An alpha-1 adrenergic agonist used as a mydriatic, nasal decongestant, and cardiotonic agent.
Drugs that selectively bind to and activate alpha adrenergic receptors.
Compounds that bind to and activate ADRENERGIC ALPHA-1 RECEPTORS.
Drugs used to cause constriction of the blood vessels.
A subclass of alpha-adrenergic receptors that mediate contraction of SMOOTH MUSCLE in a variety of tissues such as ARTERIOLES; VEINS; and the UTERUS. They are usually found on postsynaptic membranes and signal through GQ-G11 G-PROTEINS.
One of the two major pharmacological subdivisions of adrenergic receptors that were originally defined by the relative potencies of various adrenergic compounds. The alpha receptors were initially described as excitatory receptors that post-junctionally stimulate SMOOTH MUSCLE contraction. However, further analysis has revealed a more complex picture involving several alpha receptor subtypes and their involvement in feedback regulation.
A phenethylamine found in EPHEDRA SINICA. PSEUDOEPHEDRINE is an isomer. It is an alpha- and beta-adrenergic agonist that may also enhance release of norepinephrine. It has been used for asthma, heart failure, rhinitis, and urinary incontinence, and for its central nervous system stimulatory effects in the treatment of narcolepsy and depression. It has become less extensively used with the advent of more selective agonists.
A selective adrenergic alpha-1 antagonist used in the treatment of HEART FAILURE; HYPERTENSION; PHEOCHROMOCYTOMA; RAYNAUD DISEASE; PROSTATIC HYPERTROPHY; and URINARY RETENTION.
The physiological narrowing of BLOOD VESSELS by contraction of the VASCULAR SMOOTH MUSCLE.
Drugs that bind to but do not activate alpha-adrenergic receptors thereby blocking the actions of endogenous or exogenous adrenergic agonists. Adrenergic alpha-antagonists are used in the treatment of hypertension, vasospasm, peripheral vascular disease, shock, and pheochromocytoma.
Agents that dilate the pupil. They may be either sympathomimetics or parasympatholytics.
Drugs that mimic the effects of stimulating postganglionic adrenergic sympathetic nerves. Included here are drugs that directly stimulate adrenergic receptors and drugs that act indirectly by provoking the release of adrenergic transmitters.
The portion of the descending aorta proceeding from the arch of the aorta and extending to the DIAPHRAGM, eventually connecting to the ABDOMINAL AORTA.
Drugs that bind to and block the activation of ADRENERGIC ALPHA-1 RECEPTORS.
A response by the BARORECEPTORS to increased BLOOD PRESSURE. Increased pressure stretches BLOOD VESSELS which activates the baroreceptors in the vessel walls. The net response of the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM is a reduction of central sympathetic outflow. This reduces blood pressure both by decreasing peripheral VASCULAR RESISTANCE and by lowering CARDIAC OUTPUT. Because the baroreceptors are tonically active, the baroreflex can compensate rapidly for both increases and decreases in blood pressure.
Drugs that bind to and activate adrenergic receptors.
PRESSURE of the BLOOD on the ARTERIES and other BLOOD VESSELS.
Isopropyl analog of EPINEPHRINE; beta-sympathomimetic that acts on the heart, bronchi, skeletal muscle, alimentary tract, etc. It is used mainly as bronchodilator and heart stimulant.
A powerful vasodilator used in emergencies to lower blood pressure or to improve cardiac function. It is also an indicator for free sulfhydryl groups in proteins.
Precursor of epinephrine that is secreted by the adrenal medulla and is a widespread central and autonomic neurotransmitter. Norepinephrine is the principal transmitter of most postganglionic sympathetic fibers and of the diffuse projection system in the brain arising from the locus ceruleus. It is also found in plants and is used pharmacologically as a sympathomimetic.
An imidazoline sympatholytic agent that stimulates ALPHA-2 ADRENERGIC RECEPTORS and central IMIDAZOLINE RECEPTORS. It is commonly used in the management of HYPERTENSION.
Cell-surface proteins that bind epinephrine and/or norepinephrine with high affinity and trigger intracellular changes. The two major classes of adrenergic receptors, alpha and beta, were originally discriminated based on their cellular actions but now are distinguished by their relative affinity for characteristic synthetic ligands. Adrenergic receptors may also be classified according to the subtypes of G-proteins with which they bind; this scheme does not respect the alpha-beta distinction.
Drugs used to cause dilation of the blood vessels.
One of the MUSCARINIC ANTAGONISTS with pharmacologic action similar to ATROPINE and used mainly as an ophthalmic parasympatholytic or mydriatic.
The nonstriated involuntary muscle tissue of blood vessels.
The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.
A process leading to shortening and/or development of tension in muscle tissue. Muscle contraction occurs by a sliding filament mechanism whereby actin filaments slide inward among the myosin filaments.
An alpha-1 adrenergic agonist that causes prolonged peripheral VASOCONSTRICTION.
Arteries which arise from the abdominal aorta and distribute to most of the intestines.
The physiological widening of BLOOD VESSELS by relaxing the underlying VASCULAR SMOOTH MUSCLE.
A variety of anesthetic methods such as EPIDURAL ANESTHESIA used to control the pain of childbirth.
Receptors in the vascular system, particularly the aorta and carotid sinus, which are sensitive to stretch of the vessel walls.
A widely used non-cardioselective beta-adrenergic antagonist. Propranolol has been used for MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION; ARRHYTHMIA; ANGINA PECTORIS; HYPERTENSION; HYPERTHYROIDISM; MIGRAINE; PHEOCHROMOCYTOMA; and ANXIETY but adverse effects instigate replacement by newer drugs.
A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.
The number of times the HEART VENTRICLES contract per unit of time, usually per minute.
A white crystal or crystalline powder used in BUFFERS; FERTILIZERS; and EXPLOSIVES. It can be used to replenish ELECTROLYTES and restore WATER-ELECTROLYTE BALANCE in treating HYPOKALEMIA.
Procedure in which an anesthetic is injected directly into the spinal cord.
A nonselective alpha-adrenergic antagonist. It is used in the treatment of hypertension and hypertensive emergencies, pheochromocytoma, vasospasm of RAYNAUD DISEASE and frostbite, clonidine withdrawal syndrome, impotence, and peripheral vascular disease.
A strain of albino rat developed at the Wistar Institute that has spread widely at other institutions. This has markedly diluted the original strain.
The active sympathomimetic hormone from the ADRENAL MEDULLA. It stimulates both the alpha- and beta- adrenergic systems, causes systemic VASOCONSTRICTION and gastrointestinal relaxation, stimulates the HEART, and dilates BRONCHI and cerebral vessels. It is used in ASTHMA and CARDIAC FAILURE and to delay absorption of local ANESTHETICS.
Abnormally low BLOOD PRESSURE that can result in inadequate blood flow to the brain and other vital organs. Common symptom is DIZZINESS but greater negative impacts on the body occur when there is prolonged depravation of oxygen and nutrients.
The thoracolumbar division of the autonomic nervous system. Sympathetic preganglionic fibers originate in neurons of the intermediolateral column of the spinal cord and project to the paravertebral and prevertebral ganglia, which in turn project to target organs. The sympathetic nervous system mediates the body's response to stressful situations, i.e., the fight or flight reactions. It often acts reciprocally to the parasympathetic system.
A neurotransmitter found at neuromuscular junctions, autonomic ganglia, parasympathetic effector junctions, a subset of sympathetic effector junctions, and at many sites in the central nervous system.
A plant alkaloid with alpha-2-adrenergic blocking activity. Yohimbine has been used as a mydriatic and in the treatment of ERECTILE DYSFUNCTION.
1,4-Diethylene dioxides. Industrial solvents. According to the Fourth Annual Report on Carcinogens (NTP 85-002, 1985), dioxane itself may "reasonably be anticipated to be a carcinogen." (Merck Index, 11th ed)
A free radical gas produced endogenously by a variety of mammalian cells, synthesized from ARGININE by NITRIC OXIDE SYNTHASE. Nitric oxide is one of the ENDOTHELIUM-DEPENDENT RELAXING FACTORS released by the vascular endothelium and mediates VASODILATION. It also inhibits platelet aggregation, induces disaggregation of aggregated platelets, and inhibits platelet adhesion to the vascular endothelium. Nitric oxide activates cytosolic GUANYLATE CYCLASE and thus elevates intracellular levels of CYCLIC GMP.
That phase of a muscle twitch during which a muscle returns to a resting position.
Genetically identical individuals developed from brother and sister matings which have been carried out for twenty or more generations or by parent x offspring matings carried out with certain restrictions. This also includes animals with a long history of closed colony breeding.
The main trunk of the systemic arteries.
Drugs that selectively bind to and activate beta-adrenergic receptors.
The vessels carrying blood away from the heart.
Single pavement layer of cells which line the luminal surface of the entire vascular system and regulate the transport of macromolecules and blood components.
A basic element found in nearly all organized tissues. It is a member of the alkaline earth family of metals with the atomic symbol Ca, atomic number 20, and atomic weight 40. Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the body and combines with phosphorus to form calcium phosphate in the bones and teeth. It is essential for the normal functioning of nerves and muscles and plays a role in blood coagulation (as factor IV) and in many enzymatic processes.
A non-selective inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase. It has been used experimentally to induce hypertension.
The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.
Antidiuretic hormones released by the NEUROHYPOPHYSIS of all vertebrates (structure varies with species) to regulate water balance and OSMOLARITY. In general, vasopressin is a nonapeptide consisting of a six-amino-acid ring with a cysteine 1 to cysteine 6 disulfide bridge or an octapeptide containing a CYSTINE. All mammals have arginine vasopressin except the pig with a lysine at position 8. Vasopressin, a vasoconstrictor, acts on the KIDNEY COLLECTING DUCTS to increase water reabsorption, increase blood volume and blood pressure.
In anatomical terms, "tail" is not used as a medical definition to describe any part of the human body; it is however used in veterinary medicine to refer to the distal portion of the spine in animals possessing tails.
The aperture in the iris through which light passes.
An alpha-adrenergic antagonist with long duration of action. It has been used to treat hypertension and as a peripheral vasodilator.
Compounds or agents that combine with an enzyme in such a manner as to prevent the normal substrate-enzyme combination and the catalytic reaction.
A direct acting sympathomimetic used as a vasoconstrictor to relieve nasal congestion. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p1251)
The flow of BLOOD through or around an organ or region of the body.
The increase in a measurable parameter of a PHYSIOLOGICAL PROCESS, including cellular, microbial, and plant; immunological, cardiovascular, respiratory, reproductive, urinary, digestive, neural, musculoskeletal, ocular, and skin physiological processes; or METABOLIC PROCESS, including enzymatic and other pharmacological processes, by a drug or other chemical.
An octapeptide that is a potent but labile vasoconstrictor. It is produced from angiotensin I after the removal of two amino acids at the C-terminal by ANGIOTENSIN CONVERTING ENZYME. The amino acid in position 5 varies in different species. To block VASOCONSTRICTION and HYPERTENSION effect of angiotensin II, patients are often treated with ACE INHIBITORS or with ANGIOTENSIN II TYPE 1 RECEPTOR BLOCKERS.
An NADPH-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of L-ARGININE and OXYGEN to produce CITRULLINE and NITRIC OXIDE.
