Phosphorus: A non-metal element that has the atomic symbol P, atomic number 15, and atomic weight 31. It is an essential element that takes part in a broad variety of biochemical reactions.Phosphates: Inorganic salts of phosphoric acid.Phosphorus, Dietary: Phosphorus used in foods or obtained from food. This element is a major intracellular component which plays an important role in many biochemical pathways relating to normal physiological functions. High concentrations of dietary phosphorus can cause nephrocalcinosis which is associated with impaired kidney function. Low concentrations of dietary phosphorus cause an increase in calcitriol in the blood and osteoporosis.Phosphorus Compounds: Inorganic compounds that contain phosphorus as an integral part of the molecule.Calcium Phosphates: Calcium salts of phosphoric acid. These compounds are frequently used as calcium supplements.Glucose-6-Phosphate: An ester of glucose with phosphoric acid, made in the course of glucose metabolism by mammalian and other cells. It is a normal constituent of resting muscle and probably is in constant equilibrium with fructose-6-phosphate. (Stedman, 26th ed)Glyceraldehyde-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenases: Enzymes that catalyze the dehydrogenation of GLYCERALDEHYDE 3-PHOSPHATE. Several types of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate-dehydrogenase exist including phosphorylating and non-phosphorylating varieties and ones that transfer hydrogen to NADP and ones that transfer hydrogen to NAD.Sugar PhosphatesPhosphorus Metabolism Disorders: Disorders in the processing of phosphorus in the body: its absorption, transport, storage, and utilization.Hyperphosphatemia: A condition of abnormally high level of PHOSPHATES in the blood, usually significantly above the normal range of 0.84-1.58 mmol per liter of serum.Inositol Phosphates: Phosphoric acid esters of inositol. They include mono- and polyphosphoric acid esters, with the exception of inositol hexaphosphate which is PHYTIC ACID.Parathyroid Hormone: A polypeptide hormone (84 amino acid residues) secreted by the PARATHYROID GLANDS which performs the essential role of maintaining intracellular CALCIUM levels in the body. Parathyroid hormone increases intracellular calcium by promoting the release of CALCIUM from BONE, increases the intestinal absorption of calcium, increases the renal tubular reabsorption of calcium, and increases the renal excretion of phosphates.Phosphorus Isotopes: Stable phosphorus atoms that have the same atomic number as the element phosphorus, but differ in atomic weight. P-31 is a stable phosphorus isotope.Phosphate Transport Proteins: Membrane proteins that are involved in the active transport of phosphate.6-Phytase: An enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of myo-inositol hexakisphosphate and water to 1L-myo-inositol 1,2,3,4,5-pentakisphosphate and orthophosphate. EC 3.1.3.26.Calcium: A basic element found in nearly all organized tissues. It is a member of the alkaline earth family of metals with the atomic symbol Ca, atomic number 20, and atomic weight 40. Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the body and combines with phosphorus to form calcium phosphate in the bones and teeth. It is essential for the normal functioning of nerves and muscles and plays a role in blood coagulation (as factor IV) and in many enzymatic processes.Minerals: Native, inorganic or fossilized organic substances having a definite chemical composition and formed by inorganic reactions. They may occur as individual crystals or may be disseminated in some other mineral or rock. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed; McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Glyceraldehyde 3-Phosphate: An aldotriose which is an important intermediate in glycolysis and in tryptophan biosynthesis.Pentose Phosphate Pathway: An oxidative decarboxylation process that converts GLUCOSE-6-PHOSPHATE to D-ribose-5-phosphate via 6-phosphogluconate. The pentose product is used in the biosynthesis of NUCLEIC ACIDS. The generated energy is stored in the form of NADPH. This pathway is prominent in tissues which are active in the synthesis of FATTY ACIDS and STEROIDS.Glucosephosphate DehydrogenaseDihydroxyacetone Phosphate: An important intermediate in lipid biosynthesis and in glycolysis.Nitrogen: An element with the atomic symbol N, atomic number 7, and atomic weight [14.00643; 14.00728]. Nitrogen exists as a diatomic gas and makes up about 78% of the earth's atmosphere by volume. It is a constituent of proteins and nucleic acids and found in all living cells.Calcium, Dietary: Calcium compounds used as food supplements or in food to supply the body with calcium. Dietary calcium is needed during growth for bone development and for maintenance of skeletal integrity later in life to prevent osteoporosis.Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy: Spectroscopic method of measuring the magnetic moment of elementary particles such as atomic nuclei, protons or electrons. It is employed in clinical applications such as NMR Tomography (MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING).Hypophosphatemia: A condition of an abnormally low level of PHOSPHATES in the blood.Kinetics: The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.Pyridoxal Phosphate: This is the active form of VITAMIN B 6 serving as a coenzyme for synthesis of amino acids, neurotransmitters (serotonin, norepinephrine), sphingolipids, aminolevulinic acid. During transamination of amino acids, pyridoxal phosphate is transiently converted into pyridoxamine phosphate (PYRIDOXAMINE).Glycerophosphates: Any salt or ester of glycerophosphoric acid.Glucose-6-Phosphate Isomerase: An aldose-ketose isomerase that catalyzes the reversible interconversion of glucose 6-phosphate and fructose 6-phosphate. In prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms it plays an essential role in glycolytic and gluconeogenic pathways. In mammalian systems the enzyme is found in the cytoplasm and as a secreted protein. This secreted form of glucose-6-phosphate isomerase has been referred to as autocrine motility factor or neuroleukin, and acts as a cytokine which binds to the AUTOCRINE MOTILITY FACTOR RECEPTOR. Deficiency of the enzyme in humans is an autosomal recessive trait, which results in CONGENITAL NONSPHEROCYTIC HEMOLYTIC ANEMIA.GlucosephosphatesPhosphate-Binding Proteins: Proteins that bind to and are involved in the metabolism of phosphate ions.Organophosphates: Carbon-containing phosphoric acid derivatives. Included under this heading are compounds that have CARBON atoms bound to one or more OXYGEN atoms of the P(=O)(O)3 structure. Note that several specific classes of endogenous phosphorus-containing compounds such as NUCLEOTIDES; PHOSPHOLIPIDS; and PHOSPHOPROTEINS are listed elsewhere.PentosephosphatesOrganophosphorus Compounds: Organic compounds that contain phosphorus as an integral part of the molecule. Included under this heading is broad array of synthetic compounds that are used as PESTICIDES and DRUGS.Phytic Acid: Complexing agent for removal of traces of heavy metal ions. It acts also as a hypocalcemic agent.Hydrogen-Ion Concentration: The normality of a solution with respect to HYDROGEN ions; H+. It is related to acidity measurements in most cases by pH = log 1/2[1/(H+)], where (H+) is the hydrogen ion concentration in gram equivalents per liter of solution. