMs), cadherins, integrins, and selectins. Dysregulation of CAMs has been implicated in various diseases, including cancer, inflammation, and neurological disorders.

Microtubule proteins are a class of structural proteins that make up the microtubules, which are key components of the cytoskeleton in eukaryotic cells. The main microtubule protein is tubulin, which exists in two forms: alpha-tubulin and beta-tubulin. These tubulins polymerize to form heterodimers, which then assemble into protofilaments, which in turn aggregate to form hollow microtubules. Microtubules are dynamic structures that undergo continuous assembly and disassembly, and they play crucial roles in various cellular processes, including intracellular transport, cell division, and maintenance of cell shape. Other microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs) also bind to microtubules and regulate their stability, dynamics, and interactions with other cellular structures.

PTEN phosphohydrolase, also known as PTEN protein or phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome ten, is a tumor suppressor protein that plays a crucial role in regulating cell growth and division. It works by dephosphorylating (removing a phosphate group from) the lipid second messenger PIP3, which is involved in signaling pathways that promote cell proliferation and survival. By negatively regulating these pathways, PTEN helps to prevent uncontrolled cell growth and tumor formation. Mutations in the PTEN gene can lead to a variety of cancer types, including breast, prostate, and endometrial cancer.

Threonine is an essential amino acid, meaning it cannot be synthesized by the human body and must be obtained through the diet. Its chemical formula is HO2CCH(NH2)CH(OH)CH3. Threonine plays a crucial role in various biological processes, including protein synthesis, immune function, and fat metabolism. It is particularly important for maintaining the structural integrity of proteins, as it is often found in their hydroxyl-containing regions. Foods rich in threonine include animal proteins such as meat, dairy products, and eggs, as well as plant-based sources like lentils and soybeans.

Glycogen Synthase-D Phosphatase is not a commonly used medical term, but I can provide you with some information about Glycogen Synthase and Phosphatases that might help.

Glycogen synthase is an enzyme that plays a crucial role in the synthesis of glycogen, which is a form of energy storage in the body, mainly in the liver and muscles. The activity of this enzyme is regulated by phosphorylation and dephosphorylation, which are chemical reactions that add or remove phosphate groups to/from the enzyme, respectively.

Phosphatases are a group of enzymes that catalyze the removal of phosphate groups from various substrates, including proteins like glycogen synthase. Specifically, Glycogen Synthase-D Phosphatase refers to a type of phosphatase that dephosphorylates and activates glycogen synthase by removing phosphate groups from it. This activation leads to increased glycogen synthesis in the body.

Therefore, Glycogen Synthase-D Phosphatase is an enzyme responsible for dephosphorylating and activating glycogen synthase, thereby promoting glycogen storage in the body.

Carrier proteins, also known as transport proteins, are a type of protein that facilitates the movement of molecules across cell membranes. They are responsible for the selective and active transport of ions, sugars, amino acids, and other molecules from one side of the membrane to the other, against their concentration gradient. This process requires energy, usually in the form of ATP (adenosine triphosphate).

Carrier proteins have a specific binding site for the molecule they transport, and undergo conformational changes upon binding, which allows them to move the molecule across the membrane. Once the molecule has been transported, the carrier protein returns to its original conformation, ready to bind and transport another molecule.

Carrier proteins play a crucial role in maintaining the balance of ions and other molecules inside and outside of cells, and are essential for many physiological processes, including nerve impulse transmission, muscle contraction, and nutrient uptake.

Post-translational protein processing refers to the modifications and changes that proteins undergo after their synthesis on ribosomes, which are complex molecular machines responsible for protein synthesis. These modifications occur through various biochemical processes and play a crucial role in determining the final structure, function, and stability of the protein.

The process begins with the translation of messenger RNA (mRNA) into a linear polypeptide chain, which is then subjected to several post-translational modifications. These modifications can include:

1. Proteolytic cleavage: The removal of specific segments or domains from the polypeptide chain by proteases, resulting in the formation of mature, functional protein subunits.
2. Chemical modifications: Addition or modification of chemical groups to the side chains of amino acids, such as phosphorylation (addition of a phosphate group), glycosylation (addition of sugar moieties), methylation (addition of a methyl group), acetylation (addition of an acetyl group), and ubiquitination (addition of a ubiquitin protein).
3. Disulfide bond formation: The oxidation of specific cysteine residues within the polypeptide chain, leading to the formation of disulfide bonds between them. This process helps stabilize the three-dimensional structure of proteins, particularly in extracellular environments.
4. Folding and assembly: The acquisition of a specific three-dimensional conformation by the polypeptide chain, which is essential for its function. Chaperone proteins assist in this process to ensure proper folding and prevent aggregation.
5. Protein targeting: The directed transport of proteins to their appropriate cellular locations, such as the nucleus, mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum, or plasma membrane. This is often facilitated by specific signal sequences within the protein that are recognized and bound by transport machinery.

Collectively, these post-translational modifications contribute to the functional diversity of proteins in living organisms, allowing them to perform a wide range of cellular processes, including signaling, catalysis, regulation, and structural support.

Subcellular fractions refer to the separation and collection of specific parts or components of a cell, including organelles, membranes, and other structures, through various laboratory techniques such as centrifugation and ultracentrifugation. These fractions can be used in further biochemical and molecular analyses to study the structure, function, and interactions of individual cellular components. Examples of subcellular fractions include nuclear extracts, mitochondrial fractions, microsomal fractions (membrane vesicles), and cytosolic fractions (cytoplasmic extracts).

A cell membrane, also known as the plasma membrane, is a thin semi-permeable phospholipid bilayer that surrounds all cells in animals, plants, and microorganisms. It functions as a barrier to control the movement of substances in and out of the cell, allowing necessary molecules such as nutrients, oxygen, and signaling molecules to enter while keeping out harmful substances and waste products. The cell membrane is composed mainly of phospholipids, which have hydrophilic (water-loving) heads and hydrophobic (water-fearing) tails. This unique structure allows the membrane to be flexible and fluid, yet selectively permeable. Additionally, various proteins are embedded in the membrane that serve as channels, pumps, receptors, and enzymes, contributing to the cell's overall functionality and communication with its environment.

Cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinases, also known as protein kinase A (PKA), are a family of enzymes that play a crucial role in intracellular signaling pathways. These enzymes are responsible for the regulation of various cellular processes, including metabolism, gene expression, and cell growth and differentiation.

PKA is composed of two regulatory subunits and two catalytic subunits. When cAMP binds to the regulatory subunits, it causes a conformational change that leads to the dissociation of the catalytic subunits. The freed catalytic subunits then phosphorylate specific serine and threonine residues on target proteins, thereby modulating their activity.

The cAMP-dependent protein kinases are activated in response to a variety of extracellular signals, such as hormones and neurotransmitters, that bind to G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) or receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs). These signals lead to the activation of adenylyl cyclase, which catalyzes the conversion of ATP to cAMP. The resulting increase in intracellular cAMP levels triggers the activation of PKA and the downstream phosphorylation of target proteins.

Overall, cAMP-dependent protein kinases are essential regulators of many fundamental cellular processes and play a critical role in maintaining normal physiology and homeostasis. Dysregulation of these enzymes has been implicated in various diseases, including cancer, diabetes, and neurological disorders.

Sialglycoproteins are a type of glycoprotein that have sialic acid as the terminal sugar in their oligosaccharide chains. These complex molecules are abundant on the surface of many cell types and play important roles in various biological processes, including cell recognition, cell-cell interactions, and protection against proteolytic degradation.

The presence of sialic acid on the outermost part of these glycoproteins makes them negatively charged, which can affect their interaction with other molecules such as lectins, antibodies, and enzymes. Sialglycoproteins are also involved in the regulation of various physiological functions, including blood coagulation, inflammation, and immune response.

Abnormalities in sialglycoprotein expression or structure have been implicated in several diseases, such as cancer, autoimmune disorders, and neurodegenerative conditions. Therefore, understanding the biology of sialoglycoproteins is important for developing new diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for these diseases.

Receptor-like protein tyrosine phosphatases, class 5 (RPTPs-Class 5), also known as R7 family or PTP receptor type R, are a subfamily of receptor-like protein tyrosine phosphatases (RPTPs) that play crucial roles in various cellular processes, including cell growth, differentiation, and migration. These transmembrane enzymes are characterized by the presence of two extracellular carbonic anhydrase-like domains (CA domains), a single membrane-spanning region, and one intracellular protein tyrosine phosphatase domain.

The RPTPs-Class 5 includes four members in humans: PTPRF (also known as LAR), PTPRF-B (or LAR2), PTPRJ (or PTP receptor type J), and PTPRK (or PTP receptor type K). These phosphatases have the ability to dephosphorylate tyrosine residues on their target proteins, thereby regulating various signaling pathways. Dysregulation of RPTPs-Class 5 has been implicated in several diseases, including cancer and neurological disorders.

In summary, Receptor-like protein tyrosine phosphatases, class 5 are a group of transmembrane enzymes that regulate cellular processes by dephosphorylating tyrosine residues on target proteins, playing essential roles in maintaining proper cell function and homeostasis.

Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase, Non-Receptor Type 12 (PTPN12) is a protein belonging to the family of protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs), which are enzymes that regulate various cellular processes by removing phosphate groups from phosphorylated tyrosine residues on proteins. PTPN12, specifically, is a non-receptor type PTP, meaning it does not have a transmembrane domain and is found in the cytosol of the cell.

PTPN12 plays crucial roles in several signaling pathways that regulate cell growth, differentiation, migration, and survival. It has been shown to dephosphorylate and negatively regulate various proteins, including Src family kinases (SFKs), receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), and adaptor proteins. Dysregulation of PTPN12 has been implicated in several diseases, such as cancer, where its expression is often reduced or lost, leading to increased activation of oncogenic signaling pathways.

Complementary DNA (cDNA) is a type of DNA that is synthesized from a single-stranded RNA molecule through the process of reverse transcription. In this process, the enzyme reverse transcriptase uses an RNA molecule as a template to synthesize a complementary DNA strand. The resulting cDNA is therefore complementary to the original RNA molecule and is a copy of its coding sequence, but it does not contain non-coding regions such as introns that are present in genomic DNA.

Complementary DNA is often used in molecular biology research to study gene expression, protein function, and other genetic phenomena. For example, cDNA can be used to create cDNA libraries, which are collections of cloned cDNA fragments that represent the expressed genes in a particular cell type or tissue. These libraries can then be screened for specific genes or gene products of interest. Additionally, cDNA can be used to produce recombinant proteins in heterologous expression systems, allowing researchers to study the structure and function of proteins that may be difficult to express or purify from their native sources.

Dual Specificity Phosphatase 3 (DUSP3), also known as Phosphatase of Regenerating Liver-3 (PRL-3), is a protein that belongs to the dual specificity phosphatase family. These enzymes are capable of dephosphorylating both tyrosine and serine/threonine residues on their target proteins, thereby regulating various cellular processes such as signal transduction, cell growth, differentiation, and survival.

DUSP3 specifically dephosphorylates and inactivates members of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family, including extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs), c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs), and p38 MAPKs. These MAPKs play crucial roles in various cellular responses to external stimuli, such as growth factors, hormones, and stress. By negatively regulating MAPK signaling, DUSP3 helps maintain the balance of these pathways and prevents excessive or aberrant activation.

Dysregulation of DUSP3 has been implicated in several diseases, including cancer. Overexpression of DUSP3 has been observed in various tumor types, where it may contribute to tumor progression by promoting cell proliferation, survival, and metastasis. On the other hand, loss or downregulation of DUSP3 has also been associated with tumorigenesis, suggesting a complex role for this phosphatase in cancer development and progression.

COS cells are a type of cell line that are commonly used in molecular biology and genetic research. The name "COS" is an acronym for "CV-1 in Origin," as these cells were originally derived from the African green monkey kidney cell line CV-1. COS cells have been modified through genetic engineering to express high levels of a protein called SV40 large T antigen, which allows them to efficiently take up and replicate exogenous DNA.

There are several different types of COS cells that are commonly used in research, including COS-1, COS-3, and COS-7 cells. These cells are widely used for the production of recombinant proteins, as well as for studies of gene expression, protein localization, and signal transduction.

It is important to note that while COS cells have been a valuable tool in scientific research, they are not without their limitations. For example, because they are derived from monkey kidney cells, there may be differences in the way that human genes are expressed or regulated in these cells compared to human cells. Additionally, because COS cells express SV40 large T antigen, they may have altered cell cycle regulation and other phenotypic changes that could affect experimental results. Therefore, it is important to carefully consider the choice of cell line when designing experiments and interpreting results.

'Tumor cells, cultured' refers to the process of removing cancerous cells from a tumor and growing them in controlled laboratory conditions. This is typically done by isolating the tumor cells from a patient's tissue sample, then placing them in a nutrient-rich environment that promotes their growth and multiplication.

The resulting cultured tumor cells can be used for various research purposes, including the study of cancer biology, drug development, and toxicity testing. They provide a valuable tool for researchers to better understand the behavior and characteristics of cancer cells outside of the human body, which can lead to the development of more effective cancer treatments.

It is important to note that cultured tumor cells may not always behave exactly the same way as they do in the human body, so findings from cell culture studies must be validated through further research, such as animal models or clinical trials.

Casein Kinase II (CK2) is a serine/threonine protein kinase that is widely expressed in eukaryotic cells and is involved in the regulation of various cellular processes. It is a heterotetrameric enzyme, consisting of two catalytic subunits (alpha and alpha') and two regulatory subunits (beta).

CK2 phosphorylates a wide range of substrates, including transcription factors, signaling proteins, and other kinases. It is known to play roles in cell cycle regulation, apoptosis, DNA damage response, and protein stability, among others. CK2 activity is often found to be elevated in various types of cancer, making it a potential target for cancer therapy.

A catalytic domain is a portion or region within a protein that contains the active site, where the chemical reactions necessary for the protein's function are carried out. This domain is responsible for the catalysis of biological reactions, hence the name "catalytic domain." The catalytic domain is often composed of specific amino acid residues that come together to form the active site, creating a unique three-dimensional structure that enables the protein to perform its specific function.

In enzymes, for example, the catalytic domain contains the residues that bind and convert substrates into products through chemical reactions. In receptors, the catalytic domain may be involved in signal transduction or other regulatory functions. Understanding the structure and function of catalytic domains is crucial to understanding the mechanisms of protein function and can provide valuable insights for drug design and therapeutic interventions.

Adaptor proteins are a type of protein that play a crucial role in intracellular signaling pathways by serving as a link between different components of the signaling complex. Specifically, "signal transducing adaptor proteins" refer to those adaptor proteins that are involved in signal transduction processes, where they help to transmit signals from the cell surface receptors to various intracellular effectors. These proteins typically contain modular domains that allow them to interact with multiple partners, thereby facilitating the formation of large signaling complexes and enabling the integration of signals from different pathways.

Signal transducing adaptor proteins can be classified into several families based on their structural features, including the Src homology 2 (SH2) domain, the Src homology 3 (SH3) domain, and the phosphotyrosine-binding (PTB) domain. These domains enable the adaptor proteins to recognize and bind to specific motifs on other signaling molecules, such as receptor tyrosine kinases, G protein-coupled receptors, and cytokine receptors.

One well-known example of a signal transducing adaptor protein is the growth factor receptor-bound protein 2 (Grb2), which contains an SH2 domain that binds to phosphotyrosine residues on activated receptor tyrosine kinases. Grb2 also contains an SH3 domain that interacts with proline-rich motifs on other signaling proteins, such as the guanine nucleotide exchange factor SOS. This interaction facilitates the activation of the Ras small GTPase and downstream signaling pathways involved in cell growth, differentiation, and survival.

Overall, signal transducing adaptor proteins play a critical role in regulating various cellular processes by modulating intracellular signaling pathways in response to extracellular stimuli. Dysregulation of these proteins has been implicated in various diseases, including cancer and inflammatory disorders.

Protein Kinase C (PKC) is a family of serine-threonine kinases that play crucial roles in various cellular signaling pathways. These enzymes are activated by second messengers such as diacylglycerol (DAG) and calcium ions (Ca2+), which result from the activation of cell surface receptors like G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs).

Once activated, PKC proteins phosphorylate downstream target proteins, thereby modulating their activities. This regulation is involved in numerous cellular processes, including cell growth, differentiation, apoptosis, and membrane trafficking. There are at least 10 isoforms of PKC, classified into three subfamilies based on their second messenger requirements and structural features: conventional (cPKC; α, βI, βII, and γ), novel (nPKC; δ, ε, η, and θ), and atypical (aPKC; ζ and ι/λ). Dysregulation of PKC signaling has been implicated in several diseases, such as cancer, diabetes, and neurological disorders.

Receptor-like protein tyrosine phosphatases (RPTPs) are a subclass of protein tyrosine phosphatases that possess an extracellular domain, a transmembrane domain, and an intracellular domain with tyrosine phosphatase activity. They play crucial roles in various cellular processes, including cell growth, differentiation, migration, and survival, by regulating the balance of protein tyrosine phosphorylation. RPTPs can act as receptors, interacting with extracellular ligands to initiate intracellular signaling cascades. Dysregulation of RPTPs has been implicated in several human diseases, including cancer and neurological disorders.

Immunoblotting, also known as western blotting, is a laboratory technique used in molecular biology and immunogenetics to detect and quantify specific proteins in a complex mixture. This technique combines the electrophoretic separation of proteins by gel electrophoresis with their detection using antibodies that recognize specific epitopes (protein fragments) on the target protein.

The process involves several steps: first, the protein sample is separated based on size through sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Next, the separated proteins are transferred onto a nitrocellulose or polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membrane using an electric field. The membrane is then blocked with a blocking agent to prevent non-specific binding of antibodies.

After blocking, the membrane is incubated with a primary antibody that specifically recognizes the target protein. Following this, the membrane is washed to remove unbound primary antibodies and then incubated with a secondary antibody conjugated to an enzyme such as horseradish peroxidase (HRP) or alkaline phosphatase (AP). The enzyme catalyzes a colorimetric or chemiluminescent reaction that allows for the detection of the target protein.