The external reproductive organ of males. It is composed of a mass of erectile tissue enclosed in three cylindrical fibrous compartments. Two of the three compartments, the corpus cavernosa, are placed side-by-side along the upper part of the organ. The third compartment below, the corpus spongiosum, houses the urethra.
The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)
The force that opposes the flow of BLOOD through a vascular bed. It is equal to the difference in BLOOD PRESSURE across the vascular bed divided by the CARDIAC OUTPUT.
A beta-2 adrenergic agonist used in the treatment of ASTHMA and BRONCHIAL SPASM.
The hollow, muscular organ that maintains the circulation of the blood.
Quinoxalines are heterocyclic organic compounds consisting of a benzene fused to a pyrazine ring, which have been studied for their potential antibacterial, antifungal, and anticancer properties.
A subclass of alpha-adrenergic receptors found on both presynaptic and postsynaptic membranes where they signal through Gi-Go G-PROTEINS. While postsynaptic alpha-2 receptors play a traditional role in mediating the effects of ADRENERGIC AGONISTS, the subset of alpha-2 receptors found on presynaptic membranes signal the feedback inhibition of NEUROTRANSMITTER release.
Enlargement of the HEART, usually indicated by a cardiothoracic ratio above 0.50. Heart enlargement may involve the right, the left, or both HEART VENTRICLES or HEART ATRIA. Cardiomegaly is a nonspecific symptom seen in patients with chronic systolic heart failure (HEART FAILURE) or several forms of CARDIOMYOPATHIES.
The recording of muscular movements. The apparatus is called a myograph, the record or tracing, a myogram. (From Stedman, 25th ed)
An inhibitor of nitric oxide synthetase which has been shown to prevent glutamate toxicity. Nitroarginine has been experimentally tested for its ability to prevent ammonia toxicity and ammonia-induced alterations in brain energy and ammonia metabolites. (Neurochem Res 1995:200(4):451-6)
The movement and the forces involved in the movement of the blood through the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM.
Agents that have a strengthening effect on the heart or that can increase cardiac output. They may be CARDIAC GLYCOSIDES; SYMPATHOMIMETICS; or other drugs. They are used after MYOCARDIAL INFARCT; CARDIAC SURGICAL PROCEDURES; in SHOCK; or in congestive heart failure (HEART FAILURE).
Unstriated and unstriped muscle, one of the muscles of the internal organs, blood vessels, hair follicles, etc. Contractile elements are elongated, usually spindle-shaped cells with centrally located nuclei. Smooth muscle fibers are bound together into sheets or bundles by reticular fibers and frequently elastic nets are also abundant. (From Stedman, 25th ed)
The state of activity or tension of a muscle beyond that related to its physical properties, that is, its active resistance to stretch. In skeletal muscle, tonus is dependent upon efferent innervation. (Stedman, 25th ed)
One of two major pharmacologically defined classes of adrenergic receptors. The beta adrenergic receptors play an important role in regulating CARDIAC MUSCLE contraction, SMOOTH MUSCLE relaxation, and GLYCOGENOLYSIS.
Compounds that bind to and activate ADRENERGIC ALPHA-2 RECEPTORS.
Extraction of the FETUS by means of abdominal HYSTEROTOMY.
A 21-amino acid peptide produced in a variety of tissues including endothelial and vascular smooth-muscle cells, neurons and astrocytes in the central nervous system, and endometrial cells. It acts as a modulator of vasomotor tone, cell proliferation, and hormone production. (N Eng J Med 1995;333(6):356-63)
An adrenergic beta-2 agonist used to control PREMATURE LABOR.
Removal of an autonomic or sensory ganglion by any means.
The muscle tissue of the HEART. It is composed of striated, involuntary muscle cells (MYOCYTES, CARDIAC) connected to form the contractile pump to generate blood flow.
Treatment process involving the injection of fluid into an organ or tissue.
An ergot alkaloid (ERGOT ALKALOIDS) with uterine and VASCULAR SMOOTH MUSCLE contractile properties.
Drugs that bind to but do not activate beta-adrenergic receptors thereby blocking the actions of beta-adrenergic agonists. Adrenergic beta-antagonists are used for treatment of hypertension, cardiac arrhythmias, angina pectoris, glaucoma, migraine headaches, and anxiety.
A non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agent (NSAID) that inhibits the enzyme cyclooxygenase necessary for the formation of prostaglandins and other autacoids. It also inhibits the motility of polymorphonuclear leukocytes.
Contractile activity of the MYOCARDIUM.
A general class of ortho-dihydroxyphenylalkylamines derived from tyrosine.
A compound consisting of dark green crystals or crystalline powder, having a bronze-like luster. Solutions in water or alcohol have a deep blue color. Methylene blue is used as a bacteriologic stain and as an indicator. It inhibits GUANYLATE CYCLASE, and has been used to treat cyanide poisoning and to lower levels of METHEMOGLOBIN.
Agents having as their major action the interruption of neural transmission at nicotinic receptors on postganglionic autonomic neurons. Because their actions are so broad, including blocking of sympathetic and parasympathetic systems, their therapeutic use has been largely supplanted by more specific drugs. They may still be used in the control of blood pressure in patients with acute dissecting aortic aneurysm and for the induction of hypotension in surgery.
The active form of GLYCOGEN PHOSPHORYLASE that is derived from the phosphorylation of PHOSPHORYLASE B. Phosphorylase a is deactivated via hydrolysis of phosphoserine by PHOSPHORYLASE PHOSPHATASE to form PHOSPHORYLASE B.
A nicotinic antagonist that has been used as a ganglionic blocker in hypertension, as an adjunct to anesthesia, and to induce hypotension during surgery.
A stable prostaglandin endoperoxide analog which serves as a thromboxane mimetic. Its actions include mimicking the hydro-osmotic effect of VASOPRESSIN and activation of TYPE C PHOSPHOLIPASES. (From J Pharmacol Exp Ther 1983;224(1): 108-117; Biochem J 1984;222(1):103-110)
An adrenergic alpha-2 agonist used as a sedative, analgesic and centrally acting muscle relaxant in VETERINARY MEDICINE.
Drugs that bind to but do not activate ADRENERGIC RECEPTORS. Adrenergic antagonists block the actions of the endogenous adrenergic transmitters EPINEPHRINE and NOREPINEPHRINE.
The 10th cranial nerve. The vagus is a mixed nerve which contains somatic afferents (from skin in back of the ear and the external auditory meatus), visceral afferents (from the pharynx, larynx, thorax, and abdomen), parasympathetic efferents (to the thorax and abdomen), and efferents to striated muscle (of the larynx and pharynx).
Muscular contractions characterized by increase in tension without change in length.
Drugs designed to treat inflammation of the nasal passages, generally the result of an infection (more often than not the common cold) or an allergy related condition, e.g., hay fever. The inflammation involves swelling of the mucous membrane that lines the nasal passages and results in inordinate mucus production. The primary class of nasal decongestants are vasoconstrictor agents. (From PharmAssist, The Family Guide to Health and Medicine, 1993)
An involuntary movement or exercise of function in a part, excited in response to a stimulus applied to the periphery and transmitted to the brain or spinal cord.
Use of electric potential or currents to elicit biological responses.
A 29-amino acid pancreatic peptide derived from proglucagon which is also the precursor of intestinal GLUCAGON-LIKE PEPTIDES. Glucagon is secreted by PANCREATIC ALPHA CELLS and plays an important role in regulation of BLOOD GLUCOSE concentration, ketone metabolism, and several other biochemical and physiological processes. (From Gilman et al., Goodman and Gilman's The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, 9th ed, p1511)
Guanosine cyclic 3',5'-(hydrogen phosphate). A guanine nucleotide containing one phosphate group which is esterified to the sugar moiety in both the 3'- and 5'-positions. It is a cellular regulatory agent and has been described as a second messenger. Its levels increase in response to a variety of hormones, including acetylcholine, insulin, and oxytocin and it has been found to activate specific protein kinases. (From Merck Index, 11th ed)
The action of a drug that may affect the activity, metabolism, or toxicity of another drug.
The neural systems which act on VASCULAR SMOOTH MUSCLE to control blood vessel diameter. The major neural control is through the sympathetic nervous system.
Glycogen stored in the liver. (Dorland, 28th ed)
Seven membered heterocyclic rings containing a NITROGEN atom.
Agents affecting the function of, or mimicking the actions of, the autonomic nervous system and thereby having an effect on such processes as respiration, circulation, digestion, body temperature regulation, certain endocrine gland secretions, etc.
A potent vasodilator agent with calcium antagonistic action. It is a useful anti-anginal agent that also lowers blood pressure.
Sympathetic alpha-adrenergic agonist with actions like PHENYLEPHRINE. It is used as a vasoconstrictor in circulatory failure, asthma, nasal congestion, and glaucoma.
Persistently high systemic arterial BLOOD PRESSURE. Based on multiple readings (BLOOD PRESSURE DETERMINATION), hypertension is currently defined as when SYSTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently greater than 140 mm Hg or when DIASTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently 90 mm Hg or more.
Sympathomimetic, vasoconstrictor agent.
A strain of Rattus norvegicus with elevated blood pressure used as a model for studying hypertension and stroke.
Striated muscle cells found in the heart. They are derived from cardiac myoblasts (MYOBLASTS, CARDIAC).
A volatile vasodilator which relieves ANGINA PECTORIS by stimulating GUANYLATE CYCLASE and lowering cytosolic calcium. It is also sometimes used for TOCOLYSIS and explosives.
A common name used for the genus Cavia. The most common species is Cavia porcellus which is the domesticated guinea pig used for pets and biomedical research.
Drugs that inhibit the actions of the sympathetic nervous system by any mechanism. The most common of these are the ADRENERGIC ANTAGONISTS and drugs that deplete norepinephrine or reduce the release of transmitters from adrenergic postganglionic terminals (see ADRENERGIC AGENTS). Drugs that act in the central nervous system to reduce sympathetic activity (e.g., centrally acting alpha-2 adrenergic agonists, see ADRENERGIC ALPHA-AGONISTS) are included here.
Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.
Sterile solutions that are intended for instillation into the eye. It does not include solutions for cleaning eyeglasses or CONTACT LENS SOLUTIONS.
A competitive inhibitor of nitric oxide synthetase.
An alpha-adrenergic blocking agent that is used in Raynaud's disease. It is also used locally in the eye to reverse the mydriasis caused by phenylephrine and other sympathomimetic agents. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p1312)
An serine-threonine protein kinase that requires the presence of physiological concentrations of CALCIUM and membrane PHOSPHOLIPIDS. The additional presence of DIACYLGLYCEROLS markedly increases its sensitivity to both calcium and phospholipids. The sensitivity of the enzyme can also be increased by PHORBOL ESTERS and it is believed that protein kinase C is the receptor protein of tumor-promoting phorbol esters.
A strain of Rattus norvegicus used as a normotensive control for the spontaneous hypertensive rats (SHR).
A group of compounds that are derivatives of beta-methylacetylcholine (methacholine).
The most anterior portion of the uveal layer, separating the anterior chamber from the posterior. It consists of two layers - the stroma and the pigmented epithelium. Color of the iris depends on the amount of melanin in the stroma on reflection from the pigmented epithelium.
A phenylephrine-related beta-1 adrenergic and alpha adrenergic agonist used as a cardiotonic and antihypotensive agent.
A class of glucosyltransferases that catalyzes the degradation of storage polysaccharides, such as glucose polymers, by phosphorolysis in animals (GLYCOGEN PHOSPHORYLASE) and in plants (STARCH PHOSPHORYLASE).