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)HexosephosphatesMagnesium: A metallic element that has the atomic symbol Mg, atomic number 12, and atomic weight 24.31. It is important for the activity of many enzymes, especially those involved in OXIDATIVE PHOSPHORYLATION.Alkaline Phosphatase: An enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of an orthophosphoric monoester and water to an alcohol and orthophosphate. EC 3.1.3.1.Glycerol-3-Phosphate O-Acyltransferase: An enzyme that transfers acyl groups from acyl-CoA to glycerol-3-phosphate to form monoglyceride phosphates. It acts only with CoA derivatives of fatty acids of chain length above C-10. Also forms diglyceride phosphates. EC 2.3.1.15.Sphingosine: An amino alcohol with a long unsaturated hydrocarbon chain. Sphingosine and its derivative sphinganine are the major bases of the sphingolipids in mammals. (Dorland, 28th ed)Eutrophication: The enrichment of a terrestrial or aquatic ECOSYSTEM by the addition of nutrients, especially nitrogen and phosphorus, that results in a superabundant growth of plants, ALGAE, or other primary producers. It can be a natural process or result from human activity such as agriculture runoff or sewage pollution. In aquatic ecosystems, an increase in the algae population is termed an algal bloom.Carbamyl Phosphate: The monoanhydride of carbamic acid with PHOSPHORIC ACID. It is an important intermediate metabolite and is synthesized enzymatically by CARBAMYL-PHOSPHATE SYNTHASE (AMMONIA) and CARBAMOYL-PHOSPHATE SYNTHASE (GLUTAMINE-HYDROLYZING).Polyphosphates: Linear polymers in which orthophosphate residues are linked with energy-rich phosphoanhydride bonds. They are found in plants, animals, and microorganisms.Lysophospholipids: Derivatives of PHOSPHATIDIC ACIDS that lack one of its fatty acyl chains due to its hydrolytic removal.Soil: The unconsolidated mineral or organic matter on the surface of the earth that serves as a natural medium for the growth of land plants.Phosphocreatine: An endogenous substance found mainly in skeletal muscle of vertebrates. It has been tried in the treatment of cardiac disorders and has been added to cardioplegic solutions. (Reynolds JEF(Ed): Martindale: The Extra Pharmacopoeia (electronic version). Micromedex, Inc, Englewood, CO, 1996)Phosphorus Radioisotopes: Unstable isotopes of phosphorus that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. P atoms with atomic weights 28-34 except 31 are radioactive phosphorus isotopes.Phosphites: Inorganic salts or organic esters of phosphorous acid that contain the (3-)PO3 radical. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Fertilizers: Substances or mixtures that are added to the soil to supply nutrients or to make available nutrients already present in the soil, in order to increase plant growth and productivity.Bone and Bones: A specialized CONNECTIVE TISSUE that is the main constituent of the SKELETON. The principle cellular component of bone is comprised of OSTEOBLASTS; OSTEOCYTES; and OSTEOCLASTS, while FIBRILLAR COLLAGENS and hydroxyapatite crystals form the BONE MATRIX.Diet: Regular course of eating and drinking adopted by a person or animal.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Ribosemonophosphates: Ribose substituted in the 1-, 3-, or 5-position by a phosphoric acid moiety.Adenosine Triphosphate: An adenine nucleotide containing three phosphate groups esterified to the sugar moiety. In addition to its crucial roles in metabolism adenosine triphosphate is a neurotransmitter.Plant Roots: The usually underground portions of a plant that serve as support, store food, and through which water and mineral nutrients enter the plant. (From American Heritage Dictionary, 1982; Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990)Phosphatidylinositol Phosphates: Phosphatidylinositols in which one or more alcohol group of the inositol has been substituted with a phosphate group.Nephrocalcinosis: A condition characterized by calcification of the renal tissue itself. It is usually seen in distal RENAL TUBULAR ACIDOSIS with calcium deposition in the DISTAL KIDNEY TUBULES and the surrounding interstitium. Nephrocalcinosis causes RENAL INSUFFICIENCY.Calcitriol: The physiologically active form of vitamin D. It is formed primarily in the kidney by enzymatic hydroxylation of 25-hydroxycholecalciferol (CALCIFEDIOL). Its production is stimulated by low blood calcium levels and parathyroid hormone. Calcitriol increases intestinal absorption of calcium and phosphorus, and in concert with parathyroid hormone increases bone resorption.Aldehyde-Lyases: Enzymes that catalyze a reverse aldol condensation. A molecule containing a hydroxyl group and a carbonyl group is cleaved at a C-C bond to produce two smaller molecules (ALDEHYDES or KETONES). EC 4.1.2.Glycerolphosphate DehydrogenaseFructosephosphatesHyperparathyroidism, Secondary: Abnormally elevated PARATHYROID HORMONE secretion as a response to HYPOCALCEMIA. It is caused by chronic KIDNEY FAILURE or other abnormalities in the controls of bone and mineral metabolism, leading to various BONE DISEASES, such as RENAL OSTEODYSTROPHY.Receptors, Lysosphingolipid: A subfamily of lysophospholipid receptors with specificity for LYSOSPHINGOLIPIDS such as sphingosine-1-phosphate and sphingosine phosphorylcholine.Biomass: Total mass of all the organisms of a given type and/or in a given area. (From Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990) It includes the yield of vegetative mass produced from any given crop.Receptor, IGF Type 2: A receptor that is specific for IGF-II and mannose-6-phosphate. The receptor is a 250-kDa single chain polypeptide which is unrelated in structure to the type 1 IGF receptor (RECEPTOR, IGF TYPE 1) and does not have a tyrosine kinase domain.Glyceraldehyde 3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase (NADP+)Hypophosphatemia, Familial: An inherited condition of abnormally low serum levels of PHOSPHATES (below 1 mg/liter) which can occur in a number of genetic diseases with defective reabsorption of inorganic phosphorus by the PROXIMAL RENAL TUBULES. This leads to phosphaturia, HYPOPHOSPHATEMIA, and disturbances of cellular and organ functions such as those in X-LINKED HYPOPHOSPHATEMIC RICKETS; OSTEOMALACIA; and FANCONI SYNDROME.Glutamine-Fructose-6-Phosphate Transaminase (Isomerizing): An enzyme that catalyzes the synthesis of fructose-6-phosphate plus GLUTAMINE from GLUTAMATE plus glucosamine-6-phosphate.Mannosephosphates: Phosphoric acid esters of mannose.Polyisoprenyl Phosphates: Phosphoric or pyrophosphoric acid esters of polyisoprenoids.Rickets: Disorders caused by interruption of BONE MINERALIZATION manifesting as OSTEOMALACIA in adults and characteristic deformities in infancy and childhood due to disturbances in normal BONE FORMATION. The mineralization process may be interrupted by disruption of VITAMIN D; PHOSPHORUS; or CALCIUM homeostasis, resulting from dietary deficiencies, or acquired, or inherited metabolic, or hormonal disturbances.Calcium Carbonate: Carbonic acid calcium salt (CaCO3). An odorless, tasteless powder or crystal that occurs in nature. It is used therapeutically as a phosphate buffer in hemodialysis patients and as a calcium supplement.Electron Probe Microanalysis: Identification and measurement of ELEMENTS and their location based on the fact that X-RAYS emitted by an element excited by an electron beam have a wavelength characteristic of that element and an intensity related to its concentration. It is performed with an electron microscope fitted with an x-ray spectrometer, in scanning or transmission mode.Phosphotransferases: A rather large group of enzymes comprising not only those transferring phosphate but also diphosphate, nucleotidyl residues, and others. These have also been subdivided according to the acceptor group. (From Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992) EC 2.7.Arsenates: Inorganic or organic salts and esters of arsenic acid.Renal Dialysis: Therapy for the insufficient cleansing of the BLOOD by the kidneys based on dialysis and including hemodialysis, PERITONEAL DIALYSIS, and HEMODIAFILTRATION.Kidney Failure, Chronic: The end-stage of CHRONIC RENAL INSUFFICIENCY. It is characterized by the severe irreversible kidney damage (as measured by the level of PROTEINURIA) and the reduction in GLOMERULAR FILTRATION RATE to less than 15 ml per min (Kidney Foundation: Kidney Disease Outcome Quality Initiative, 2002). These patients generally require