Immunoblotting is widely used in research and clinical settings to study protein expression, post-translational modifications, protein-protein interactions, and disease biomarkers. It provides high specificity and sensitivity, making it a valuable tool for identifying and quantifying proteins in various biological samples.

Genetic transcription is the process by which the information in a strand of DNA is used to create a complementary RNA molecule. This process is the first step in gene expression, where the genetic code in DNA is converted into a form that can be used to produce proteins or functional RNAs.

During transcription, an enzyme called RNA polymerase binds to the DNA template strand and reads the sequence of nucleotide bases. As it moves along the template, it adds complementary RNA nucleotides to the growing RNA chain, creating a single-stranded RNA molecule that is complementary to the DNA template strand. Once transcription is complete, the RNA molecule may undergo further processing before it can be translated into protein or perform its functional role in the cell.

Transcription can be either "constitutive" or "regulated." Constitutive transcription occurs at a relatively constant rate and produces essential proteins that are required for basic cellular functions. Regulated transcription, on the other hand, is subject to control by various intracellular and extracellular signals, allowing cells to respond to changing environmental conditions or developmental cues.

SRC homology domains, often abbreviated as SH domains, are conserved protein modules that were first identified in the SRC family of non-receptor tyrosine kinases. These domains are involved in various intracellular signaling processes and mediate protein-protein interactions. There are several types of SH domains, including:

1. SH2 domain: This domain is approximately 100 amino acids long and binds to specific phosphotyrosine-containing motifs in other proteins, thereby mediating signal transduction.
2. SH3 domain: This domain is about 60 amino acids long and recognizes proline-rich sequences in target proteins, playing a role in protein-protein interactions and intracellular signaling.
3. SH1 domain: Also known as the tyrosine kinase catalytic domain, this region contains the active site responsible for transferring a phosphate group from ATP to specific tyrosine residues on target proteins.
4. SH4 domain: This domain is present in some SRC family members and serves as a membrane-targeting module by interacting with lipids or transmembrane proteins.

These SH domains allow SRC kinases and other proteins containing them to participate in complex signaling networks that regulate various cellular processes, such as proliferation, differentiation, survival, and migration.

Mitosis is a type of cell division in which the genetic material of a single cell, called the mother cell, is equally distributed into two identical daughter cells. It's a fundamental process that occurs in multicellular organisms for growth, maintenance, and repair, as well as in unicellular organisms for reproduction.

The process of mitosis can be broken down into several stages: prophase, prometaphase, metaphase, anaphase, and telophase. During prophase, the chromosomes condense and become visible, and the nuclear envelope breaks down. In prometaphase, the nuclear membrane is completely disassembled, and the mitotic spindle fibers attach to the chromosomes at their centromeres.

During metaphase, the chromosomes align at the metaphase plate, an imaginary line equidistant from the two spindle poles. In anaphase, sister chromatids are pulled apart by the spindle fibers and move toward opposite poles of the cell. Finally, in telophase, new nuclear envelopes form around each set of chromosomes, and the chromosomes decondense and become less visible.

Mitosis is followed by cytokinesis, a process that divides the cytoplasm of the mother cell into two separate daughter cells. The result of mitosis and cytokinesis is two genetically identical cells, each with the same number and kind of chromosomes as the original parent cell.

"Saccharomyces cerevisiae" is not typically considered a medical term, but it is a scientific name used in the field of microbiology. It refers to a species of yeast that is commonly used in various industrial processes, such as baking and brewing. It's also widely used in scientific research due to its genetic tractability and eukaryotic cellular organization.

However, it does have some relevance to medical fields like medicine and nutrition. For example, certain strains of S. cerevisiae are used as probiotics, which can provide health benefits when consumed. They may help support gut health, enhance the immune system, and even assist in the digestion of certain nutrients.

In summary, "Saccharomyces cerevisiae" is a species of yeast with various industrial and potential medical applications.

Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase, Non-Receptor Type 13 (PTPN13), also known as PTP Delta or PTPD, is a protein tyrosine phosphatase enzyme that plays a crucial role in regulating various cellular processes, including cell growth, differentiation, and migration. It is a non-receptor type phosphatase, meaning it does not have a transmembrane domain and is localized in the cytoplasm.

PTPN13 contains several functional domains, including a catalytic domain that dephosphorylates tyrosine residues on target proteins, a protein-protein interaction domain, and a focal adhesion targeting (FAT) domain that localizes the enzyme to focal adhesions, which are sites of cell-matrix contact.

PTPN13 has been shown to interact with and dephosphorylate several signaling molecules, including receptor tyrosine kinases, adaptor proteins, and small GTPases, thereby regulating various downstream signaling pathways involved in cell survival, proliferation, and migration. Dysregulation of PTPN13 has been implicated in the development and progression of several diseases, including cancer, cardiovascular disease, and neurological disorders.

In genetics, sequence alignment is the process of arranging two or more DNA, RNA, or protein sequences to identify regions of similarity or homology between them. This is often done using computational methods to compare the nucleotide or amino acid sequences and identify matching patterns, which can provide insight into evolutionary relationships, functional domains, or potential genetic disorders. The alignment process typically involves adjusting gaps and mismatches in the sequences to maximize the similarity between them, resulting in an aligned sequence that can be visually represented and analyzed.

"Bone" is the hard, dense connective tissue that makes up the skeleton of vertebrate animals. It provides support and protection for the body's internal organs, and serves as a attachment site for muscles, tendons, and ligaments. Bone is composed of cells called osteoblasts and osteoclasts, which are responsible for bone formation and resorption, respectively, and an extracellular matrix made up of collagen fibers and mineral crystals.

Bones can be classified into two main types: compact bone and spongy bone. Compact bone is dense and hard, and makes up the outer layer of all bones and the shafts of long bones. Spongy bone is less dense and contains large spaces, and makes up the ends of long bones and the interior of flat and irregular bones.

The human body has 206 bones in total. They can be further classified into five categories based on their shape: long bones, short bones, flat bones, irregular bones, and sesamoid bones.

In the field of medicine, "time factors" refer to the duration of symptoms or time elapsed since the onset of a medical condition, which can have significant implications for diagnosis and treatment. Understanding time factors is crucial in determining the progression of a disease, evaluating the effectiveness of treatments, and making critical decisions regarding patient care.

For example, in stroke management, "time is brain," meaning that rapid intervention within a specific time frame (usually within 4.5 hours) is essential to administering tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a clot-busting drug that can minimize brain damage and improve patient outcomes. Similarly, in trauma care, the "golden hour" concept emphasizes the importance of providing definitive care within the first 60 minutes after injury to increase survival rates and reduce morbidity.

Time factors also play a role in monitoring the progression of chronic conditions like diabetes or heart disease, where regular follow-ups and assessments help determine appropriate treatment adjustments and prevent complications. In infectious diseases, time factors are crucial for initiating antibiotic therapy and identifying potential outbreaks to control their spread.

Overall, "time factors" encompass the significance of recognizing and acting promptly in various medical scenarios to optimize patient outcomes and provide effective care.

Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase, Non-Receptor Type 3 (PTPN3) is a type of enzyme that belongs to the protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) family. PTPs are responsible for regulating various cellular processes by removing phosphate groups from phosphorylated tyrosine residues on proteins, thereby controlling the activity of proteins involved in intracellular signaling pathways.

PTPN3, also known as HePTP (hematopoietic protein tyrosine phosphatase), is a non-receptor type PTP that contains a single catalytic domain and is widely expressed in various tissues, including the brain, lung, liver, muscle, and hematopoietic cells. It has been shown to dephosphorylate several signaling molecules, such as receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), non-receptor tyrosine kinases (NRTKs), and adaptor proteins, thereby regulating their activity and downstream signaling pathways.

PTPN3 has been implicated in several cellular processes, including cell growth, differentiation, survival, and migration. Dysregulation of PTPN3 has been associated with various human diseases, such as cancer, inflammation, and neurodegenerative disorders. Therefore, understanding the function and regulation of PTPN3 is crucial for developing novel therapeutic strategies for these diseases.

Nucleoproteins are complexes formed by the association of proteins with nucleic acids (DNA or RNA). These complexes play crucial roles in various biological processes, such as packaging and protecting genetic material, regulating gene expression, and replication and repair of DNA. In these complexes, proteins interact with nucleic acids through electrostatic, hydrogen bonding, and other non-covalent interactions, leading to the formation of stable structures that help maintain the integrity and function of the genetic material. Some well-known examples of nucleoproteins include histones, which are involved in DNA packaging in eukaryotic cells, and reverse transcriptase, an enzyme found in retroviruses that transcribes RNA into DNA.

Gene expression regulation, enzymologic refers to the biochemical processes and mechanisms that control the transcription and translation of specific genes into functional proteins or enzymes. This regulation is achieved through various enzymatic activities that can either activate or repress gene expression at different levels, such as chromatin remodeling, transcription factor activation, mRNA processing, and protein degradation.

Enzymologic regulation of gene expression involves the action of specific enzymes that catalyze chemical reactions involved in these processes. For example, histone-modifying enzymes can alter the structure of chromatin to make genes more or less accessible for transcription, while RNA polymerase and its associated factors are responsible for transcribing DNA into mRNA. Additionally, various enzymes are involved in post-transcriptional modifications of mRNA, such as splicing, capping, and tailing, which can affect the stability and translation of the transcript.