Sensitivity of [11C]phenylephrine kinetics to monoamine oxidase activity in normal human heart. (1/2866)

Phenylephrine labeled with 11C was developed as a radiotracer for imaging studies of cardiac sympathetic nerves with PET. A structural analog of norepinephrine, (-)-[11C]phenylephrine (PHEN) is transported into cardiac sympathetic nerve varicosities by the neuronal norepinephrine transporter and stored in vesicles. PHEN is also a substrate for monoamine oxidase (MAO). The goal of this study was to assess the importance of neuronal MAO activity on the kinetics of PHEN in the normal human heart. MAO metabolism of PHEN was inhibited at the tracer level by substituting deuterium atoms for the two hydrogen atoms at the alpha-carbon side chain position to yield the MAO-resistant analog D2-PHEN. METHODS: Paired PET studies of PHEN and D2-PHEN were performed in six normal volunteers. Hemodynamic and electrocardiographic responses were monitored. Blood levels of intact radiotracer and radiolabeled metabolites were measured in venous samples taken during the 60 min dynamic PET study. Myocardial retention of the tracers was regionally quantified as a retention index. Tracer efflux between 6 and 50 min after tracer injection was fit to a single exponential process to obtain a washout half-time for all left ventricular regions. RESULTS: Although initial heart uptake of the two tracers was similar, D2-PHEN cleared from the heart 2.6 times more slowly than PHEN (mean half-time 155+/-52 versus 55+/-10 min, respectively; P < 0.01). Correspondingly, heart retention of D2-PHEN at 40-60 min after tracer injection was higher than PHEN (mean retention indices 0.086+/-0.018 versus 0.066+/-0.011 mL blood/ min/mL tissue, respectively; P < 0.003). CONCLUSION: Efflux of radioactivity from normal human heart after uptake of PHEN is primarily due to metabolism of the tracer by neuronal MAO. Related mechanistic studies in the isolated rat heart indicate that vesicular storage of PHEN protects the tracer from rapid metabolism by neuronal MAO, suggesting that MAO metabolism of PHEN leaking from storage vesicles leads to the gradual loss of PHEN from the neurons. Thus, although MAO metabolism influences the rate of clearance of PHEN from the neurons, MAO metabolism is not the rate-determining step in the observed efflux rate under normal conditions. Rather, the rate at which PHEN leaks from storage vesicles is likely to be the rate-limiting step in the observed efflux rate.  (+info)

Influence of vesicular storage and monoamine oxidase activity on [11C]phenylephrine kinetics: studies in isolated rat heart. (2/2866)

[11C]Phenylephrine (PHEN) is a radiolabeled analogue of norepinephrine that is transported into cardiac sympathetic nerve varicosities by the neuronal norepinephrine transporter and taken up into storage vesicles localized within the nerve varicosities by the vesicular monoamine transporter. PHEN is structurally related to two previously developed sympathetic nerve markers: [11C]-meta-hydroxyephedrine and [11C]epinephrine. To better characterize the neuronal handling of PHEN, particularly its sensitivity to neuronal monoamine oxidase (MAO) activity, kinetic studies in an isolated working rat heart system were performed. METHODS: Radiotracer was administered to the isolated working heart as a 10-min constant infusion followed by a 110-min washout period. Two distinctly different approaches were used to assess the sensitivity of the kinetics of PHEN to MAO activity. In the first approach, oxidation of PHEN by MAO was inhibited at the enzymatic level with the MAO inhibitor pargyline. In the second approach, the two hydrogen atoms on the a-carbon of the side chain of PHEN were replaced with deuterium atoms ([11C](-)-alpha-alpha-dideutero-phenylephrine [D2-PHEN]) to inhibit MAO activity at the tracer level. The importance of vesicular uptake on the kinetics of PHEN and D2-PHEN was assessed by inhibiting vesicular monoamine transporter-mediated storage into vesicles with reserpine. RESULTS: Under control conditions, PHEN initially accumulated into the heart at a rate of 0.72+/-0.15 mL/min/g wet. Inhibition of MAO activity with either pargyline or di-deuterium substitution did not significantly alter this rate. However, MAO inhibition did significantly slow the clearance of radioactivity from the heart during the washout phase of the study. Blocking vesicular uptake with reserpine reduced the initial uptake rates of PHEN and D2-PHEN, as well as greatly accelerated the clearance of radioactivity from the heart during washout. CONCLUSION: These studies indicate that PHEN kinetics are sensitive to neuronal MAO activity. Under normal conditions, efficient vesicular storage of PHEN serves to protect the tracer from rapid metabolism by neuronal MAO. However, it is likely that leakage of PHEN from the storage vesicles and subsequent metabolism by MAO lead to an appreciable clearance of radioactivity from the heart.  (+info)

Uninjured C-fiber nociceptors develop spontaneous activity and alpha-adrenergic sensitivity following L6 spinal nerve ligation in monkey. (3/2866)

We investigated whether uninjured cutaneous C-fiber nociceptors in primates develop abnormal responses after partial denervation of the skin. Partial denervation was induced by tightly ligating spinal nerve L6 that innervates the dorsum of the foot. Using an in vitro skin-nerve preparation, we recorded from uninjured single afferent nerve fibers in the superficial peroneal nerve. Recordings were made from 32 C-fiber nociceptors 2-3 wk after ligation and from 29 C-fiber nociceptors in control animals. Phenylephrine, a selective alpha1-adrenergic agonist, and UK14304 (UK), a selective alpha2-adrenergic agonist, were applied to the receptive field for 5 min in increasing concentrations from 0.1 to 100 microM. Nociceptors from in vitro control experiments were not significantly different from nociceptors recorded by us previously in in vivo experiments. In comparison to in vitro control animals, the afferents found in lesioned animals had 1) a significantly higher incidence of spontaneous activity, 2) a significantly higher incidence of response to phenylephrine, and 3) a higher incidence of response to UK. In lesioned animals, the peak response to phenylephrine was significantly greater than to UK, and the mechanical threshold of phenylephrine-sensitive afferents was significantly lower than for phenylephrine-insensitive afferents. Staining with protein gene product 9.5 revealed an approximately 55% reduction in the number of unmyelinated terminals in the epidermis of the lesioned limb compared with the contralateral limb. Thus uninjured cutaneous C-fiber nociceptors that innervate skin partially denervated by ligation of a spinal nerve acquire two abnormal properties: spontaneous activity and alpha-adrenergic sensitivity. These abnormalities in nociceptor function may contribute to neuropathic pain.  (+info)

Effect of acute and long-term treatment with 17-beta-estradiol on the vasomotor responses in the rat aorta. (4/2866)