HEMODIALYSIS or KIDNEY TRANSPLANTATION.Phosphotransferases (Alcohol Group Acceptor): A group of enzymes that transfers a phosphate group onto an alcohol group acceptor. EC 2.7.1.Carbon: A nonmetallic element with atomic symbol C, atomic number 6, and atomic weight [12.0096; 12.0116]. It may occur as several different allotropes including DIAMOND; CHARCOAL; and GRAPHITE; and as SOOT from incompletely burned fuel.Escherichia coli: A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria (GRAM-NEGATIVE FACULTATIVELY ANAEROBIC RODS) commonly found in the lower part of the intestine of warm-blooded animals. It is usually nonpathogenic, but some strains are known to produce DIARRHEA and pyogenic infections. Pathogenic strains (virotypes) are classified by their specific pathogenic mechanisms such as toxins (ENTEROTOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI), etc.Animal Feed: Foodstuff used especially for domestic and laboratory animals, or livestock.Phosphoric Monoester Hydrolases: A group of hydrolases which catalyze the hydrolysis of monophosphoric esters with the production of one mole of orthophosphate. EC 3.1.3.Aluminum: A metallic element that has the atomic number 13, atomic symbol Al, and atomic weight 26.98.Food Additives: Substances which are of little or no nutritive value, but are used in the processing or storage of foods or animal feed, especially in the developed countries; includes ANTIOXIDANTS; FOOD PRESERVATIVES; FOOD COLORING AGENTS; FLAVORING AGENTS; ANTI-INFECTIVE AGENTS (both plain and LOCAL); VEHICLES; EXCIPIENTS and other similarly used substances. Many of the same substances are PHARMACEUTIC AIDS when added to pharmaceuticals rather than to foods.TriosesSodium-Phosphate Cotransporter Proteins: A family of symporters that facilitate sodium-dependent membrane transport of phosphate.Calcification, Physiologic: Process by which organic tissue becomes hardened by the physiologic deposit of calcium salts.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Glucosephosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency: A disease-producing enzyme deficiency subject to many variants, some of which cause a deficiency of GLUCOSE-6-PHOSPHATE DEHYDROGENASE activity in erythrocytes, leading to hemolytic anemia.Fibroblast Growth Factors: A family of small polypeptide growth factors that share several common features including a strong affinity for HEPARIN, and a central barrel-shaped core region of 140 amino acids that is highly homologous between family members. Although originally studied as proteins that stimulate the growth of fibroblasts this distinction is no longer a requirement for membership in the fibroblast growth factor family.Plant Shoots: New immature growth of a plant including stem, leaves, tips of branches, and SEEDLINGS.Glucose: A primary source of energy for living organisms. It is naturally occurring and is found in fruits and other parts of plants in its free state. It is used therapeutically in fluid and nutrient replacement.Vitamin D: A vitamin that includes both CHOLECALCIFEROLS and ERGOCALCIFEROLS, which have the common effect of preventing or curing RICKETS in animals. It can also be viewed as a hormone since it can be formed in SKIN by action of ULTRAVIOLET RAYS upon the precursors, 7-dehydrocholesterol and ERGOSTEROL, and acts on VITAMIN D RECEPTORS to regulate CALCIUM in opposition to PARATHYROID HORMONE.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Swine: Any of various animals that constitute the family Suidae and comprise stout-bodied, short-legged omnivorous mammals with thick skin, usually covered with coarse bristles, a rather long mobile snout, and small tail. Included are the genera Babyrousa, Phacochoerus (wart hogs), and Sus, the latter containing the domestic pig (see SUS SCROFA).Sewage: Refuse liquid or waste matter carried off by sewers.Renal Insufficiency, Chronic: Conditions in which the KIDNEYS perform below the normal level for more than three months. Chronic kidney insufficiency is classified by five stages according to the decline in GLOMERULAR FILTRATION RATE and the degree of kidney damage (as measured by the level of PROTEINURIA). The most severe form is the end-stage renal disease (CHRONIC KIDNEY FAILURE). (Kidney Foundation: Kidney Disease Outcome Quality Initiative, 2002)Acid Phosphatase: An enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of an orthophosphoric monoester and water to an alcohol and orthophosphate. EC 3.1.3.2.Substrate Specificity: A characteristic feature of enzyme activity in relation to the kind of substrate on which the enzyme or catalytic molecule reacts.Kidney: Body organ that filters blood for the secretion of URINE and that regulates ion concentrations.Hydrolysis: The process of cleaving a chemical compound by the addition of a molecule of water.Absorption: The physical or physiological processes by which substances, tissue, cells, etc. take up or take in other substances or energy.Calcium Compounds: Inorganic compounds that contain calcium as an integral part of the molecule.UTP-Hexose-1-Phosphate Uridylyltransferase: An enzyme that catalyzes the synthesis of UDPgalactose from UTP and galactose-1-phosphate. It is present in low levels in fetal and infant liver, but increases with age, thereby enabling galactosemic infants who survive to develop the capacity to metabolize galactose. EC 2.7.7.10.Aldose-Ketose Isomerases: Enzymes that catalyze the interconversion of aldose and ketose compounds.Halomonadaceae: A family of gram-negative, moderately halophilic bacteria in the order Oceanospirillales. Members of the family have been isolated from temperate and Antarctic saline lakes, solar salt facilities, saline soils, and marine environments.Manure: Accumulations of solid or liquid animal excreta usually from stables and barnyards with or without litter material. Its chief application is as a fertilizer. (From Webster's 3d ed)Binding Sites: The parts of a macromolecule that directly participate in its specific combination with another molecule.Renal Osteodystrophy: Decalcification of bone or abnormal bone development due to chronic KIDNEY DISEASES, in which 1,25-DIHYDROXYVITAMIN D3 synthesis by the kidneys is impaired, leading to reduced negative feedback on PARATHYROID HORMONE. The resulting SECONDARY HYPERPARATHYROIDISM eventually leads to bone disorders.Calcinosis: Pathologic deposition of calcium salts in tissues.Myo-Inositol-1-Phosphate Synthase: An enzyme that catalyzes the formation of myo-inositol-1-phosphate from glucose-6-phosphate in the presence of NAD. EC 5.5.1.4.Glyceraldehyde-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase (Phosphorylating): An NAD-dependent glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase found in the cytosol of eucaryotes. It catalyses the dehydrogenation and phosphorylation of GLYCERALDEHYDE 3-PHOSPHATE to 3-phospho-D-glyceroyl phosphate, which is an important step in the GLYCOLYSIS pathway.PolyaminesHydroxycholecalciferols: Hydroxy analogs of vitamin D 3; (CHOLECALCIFEROL); including CALCIFEDIOL; CALCITRIOL; and 24,25-DIHYDROXYVITAMIN D 3.Diphosphates: Inorganic salts of phosphoric acid that contain two phosphate groups.NADP: Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate. A coenzyme composed of ribosylnicotinamide 5'-phosphate (NMN) coupled by pyrophosphate linkage to the 5'-phosphate adenosine 2',5'-bisphosphate. It serves as an electron carrier in a number of reactions, being alternately oxidized (NADP+) and reduced (NADPH). (Dorland, 27th ed)Parathyroid Glands: Two pairs of small oval-shaped glands located in the front and the base of the NECK and adjacent to the two lobes of THYROID GLAND. They secrete PARATHYROID HORMONE that regulates the balance of CALCIUM; PHOSPHORUS; and MAGNESIUM in the body.Glycolysis: A metabolic process that converts GLUCOSE into two molecules of PYRUVIC ACID through a series of enzymatic reactions. Energy generated by this process is conserved in two molecules