Overall, the enzymologic regulation of gene expression is a complex and dynamic process that allows cells to respond to changes in their environment and maintain proper physiological function.

Cytoplasm is the material within a eukaryotic cell (a cell with a true nucleus) that lies between the nuclear membrane and the cell membrane. It is composed of an aqueous solution called cytosol, in which various organelles such as mitochondria, ribosomes, endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, lysosomes, and vacuoles are suspended. Cytoplasm also contains a variety of dissolved nutrients, metabolites, ions, and enzymes that are involved in various cellular processes such as metabolism, signaling, and transport. It is where most of the cell's metabolic activities take place, and it plays a crucial role in maintaining the structure and function of the cell.

DNA primers are short single-stranded DNA molecules that serve as a starting point for DNA synthesis. They are typically used in laboratory techniques such as the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and DNA sequencing. The primer binds to a complementary sequence on the DNA template through base pairing, providing a free 3'-hydroxyl group for the DNA polymerase enzyme to add nucleotides and synthesize a new strand of DNA. This allows for specific and targeted amplification or analysis of a particular region of interest within a larger DNA molecule.

'Escherichia coli' (E. coli) is a type of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacterium that commonly inhabits the intestinal tract of humans and warm-blooded animals. It is a member of the family Enterobacteriaceae and one of the most well-studied prokaryotic model organisms in molecular biology.

While most E. coli strains are harmless and even beneficial to their hosts, some serotypes can cause various forms of gastrointestinal and extraintestinal illnesses in humans and animals. These pathogenic strains possess virulence factors that enable them to colonize and damage host tissues, leading to diseases such as diarrhea, urinary tract infections, pneumonia, and sepsis.

E. coli is a versatile organism with remarkable genetic diversity, which allows it to adapt to various environmental niches. It can be found in water, soil, food, and various man-made environments, making it an essential indicator of fecal contamination and a common cause of foodborne illnesses. The study of E. coli has contributed significantly to our understanding of fundamental biological processes, including DNA replication, gene regulation, and protein synthesis.

Rabies is a viral disease that affects the nervous system of mammals, including humans. It's caused by the rabies virus (RV), which belongs to the family Rhabdoviridae and genus Lyssavirus. The virus has a bullet-shaped appearance under an electron microscope and is encased in a lipid envelope.

The rabies virus primarily spreads through the saliva of infected animals, usually via bites. Once inside the body, it travels along nerve fibers to the brain, where it multiplies rapidly and causes inflammation (encephalitis). The infection can lead to symptoms such as anxiety, confusion, hallucinations, seizures, paralysis, coma, and ultimately death if left untreated.

Rabies is almost always fatal once symptoms appear, but prompt post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP), which includes vaccination and sometimes rabies immunoglobulin, can prevent the disease from developing when administered after an exposure to a potentially rabid animal. Pre-exposure vaccination is also recommended for individuals at high risk of exposure, such as veterinarians and travelers visiting rabies-endemic areas.

Biological models, also known as physiological models or organismal models, are simplified representations of biological systems, processes, or mechanisms that are used to understand and explain the underlying principles and relationships. These models can be theoretical (conceptual or mathematical) or physical (such as anatomical models, cell cultures, or animal models). They are widely used in biomedical research to study various phenomena, including disease pathophysiology, drug action, and therapeutic interventions.

Examples of biological models include:

1. Mathematical models: These use mathematical equations and formulas to describe complex biological systems or processes, such as population dynamics, metabolic pathways, or gene regulation networks. They can help predict the behavior of these systems under different conditions and test hypotheses about their underlying mechanisms.
2. Cell cultures: These are collections of cells grown in a controlled environment, typically in a laboratory dish or flask. They can be used to study cellular processes, such as signal transduction, gene expression, or metabolism, and to test the effects of drugs or other treatments on these processes.
3. Animal models: These are living organisms, usually vertebrates like mice, rats, or non-human primates, that are used to study various aspects of human biology and disease. They can provide valuable insights into the pathophysiology of diseases, the mechanisms of drug action, and the safety and efficacy of new therapies.
4. Anatomical models: These are physical representations of biological structures or systems, such as plastic models of organs or tissues, that can be used for educational purposes or to plan surgical procedures. They can also serve as a basis for developing more sophisticated models, such as computer simulations or 3D-printed replicas.

Overall, biological models play a crucial role in advancing our understanding of biology and medicine, helping to identify new targets for therapeutic intervention, develop novel drugs and treatments, and improve human health.

Site-directed mutagenesis is a molecular biology technique used to introduce specific and targeted changes to a specific DNA sequence. This process involves creating a new variant of a gene or a specific region of interest within a DNA molecule by introducing a planned, deliberate change, or mutation, at a predetermined site within the DNA sequence.

The methodology typically involves the use of molecular tools such as PCR (polymerase chain reaction), restriction enzymes, and/or ligases to introduce the desired mutation(s) into a plasmid or other vector containing the target DNA sequence. The resulting modified DNA molecule can then be used to transform host cells, allowing for the production of large quantities of the mutated gene or protein for further study.

Site-directed mutagenesis is a valuable tool in basic research, drug discovery, and biotechnology applications where specific changes to a DNA sequence are required to understand gene function, investigate protein structure/function relationships, or engineer novel biological properties into existing genes or proteins.

Cell cycle proteins are a group of regulatory proteins that control the progression of the cell cycle, which is the series of events that take place in a eukaryotic cell leading to its division and duplication. These proteins can be classified into several categories based on their functions during different stages of the cell cycle.

The major groups of cell cycle proteins include:

1. Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs): CDKs are serine/threonine protein kinases that regulate key transitions in the cell cycle. They require binding to a regulatory subunit called cyclin to become active. Different CDK-cyclin complexes are activated at different stages of the cell cycle.
2. Cyclins: Cyclins are a family of regulatory proteins that bind and activate CDKs. Their levels fluctuate throughout the cell cycle, with specific cyclins expressed during particular phases. For example, cyclin D is important for the G1 to S phase transition, while cyclin B is required for the G2 to M phase transition.
3. CDK inhibitors (CKIs): CKIs are regulatory proteins that bind to and inhibit CDKs, thereby preventing their activation. CKIs can be divided into two main families: the INK4 family and the Cip/Kip family. INK4 family members specifically inhibit CDK4 and CDK6, while Cip/Kip family members inhibit a broader range of CDKs.
4. Anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C): APC/C is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that targets specific proteins for degradation by the 26S proteasome. During the cell cycle, APC/C regulates the metaphase to anaphase transition and the exit from mitosis by targeting securin and cyclin B for degradation.
5. Other regulatory proteins: Several other proteins play crucial roles in regulating the cell cycle, such as p53, a transcription factor that responds to DNA damage and arrests the cell cycle, and the polo-like kinases (PLKs), which are involved in various aspects of mitosis.

Overall, cell cycle proteins work together to ensure the proper progression of the cell cycle, maintain genomic stability, and prevent uncontrolled cell growth, which can lead to cancer.

A peptide fragment is a short chain of amino acids that is derived from a larger peptide or protein through various biological or chemical processes. These fragments can result from the natural breakdown of proteins in the body during regular physiological processes, such as digestion, or they can be produced experimentally in a laboratory setting for research or therapeutic purposes.

Peptide fragments are often used in research to map the structure and function of larger peptides and proteins, as well as to study their interactions with other molecules. In some cases, peptide fragments may also have biological activity of their own and can be developed into drugs or diagnostic tools. For example, certain peptide fragments derived from hormones or neurotransmitters may bind to receptors in the body and mimic or block the effects of the full-length molecule.

Ion exchange chromatography is a type of chromatography technique used to separate and analyze charged molecules (ions) based on their ability to exchange bound ions in a solid resin or gel with ions of similar charge in the mobile phase. The stationary phase, often called an ion exchanger, contains fixed ated functional groups that can attract counter-ions of opposite charge from the sample mixture.

In this technique, the sample is loaded onto an ion exchange column containing the charged resin or gel. As the sample moves through the column, ions in the sample compete for binding sites on the stationary phase with ions already present in the column. The ions that bind most strongly to the stationary phase will elute (come off) slower than those that bind more weakly.

Ion exchange chromatography can be performed using either cation exchangers, which exchange positive ions (cations), or anion exchangers, which exchange negative ions (anions). The pH and ionic strength of the mobile phase can be adjusted to control the binding and elution of specific ions.

Ion exchange chromatography is widely used in various applications such as water treatment, protein purification, and chemical analysis.

'Cercopithecus aethiops' is the scientific name for the monkey species more commonly known as the green monkey. It belongs to the family Cercopithecidae and is native to western Africa. The green monkey is omnivorous, with a diet that includes fruits, nuts, seeds, insects, and small vertebrates. They are known for their distinctive greenish-brown fur and long tail. Green monkeys are also important animal models in biomedical research due to their susceptibility to certain diseases, such as SIV (simian immunodeficiency virus), which is closely related to HIV.