1. This study sought to evaluate whether the effects of acute and long-term treatment with 17-beta-estradiol on the vasomotor responses in rat aortic rings are mediated through the same mechanism. 2. Ovariectomized rats were treated daily with either 17-beta-estradiol-3-benzoate (100 microg kg(-1)) or vehicle for 1 week. 3. The effect of long-term 17-beta-estradiol treatment on the responses to cumulative doses of phenylephrine, 5-HT, calcium, potassium and 17-beta-estradiol was determined in aortic rings. In the same rings, the effect of acute exposure to 17-beta-estradiol (5 and 10 microM) on the dose response curves for phenylephrine, 5-HT, calcium, potassium and acetylcholine were estimated. The measurements were made in rings with and without intact endothelium. The tone-related basal release of nitric oxide (NO) was measured in rings with intact endothelium. 4. Long-term 17-beta-estradiol treatment reduced the maximum developed contraction to all contracting agents studied. This effect was abolished in endothelium denuded vessels. Acute 17-beta-estradiol treatment also reduced maximal contraction. This effect, however, was independent of the endothelium. 5. Long-term 17-beta-estradiol treatment significantly increased the ability of the rings to dilate in response to acetylcholine whereas acute exposure to 17-beta-estradiol had no effect. The tone-related release of NO was significantly increased after long-term exposure to 17-beta-estradiol. 6. In conclusion, this study indicate that the acute and long-term effects of 17-beta-estradiol in the rat aorta are mediated through different mechanisms. The long-term effect is mediated through the endothelium most likely by increasing NO release. In contrast, the acute effect of 17-beta-estradiol seems to be through an effect on the vascular smooth muscle cells.  (+info)

Modulation of temperature-induced tone by vasoconstrictor agents. (5/2866)

One of the primary cardiovascular adjustments to hyperthermia is a sympathetically mediated increase in vascular resistance in the viscera. Nonneural factors such as a change in vascular tone or reactivity may also contribute to this response. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine whether vascular smooth muscle tone is altered during heating to physiologically relevant temperatures >37 degrees C. Gradually increasing bath temperature from 37 degrees C (normothermia) to 43 degrees C (severe hyperthermia) produced graded contractions in vascular ring segments from rat mesenteric arteries and thoracic aortae. In untreated rings these contractions were relatively small, whereas hyperthermia elicited near-maximal increases in tension when rings were constricted with phenylephrine or KCl before heating. In phenylephrine-treated mesenteric arterial rings, the contractile responses to heating were markedly attenuated by the Ca2+ channel antagonists nifedipine and diltiazem. Diltiazem also blocked the contractile responses to heating in thoracic aortic rings. These results demonstrate that hyperthermia has a limited effect on tension generation in rat vascular smooth muscle in the absence of vascular tone. However, in the presence of agonist-induced tone, tension generation during heating is markedly enhanced and dependent on extracellular Ca2+. In conclusion, these data suggest that local regulation of vascular tone can contribute to the hemodynamic adjustments to hyperthermia.  (+info)

Latrunculin-A causes mydriasis and cycloplegia in the cynomolgus monkey. (6/2866)

PURPOSE: To determine the effect of latrunculin (LAT)-A, which binds to G-actin and disassembles actin filaments, on the pupil, accommodation, and isolated ciliary muscle (CM) contraction in monkeys. METHODS: Pupil diameter (vernier calipers) and refraction (coincidence refractometry) were measured every 15 minutes from 0.75 to 3.5 hours after topical LAT-A 42 microg (approximately 10 microM in the anterior chamber [AC]). Refraction was measured every 5 minutes from 0.5 to 1.5 hours after intracameral injection of 10 microl of 50 microM LAT-A (approximately 5 microM in AC), with intramuscular infusion of 1.5 mg/kg pilocarpine HCl (PILO) during the first 15 minutes of measurements. Pupil diameter was measured at 1 and 2 hours, and refraction was measured every 5 minutes from 1 to 2 hours, after intravitreal injection of 20 microl of 1.25 mM LAT-A (approximately 10 microM in vitreous), with intramuscular infusion of 1.5 mg/kg PILO during the first 15 minutes of measurements (all after topical 2.5% phenylephrine), and contractile response of isolated CM strips, obtained <1 hour postmortem and mounted in a perfusion apparatus, to 10 microM PILO +/- LAT-A was measured at various concentrations. RESULTS: Topical LAT-A of 42 microg dilated the pupil without affecting refraction. Intracameral LAT-A of 5 microM inhibited miotic and accommodative responses to intramuscular PILO. Intravitreal LAT-A of 10 microM had no effect on accommodative or miotic responses to intramuscular PILO. LAT-A dose-dependently relaxed the PILO-contracted CM by up to 50% at 3 microM in both the longitudinal and circular vectors. CONCLUSIONS: In monkeys, LAT-A causes mydriasis and cycloplegia, perhaps related to its known ability to disrupt the actin microfilament network and consequently to affect cell contractility and adhesion. Effects of LAT-A on the iris and CM may have significant physiological and clinical implications.  (+info)

Endothelin antagonists block alpha1-adrenergic constriction of coronary arterioles. (7/2866)

We have previously observed that intracoronary administration of the alpha1-adrenergic agonist phenylephrine (PE) over a period of minutes induced both an immediate and long-lasting (2 h) vasoconstriction of epicardial coronary arterioles. Because it is unlikely that alpha1-adrenergic constriction would persist for hours after removal of the agonist, this observation supports the view that another constrictor(s) is released during alpha1-adrenergic activation and induces the prolonged vasoconstriction. Therefore, we hypothesized that the prolonged microvascular constriction after PE is due to the production of endothelin (ET). We focused on ET not only because this peptide produces potent vasoconstriction but also because its vasoconstrictor action is characterized by a long duration. To test this hypothesis, the diameters of coronary arterioles (<222 micrometers) in the beating heart of pentobarbital-anesthetized dogs with stroboscopic intravital microscopy were measured during a 15-min intracoronary infusion of PE (1 microgram. kg-1 . min-1) and at 15-min intervals for a total of 120 min. All experiments were performed in the presence of beta-adrenergic blockade with propranolol. At 120 min, arterioles in the PE group were constricted (-23 +/- 9% change in diameter vs. baseline). Pretreatment with the ET-converting enzyme inhibitor phosphoramidon or the ETA-receptor antagonist FR-139317 prevented the PE-induced constriction at 120 min (-1 +/- 3 and -6 +/- 3%, respectively, P < 0.01 vs. PE). Pretreatment with the selective alpha1-adrenergic antagonist prazosin (Prz) also prevented the sustained constriction (0 +/- 2%, P < 0.01 vs. PE) but Prz given 60 min after PE infusion did not (-13 +/- 3%). In the aggregate, these results show that vasoconstriction of epicardial coronary arterioles via alpha1-adrenergic activation is blocked by an ET antagonist and an inhibitor of its production. From these data, we conclude that alpha1-adrenergic activation promotes the production and/or release of ET, which produces or facilitates microvascular constriction of epicardial canine coronary arterioles.  (+info)

Altered alpha 1-adrenoceptor subtypes mediated cardiac function after treatment of propranolol to rats. (8/2866)

AIM: To study inotropic and chronotropic effects mediated by alpha 1A- and alpha 1B-adrenoceptors after 5-d propranolol (Pro) treatment. METHODS: The positive inotropic and chronotropic effects mediated by alpha 1A and alpha 1B subtypes were determined on isolated left ventricular papillary muscles and right atrium in Pro- and NaCl-treated rats. RESULTS: The basic contractility of papillary muscles induced by phenylephrine (Phe) was 90 +/- 18 mg in Pro-treated rats and 53 +/- 17 mg in control group (P < 0.05). The increment on force of contraction was 20 +/- 12 mg in Pro-pretreated rats and 5 +/- 5 mg in NaCl-treated rats (P < 0.05). After preincubated with chloroethylclonidine, the increment on force of contraction was reduced in Pro-treated rats, but was not much changed in control group. Phe in presence of 5-methylurapidil induced positive inotropic effect with 13 +/- 5 mg in Pro-treated group, but not in NaCl-treated rats. Under the normal and the inhibited cardiac state, the maximal increment in beat rate mediated by alpha 1B showed no difference between the Pro-treated and NaCl-treated rats. CONCLUSION: After chronic treatment of Pro, alpha 1-adrenoceptor-mediated positive inotropic effect in rat heart was improved, which was mainly induced by stimulation of alpha 1B when beta-adrenoceptors were blocked.  (+info)

Phenylephrine is a medication that belongs to the class of drugs known as sympathomimetic amines. It primarily acts as an alpha-1 adrenergic receptor agonist, which means it stimulates these receptors, leading to vasoconstriction (constriction of blood vessels). This effect can be useful in various medical situations, such as:

1. Nasal decongestion: When applied topically in the nose, phenylephrine causes constriction of the blood vessels in the nasal passages, which helps to relieve congestion and swelling. It is often found in over-the-counter (OTC) cold and allergy products.
2. Ocular circulation: In ophthalmology, phenylephrine is used to dilate the pupils before eye examinations. The increased pressure from vasoconstriction helps to open up the pupil, allowing for a better view of the internal structures of the eye.
3. Hypotension management: In some cases, phenylephrine may be given intravenously to treat low blood pressure (hypotension) during medical procedures like spinal anesthesia or septic shock. The vasoconstriction helps to increase blood pressure and improve perfusion of vital organs.

It is essential to use phenylephrine as directed, as improper usage can lead to adverse effects such as increased heart rate, hypertension, arrhythmias, and rebound congestion (when used as a nasal decongestant). Always consult with a healthcare professional for appropriate guidance on using this medication.

Adrenergic alpha-agonists are a type of medication that binds to and activates adrenergic alpha receptors, which are found in the nervous system and other tissues throughout the body. These receptors are activated naturally by chemicals called catecholamines, such as norepinephrine and epinephrine (also known as adrenaline), that are released in response to stress or excitement.

When adrenergic alpha-agonists bind to these receptors, they mimic the effects of catecholamines and cause various physiological responses, such as vasoconstriction (constriction of blood vessels), increased heart rate and force of heart contractions, and relaxation of smooth muscle in the airways.