of ATP. Glycolysis is the universal catabolic pathway for glucose, free glucose, or glucose derived from complex CARBOHYDRATES, such as GLYCOGEN and STARCH.Phosphotransferases (Phosphate Group Acceptor): A group of enzymes that catalyzes the transfer of a phosphate group onto a phosphate group acceptor. EC 2.7.4.Uremia: A clinical syndrome associated with the retention of renal waste products or uremic toxins in the blood. It is usually the result of RENAL INSUFFICIENCY. Most uremic toxins are end products of protein or nitrogen CATABOLISM, such as UREA or CREATININE. Severe uremia can lead to multiple organ dysfunctions with a constellation of symptoms.Ribulosephosphates: Ribulose substituted by one or more phosphoric acid moieties.Lupinus: A plant genus of the family FABACEAE that is a source of SPARTEINE, lupanine and other lupin alkaloids.Elements: Substances that comprise all matter. Each element is made up of atoms that are identical in number of electrons and protons and in nuclear charge, but may differ in mass or number of neutrons.Mycorrhizae: Symbiotic combination (dual organism) of the MYCELIUM of FUNGI with the roots of plants (PLANT ROOTS). The roots of almost all higher plants exhibit this mutually beneficial relationship, whereby the fungus supplies water and mineral salts to the plant, and the plant supplies CARBOHYDRATES to the fungus. There are two major types of mycorrhizae: ectomycorrhizae and endomycorrhizae.Phospholipids: Lipids containing one or more phosphate groups, particularly those derived from either glycerol (phosphoglycerides see GLYCEROPHOSPHOLIPIDS) or sphingosine (SPHINGOLIPIDS). They are polar lipids that are of great importance for the structure and function of cell membranes and are the most abundant of membrane lipids, although not stored in large amounts in the system.Transaldolase: An enzyme of the transferase class that catalyzes the reaction sedoheptulose 7-phosphate and D-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate to yield D-erythrose 4-phosphate and D-fructose phosphate in the PENTOSE PHOSPHATE PATHWAY. (Dorland, 27th ed) EC 2.2.1.2.Chromatography, Paper: An analytical technique for resolution of a chemical mixture into its component compounds. Compounds are separated on an adsorbent paper (stationary phase) by their varied degree of solubility/mobility in the eluting solvent (mobile phase).Metacarpus: The region of the HAND between the WRIST and the FINGERS.Ergocalciferols: Derivatives of ERGOSTEROL formed by ULTRAVIOLET RAYS breaking of the C9-C10 bond. They differ from CHOLECALCIFEROL in having a double bond between C22 and C23 and a methyl group at C24.Waste Disposal, Fluid: The discarding or destroying of liquid waste products or their transformation into something useful or innocuous.Phosphogluconate Dehydrogenase: An enzyme of the oxidoreductase class that catalyzes the reaction 6-phospho-D-gluconate and NADP+ to yield D-ribulose 5-phosphate, carbon dioxide, and NADPH. The reaction is a step in the pentose phosphate pathway of glucose metabolism. (From Dorland, 27th ed) EC 1.1.1.43.Glycerol-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase (NAD+)Phosphatidylinositols: Derivatives of phosphatidic acids in which the phosphoric acid is bound in ester linkage to the hexahydroxy alcohol, myo-inositol. Complete hydrolysis yields 1 mole of glycerol, phosphoric acid, myo-inositol, and 2 moles of fatty acids.Soybeans: An annual legume. The SEEDS of this plant are edible and used to produce a variety of SOY FOODS.Polyisoprenyl Phosphate Monosaccharides: These compounds function as activated monosaccharide carriers in the biosynthesis of glycoproteins and oligosaccharide phospholipids. Obtained from a nucleoside diphosphate sugar and a polyisoprenyl phosphate.Potassium Compounds: Inorganic compounds that contain potassium as an integral part of the molecule.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Temperature: The property of objects that determines the direction of heat flow when they are placed in direct thermal contact. The temperature is the energy of microscopic motions (vibrational and translational) of the particles of atoms.Transferases (Other Substituted Phosphate Groups): A class of enzymes that transfers substituted phosphate groups. EC 2.7.8.Liver: A large lobed glandular organ in the abdomen of vertebrates that is responsible for detoxification, metabolism, synthesis and storage of various substances.Cattle: Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.Hyperparathyroidism: A condition of abnormally elevated output of PARATHYROID HORMONE (or PTH) triggering responses that increase blood CALCIUM. It is characterized by HYPERCALCEMIA and BONE RESORPTION, eventually leading to bone diseases. PRIMARY HYPERPARATHYROIDISM is caused by parathyroid HYPERPLASIA or PARATHYROID NEOPLASMS. SECONDARY HYPERPARATHYROIDISM is increased PTH secretion in response to HYPOCALCEMIA, usually caused by chronic KIDNEY DISEASES.Tritolyl Phosphates: A mixture of isomeric tritolyl phosphates. Used in the sterilization of certain surgical instruments and in many industrial processes.Lanthanum: Lanthanum. The prototypical element in the rare earth family of metals. It has the atomic symbol La, atomic number 57, and atomic weight 138.91. Lanthanide ion is used in experimental biology as a calcium antagonist; lanthanum oxide improves the optical properties of glass.Mannitol Phosphates: Phosphoric acid esters of mannitol.Biological Transport: The movement of materials (including biochemical substances and drugs) through a biological system at the cellular level. The transport can be across cell membranes and epithelial layers. It also can occur within intracellular compartments and extracellular compartments.Phytoplankton: Free-floating minute organisms that are photosynthetic. The term is non-taxonomic and refers to a lifestyle (energy utilization and motility), rather than a particular type of organism. Most, but not all, are unicellular algae. Important groups include DIATOMS; DINOFLAGELLATES; CYANOBACTERIA; CHLOROPHYTA; HAPTOPHYTA; CRYPTOMONADS; and silicoflagellates.Hypocalcemia: Reduction of the blood calcium below normal. Manifestations include hyperactive deep tendon reflexes, Chvostek's sign, muscle and abdominal cramps, and carpopedal spasm. (Dorland, 27th ed)Phosphorylation: The introduction of a phosphoryl group into a compound through the formation of an ester bond between the compound and a phosphorus moiety.Acetates: Derivatives of ACETIC ACID. Included under this heading are a broad variety of acid forms, salts, esters, and amides that contain the carboxymethane structure.Animal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena: Nutritional physiology of animals.Fresh Water: Water containing no significant amounts of salts, such as water from RIVERS and LAKES.Water Quality: A rating of a body of water based on measurable physical, chemical, and biological characteristics.Culture Media: Any liquid or solid preparation made specifically for the growth, storage, or transport of microorganisms or other types of cells. The variety of media that exist allow for the culturing of specific microorganisms and cell types, such as differential media, selective media, test media, and defined media. Solid media consist of liquid media that have been solidified with an agent such as AGAR or GELATIN.Inositol: An isomer of glucose that has traditionally been considered to be a B vitamin although it has an uncertain status as a vitamin and a deficiency syndrome has not been identified in man. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p1379) Inositol phospholipids are important in signal transduction.Carbohydrate Epimerases: Enzymes that catalyze the epimerization of chiral centers within carbohydrates or their derivatives. EC 5.1.3.Catalysis: The facilitation of a chemical reaction by material (catalyst) that is not consumed by the reaction.Dihydroxycholecalciferols: Cholecalciferols substituted with two hydroxy groups in any position.Mannose-6-Phosphate Isomerase: An enzyme that catalyzes the reversible isomerization of D-mannose-6-phosphate to form D-fructose-6-phosphate, an important step in glycolysis. EC 5.3.1.8.Propylene Glycols: Derivatives of propylene glycol (1,2-propanediol). They are used as humectants and solvents in pharmaceutical preparations.Polyisoprenyl Phosphate Sugars: Compounds functioning as activated glycosyl carriers in the biosynthesis of glycoproteins and glycophospholipids. They include the polyisoprenyl pyrophosphates.Bioreactors: Tools or devices for generating products using the synthetic or chemical conversion capacity of a biological system. They can be classical fermentors, cell culture perfusion systems, or enzyme bioreactors. For production of proteins or enzymes, recombinant microorganisms such as bacteria, mammalian cells, or insect or plant cells are usually chosen.Chromatography, Thin Layer: Chromatography on thin layers of adsorbents rather than in columns. The adsorbent can be alumina, silica gel, silicates, charcoals, or cellulose. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Chemistry: A basic science concerned with the composition, structure, and properties of matter; and the reactions that occur between substances and the associated energy exchange.Adenosine Diphosphate: Adenosine 5'-(trihydrogen diphosphate). An adenine nucleotide containing two phosphate groups esterified to the sugar moiety at the 5'-position.Dietary Proteins: Proteins obtained from foods. They are the main source of the ESSENTIAL AMINO ACIDS.Bacterial Proteins: Proteins found in any species of bacterium.Sodium-Phosphate Cotransporter Proteins, Type IIa: An electrogenic sodium-dependent phosphate transporter. It is present primarily in BRUSH BORDER membranes of PROXIMAL RENAL TUBULES.Electrolytes: Substances that dissociate into two or more ions, to some extent, in water. Solutions of electrolytes thus conduct an electric current and can be decomposed by it (ELECTROLYSIS). (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Phosphoric Acids: Inorganic derivatives of phosphoric acid (H3PO4). Note that organic derivatives of phosphoric acids are listed under ORGANOPHOSPHATES.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Chemical Phenomena: The composition, conformation, and properties of atoms and molecules, and their reaction and interaction processes.Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid: Liquid chromatographic techniques which feature high inlet pressures, high sensitivity, and high speed.KetosesOxygen Isotopes: Stable oxygen atoms that have the same atomic number as the element oxygen, but differ in atomic weight. O-17 and 18 are stable oxygen isotopes.Intestinal Absorption: Uptake of substances through the lining of the INTESTINES.Erythritol: A four-carbon sugar that is found in algae, fungi, and lichens. It is twice as sweet as sucrose and can be used as a coronary vasodilator.Zinc: A metallic element of atomic number 30 and atomic weight 65.38. It is a necessary trace element in the diet, forming an essential part of many enzymes, and playing an important role in protein synthesis and in cell division. Zinc deficiency is associated with ANEMIA, short stature, HYPOGONADISM, impaired WOUND HEALING, and geophagia. It is known by the symbol Zn.Buffers: A chemical system that functions to control the levels of specific ions in solution. When the level of hydrogen ion in solution is controlled the system is called a pH buffer.Bone Diseases: Diseases of BONES.Models, Molecular: Models used experimentally or theoretically to study molecular shape, electronic properties, or interactions; includes analogous molecules, computer-generated graphics, and mechanical structures.Rabbits: The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.Phosphofructokinase-1: An allosteric enzyme that regulates glycolysis by catalyzing the transfer of a phosphate group from ATP to fructose-6-phosphate to yield fructose-1,6-bisphosphate. D-tagatose- 6-phosphate and sedoheptulose-7-phosphate also are acceptors. UTP, CTP, and ITP also are donors. In human phosphofructokinase-1, three types of subunits have been identified. They are PHOSPHOFRUCTOKINASE-1, MUSCLE TYPE; PHOSPHOFRUCTOKINASE-1, LIVER TYPE; and PHOSPHOFRUCTOKINASE-1, TYPE C; found in platelets, brain, and other tissues.Nucleic Acids: High molecular weight polymers containing a mixture of purine and pyrimidine nucleotides chained together by ribose or deoxyribose linkages.Chelating Agents: Chemicals that bind to and remove ions from solutions. Many chelating agents function through the formation of COORDINATION COMPLEXES with METALS.Plant Leaves: Expanded structures, usually green, of vascular plants, characteristically consisting of a bladelike expansion attached to a stem, and functioning as the principal organ of photosynthesis and transpiration. (American Heritage Dictionary, 2d ed)Energy Metabolism: The chemical reactions involved in the production and utilization of various forms of energy in cells.Adenosine Monophosphate: Adenine nucleotide containing one phosphate group esterified to the sugar moiety in the 2'-, 3'-, or 5'-position.Protein Binding: The process in which substances, either endogenous or exogenous, bind to proteins, peptides, enzymes, protein precursors, or allied compounds. Specific protein-binding measures are often used as assays in diagnostic assessments.Stereoisomerism: The phenomenon whereby compounds whose molecules have the same number and kind of atoms and the same atomic arrangement, but differ in their spatial relationships. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 5th ed)Phosphines: Inorganic or organic compounds derived from phosphine (PH3) by the replacement of H atoms. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Dose-Response Relationship, Drug: The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.Water Purification: Any of several processes in which undesirable impurities in water are removed or neutralized; for example, chlorination, filtration, primary treatment, ion exchange, and distillation. It includes treatment of WASTE WATER to provide potable and hygienic water in a controlled or closed environment as well as provision of public drinking water supplies.Bacteria: One of the three domains of life (the others being Eukarya and ARCHAEA), also called Eubacteria. They are unicellular prokaryotic microorganisms which generally possess rigid cell walls, multiply by cell division, and exhibit three principal forms: round or coccal, rodlike or bacillary, and spiral or spirochetal. Bacteria can be classified by their response to OXYGEN: aerobic, anaerobic, or facultatively anaerobic; by the mode by which they obtain their energy: chemotrophy (via chemical reaction) or PHOTOTROPHY (via light reaction); for chemotrophs by their source of chemical energy: CHEMOLITHOTROPHY (from inorganic compounds) or chemoorganotrophy (from organic compounds); and by their source for CARBON; NITROGEN; etc.; HETEROTROPHY (from organic sources) or AUTOTROPHY (from CARBON DIOXIDE). They can also be classified by whether or not they stain (based on the structure of their CELL WALLS) with CRYSTAL VIOLET dye: gram-negative or gram-positive.Ribose: A pentose active in biological systems usually in its D-form.Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Molecular Weight: The sum of the weight of all the atoms in a molecule.Galactosephosphates: Phosphoric acid esters of galactose.3-Deoxy-7-Phosphoheptulonate Synthase: An enzyme that catalyzes the formation of 7-phospho-2-keto-3-deoxy-D-arabinoheptonate from phosphoenolpyruvate and D-erythrose-4-phosphate. It is one of the first enzymes in the biosynthesis of TYROSINE and PHENYLALANINE. This enzyme was formerly listed as EC 4.1.2.15.Zea mays: A plant species of the family POACEAE. It is a tall grass grown for its EDIBLE GRAIN, corn, used as food and animal FODDER.