4-Nitrophenylphosphatase is an enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of 4-nitrophenyl phosphate, producing 4-nitrophenol and phosphate. This enzyme is commonly used in laboratory assays to measure enzyme activity or to determine the presence of certain metals, such as aluminum and lead, which can inhibit its activity. The hydrolysis reaction results in the formation of yellow 4-nitrophenol, which can be easily measured spectrophotometrically at a wavelength of 405 nm. The activity of 4-nitrophenylphosphatase is often used as an indicator of the functional status of certain organelles, such as lysosomes, in biological systems.

Gel chromatography is a type of liquid chromatography that separates molecules based on their size or molecular weight. It uses a stationary phase that consists of a gel matrix made up of cross-linked polymers, such as dextran, agarose, or polyacrylamide. The gel matrix contains pores of various sizes, which allow smaller molecules to penetrate deeper into the matrix while larger molecules are excluded.

In gel chromatography, a mixture of molecules is loaded onto the top of the gel column and eluted with a solvent that moves down the column by gravity or pressure. As the sample components move down the column, they interact with the gel matrix and get separated based on their size. Smaller molecules can enter the pores of the gel and take longer to elute, while larger molecules are excluded from the pores and elute more quickly.

Gel chromatography is commonly used to separate and purify proteins, nucleic acids, and other biomolecules based on their size and molecular weight. It is also used in the analysis of polymers, colloids, and other materials with a wide range of applications in chemistry, biology, and medicine.