Adrenergic alpha-agonists are used to treat a variety of medical conditions, including hypertension (high blood pressure), glaucoma, nasal congestion, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Examples of adrenergic alpha-agonists include phenylephrine, clonidine, and guanfacine.

It's important to note that adrenergic alpha-agonists can have both beneficial and harmful effects, depending on the specific medication, dosage, and individual patient factors. Therefore, they should only be used under the guidance of a healthcare professional.

Adrenergic alpha-1 receptor agonists are a type of medication that binds to and activates adrenergic alpha-1 receptors, which are found in various tissues throughout the body, including the smooth muscle of blood vessels, the heart, the liver, and the kidneys. When these receptors are activated, they cause a variety of physiological responses, such as vasoconstriction (constriction of blood vessels), increased heart rate and force of heart contractions, and relaxation of the detrusor muscle in the bladder.

Examples of adrenergic alpha-1 receptor agonists include phenylephrine, which is used to treat low blood pressure and nasal congestion, and midodrine, which is used to treat orthostatic hypotension (low blood pressure upon standing). These medications can have side effects such as increased heart rate, headache, and anxiety. It's important to use them under the supervision of a healthcare provider, as they may interact with other medications and medical conditions.

Vasoconstrictor agents are substances that cause the narrowing of blood vessels by constricting the smooth muscle in their walls. This leads to an increase in blood pressure and a decrease in blood flow. They work by activating the sympathetic nervous system, which triggers the release of neurotransmitters such as norepinephrine and epinephrine that bind to alpha-adrenergic receptors on the smooth muscle cells of the blood vessel walls, causing them to contract.

Vasoconstrictor agents are used medically for a variety of purposes, including:

* Treating hypotension (low blood pressure)
* Controlling bleeding during surgery or childbirth
* Relieving symptoms of nasal congestion in conditions such as the common cold or allergies

Examples of vasoconstrictor agents include phenylephrine, oxymetazoline, and epinephrine. It's important to note that prolonged use or excessive doses of vasoconstrictor agents can lead to rebound congestion and other adverse effects, so they should be used with caution and under the guidance of a healthcare professional.

Alpha-1 adrenergic receptors (also known as α1-adrenoreceptors) are a type of G protein-coupled receptor that binds catecholamines, such as norepinephrine and epinephrine. These receptors are primarily found in the smooth muscle of various organs, including the vasculature, heart, liver, kidneys, gastrointestinal tract, and genitourinary system.

When an alpha-1 adrenergic receptor is activated by a catecholamine, it triggers a signaling cascade that leads to the activation of phospholipase C, which in turn activates protein kinase C and increases intracellular calcium levels. This ultimately results in smooth muscle contraction, increased heart rate and force of contraction, and vasoconstriction.

Alpha-1 adrenergic receptors are also found in the central nervous system, where they play a role in regulating wakefulness, attention, and anxiety. There are three subtypes of alpha-1 adrenergic receptors (α1A, α1B, and α1D), each with distinct physiological roles and pharmacological properties.

In summary, alpha-1 adrenergic receptors are a type of G protein-coupled receptor that binds catecholamines and mediates various physiological responses, including smooth muscle contraction, increased heart rate and force of contraction, vasoconstriction, and regulation of wakefulness and anxiety.

Adrenergic receptors are a type of G protein-coupled receptor that bind and respond to catecholamines, such as epinephrine (adrenaline) and norepinephrine (noradrenaline). Alpha adrenergic receptors (α-ARs) are a subtype of adrenergic receptors that are classified into two main categories: α1-ARs and α2-ARs.

The activation of α1-ARs leads to the activation of phospholipase C, which results in an increase in intracellular calcium levels and the activation of various signaling pathways that mediate diverse physiological responses such as vasoconstriction, smooth muscle contraction, and cell proliferation.

On the other hand, α2-ARs are primarily located on presynaptic nerve terminals where they function to inhibit the release of neurotransmitters, including norepinephrine. The activation of α2-ARs also leads to the inhibition of adenylyl cyclase and a decrease in intracellular cAMP levels, which can mediate various physiological responses such as sedation, analgesia, and hypotension.

Overall, α-ARs play important roles in regulating various physiological functions, including cardiovascular function, mood, and cognition, and are also involved in the pathophysiology of several diseases, such as hypertension, heart failure, and neurodegenerative disorders.

Ephedrine is a medication that stimulates the nervous system and is used to treat low blood pressure, asthma, and nasal congestion. It works by narrowing the blood vessels and increasing heart rate, which can help to increase blood pressure and open up the airways in the lungs. Ephedrine may also be used as a bronchodilator to treat COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease).

Ephedrine is available in various forms, including tablets, capsules, and solutions for injection. It is important to follow the instructions of a healthcare provider when taking ephedrine, as it can have side effects such as rapid heart rate, anxiety, headache, and dizziness. Ephedrine should not be used by people with certain medical conditions, such as heart disease, high blood pressure, or narrow-angle glaucoma, and it should not be taken during pregnancy or breastfeeding without consulting a healthcare provider.

In addition to its medical uses, ephedrine has been used as a performance-enhancing drug and is banned by many sports organizations. It can also be found in some over-the-counter cold and allergy medications, although these products are required to carry warnings about the potential for misuse and addiction.

**Prazosin** is an antihypertensive drug, which belongs to the class of medications called alpha-blockers. It works by relaxing the muscles in the blood vessels, which helps to lower blood pressure and improve blood flow. Prazosin is primarily used to treat high blood pressure (hypertension), but it may also be used for the management of symptoms related to enlarged prostate (benign prostatic hyperplasia).

In a medical definition context:

Prazosin: A selective α1-adrenergic receptor antagonist, used in the treatment of hypertension and benign prostatic hyperplasia. It acts by blocking the action of norepinephrine on the smooth muscle of blood vessels, resulting in vasodilation and decreased peripheral vascular resistance. This leads to a reduction in blood pressure and an improvement in urinary symptoms associated with an enlarged prostate.

Vasoconstriction is a medical term that refers to the narrowing of blood vessels due to the contraction of the smooth muscle in their walls. This process decreases the diameter of the lumen (the inner space of the blood vessel) and reduces blood flow through the affected vessels. Vasoconstriction can occur throughout the body, but it is most noticeable in the arterioles and precapillary sphincters, which control the amount of blood that flows into the capillary network.

The autonomic nervous system, specifically the sympathetic division, plays a significant role in regulating vasoconstriction through the release of neurotransmitters like norepinephrine (noradrenaline). Various hormones and chemical mediators, such as angiotensin II, endothelin-1, and serotonin, can also induce vasoconstriction.

Vasoconstriction is a vital physiological response that helps maintain blood pressure and regulate blood flow distribution in the body. However, excessive or prolonged vasoconstriction may contribute to several pathological conditions, including hypertension, stroke, and peripheral vascular diseases.

Adrenergic alpha-antagonists, also known as alpha-blockers, are a class of medications that block the effects of adrenaline and noradrenaline at alpha-adrenergic receptors. These receptors are found in various tissues throughout the body, including the smooth muscle of blood vessels, the heart, the genitourinary system, and the eyes.

When alpha-blockers bind to these receptors, they prevent the activation of the sympathetic nervous system, which is responsible for the "fight or flight" response. This results in a relaxation of the smooth muscle, leading to vasodilation (widening of blood vessels), decreased blood pressure, and increased blood flow.

Alpha-blockers are used to treat various medical conditions, such as hypertension (high blood pressure), benign prostatic hyperplasia (enlarged prostate), pheochromocytoma (a rare tumor of the adrenal gland), and certain types of glaucoma.

Examples of alpha-blockers include doxazosin, prazosin, terazosin, and tamsulosin. Side effects of alpha-blockers may include dizziness, lightheadedness, headache, weakness, and orthostatic hypotension (a sudden drop in blood pressure upon standing).

Mydriatics are medications that cause mydriasis, which is the dilation of the pupil. These drugs work by blocking the action of the muscarinic receptors in the iris, leading to relaxation of the circular muscle and constriction of the radial muscle, resulting in pupil dilation. Mydriatics are often used in eye examinations to facilitate examination of the interior structures of the eye. Commonly used mydriatic agents include tropicamide, phenylephrine, and cyclopentolate. It is important to note that mydriatics can have side effects such as blurred vision, photophobia, and accommodation difficulties, so patients should be advised accordingly.

Sympathomimetic drugs are substances that mimic or stimulate the actions of the sympathetic nervous system. The sympathetic nervous system is one of the two divisions of the autonomic nervous system, which regulates various automatic physiological functions in the body. The sympathetic nervous system's primary function is to prepare the body for the "fight-or-flight" response, which includes increasing heart rate, blood pressure, respiratory rate, and metabolism while decreasing digestive activity.

Sympathomimetic drugs can exert their effects through various mechanisms, including directly stimulating adrenergic receptors (alpha and beta receptors) or indirectly causing the release of norepinephrine and epinephrine from nerve endings. These drugs are used in various clinical settings to treat conditions such as asthma, nasal congestion, low blood pressure, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Examples of sympathomimetic drugs include epinephrine, norepinephrine, dopamine, dobutamine, albuterol, pseudoephedrine, and methylphenidate.

It is important to note that sympathomimetic drugs can also have adverse effects, particularly when used in high doses or in individuals with certain medical conditions. These adverse effects may include anxiety, tremors, palpitations, hypertension, arrhythmias, and seizures. Therefore, these medications should be used under the close supervision of a healthcare provider.

The thoracic aorta is the segment of the largest artery in the human body (the aorta) that runs through the chest region (thorax). The thoracic aorta begins at the aortic arch, where it branches off from the ascending aorta, and extends down to the diaphragm, where it becomes the abdominal aorta.

The thoracic aorta is divided into three parts: the ascending aorta, the aortic arch, and the descending aorta. The ascending aorta rises from the left ventricle of the heart and is about 2 inches (5 centimeters) long. The aortic arch curves backward and to the left, giving rise to the brachiocephalic trunk, the left common carotid artery, and the left subclavian artery. The descending thoracic aorta runs downward through the chest, passing through the diaphragm to become the abdominal aorta.