... phosphates; phosphorus; rocks; salts; sands; sandstones; slates; and talcs that are yet to be fully exploited and the ...
Global Phosphorus Research Initiative (GPRI). Retrieved 2009-12-11. Stephen M. Jasinski (January 2006). "Phosphate Rock" (PDF ... phosphorus, so showing decline in human phosphorus production will occur soon would require far more than comparing the former ... Phosphorus supplies are essential to farming and depletion of reserves is estimated at somewhere from 60 to 130 years. ... Phosphorus supplies affect agricultural output which in turn limits alternative fuels such as biodiesel and ethanol. Its ...
Tc99m-Phosphonates and phosphates Myocardial imaging IV In-vivo Imaging Tc99m-DTPA (diethylenetriaminepenta-acetic acid) Renal ... Phosphorus-32Edit. 32P is a beta emitter. Name Treatment of Route of administration ... Tc99m-Phosphonates and phosphates (MDP/HDP) Bone imaging IV In-vivo Imaging ...
Sulfur and phosphorus are required for all life. Phosphorus almost exclusively exists as phosphate and its various esters. ... About 99% of mammals' mass are the elements carbon, nitrogen, calcium, sodium, chlorine, potassium, hydrogen, phosphorus, ... The most important ions are sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium, chloride, phosphate, and bicarbonate. The maintenance of ... The Watson-Crick structure for DNA demonstrated the key structural role played by phosphate-containing polymers. ...
Tofazzal (2014). Phosphate Solubilizing Rhizobacteria in Phosphorus Nutrition of Wheat. Saarbrücken: Lap Lambert Academic ... Motaher (2012). "Plant Probiotics in Phosphorus Nutrition in Crops, with Special Reference to Rice". In Maheshwari, D. K. ...
Phosphorus is essential for flowering or fruiting plants. Potassium is essential for strong roots and increased nutrient uptake ... Plants require soil minerals, mainly nitrate, phosphate, and potassium. Nitrogen is essential for green, leafy growth. ...
In the upper section the alchemical symbol of phosphorus is shown over a golden woven background. The lower silver section ... the mining of phosphates. Nauru Image of the national coat of arms of Nauru. ... The woven background symbolizes the people of Nauru; the frigatebird the fauna there; the alchemical symbol for phosphorus, ...
Phosphate. PTH is the major regulator of serum phosphate concentrations via actions on the kidney. It is an inhibitor of ... proximal tubular reabsorption of phosphorus. Through activation of vitamin D the absorption (intestinal) of Phosphate is ... The major function of the parathyroid glands is to maintain the body's calcium and phosphate levels within a very narrow range ... is a small protein that takes part in the control of calcium and phosphate homeostasis, as well as bone physiology. Parathyroid ...
... it can increase phosphorus availability after application of rock phosphate. M. pruriens was used in Native American milpa ... Utilization of rock phosphate by crops on a representative toposequence in the Northern Guinea savanna zone of Nigeria: ...
Haynes, R. J. (October 1982). "Effects of liming on phosphate availability in acid soils". Plant and Soil. 68 (3): 289-308. doi ... The effect of pH on phosphorus availability varies considerably, depending on soil conditions and the crop in question. The ... In such cases, it is often more efficient to add phosphorus, iron, manganese, copper and/or zinc instead, because deficiencies ... Sumner, M.E.; Farina, M.P.W. (1986). "Phosphorus interactions with other nutrients and lime in field cropping systems". In ...
However, rock phosphate reserves will be depleted in 50-100 years; peak phosphorus will occur in about 2030. The phenomenon of ... peak phosphorus is expected to increase food prices as fertilizer costs increase as rock phosphate reserves become more ... In the long term, phosphate will therefore have to be recovered and recycled from human and animal waste in order to maintain ... Phosphate is a primary component in the chemical fertilizer which is applied in modern agricultural production. ...
For example, the phosphate ion containing radioactive phosphorus-32 is 32PO43−. Also a study involving stable isotope ratios ...
Large quantities of phosphorus entered the Kootenay River; the cause of cyanobacterial blooms from the 1950s until the early ... This plant closed in 1973 eliminating these phosphates. The construction of the Libby Dam on the Kootenai River in Montana and ... British Columbia In 1953 water quality in the lake was negatively affected when the Cominco phosphate fertilizer plant on the ... the Duncan Dam 1967 on the Duncan river, combined to further reduce natural phosphorus levels in the lake from the recorded ...
... produced elemental phosphorus from phosphate ore operated from 1947 until 1981. The factory was originally operated by Victor ... The main contaminants of concern (COCs) in soil include arsenic, antimony, beryllium, elemental phosphorus, polynuclear ...
Producers of phosphorus-containing fertilizers now select phosphate rock based on the cadmium content. Phosphate rocks contain ... In the nitrophosphate process or Odda process (invented in 1927), phosphate rock with up to a 20% phosphorus (P) content is ... The most popular phosphate-containing minerals are referred to collectively as phosphate rock. The main minerals are ... Uranium-238 concentrations can range from 7 to 100 pCi/g in phosphate rock and from 1 to 67 pCi/g in phosphate fertilizers. ...
Bacterial precipitation of metal phosphates". In Valsami-Jones, E. Phosphorus in Environmental Technologies: Principles and ... It occurs through the formation of slimes and capsules, and with a preference for binding to the phosphate and phosphoryl ... Besides, through insertion of genes from other species it has been achieved that it can also precipitates uranyl phosphates and ... Martinez, R.J; Beazley, M.J; Sobecky, P.A (2014). "Phosphate-Mediated Remediation of Metals and Radionuclides" (Web). Advances ...
CS1 maint: Multiple names: authors list (link) Steele TH, DeLuca HF (1976). "Influence of dietary phosphorus on renal phosphate ...
MHBs also help gather unavailable phosphorus from soil.. Phosphate solubilizing rhizobacteria are the most common MHB that aid ... the MHB create a pool of phosphate that the mycorrhiza could use. The bacteria work in phosphorus-limited conditions to help ... The bacteria are involved in this process by releasing phosphate-degrading compounds in the soil to break down organic and ... Kucey, R.M.N.; Janzen, H.H.; Leggett, M.E. Microbially Mediated Increases in Plant-Available Phosphorus. pp. 199-228. doi: ...
The following example describes the determination of phosphorus. A sample containing the phosphate is mixed with an acid ... Examples of procedures are: the analysis of phosphate in sea water. standard methods for determining phosphorus and silicon ... Determination of phosphorus content - Molybdenum blue spectrophotometric method" "Determination of Phosphorus, Germanium, ... The phosphorus atom in the anion is termed the heteroatom, other heteroatoms are silicon and arsenic. The heteropoly-molybdenum ...