Phosphoprotein levels are counterbalanced by phosphatases. Ultimately, transcriptional activation of certain target genes ...
ISBN 978-1-4292-2936-4. Gong CX, Singh TJ, Grundke-Iqbal I, Iqbal K (September 1993). "Phosphoprotein phosphatase activities in ... Protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) belongs to a certain class of phosphatases known as protein serine/threonine phosphatases. This ... Regulation of HIV-1 transcription by Protein Phosphatase 1 (PP1). It has been recognized that protein phosphatase-1 (PP1) ... type of phosphatase includes metal-dependent protein phosphatases (PPMs) and aspartate-based phosphatases. PP1 has been found ...
Sundarajan TA; Sarma PS (1959). "Substrate specificity of phosphoprotein phosphatase from spleen". Biochem. J. 71 (3): 537-544 ... This enzyme is also called creatine phosphatase. Parvin R, Smith RA (1969). "Phosphoramidates. V. Probable identity of rat ... liver microsomal glucose 6-phosphatase, phosphoramidase, and phosphoramidate-hexose phosphotransferase". Biochemistry. 8 (4): ...
"PP4R4/KIAA1622 Forms a Novel Stable Cytosolic Complex with Phosphoprotein Phosphatase 4". J. Biol. Chem. 283 (43): 29273-84. ... evolutionarily conserved protein phosphatase complex involved in cisplatin sensitivity". Mol. Cell. Proteomics. 4 (11): 1725-40 ...
"PP4R4/KIAA1622 forms a novel stable cytosolic complex with phosphoprotein phosphatase 4". The Journal of Biological Chemistry. ... Serine/threonine-protein phosphatase 4 catalytic subunit is an enzyme that in humans is encoded by the PPP4C gene. PPP4C has ... Chen L, Dong W, Zou T, Ouyang L, He G, Liu Y, Qi Y (Aug 2008). "Protein phosphatase 4 negatively regulates LPS cascade by ... Hu MC, Tang-Oxley Q, Qiu WR, Wang YP, Mihindukulasuriya KA, Afshar R, Tan TH (Dec 1998). "Protein phosphatase X interacts with ...
Eto M, Karginov A, Brautigan DL (Jan 2000). "A novel phosphoprotein inhibitor of protein type-1 phosphatase holoenzymes". ... Protein phosphatase 1 regulatory subunit 14B is an enzyme that in humans is encoded by the PPP1R14B gene. GRCh38: Ensembl ... "Entrez Gene: PPP1R14B protein phosphatase 1, regulatory (inhibitor) subunit 14B". Dias Neto E, Correa RG, Verjovski-Almeida S, ... Tountas NA, Mandell JW, Everett AD, Brautigan DL (2005). "Juxtamembrane localization of the protein phosphatase-1 inhibitor ...
Pandey AV, Mellon SH, Miller WL (2003). "Protein phosphatase 2A and phosphoprotein SET regulate androgen production by P450c17 ... 2007). "Lipid phosphate phosphatases 1 and 3 are localized in distinct lipid rafts". J. Biochem. 140 (5): 677-686. doi:10.1093/ ... 2003). "Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) regulates interleukin-4-mediated STAT6 signaling". J. Biol. Chem. 278 (5): 2787-2791. doi ... Lipid phosphate phosphohydrolase 1 also known as phosphatidic acid phosphatase 2a is an enzyme that in humans is encoded by the ...
1996). "Identification of the sites of interaction between lymphocyte phosphatase-associated phosphoprotein (LPAP) and CD45". J ... Protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor type C-associated protein is an enzyme that in humans is encoded by the PTPRCAP gene. The ... Vogel A, Strassburg CP, Manns MP (2003). "77 C/G mutation in the tyrosine phosphatase CD45 gene and autoimmune hepatitis: ... 1994). "LPAP, a novel 32-kDa phosphoprotein that interacts with CD45 in human lymphocytes". J. Biol. Chem. 269 (46): 29102-11. ...
This process is valuable in the extraction of proteins and specifically phosphoprotein and phosphopeptide phosphatases. Another ...
"The phosphorylation state of tau in the developing rat brain is regulated by phosphoprotein phosphatases". The Journal of ... Like kinases, phosphatases too play a role in regulating the phosphorylation of tau. For example, PP2A and PP2B are both ... Tau is a phosphoprotein with 79 potential Serine (Ser) and Threonine (Thr) phosphorylation sites on the longest tau isoform. ... Fujio K, Sato M, Uemura T, Sato T, Sato-Harada R, Harada A (July 2007). "14-3-3 proteins and protein phosphatases are not ...
"PP4R4/KIAA1622 forms a novel stable cytosolic complex with phosphoprotein phosphatase 4". The Journal of Biological Chemistry. ... evolutionarily conserved protein phosphatase complex involved in cisplatin sensitivity". Molecular & Cellular Proteomics. 4 (11 ...
"PP4R4/KIAA1622 forms a novel stable cytosolic complex with phosphoprotein phosphatase 4". The Journal of Biological Chemistry. ... Serine/threonine-protein phosphatase 4 regulatory subunit 3B is an enzyme that in humans is encoded by the SMEK2 gene. SMEK2 ... "A PP4-phosphatase complex dephosphorylates gamma-H2AX generated during DNA replication". Molecular Cell. 31 (1): 33-46. doi: ... evolutionarily conserved protein phosphatase complex involved in cisplatin sensitivity" (PDF). Molecular & Cellular Proteomics ...
"PP4R4/KIAA1622 forms a novel stable cytosolic complex with phosphoprotein phosphatase 4". The Journal of Biological Chemistry. ... evolutionarily conserved protein phosphatase complex involved in cisplatin sensitivity". Molecular & Cellular Proteomics. 4 (11 ...
... ion exchange chromatography was used to identify phosphoprotein phosphatase I and II. Since the discovery of these ... Tau dephosphorylation is catalysed by protein phosphatase-2A and phosphatase-2B. Deficiency or modification of one or both ... By using a desphosphorylating phosphatase, re-ligation can be avoided. Alkaline phosphatases, which remove the phosphate group ... and substrate specificities of phosphoprotein phosphatase(s) from rabbit liver". The Journal of Biological Chemistry. 251 (16 ...
"PP4R4/KIAA1622 Forms a Novel Stable Cytosolic Complex with Phosphoprotein Phosphatase 4". J. Biol. Chem. 283 (43): 29273-84. ... evolutionarily conserved protein phosphatase complex involved in cisplatin sensitivity". Mol. Cell. Proteomics. 4 (11): 1725-40 ...
"PP4R4/KIAA1622 forms a novel stable cytosolic complex with phosphoprotein phosphatase 4". The Journal of Biological Chemistry. ... evolutionarily conserved protein phosphatase complex involved in cisplatin sensitivity". Molecular & Cellular Proteomics. 4 (11 ...
"PP4R4/KIAA1622 forms a novel stable cytosolic complex with phosphoprotein phosphatase 4". The Journal of Biological Chemistry. ... evolutionarily conserved protein phosphatase complex involved in cisplatin sensitivity" (PDF). Molecular & Cellular Proteomics ...
"PP4R4/KIAA1622 forms a novel stable cytosolic complex with phosphoprotein phosphatase 4". The Journal of Biological Chemistry. ... "Large-scale characterization of HeLa cell nuclear phosphoproteins". Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the ...
"PP4R4/KIAA1622 forms a novel stable cytosolic complex with phosphoprotein phosphatase 4". The Journal of Biological Chemistry. ... "A PP2A phosphatase high density interaction network identifies a novel striatin-interacting phosphatase and kinase complex ... Chung H, Nairn AC, Murata K, Brautigan DL (Aug 1999). "Mutation of Tyr307 and Leu309 in the protein phosphatase 2A catalytic ... Chung H, Nairn AC, Murata K, Brautigan DL (Aug 1999). "Mutation of Tyr307 and Leu309 in the protein phosphatase 2A catalytic ...
"PP4R4/KIAA1622 forms a novel stable cytosolic complex with phosphoprotein phosphatase 4". The Journal of Biological Chemistry. ... Serine/threonine-protein phosphatase 4 regulatory subunit 1 is an enzyme that in humans is encoded by the PPP4R1 gene. PPP4R1 ... "Entrez Gene: PPP4R1 protein phosphatase 4, regulatory subunit 1". Ewing RM, Chu P, Elisma F, Li H, Taylor P, Climie S, McBroom- ... "Cloning and characterization of a novel subunit of protein serine/threonine phosphatase 4 from mesangial cells". Journal of the ...
"PP4R4/KIAA1622 forms a novel stable cytosolic complex with phosphoprotein phosphatase 4". The Journal of Biological Chemistry. ... evolutionarily conserved protein phosphatase complex involved in cisplatin sensitivity". Molecular & Cellular Proteomics. 4 (11 ...
2000). "The phosphatidylinositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatase SHIP1 associates with the dok1 phosphoprotein in bcr-Abl ... "The phosphatidylinositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatase SHIP1 associates with the dok1 phosphoprotein in bcr-Abl transformed cells ...
Protein phosphatase 1 regulatory subunit 1B (PPP1R1B), also known as dopamine- and cAMP-regulated neuronal phosphoprotein ( ... "Entrez Gene: PPP1R1B protein phosphatase 1, regulatory (inhibitor) subunit 1B (dopamine and cAMP regulated phosphoprotein, ... monophosphate-regulated neuronal phosphoprotein. II. Comparison of the kinetics of phosphorylation of DARPP-32 and phosphatase ... This gene is also known as DARPP-32, highlighting its role as a dopamine- and cyclic AMP-regulated phosphoprotein. As such ...
In eukaryotic cells, phosphatases catalyze the removal of phosphate groups from tyrosine, serine and threonine phosphoproteins ... Tolstykh, T (2000). "Carboxyl methylation regulates phosphoprotein phosphatase 2A by controlling the association of regulatory ... The catalytic subunit of the major serine/threonine phosphatases, like Protein phosphatase 2 is covalently modified by the ... C-terminal protein methylation regulates the assembly of protein phosphatase. Methylation of the protein phosphatase 2A ...
1991). "A functional complex is formed in human T lymphocytes between the protein tyrosine phosphatase CD45, the protein ... Acidic leucine-rich nuclear phosphoprotein 32 family member A is a protein that in humans is encoded by the ANP32A gene. It is ... Acidic leucine-rich nuclear phosphoprotein 32 family member A has been shown to interact with MAP1B, TAF1A and Protein SET. ... "Entrez Gene: ANP32A Acidic (leucine-rich) nuclear phosphoprotein 32 family, member A". Opal, Puneet; Garcia Jesus J; Propst ...
Form 'a' is de-phosphorylated into form 'b' by the enzyme phosphoprotein phosphatase, which is activated by elevated insulin. ...
"The phosphatidylinositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatase SHIP1 associates with the dok1 phosphoprotein in bcr-Abl transformed cells ... Src homology 2 (SH2) domain containing inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatase 1 (SHIP1) is an enzyme with phosphatase activity. ... "The phosphatidylinositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatase SHIP1 associates with the dok1 phosphoprotein in bcr-Abl transformed cells ... "Association of tyrosine phosphatases SHP-1 and SHP-2, inositol 5-phosphatase SHIP with gp49B1, and chromosomal assignment of ...
"The phosphatidylinositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatase SHIP1 associates with the dok1 phosphoprotein in bcr-Abl transformed cells ... "The phosphatidylinositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatase SHIP1 associates with the dok1 phosphoprotein in bcr-Abl transformed cells ... Wisniewski D, Strife A, Wojciechowicz D, Lambek C, Clarkson B (1994). "A 62-kilodalton tyrosine phosphoprotein constitutively ...
June 2000). "Phosphorylation of CPI-17, an inhibitory phosphoprotein of smooth muscle myosin phosphatase, by Rho-kinase". FEBS ... July 2001). "Identification of human CPI-17, an inhibitory phosphoprotein for myosin phosphatase". Biochemical and Biophysical ... Protein phosphatase 1 regulatory subunit 14A also known as CPI-17 (C-kinase potentiated Protein phosphatase-1 Inhibitor Mr = 17 ... There are three homologues of CPI-17: Phosphatase Holoenzyme Inhibitor (PHI: PPP1R14B), Kinase Enhanced Phosphatase Inhibitor ( ...
"The phosphatidylinositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatase SHIP1 associates with the dok1 phosphoprotein in bcr-Abl transformed cells ...
Buy trusted and affordable, high quality antagonists, inhibitors, antibodies and fluorescent tools from Hello Bio