The thoracic aorta supplies oxygenated blood to the upper body, including the head, neck, arms, and chest. It plays a critical role in maintaining blood flow and pressure throughout the body.

Adrenergic alpha-1 receptor antagonists, also known as alpha-blockers, are a class of medications that block the effects of the neurotransmitter norepinephrine at alpha-1 receptors. These receptors are found in various tissues throughout the body, including the smooth muscle of blood vessels, the bladder, and the eye.

When norepinephrine binds to alpha-1 receptors, it causes smooth muscle to contract, leading to vasoconstriction (constriction of blood vessels), increased blood pressure, and other effects. By blocking these receptors, alpha-blockers can cause relaxation of smooth muscle, leading to vasodilation (expansion of blood vessels), decreased blood pressure, and other effects.

Alpha-blockers are used in the treatment of various medical conditions, including hypertension (high blood pressure), benign prostatic hyperplasia (enlarged prostate), and pheochromocytoma (a rare tumor of the adrenal gland). Examples of alpha-blockers include doxazosin, prazosin, and terazosin.

It's important to note that while alpha-blockers can be effective in treating certain medical conditions, they can also have side effects, such as dizziness, lightheadedness, and orthostatic hypotension (a sudden drop in blood pressure when standing up). As with any medication, it's important to use alpha-blockers under the guidance of a healthcare provider.

The baroreflex is a physiological mechanism that helps regulate blood pressure and heart rate in response to changes in stretch of the arterial walls. It is mediated by baroreceptors, which are specialized sensory nerve endings located in the carotid sinus and aortic arch. These receptors detect changes in blood pressure and send signals to the brainstem via the glossopharyngeal (cranial nerve IX) and vagus nerves (cranial nerve X), respectively.

In response to an increase in arterial pressure, the baroreceptors are stimulated, leading to increased firing of afferent neurons that signal the brainstem. This results in a reflexive decrease in heart rate and cardiac output, as well as vasodilation of peripheral blood vessels, which collectively work to reduce blood pressure back towards its normal level. Conversely, if arterial pressure decreases, the baroreceptors are less stimulated, leading to an increase in heart rate and cardiac output, as well as vasoconstriction of peripheral blood vessels, which helps restore blood pressure.

Overall, the baroreflex is a crucial homeostatic mechanism that helps maintain stable blood pressure and ensure adequate perfusion of vital organs.

Adrenergic agonists are medications or substances that bind to and activate adrenergic receptors, which are a type of receptor in the body that respond to neurotransmitters such as norepinephrine and epinephrine (also known as adrenaline).

There are two main types of adrenergic receptors: alpha and beta receptors. Alpha-adrenergic agonists activate alpha receptors, while beta-adrenergic agonists activate beta receptors. These medications can have a variety of effects on the body, depending on which type of receptor they act on.

Alpha-adrenergic agonists are often used to treat conditions such as nasal congestion, glaucoma, and low blood pressure. Examples include phenylephrine, oxymetazoline, and clonidine.

Beta-adrenergic agonists are commonly used to treat respiratory conditions such as asthma and COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease). They work by relaxing the smooth muscle in the airways, which makes it easier to breathe. Examples include albuterol, salmeterol, and formoterol.

It's important to note that adrenergic agonists can have both desired and undesired effects on the body. They should be used under the guidance of a healthcare professional, who can monitor their effectiveness and potential side effects.

Blood pressure is the force exerted by circulating blood on the walls of the blood vessels. It is measured in millimeters of mercury (mmHg) and is given as two figures:

1. Systolic pressure: This is the pressure when the heart pushes blood out into the arteries.
2. Diastolic pressure: This is the pressure when the heart rests between beats, allowing it to fill with blood.

Normal blood pressure for adults is typically around 120/80 mmHg, although this can vary slightly depending on age, sex, and other factors. High blood pressure (hypertension) is generally considered to be a reading of 130/80 mmHg or higher, while low blood pressure (hypotension) is usually defined as a reading below 90/60 mmHg. It's important to note that blood pressure can fluctuate throughout the day and may be affected by factors such as stress, physical activity, and medication use.

Isoproterenol is a medication that belongs to a class of drugs called beta-adrenergic agonists. Medically, it is defined as a synthetic catecholamine with both alpha and beta adrenergic receptor stimulating properties. It is primarily used as a bronchodilator to treat conditions such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) by relaxing the smooth muscles in the airways, thereby improving breathing.

Isoproterenol can also be used in the treatment of bradycardia (abnormally slow heart rate), cardiac arrest, and heart blocks by increasing the heart rate and contractility. However, due to its non-selective beta-agonist activity, it may cause various side effects such as tremors, palpitations, and increased blood pressure. Its use is now limited due to the availability of more selective and safer medications.

nitroprusside (ni-troe-rus-ide)

A rapid-acting vasodilator used in the management of severe hypertension, acute heart failure, and to reduce afterload in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. It is a potent arterial and venous dilator that decreases preload and afterload, thereby reducing myocardial oxygen demand. Nitroprusside is metabolized to cyanide, which must be monitored closely during therapy to prevent toxicity.

Pharmacologic class: Peripheral vasodilators

Therapeutic class: Antihypertensives, Vasodilators

Medical Categories: Cardiovascular Drugs, Hypertension Agents

Norepinephrine, also known as noradrenaline, is a neurotransmitter and a hormone that is primarily produced in the adrenal glands and is released into the bloodstream in response to stress or physical activity. It plays a crucial role in the "fight-or-flight" response by preparing the body for action through increasing heart rate, blood pressure, respiratory rate, and glucose availability.

As a neurotransmitter, norepinephrine is involved in regulating various functions of the nervous system, including attention, perception, motivation, and arousal. It also plays a role in modulating pain perception and responding to stressful or emotional situations.

In medical settings, norepinephrine is used as a vasopressor medication to treat hypotension (low blood pressure) that can occur during septic shock, anesthesia, or other critical illnesses. It works by constricting blood vessels and increasing heart rate, which helps to improve blood pressure and perfusion of vital organs.

Clonidine is an medication that belongs to a class of drugs called centrally acting alpha-agonist hypotensives. It works by stimulating certain receptors in the brain and lowering the heart rate, which results in decreased blood pressure. Clonidine is commonly used to treat hypertension (high blood pressure), but it can also be used for other purposes such as managing withdrawal symptoms from opioids or alcohol, treating attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and preventing migraines. It can be taken orally in the form of tablets or transdermally through a patch applied to the skin. As with any medication, clonidine should be used under the guidance and supervision of a healthcare provider.

Adrenergic receptors are a type of G protein-coupled receptor that bind and respond to catecholamines, which include the neurotransmitters norepinephrine (noradrenaline) and epinephrine (adrenaline). These receptors play a crucial role in the body's "fight or flight" response and are involved in regulating various physiological functions such as heart rate, blood pressure, respiration, and metabolism.

There are nine different subtypes of adrenergic receptors, which are classified into two main groups based on their pharmacological properties: alpha (α) and beta (β) receptors. Alpha receptors are further divided into two subgroups, α1 and α2, while beta receptors are divided into three subgroups, β1, β2, and β3. Each subtype has a unique distribution in the body and mediates distinct physiological responses.

Activation of adrenergic receptors occurs when catecholamines bind to their specific binding sites on the receptor protein. This binding triggers a cascade of intracellular signaling events that ultimately lead to changes in cell function. Different subtypes of adrenergic receptors activate different G proteins and downstream signaling pathways, resulting in diverse physiological responses.

In summary, adrenergic receptors are a class of G protein-coupled receptors that bind catecholamines and mediate various physiological functions. Understanding the function and regulation of these receptors is essential for developing therapeutic strategies to treat a range of medical conditions, including hypertension, heart failure, asthma, and anxiety disorders.

Vasodilator agents are pharmacological substances that cause the relaxation or widening of blood vessels by relaxing the smooth muscle in the vessel walls. This results in an increase in the diameter of the blood vessels, which decreases vascular resistance and ultimately reduces blood pressure. Vasodilators can be further classified based on their site of action:

1. Systemic vasodilators: These agents cause a generalized relaxation of the smooth muscle in the walls of both arteries and veins, resulting in a decrease in peripheral vascular resistance and preload (the volume of blood returning to the heart). Examples include nitroglycerin, hydralazine, and calcium channel blockers.
2. Arterial vasodilators: These agents primarily affect the smooth muscle in arterial vessel walls, leading to a reduction in afterload (the pressure against which the heart pumps blood). Examples include angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), and direct vasodilators like sodium nitroprusside.
3. Venous vasodilators: These agents primarily affect the smooth muscle in venous vessel walls, increasing venous capacitance and reducing preload. Examples include nitroglycerin and other organic nitrates.

Vasodilator agents are used to treat various cardiovascular conditions such as hypertension, heart failure, angina, and pulmonary arterial hypertension. It is essential to monitor their use carefully, as excessive vasodilation can lead to orthostatic hypotension, reflex tachycardia, or fluid retention.

Tropicamide is a muscarinic antagonist, which is a type of drug that blocks the action of acetylcholine in the body. In particular, it blocks the muscarinic receptors found in the eye, which results in pupil dilation (mydriasis) and paralysis of the ciliary muscle (cycloplegia).

Tropicamide is commonly used in ophthalmology as a diagnostic aid during eye examinations. It is often instilled into the eye to dilate the pupil, which allows the eye care professional to more easily examine the back of the eye and assess conditions such as cataracts, glaucoma, or retinal disorders. The cycloplegic effect of tropicamide also helps to relax the accommodation reflex, making it easier to measure the refractive error of the eye and determine the appropriate prescription for eyeglasses or contact lenses.

It is important to note that tropicamide can cause temporary blurring of vision and sensitivity to light, so patients should be advised not to drive or operate heavy machinery until the effects of the medication have worn off.