... they are believed to strongly influence nitrogen to phosphorus ratios ("N:P ratio"). In South Africa, Hartebeestpoort Dam is ... Microcystis is capable of strong uptake of phosphate and nitrogen; ... highly impacted by Microcystis because of elevated phosphate and nitrate levels flowing from the sewers of Johannesburg, one of ...
Some new methods of easily preparing solid phosphorus from urine, and making the same [i.e., phosphorus] as quickly and pure as ... Lead phosphate would then precipitate. The precipitate was filtered and rinsed, and then mixed with carbon and heated in a ... Phosphorus would then form in the retort and sublimate in the retort's receiver. Marggraf, Opuscules Chymiques de M. Margraf ( ... Marggraf's major work in inorganic chemistry included the improved production of phosphorus from urine and the detection of ...
The triose phosphates not thus "recycled" often condense to form hexose phosphates, which ultimately yield sucrose, starch and ... Arnon, Daniel I. (1956). "Phosphorus metabolism and photosynthesis". Review of Plant Physiology. 7: 325-354. doi:10.1146/ ... glycerate 3-phosphate, also known as 3-phosphoglycerate. Glycerate 3-phosphate, in the presence of ATP and NADPH produced ... 3 CO2 + 9 ATP + 6 NADPH + 6 H+ → C3H6O3-phosphate + 9 ADP + 8 Pi + 6 NADP+ + 3 H2O. ...
Phosphate methylation also gave the possibility to synthesize a self-complementary left-handed Z-DNA mini duplex. After a ... An important aspect of this project was based on the possibility of phosphorus (IV) to accommodate a fifth ligand under ... Van Boeckel had also been working on synthesis of phosphate methylated DNA, and knew how difficult it was to make such DNA- ... This change in geometry of phosphorus was also applicable on the biochemical dynamics of cAMP. Because of the importance of ...
Phosphatic sedimentary rocks are composed of phosphate minerals and contain more than 6.5% phosphorus; examples include ... deposits of phosphate nodules, bone beds, and phosphatic mudrocks. Sedimentary rocks are formed when sediment is deposited out ...
Esters, Sulphate Esters, Phosphate Esters, Thiophosphate Esters and Borate Esters. Liquids with these reactive groups have been ... Furthermore, partial oxidation of the organophosphate can result in the toxic phosphorus oxides release. The metabolic fate of ...
Phosphorus Sulfur Chlorine Argon Potassium Calcium Scandium Titanium Vanadium Chromium Manganese Iron Cobalt Nickel Copper Zinc ... The principal commercially viable ore of lutetium is the rare-earth phosphate mineral monazite, (Ce,La,etc.)PO4, which contains ...
Shengfeng Phosphorus Chemical. Shifang Dingli Phosphate Chemical. Kolod Food Ingredients Browse full research report at https ... Global Diammonium Phosphate Fertilizer Scope and Market Size. Diammonium Phosphate Fertilizer market is segmented by region ( ... Competitive Landscape and Diammonium Phosphate Fertilizer Market Share Analysis. Diammonium Phosphate Fertilizer market ... revenue generated in Diammonium Phosphate Fertilizer business, the date to enter into the Diammonium Phosphate Fertilizer ...
Phosphorus oxychloride(10025-87-3) Density MSDS Formula Use,If You also need to Phosphorus oxychloride(10025-87-3) Other ... ChemicalBook provide Chemical industry users with Phosphorus oxychloride(10025-87-3) Boiling point Melting point, ... phosphateDICAPTHONStarch, hydrogen phosphate, 2-hydroxypropyl etherAcetylated Dishtarch PhosphateNiclosamide3-CHLORO-1H- ... ChlorinePhosphorus trichloridePhosphorus pentachlorideOxygenSulfur dioxideSilicon dioxideWhite phosphorusDistillation equipment ...
... we provide Phosphorus Oxychloride & Sodium Dichloro Cyanurate for a long time at lowest price from China. ... Quality Phosphorus Oxychloride & Sodium Dichloro Cyanurate for sale from Loyal Bio-Chemical Manufacture Co.,Ltd, ... Phosphorus Oxychloride. Chemicals Phosphorus Pentoxide. Tris(Chloroethyl) Phosphate Fire Retardant TCEP. Phosphorous Pentoxide ... China Manufacturer with main products: Phosphorus Oxychloride, Sodium Dichloro Cyanurate, Idelalisib. * Chicken Manure Pellet ...
Superphosphate: Proportioned amounts of nitrogen and phosphate. *Diammonium phosphate: Contains 18% nitrogen and 46% phosphate. ... They contain one or more of the essential growth nutrients such as nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium and various others. Once ...
The effectiveness of different phosphates can be measured in field experiments in two ways: (i) different levels of each ... superphosphate rock phosphate Calciphos C-grade ore fertilizer effectiveness residual value This is a preview of subscription ... Barrow NJ (1980) In: Khasawneh FE, Sample EC and Kamprath EF (eds) The Role of Phosphorus in Agriculture, pp 333-359. Am Soc ... Hoare J (1980) In: Khasawneh FE, Sample EC and Kamprath EJ (eds) The Role of Phosphorus in Agriculture, pp 121-128. Am Soc ...
Phosphate Metabolism in Intact Human Erythrocytes: Determination by Phosphorus-31 Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy. ... Phosphate Metabolism in Intact Human Erythrocytes: Determination by Phosphorus-31 Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy ... Phosphate Metabolism in Intact Human Erythrocytes: Determination by Phosphorus-31 Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy ... Phosphate Metabolism in Intact Human Erythrocytes: Determination by Phosphorus-31 Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy ...
Soybean responded to phosphate fertilization regardless of the P source (Table 4). However, there was no response to phosphate ... 80 kg ha-1 total P2O5 as soluble phosphate (triple superphosphate - TSP), and (iii) 80 kg ha-1 total P2O5 as natural phosphate ... 80 kg ha-1 P2O5 as ground Arad Natural Reactive Phosphate (NRP), and control (without phosphate fertilizer). The plots were 30 ... were not affected by phosphate fertilization (Table 3). However, in the presence of phosphate fertilizer, the levels of P-total ...
... ratio of organic substrates on the regeneration of ammonium and phosphate was investigated by growing natural assemblages of ... Glucose Phosphate Biomass Ammonium Phosphorus These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is ... The effect of carbon∶nitrogen∶phosphorus (C∶N∶P) ratio of organic substrates on the regeneration of ammonium and phosphate was ... Bacterial regeneration of ammonium and phosphate as affected by the carbon:nitrogen:phosphorus ratio of organic substrates. ...
... phosphates are the most common form of phosphorus derived from its salts. ... Phosphorus is a mineral required for vital functions in the body; ... Phosphorus. Phosphates, Phosphorus. Phosphate is an intracellular ion and is derived from salt of phosphorus. Phosphates are ... Phosphate supplements are given to those who are unable to get enough phosphorus from their regular diet due to some disease or ...
Phosphorus (P) is a multi-valent nonmetal chemical element of the VA group, No 15 of the Periodic System. Its molar mass is ... Phosphate: The chemical formula of the phosphate ion is PO4. Structure. Phosphorus: Phosphorus forms several simple substances ... Phosphate: Phosphate exhibits an oxidation degree of -3. Forms/Types. Phosphorus: Phosphorus is characterized by allotropy and ... Difference Between Phosphorus and Phosphate. Definition Phosphorus: Phosphorus is a multi-valent nonmetal chemical element of ...