Phosphoprotein levels are counterbalanced by phosphatases. Ultimately, transcriptional activation of certain target genes ...
enables myosin phosphatase activity IEA Inferred from Electronic Annotation. more info. enables phosphoprotein phosphatase ... dual specificity protein phosphatase 9. Names. map kinase phosphatase 4. mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase 4. serine ... DUSP9 dual specificity phosphatase 9 [Homo sapiens] DUSP9 dual specificity phosphatase 9 [Homo sapiens]. Gene ID:1852 ... DSPc; Dual specificity phosphatases (DSP); Ser/Thr and Tyr protein phosphatases. Structurally similar to tyrosine-specific ...
Phosphoprotein Phosphatases / antagonists & inhibitors * Phosphoprotein Phosphatases / metabolism * Phosphoric Monoester ... constituents decreased phosphorylation of 17-kD protein kinase C-potentiated inhibitory protein of type 1 protein phosphatase ...
Although the role of modular protein-protein interaction domains in kinase and phosphatase signaling has been well ... protein kinases and phosphatases often recognize their targets through interactions that occur outside of the active site. ... Phosphoprotein Phosphatases / chemistry* * Phosphoprotein Phosphatases / metabolism* * Protein Conformation * Protein Kinases ... Docking interactions in protein kinase and phosphatase networks Curr Opin Struct Biol. 2006 Dec;16(6):676-85. doi: 10.1016/j. ...
A high-throughput assay for phosphoprotein-specific phosphatase activity in cellular extracts. January 1, 2013. /in Methods ... 2013) A high-throughput assay for phosphoprotein-specific phosphatase activity in cellular extracts. Mol Cell Proteomics, 12, ... 09A high-throughput assay for phosphoprotein-specific phosphatase activity in cellular extracts. ...
Dopamine and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein 32kDa (DARPP-32), protein phosphatase-1 and cyclin-dependent kinase 5 expression in ... Dopamine and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein 32kDa (DARPP-32), protein phosphatase-1 and cyclin-dependent kinase 5 expression in ... Dopamine and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein 32kDa (DARPP-32), protein phosphatase-1 and cyclin-dependent kinase 5 expression in ... Dopamine and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein 32kDa (DARPP-32), protein phosphatase-1 and cyclin-dependent kinase 5 expression in ...
Phosphoprotein Phosphatases); W36ZG6FT64 (Sirolimus); 2013/02/12 [r ...
2. phosphoprotein phosphatase: dephosphorylates--,activates. *regulation of phosphatase: Ca2+ activates. 3. Protein kinase: ...
Enzymes/Phosphatase/Phosphoprotein phosphatase/PP2A Hello Bio HB0468. Potent and non-competitive protein phosphatase inhibitor ... Exhibits higher selectivity for PP2A and PP1 over PCM (purified polycation-modulated) phosphatase and PP2B (ID,sub,50,/sub, ... It is a potent inhibitor of specific protein phosphatases and is known to have a variety of negative effects on cells. ChEBI ... It is a potent inhibitor of specific protein phosphatases and is known to have a variety of negative effects on cells. ChEBI ...
Phospho-Proteins (4) Protein Kinases/Phosphatase (2) Soluble Receptors (7) Verified Reactivity. Human (108) Mouse (55) Rat (3) ...
At2g42810.1 68409.m04791 phospho protein phosphatase -related swissprot. blastx. No significant hits ( or none blast was used ... type 5 serine/threonine phosphatase 55 kDa isoform [Solanum lycopersicum] >gi28141084,gb,AAO262…. ...
Phosphoprotein phosphatases catalyse the reverse process. Protein kinases fall into three broad classes, characterised with ... is a reversible process mediated by protein kinases and phosphoprotein phosphatases. Protein kinases catalyse the transfer of ...
... the phosphoprotein phosphatases (PPP) and the Mg2+ or Mn2+-dependent protein phosphatases (PPM). Recently, the family of ... Indeed, PTPA (phosphotyrosyl phosphatase activator, newly renamed phosphatase two A phosphatase activator) can activate the ... typical of the serine/threonine phosphoprotein phosphatase (PPP) family of phosphatases (Barford, 1996; Xing et al., 2006). ... Carboxyl methylation regulates phosphoprotein phosphatase 2A by controlling the association of regulatory B subunits. Embo J., ...
... and dual-specificity phosphoprotein phosphatases that dephosphorylate activated MAPKs.. Molecular genetics and biochemistry of ...
phosphoprotein phosphatase activity [IEA. ] bis(5-nucleosyl)-tetraphosphatase (symmetrical) activity [IEA. ] iron ion binding ... WBGene00004085 locus:pph-4.1 Serine\/threonine-protein phosphatase 4 catalytic subunit 1 status:Confirmed UniProt:Q9XW79 ...
ETP-modulated genes fell primarily into categories of targets involved in key phosphorylation events, such as phosphatases, ... kinases, and other phosphoproteins (Supplemental Figure 5A). Furthermore, the most significantly altered canonical pathways ...
CD45 non-covalently associates with lymphocyte phosphatase-associated phosphoprotein (LPAP) on T and B lymphocytes. CD45 has ... Tyrosine phosphatases, type I transmembrane protein, 180-240 kD (multiple isoforms) Distribution Hematopoietic cells, not ... It is a tyrosine phosphatase expressed on the plasma membrane of all hematopoietic cells, except erythrocytes and platelets. ...
Calcium/Calmodulin-Activated Protein Phosphatase,Phosphoprotein Phosphohydrolase,Protein phosphatase 2B,Calmodulin binding ...
Appropriate stimulation time points and prompt inactivation of phosphatases are required for most methods of phosphoprotein ... Also, intracellular phosphatases can quickly dephosphorylate these proteins. Therefore, after treatment, cells must be quickly ... Optimizing Intracellular Flow Cytometry: Detection of Cytokines, Transcription Factors, and Phosphoprotein by Flow Cytometry ... Another important consideration is the level of phosphoprotein expression. Certain protein phosphorylation events can be ...
The phosphoprotein phosphatase responsible for turnover was partially inhibited by 5 mM NaF. The pattern of ciliary ... The mutants also had apparently normal phosphoprotein phosphatase. The Paranoiac A mutant, however, showed a reduction in ...
DOKLADY AN SSSR, BIOCHEMISTRY// 00/12/1981,VO261,NO004, PP 1006-1009 PHOSPHOPROTEIN PHOSPHATASE OF KIDNEY TISSUE AND REGULATION ...
Phosphoprotein Phosphatases/metabolism; Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases/*metabolism; Schizosaccharomyces/cytology/*metabolism ... Soybean Proteins; Ubiquitin-Protein Ligase Complexes; Ubiquitin-Protein Ligases; cdc25 Phosphatases ...
Invitrogen Anti-Tartrate Resistant Acid Phosphatase Monoclonal (5C5E7), Catalog # MA5-38435. Tested in Western Blot (WB), Flow ... Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) is a basic iron-binding protein with high activity towards phosphoproteins, ATP and ... tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5a; tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b; Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase type 5; TR- ... Tartrate Resistant Acid Phosphatase Monoclonal Antibody (5C5E7). View all (23) Tartrate Resistant Acid Phosphatase antibodies ...
Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) belongs to the superfamily of phosphoprotein phosphatases (PPPs) and catalyzes protein ... The B56 family of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) regulatory subunits encodes differentiation-induced phosphoproteins that target ... So binding of a phosphatase to a protein does not always guarantee that it is a substrate of the phosphatase. Thus the B56 ... Mechanisms regulating phosphatase specificity and the removal of individual phosphorylation sites during mitotic exit.. Rogers ...
... kinases and phosphatases, fatty acid metabolism, and mitochondria. Dysregulated phosphoproteins are associated with the ... The total number of identified dysregulated phosphoproteins was 214 in the EC, 65 of which were dysregulated at the first ... A large percentage of dysregulated phosphoproteins were identified in the two regions and at different stages of NFT ... The main group of dysregulated phosphoproteins was made up of components of the membranes, cytoskeleton, synapses, proteins ...
Tensin is a phosphoprotein that is present only in very large, mature adhesions[8], and has a prominent role in signaling ... Hall, E. H., Daugherty, A. E., Choi, C. K., Horwitz, A. F. & Brautigan, D. L. Tensin1 requires protein phosphatase-1alpha in ... p130 Crk-associated substrate (p130Cas) is a phosphoprotein that localizes to adhesions by binding to paxillin and other ... Paxillin is a phosphoprotein that localizes to adhesions. Through multiple phosphorylated tyrosine and serine/threonine ...
Emerging insights into serine/threonine-specific phosphoprotein phosphatase function and selectivity. 2022;135. ... Protein Phosphatase 4 Negatively Regulates the Immune Deficiency-NF-κB Pathway during the Drosophila Immune Response. 2021;207: ... Identification of protein phosphatase 4 catalytic subunit as a Wnt promoting factor in pan-cancer and Xenopus early ... Nuclear-enriched protein phosphatase 4 ensures outer kinetochore assembly prior to nuclear dissolution. 2023;222. ...
... and PHOSPHOPROTEIN PHOSPHATASES as well as their putative substrates such as chromatin-associated proteins, CYTOSKELETAL ... and PHOSPHOPROTEIN PHOSPHATASES as well as their putative substrates such as chromatin-associated proteins, CYTOSKELETAL ...
Unique utilization of a phosphoprotein phosphatase fold by a mammalian phosphodiesterase associated with WAGR syndrome. J. Mol ...
  • The role of serine/threonine phosphatases in human development: Evidence from congenital disorders. (bmbreports.org)
  • Emerging insights into serine/threonine-specific phosphoprotein phosphatase function and selectivity. (bmbreports.org)
  • The triglyceride catabolism regulated by a serine/threonine protein phosphatase, Smek1, is required for development and plant infection in Magnaporthe oryzae. (bmbreports.org)
  • Here DARPP-32 phosphorylation by protein kinase A (PKA), DARPP-32 into a powerful protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) inhibitor. (pp1a.com)
  • It is a potent inhibitor of specific protein phosphatases and is known to have a variety of negative effects on cells. (chemspider.com)
  • The inhibition of activation of the cells by M1/89.18.7.HK was abrogated significantly both by the phosphotyrosine protein phosphatase inhibitor orthovanadate and by excess M1/9.3.4.HL.2. (mssm.edu)
  • Phosphatase holoenzyme inhibitor (PHI)-1 is one of the newest members of the family of protein phosphatase inhibitor proteins. (uky.edu)
  • Inhibitor of protein-phosphatase 1. (t3db.ca)
  • In human ASM cells, these constituents decreased phosphorylation of 17-kD protein kinase C-potentiated inhibitory protein of type 1 protein phosphatase and 8-gingerol decreased myosin light chain phosphorylation. (nih.gov)
  • Although intracellular signal transduction is often portrayed as a protein kinase 'domino effect', the counterbalancing function of phosphatases, and thus the control of phosphatase activity, is equally relevant to proper regulation of cellular function. (ac.be)
  • In a screen for protein phosphatase homologs that functionally interact with the autophagy-dedicated protein kinase Atg1p in yeast, we have identified Aup1p, encoded by Saccharomyces cerevisiae reading frame YCR079w. (huji.ac.il)
  • Protein phosphorylation, which plays a key role in most cellular activities, is a reversible process mediated by protein kinases and phosphoprotein phosphatases. (embl.de)
  • Bien que considérée dans le passé comme une enzyme constitutive non spécifique, PP2A est une phosphatase soumise à une régulation précise et qui est importante dans le contrôle des fonctions cellulaires impliquant la phosphorylation. (ac.be)