A smooth muscle within the vascular system refers to the involuntary, innervated muscle that is found in the walls of blood vessels. These muscles are responsible for controlling the diameter of the blood vessels, which in turn regulates blood flow and blood pressure. They are called "smooth" muscles because their individual muscle cells do not have the striations, or cross-striped patterns, that are observed in skeletal and cardiac muscle cells. Smooth muscle in the vascular system is controlled by the autonomic nervous system and by hormones, and can contract or relax slowly over a period of time.

A dose-response relationship in the context of drugs refers to the changes in the effects or symptoms that occur as the dose of a drug is increased or decreased. Generally, as the dose of a drug is increased, the severity or intensity of its effects also increases. Conversely, as the dose is decreased, the effects of the drug become less severe or may disappear altogether.

The dose-response relationship is an important concept in pharmacology and toxicology because it helps to establish the safe and effective dosage range for a drug. By understanding how changes in the dose of a drug affect its therapeutic and adverse effects, healthcare providers can optimize treatment plans for their patients while minimizing the risk of harm.

The dose-response relationship is typically depicted as a curve that shows the relationship between the dose of a drug and its effect. The shape of the curve may vary depending on the drug and the specific effect being measured. Some drugs may have a steep dose-response curve, meaning that small changes in the dose can result in large differences in the effect. Other drugs may have a more gradual dose-response curve, where larger changes in the dose are needed to produce significant effects.

In addition to helping establish safe and effective dosages, the dose-response relationship is also used to evaluate the potential therapeutic benefits and risks of new drugs during clinical trials. By systematically testing different doses of a drug in controlled studies, researchers can identify the optimal dosage range for the drug and assess its safety and efficacy.

Muscle contraction is the physiological process in which muscle fibers shorten and generate force, leading to movement or stability of a body part. This process involves the sliding filament theory where thick and thin filaments within the sarcomeres (the functional units of muscles) slide past each other, facilitated by the interaction between myosin heads and actin filaments. The energy required for this action is provided by the hydrolysis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Muscle contractions can be voluntary or involuntary, and they play a crucial role in various bodily functions such as locomotion, circulation, respiration, and posture maintenance.

Methoxamine is a synthetic, selective α1-adrenergic receptor agonist used in scientific research and for therapeutic purposes. It has the ability to stimulate the α1 adrenergic receptors, leading to vasoconstriction (constriction of blood vessels), increased blood pressure, and reduced blood flow to the skin and extremities.

In a medical context, methoxamine is primarily used as an experimental drug or in research settings due to its specific pharmacological properties. It may be employed to investigate the role of α1-adrenergic receptors in various physiological processes or to temporarily counteract the hypotensive (low blood pressure) effects of certain medications, such as vasodilators or anesthetics.

It is important to note that methoxamine is not commonly used in routine clinical practice due to its strong vasoconstrictive properties and potential adverse effects on organ function if misused or improperly dosed.

The mesenteric arteries are the arteries that supply oxygenated blood to the intestines. There are three main mesenteric arteries: the superior mesenteric artery, which supplies blood to the small intestine (duodenum to two-thirds of the transverse colon) and large intestine (cecum, ascending colon, and the first part of the transverse colon); the inferior mesenteric artery, which supplies blood to the distal third of the transverse colon, descending colon, sigmoid colon, and rectum; and the middle colic artery, which is a branch of the superior mesenteric artery that supplies blood to the transverse colon. These arteries are important in maintaining adequate blood flow to the intestines to support digestion and absorption of nutrients.

Vasodilation is the widening or increase in diameter of blood vessels, particularly the involuntary relaxation of the smooth muscle in the tunica media (middle layer) of the arteriole walls. This results in an increase in blood flow and a decrease in vascular resistance. Vasodilation can occur due to various physiological and pathophysiological stimuli, such as local metabolic demands, neural signals, or pharmacological agents. It plays a crucial role in regulating blood pressure, tissue perfusion, and thermoregulation.

Obstetrical anesthesia refers to the use of anesthetic techniques and medications during childbirth or obstetrical procedures. The goal is to provide pain relief and comfort to the birthing person while ensuring the safety of both the mother and the baby. There are different types of obstetrical anesthesia, including:

1. Local anesthesia: Injection of a local anesthetic agent to numb a specific area, such as the perineum (the area between the vagina and the anus) during childbirth.
2. Regional anesthesia: Numbing a larger region of the body using techniques like spinal or epidural anesthesia. These methods involve injecting local anesthetic agents near the spinal cord to block nerve impulses, providing pain relief in the lower half of the body.
3. General anesthesia: Using inhaled gases or intravenous medications to render the birthing person unconscious during cesarean sections (C-sections) or other surgical procedures related to childbirth.

The choice of anesthetic technique depends on various factors, including the type of delivery, the mother's medical history, and the preferences of both the mother and the healthcare team. Obstetrical anesthesia requires specialized training and expertise to ensure safe and effective pain management during labor and delivery.

Pressoreceptors are specialized sensory nerve endings found in the walls of blood vessels, particularly in the carotid sinus and aortic arch. They respond to changes in blood pressure by converting the mechanical stimulus into electrical signals that are transmitted to the brain. This information helps regulate cardiovascular function and maintain blood pressure homeostasis.

Propranolol is a medication that belongs to a class of drugs called beta blockers. Medically, it is defined as a non-selective beta blocker, which means it blocks the effects of both epinephrine (adrenaline) and norepinephrine (noradrenaline) on the heart and other organs. These effects include reducing heart rate, contractility, and conduction velocity, leading to decreased oxygen demand by the myocardium. Propranolol is used in the management of various conditions such as hypertension, angina pectoris, arrhythmias, essential tremor, anxiety disorders, and infants with congenital heart defects. It may also be used to prevent migraines and reduce the risk of future heart attacks. As with any medication, it should be taken under the supervision of a healthcare provider due to potential side effects and contraindications.

Sprague-Dawley rats are a strain of albino laboratory rats that are widely used in scientific research. They were first developed by researchers H.H. Sprague and R.C. Dawley in the early 20th century, and have since become one of the most commonly used rat strains in biomedical research due to their relatively large size, ease of handling, and consistent genetic background.

Sprague-Dawley rats are outbred, which means that they are genetically diverse and do not suffer from the same limitations as inbred strains, which can have reduced fertility and increased susceptibility to certain diseases. They are also characterized by their docile nature and low levels of aggression, making them easier to handle and study than some other rat strains.

These rats are used in a wide variety of research areas, including toxicology, pharmacology, nutrition, cancer, and behavioral studies. Because they are genetically diverse, Sprague-Dawley rats can be used to model a range of human diseases and conditions, making them an important tool in the development of new drugs and therapies.

Heart rate is the number of heartbeats per unit of time, often expressed as beats per minute (bpm). It can vary significantly depending on factors such as age, physical fitness, emotions, and overall health status. A resting heart rate between 60-100 bpm is generally considered normal for adults, but athletes and individuals with high levels of physical fitness may have a resting heart rate below 60 bpm due to their enhanced cardiovascular efficiency. Monitoring heart rate can provide valuable insights into an individual's health status, exercise intensity, and response to various treatments or interventions.

Potassium chloride is an essential electrolyte that is often used in medical settings as a medication. It's a white, crystalline salt that is highly soluble in water and has a salty taste. In the body, potassium chloride plays a crucial role in maintaining fluid and electrolyte balance, nerve function, and muscle contraction.

Medically, potassium chloride is commonly used to treat or prevent low potassium levels (hypokalemia) in the blood. Hypokalemia can occur due to various reasons such as certain medications, kidney diseases, vomiting, diarrhea, or excessive sweating. Potassium chloride is available in various forms, including tablets, capsules, and liquids, and it's usually taken by mouth.

It's important to note that potassium chloride should be used with caution and under the supervision of a healthcare provider, as high levels of potassium (hyperkalemia) can be harmful and even life-threatening. Hyperkalemia can cause symptoms such as muscle weakness, irregular heartbeat, and cardiac arrest.

Spinal anesthesia is a type of regional anesthesia that involves injecting local anesthetic medication into the cerebrospinal fluid in the subarachnoid space, which is the space surrounding the spinal cord. This procedure is typically performed by introducing a needle into the lower back, between the vertebrae, to reach the subarachnoid space.

Once the local anesthetic is introduced into this space, it spreads to block nerve impulses from the corresponding levels of the spine, resulting in numbness and loss of sensation in specific areas of the body below the injection site. The extent and level of anesthesia depend on the amount and type of medication used, as well as the patient's individual response.

Spinal anesthesia is often used for surgeries involving the lower abdomen, pelvis, or lower extremities, such as cesarean sections, hernia repairs, hip replacements, and knee arthroscopies. It can also be utilized for procedures like epidural steroid injections to manage chronic pain conditions affecting the spine and lower limbs.

While spinal anesthesia provides effective pain relief during and after surgery, it may cause side effects such as low blood pressure, headache, or difficulty urinating. These potential complications should be discussed with the healthcare provider before deciding on this type of anesthesia.

Phentolamine is a non-selective alpha-blocker drug, which means it blocks both alpha-1 and alpha-2 receptors. It works by relaxing the muscle around blood vessels, which increases blood flow and lowers blood pressure. Phentolamine is used medically for various purposes, including the treatment of high blood pressure, the diagnosis and treatment of pheochromocytoma (a tumor that releases hormones causing high blood pressure), and as an antidote to prevent severe hypertension caused by certain medications or substances. It may also be used in diagnostic tests to determine if a patient's blood pressure is reactive to drugs, and it can be used during some surgical procedures to help lower the risk of hypertensive crises.

Phentolamine is available in two forms: an injectable solution and oral tablets. The injectable form is typically administered by healthcare professionals in a clinical setting, while the oral tablets are less commonly used due to their short duration of action and potential for causing severe drops in blood pressure. As with any medication, phentolamine should be taken under the supervision of a healthcare provider, and patients should follow their doctor's instructions carefully to minimize the risk of side effects and ensure the drug's effectiveness.