In Florida, there is about 19 Mt of phosphate rock mined annually. After beneficiation, the phosphate rock concentrate is ... Recovering REEs and phosphorus from these wastes is beneficial to maximize the utilization of these valuable resources. This ... of wet-process operating conditions on REE and phosphorus leaching from a kind of flotation tailing of Florida phosphate rock. ... Analyses indicated that the phosphate ions (PO43−) in the leaching solution tended to combine with REE ions to form REE ...
Optimizing Available Phosphorus in Calcareous Soils Fertilized with Diammonium Phosphate and Phosphoric Acid Using Freundlich ... L. C. Bell and C. A. Black, "Transformation of dibasic calcium phosphate dihydrate and octacalcium phosphate in slightly acid ... "Effect of phosphorus sources and levels with particular emphasis on selectively mined Eppawela rock phosphate on vegetable ... S. R. Olsen, C. V. Cole, F. S. Watanabe, and L. A. Dean, Estimation of Available Phosphorus in Soils By Extraction with Sodium ...
... for the phosphorus derived chemicals segment of the phosphate manufacturing point source category. [Elwood E Martin; General ... Phosphorus industry -- Waste disposal -- Standards -- United States. * Phosphates -- Waste disposal -- Standards -- United ... Phosphorus industry -- Waste disposal -- Standards -- United States. * Phosphates -- Waste disposal -- Standards -- United ... for the phosphorus derived chemicals segment of the phosphate manufacturing point source category a schema:CreativeWork, schema ...
... the biochemical pathway of transformation of glyphosate phosphorus to a useful phosphorus source for microorganisms has been ... Here phosphorus is found as phosphoric acid or phosphate ion, phosphoric acid esters, or phosphoric acid anhydrides. The latter ... Utilization of Glyphosate as Phosphate Source: Biochemistry and Genetics of Bacterial Carbon-Phosphorus Lyase Microbiol Mol ... This review deals with the radical-based mechanism employed by the carbon-phosphorus lyase of the carbon-phosphorus lyase ...
... monobasic sodium phosphate, phosphorus, potassium phosphate, sodium biphosphate, and sodium phosphate. Phosphate salts should ... elemental phosphorus, MCI-196, monobasic potassium phosphate, monobasic sodium phosphate, neutral calcium phosphate, phosphate ... Doses typically range from one to three grams of phosphorus (as a phosphate salt (sodium phosphate or potassium phosphate) or ... Aluminum phosphate, anhydrous sodium phosphate, bone ash, bone phosphate, calcium orthophosphate, calcium phosphate, calcium ...
Elevated serum phosphorus is a predictable accompaniment of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in the absence of dietary phosphate ... Association of serum phosphorus and calcium x phosphate product with mortality risk in chronic hemodialysis patients: a ... and laboratory parameters associated with high serum phosphorus. Serum phosphorus was similar in these two study populations ... The relative risk of death for those with a serum phosphorus greater than 6.5 mg/dL was 1.27 relative to those with a serum ...
Habitual high phosphorus intakes and foods with phosphate additives negatively affect serum parathyroid hormone concentration: ... Foods can contain natural phosphorus (NP) and phosphate-containing food additives (AP). The main objective of the present study ... Furthermore, phosphate additives may have more harmful effects on bone than other P sources, as indicated by higher mean S-PTH ...
At the heart of all contemporary biochemical systems reside reactive phosphorus (P) molecules (such as adenosine triphosphate, ... Phosphate Activation via Reduced Oxidation State Phosphorus (P). Mild Routes to Condensed-P Energy Currency Molecules. Terence ... Phosphate Activation via Reduced Oxidation State Phosphorus (P). Mild Routes to Condensed-P Energy Currency Molecules. Life. ... "Phosphate Activation via Reduced Oxidation State Phosphorus (P). Mild Routes to Condensed-P Energy Currency Molecules." Life 3 ...
Bioimaging Techniques Reveal Foliar Phosphate Uptake Pathways and Leaf Phosphorus Status. Maja Arsic, Stine Le Tougaard, Daniel ... Bioimaging Techniques Reveal Foliar Phosphate Uptake Pathways and Leaf Phosphorus Status. Maja Arsic, Stine Le Tougaard, Daniel ... Bioimaging Techniques Reveal Foliar Phosphate Uptake Pathways and Leaf Phosphorus Status Message Subject (Your Name) has sent ... Bioimaging Techniques Reveal Foliar Phosphate Uptake Pathways and Leaf Phosphorus Status. Maja Arsic, Stine Le Tougaard, Daniel ...
... we have not fully utilized its thermodynamic stability to form calcium phosphate minerals (CaP) for aqueous P management. In ... Global phosphorus (P) should be managed more sustainably to secure food, energy, and water for a growing population. Despite ... Designing the crystalline structure of calcium phosphate seed minerals in organic templates for sustainable phosphorus ... Designing the crystalline structure of calcium phosphate seed minerals in organic templates for sustainable phosphorus ...
Launched: International Phosphorus Task Team * Announced: 5th Sustainable Phosphorus Summit to take place in Kunming, China, ... Launched: International Phosphorus Task Team * Announced: 5th Sustainable Phosphorus Summit to take place in Kunming, China, ... translated from Des experts redoutent une pénurie de phosphates dici à la fin du siècle), article in Le Monde, by Bertrand ... Experts fear a shortage of phosphate by the end of the century. Posted on: January 11, 2010. ...
High-energy phosphate metabolism during two bouts of progressive calf exercise in humans measured by phosphorus-31 magnetic ... Using a whole-body 1.5 T MR scanner and a self-built exercise bench, we performed serial phosphorus-31 magnetic resonance ... Changes in PCr, inorganic phosphate (Pi) and pH were statistically evaluated in comparison to the baseline. The exercise ...
20 Badr M, Taalab A. Release of phosphorus from rock phosphate through composting using organic materials and its effect on ... This study was aimed to investigate the effect of bio-organic phosphate either alone or in combination with phosphorus ... Combined application of bio-organic phosphate and phosphorus solubilizing bacteria (Bacillus strain MWT 14) improve the ... Mechanisms of phosphate solubilization by PSB (Phosphate-solubilizing Bacteria) in soil. Kor J Soil Sci Fertil. 2012;45:169-176 ...
Liquid Cal-Mag Plus Vitamin D and Phosphorus indications, usages and related health products lists ... Liquid Cal-Mag Plus Vitamin D and Phosphorus information about active ingredients, pharmaceutical forms and doses by Swiss ... Calcium (Calcium Phosphate Tribasic)*Magnesium (Magnesium Hydroxide)*Magnesium (Magnesium Oxide)*Phosphorus (Calcium Phosphate ... Where to buy Liquid Cal-Mag Plus Vitamin D and Phosphorus brand or generic online:. ...
Biogeochemistry of phosphorus and application of oxygen isotopes of phosphate in a eutrophic tropical mariculture area. 熱帯の富栄養化 ... Biogeochemistry of phosphorus and application of oxygen isotopes of phosphate in a eutrophic tropical mariculture area ... Biogeochemistry of phosphorus and application of oxygen isotopes of phosphate in a eutrophic tropical mariculture area. ...
  • When catalyzed by a Lewis acid such as manganese chloride, POCl3 and a large amount of phenol (ArOH) heats to produce triaryl phosphate, such as in the reaction below: 3 C6H5OH + O=PCl3 → O=P(OC6H5)3 + 3 HCl. (chemicalbook.com)
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