  • Although viewed as a constitutive housekeeping enzyme in the past, PP2A is a highly regulated phosphatase and is emerging as an important regulator of multiple cellular processes involving protein phosphorylation. (ac.be)
  • But advances in the understanding of protein phosphatases make now clear that these enzymes are precisely regulated and are as important as kinases in the regulation of cellular processes involving protein phosphorylation. (ac.be)
  • Of the 28 phosphoprotein targets measured using multiplex ELISA, the GWI model (CORT+DFP) had numerous targets with increased phosphorylation over DFP alone (e.g. (cdc.gov)
  • Our results identify key sites of 53BP1 phosphorylation during mitosis, identify the counteracting phosphatase complex that restores the potential for DDR during interphase, and establish the physiological importance of this regulation. (ewha.ac.kr)
  • Dopamine and cyclic-AMP activated Mr32kDa phosphoprotein (DARPP-32) is a central signaling proteins in neurotransmission. (pp1a.com)
  • 2 Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a very abundant - it accounts for as much as 1% of total cellular proteins - ubiquitous and remarkably conserved enzyme. (ac.be)
  • Also, intracellular phosphatases can quickly dephosphorylate these proteins. (bdbiosciences.com)
  • Protein dephosphorylation by the PP2A phosphatase is mainly achieved through the interaction of its regulatory subunit with the associated proteins. (eu.org)
  • This family of proteins includes a wide variety of classes, including CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASES, mitogen-activated kinases, CYCLINS, and PHOSPHOPROTEIN PHOSPHATASES as well as their putative substrates such as chromatin-associated proteins, CYTOSKELETAL PROTEINS, and TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS. (bvsalud.org)
  • Proteins from cell lysate, uncooked serum, eluted serum proteins that were depleted of albumin and IgG, and eluted albumin and IgG from resin, were spiked with the phosphoprotein bovine beta-casein as an internal standard, reduced by 10 mM DTT in the presence of 8 M urea for 30 minutes at 37 C, and then alkylated by 50 mM iodoacetamide at space temp. (scienza-under-18.org)
  • DUSP9, a Dual-Specificity Phosphatase with a Key Role in Cell Biology and Human Diseases. (nih.gov)
  • Expression of Dual-Specificity Phosphatase 9 in Placenta and Its Relationship with Gestational Diabetes Mellitus. (nih.gov)
  • Protein Phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a widely expressed family of protein phosphatases made of a core dimer, composed of a catalytic (C) subunit and a structural (A) subunit, in association with a third variable regulatory (B) subunit. (ac.be)
  • New insights into the functional role of protein phosphatase 4 regulatory subunit PP4R3A/SMEK1 in the regulation of leukemic cell fate. (bmbreports.org)
  • Identification of protein phosphatase 4 catalytic subunit as a Wnt promoting factor in pan-cancer and Xenopus early embryogenesis. (bmbreports.org)
  • A unique isoform of the catalytic subunit of calmodulin-dependent protein phosphatase (CaM-PrP) was cloned from a murine testis library. (elsevierpure.com)
  • Although the role of modular protein-protein interaction domains in kinase and phosphatase signaling has been well characterized, it is becoming clear that many kinases and phosphatases utilize docking interactions - recognition of a short peptide motif in target partners by a groove on the catalytic domain that is separate from the active site. (nih.gov)
  • Although useful, these proxies do not provide a directmeasure of enzymatic activity, leading to inaccurate estimates of kinase and phosphatase activity. (nebraska.edu)
  • As a result,a clear understanding of the role of kinase and phosphatase activity perturbations during the development andprogression of human disease is lacking. (nebraska.edu)
  • Therefore, there is a critical need for the development and applicationof chemical tools to directly quantify kinase and phosphatase activity in human disease states. (nebraska.edu)
  • To achieve high biological specificity, protein kinases and phosphatases often recognize their targets through interactions that occur outside of the active site. (nih.gov)
  • Protein phosphatase 4 dephosphorylates phosphofructokinase-1 to regulate its enzymatic activity. (bmbreports.org)
  • We also reveal that protein phosphatase complex PP4C/R3β dephosphorylates T1609 and S1618 toallow the recruitment of 53BP1 to chromatin in G1 phase. (ewha.ac.kr)
  • It is a tyrosine phosphatase expressed on the plasma membrane of all hematopoietic cells, except erythrocytes and platelets. (biolegend.com)
  • Nouvelles avancées dans la structure et la régulation de la Protéine Phosphatase 2A : les raisons pour lesquelles PP2A ne doit plus être considérée comme une enzyme passive et non spécifique. (ac.be)
  • La Protéine Phosphatase 2A (PP2A) est une phosphatase très abondante composée d'un noyau dimérique contenant une sous-unité catalytique (C) et une sous-unité structurale (A), auquel est associé une sous-unité régulatrice (B) variable. (ac.be)
  • Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) belongs to the superfamily of phosphoprotein phosphatases (PPPs) and catalyzes protein dephosphorylation by hydrolyzing Ser/Thr-linked phosphate ester bonds ( Heroes,2013 ). (eu.org)
  • We also found that GβL interacts with PP2A and PP6, other members of the same phosphatase family. (korea.ac.kr)
  • Down-regulation of GβL by small interfering RNA diminished the inhibitory effect of phosphatases, resulting in restoration of NF-κB signaling. (korea.ac.kr)
  • and, various classes of phosphotyrosine-directed, phosphoserine- / phosphothreonine-directed, and dual-specificity phosphoprotein phosphatases that dephosphorylate activated MAPKs. (berkeley.edu)
  • In the past, most of the attention was focused primarily on protein kinases and on their regulation, mainly because phosphatases were then viewed as simple housekeeping enzymes. (ac.be)
  • Consequently, the enzymes thatmaintain the phosphoproteome, protein kinases and protein phosphatases, are considered key drug targets inhuman disease. (nebraska.edu)
  • Diluted serum samples with added protease and phosphatase inhibitors were applied to the Rabbit polyclonal to FBXW8 resin in the spin column, which was then sealed and incubated on a shaker. (scienza-under-18.org)
  • This study found an increase in excess GR transcriptional activity of protein phosphatase 1 alpha (PP1α) in HEK-293 cells and a decrease in the expression levels of GR-responsive gene knockdown following PP1α model A549 cells endogenously . (pp1a.com)
  • Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) is a basic iron-binding protein with high activity towards phosphoproteins, ATP and 4-nitrophenyl phosphatase. (thermofisher.com)
  • The higher degree of plasticity of the motif and the transient interaction provides a regulatory mechanism that acts to secure a proper balance between phosphatase and kinase activity in a given signaling network. (eu.org)
  • These results indicate that the phosphotyrosine protein phosphatase activity of CD45 is critical to its biological function and that bivalent (i.e. uncross-linked) anti-CD45 antibodies can give rise to markedly different responses. (mssm.edu)
  • It was observed that EDLA, dose dependently, abolished CAPP activity, while it had aecffect npon basal phosphatase activity. (nyu.edu)
  • DOK3 promotes atopic dermatitis by enabling the phosphatase PP4C to inhibit the T cell signaling mediator CARD11. (bmbreports.org)
  • To fully evaluate the brain-region specific effects of DFP and CORT+DFP on AChE, ACh concentrations were measured in cortex (CTX), hippocampus (HIP) and striatum (STR) using HILIC UPLC-MS/MS. Mice were euthanized using focused microwave irradiation to ensure rapid inactivation of AChE, as well as endogenous proteases and phosphatases. (cdc.gov)
  • our study demonstraten that at ImAl concentration some divaten cation, such as Mgappear to have a stimuarorv effect on both basal a CAPP phosphatase intivities. (nyu.edu)
  • On the contary monavalent cations had no effect on CAPP, inducd, they actnally stimulated basal phosphatase artivities. (nyu.edu)
  • CD45 non-covalently associates with lymphocyte phosphatase-associated phosphoprotein (LPAP) on T and B lymphocytes. (biolegend.com)
  • reported the profiling of endogenous serum phosphorylated peptides by TiO2-enrichment and MALDI-TOF MS detection.21 However, the characterization and description of the content of phosphoprotein analytes in serum were limited. (scienza-under-18.org)
  • By interacting with protein phosphatases, which do not directly bind to IKKβ, GβL mediates the association of phosphatases with IKKβ. (korea.ac.kr)
  • Protein Phosphatase 4 Is Required for Centrobin Function in DNA Damage Repair. (bmbreports.org)
  • The protein encoded by this gene is a member of the dual specificity protein phosphatase subfamily. (nih.gov)
  • Therefore, interrogation of potential organophosphorylation targets and aberrant phosphoprotein responses of critical signaling pathways in the STR were conducted. (cdc.gov)
  • Similarly, marked modifications occur in the larger phosphoprotein clusters involving cytoskeleton and neuronal structures, membrane stabilization, and kinase regulation in the late elderly.Present findings may increase understanding of human brain proteostasis modifications in the elderly in the subpopulation of individuals not having AD neuropathological change and any other neurodegenerative change in any telencephalon region. (ibecbarcelona.eu)
  • These phosphatases inactivate their target kinases by dephosphorylating both the phosphoserine/threonine and phosphotyrosine residues. (nih.gov)
  • Assessment of immunoaffinity (anti-phosphotyrosine antibody) versus chemical (TiO2) enrichment methods, as well as solitary versus dual enrichment strategies, yielded an initial assessment of the phosphoprotein/peptide content of human being serum, which can serve as a launch-point for further exploration and analysis. (scienza-under-18.org)
  • Different members of the family of dual specificity phosphatases show distinct substrate specificities for various MAP kinases, different tissue distribution and subcellular localization, and different modes of inducibility of their expression by extracellular stimuli. (nih.gov)
  • Aup1p is highly similar to a family of protein phosphatase homologs in animal cells that are predicted to localize to mitochondria based on sequence analysis. (huji.ac.il)
  • The following product was used in this experiment: Tartrate Resistant Acid Phosphatase Monoclonal Antibody (5C5E7) from Thermo Fisher Scientific, catalog # MA5-38435, RRID AB_2898349. (thermofisher.com)
  • This was confirmed by phosphatase treatment and by a specific phospho-PHI-1 antibody. (uky.edu)
  • SIRT1 regulates DNA damage signaling through the PP4 phosphatase complex. (bmbreports.org)
  • Thus, we propose that GβL functions as a negative regulator of NF-κB signaling by recruiting protein phosphatases to the IKK complex. (korea.ac.kr)
  • Find the tools and techniques, including BD fluorochrome-conjugated antibodies, buffers, kits and protocols that support intracellular cytokine staining and phosphoprotein and transcription factor detection by intracellular flow cytometry. (bdbiosciences.com)
  • HEAT repeat domain, found in protein phosphatase 2a and initiation factor eIF4G. (eu.org)
  • En el CITOPLASMA, las proteínas B I-kappa se unen al factor de transcripción NF-KAPPA B. La estimulación celular causa su disociación y traslocación del NF-kappa B activo al núcleo. (bvsalud.org)