"Wistar rats" are a strain of albino rats that are widely used in laboratory research. They were developed at the Wistar Institute in Philadelphia, USA, and were first introduced in 1906. Wistar rats are outbred, which means that they are genetically diverse and do not have a fixed set of genetic characteristics like inbred strains.

Wistar rats are commonly used as animal models in biomedical research because of their size, ease of handling, and relatively low cost. They are used in a wide range of research areas, including toxicology, pharmacology, nutrition, cancer, cardiovascular disease, and behavioral studies. Wistar rats are also used in safety testing of drugs, medical devices, and other products.

Wistar rats are typically larger than many other rat strains, with males weighing between 500-700 grams and females weighing between 250-350 grams. They have a lifespan of approximately 2-3 years. Wistar rats are also known for their docile and friendly nature, making them easy to handle and work with in the laboratory setting.

Epinephrine, also known as adrenaline, is a hormone and a neurotransmitter that is produced in the body. It is released by the adrenal glands in response to stress or excitement, and it prepares the body for the "fight or flight" response. Epinephrine works by binding to specific receptors in the body, which causes a variety of physiological effects, including increased heart rate and blood pressure, improved muscle strength and alertness, and narrowing of the blood vessels in the skin and intestines. It is also used as a medication to treat various medical conditions, such as anaphylaxis (a severe allergic reaction), cardiac arrest, and low blood pressure.

Hypotension is a medical term that refers to abnormally low blood pressure, usually defined as a systolic blood pressure less than 90 millimeters of mercury (mm Hg) or a diastolic blood pressure less than 60 mm Hg. Blood pressure is the force exerted by the blood against the walls of the blood vessels as the heart pumps blood.

Hypotension can cause symptoms such as dizziness, lightheadedness, weakness, and fainting, especially when standing up suddenly. In severe cases, hypotension can lead to shock, which is a life-threatening condition characterized by multiple organ failure due to inadequate blood flow.

Hypotension can be caused by various factors, including certain medications, medical conditions such as heart disease, endocrine disorders, and dehydration. It is important to seek medical attention if you experience symptoms of hypotension, as it can indicate an underlying health issue that requires treatment.

The sympathetic nervous system (SNS) is a part of the autonomic nervous system that operates largely below the level of consciousness, and it functions to produce appropriate physiological responses to perceived danger. It's often associated with the "fight or flight" response. The SNS uses nerve impulses to stimulate target organs, causing them to speed up (e.g., increased heart rate), prepare for action, or otherwise respond to stressful situations.

The sympathetic nervous system is activated due to stressful emotional or physical situations and it prepares the body for immediate actions. It dilates the pupils, increases heart rate and blood pressure, accelerates breathing, and slows down digestion. The primary neurotransmitter involved in this system is norepinephrine (also known as noradrenaline).

Acetylcholine is a neurotransmitter, a type of chemical messenger that transmits signals across a chemical synapse from one neuron (nerve cell) to another "target" neuron, muscle cell, or gland cell. It is involved in both peripheral and central nervous system functions.

In the peripheral nervous system, acetylcholine acts as a neurotransmitter at the neuromuscular junction, where it transmits signals from motor neurons to activate muscles. Acetylcholine also acts as a neurotransmitter in the autonomic nervous system, where it is involved in both the sympathetic and parasympathetic systems.

In the central nervous system, acetylcholine plays a role in learning, memory, attention, and arousal. Disruptions in cholinergic neurotransmission have been implicated in several neurological disorders, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and myasthenia gravis.

Acetylcholine is synthesized from choline and acetyl-CoA by the enzyme choline acetyltransferase and is stored in vesicles at the presynaptic terminal of the neuron. When a nerve impulse arrives, the vesicles fuse with the presynaptic membrane, releasing acetylcholine into the synapse. The acetylcholine then binds to receptors on the postsynaptic membrane, triggering a response in the target cell. Acetylcholine is subsequently degraded by the enzyme acetylcholinesterase, which terminates its action and allows for signal transduction to be repeated.

Yohimbine is defined as an alkaloid derived from the bark of the Pausinystalia yohimbe tree, primarily found in Central Africa. It functions as a selective antagonist of α2-adrenergers, which results in increased noradrenaline levels and subsequent vasodilation, improved sexual dysfunction, and potentially increased energy and alertness.

It is used in traditional medicine for the treatment of erectile dysfunction and as an aphrodisiac, but its efficacy and safety are still subjects of ongoing research and debate. It's important to note that yohimbine can have significant side effects, including anxiety, increased heart rate, and high blood pressure, and should only be used under the supervision of a healthcare professional.

Dioxanes are a group of chemical compounds that contain two oxygen atoms and four carbon atoms, linked together in a cyclic structure. The most common dioxane is called 1,4-dioxane, which is often used as a solvent or as a stabilizer in various industrial and consumer products, such as cosmetics, cleaning agents, and paint strippers.

In the medical field, 1,4-dioxane has been classified as a likely human carcinogen by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and as a possible human carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). Exposure to high levels of 1,4-dioxane has been linked to an increased risk of cancer in laboratory animals, and there is some evidence to suggest that it may also pose a cancer risk to humans.

It's worth noting that the use of 1,4-dioxane in cosmetics and other personal care products has been controversial, as some studies have found detectable levels of this chemical in these products. However, the levels of exposure from these sources are generally low, and it is unclear whether they pose a significant cancer risk to humans. Nonetheless, some organizations and experts have called for stricter regulations on the use of 1,4-dioxane in consumer products to minimize potential health risks.

Nitric oxide (NO) is a molecule made up of one nitrogen atom and one oxygen atom. In the body, it is a crucial signaling molecule involved in various physiological processes such as vasodilation, immune response, neurotransmission, and inhibition of platelet aggregation. It is produced naturally by the enzyme nitric oxide synthase (NOS) from the amino acid L-arginine. Inhaled nitric oxide is used medically to treat pulmonary hypertension in newborns and adults, as it helps to relax and widen blood vessels, improving oxygenation and blood flow.

Muscle relaxation, in a medical context, refers to the process of reducing tension and promoting relaxation in the skeletal muscles. This can be achieved through various techniques, including progressive muscle relaxation (PMR), where individuals consciously tense and then release specific muscle groups in a systematic manner.

PMR has been shown to help reduce anxiety, stress, and muscle tightness, and improve overall well-being. It is often used as a complementary therapy in conjunction with other treatments for conditions such as chronic pain, headaches, and insomnia.

Additionally, muscle relaxation can also be facilitated through pharmacological interventions, such as the use of muscle relaxant medications. These drugs work by inhibiting the transmission of signals between nerves and muscles, leading to a reduction in muscle tone and spasticity. They are commonly used to treat conditions such as multiple sclerosis, cerebral palsy, and spinal cord injuries.

"Inbred strains of rats" are genetically identical rodents that have been produced through many generations of brother-sister mating. This results in a high degree of homozygosity, where the genes at any particular locus in the genome are identical in all members of the strain.

Inbred strains of rats are widely used in biomedical research because they provide a consistent and reproducible genetic background for studying various biological phenomena, including the effects of drugs, environmental factors, and genetic mutations on health and disease. Additionally, inbred strains can be used to create genetically modified models of human diseases by introducing specific mutations into their genomes.

Some commonly used inbred strains of rats include the Wistar Kyoto (WKY), Sprague-Dawley (SD), and Fischer 344 (F344) rat strains. Each strain has its own unique genetic characteristics, making them suitable for different types of research.

The aorta is the largest artery in the human body, which originates from the left ventricle of the heart and carries oxygenated blood to the rest of the body. It can be divided into several parts, including the ascending aorta, aortic arch, and descending aorta. The ascending aorta gives rise to the coronary arteries that supply blood to the heart muscle. The aortic arch gives rise to the brachiocephalic, left common carotid, and left subclavian arteries, which supply blood to the head, neck, and upper extremities. The descending aorta travels through the thorax and abdomen, giving rise to various intercostal, visceral, and renal arteries that supply blood to the chest wall, organs, and kidneys.

Adrenergic beta-agonists are a class of medications that bind to and activate beta-adrenergic receptors, which are found in various tissues throughout the body. These receptors are part of the sympathetic nervous system and mediate the effects of the neurotransmitter norepinephrine (also called noradrenaline) and the hormone epinephrine (also called adrenaline).

When beta-agonists bind to these receptors, they stimulate a range of physiological responses, including relaxation of smooth muscle in the airways, increased heart rate and contractility, and increased metabolic rate. As a result, adrenergic beta-agonists are often used to treat conditions such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and bronchitis, as they can help to dilate the airways and improve breathing.

There are several different types of beta-agonists, including short-acting and long-acting formulations. Short-acting beta-agonists (SABAs) are typically used for quick relief of symptoms, while long-acting beta-agonists (LABAs) are used for more sustained symptom control. Examples of adrenergic beta-agonists include albuterol (also known as salbutamol), terbutaline, formoterol, and salmeterol.

It's worth noting that while adrenergic beta-agonists can be very effective in treating respiratory conditions, they can also have side effects, particularly if used in high doses or for prolonged periods of time. These may include tremors, anxiety, palpitations, and increased blood pressure. As with any medication, it's important to use adrenergic beta-agonists only as directed by a healthcare professional.

Arteries are blood vessels that carry oxygenated blood away from the heart to the rest of the body. They have thick, muscular walls that can withstand the high pressure of blood being pumped out of the heart. Arteries branch off into smaller vessels called arterioles, which further divide into a vast network of tiny capillaries where the exchange of oxygen, nutrients, and waste occurs between the blood and the body's cells. After passing through the capillary network, deoxygenated blood collects in venules, then merges into veins, which return the blood back to the heart.

The endothelium is a thin layer of simple squamous epithelial cells that lines the interior surface of blood vessels, lymphatic vessels, and heart chambers. The vascular endothelium, specifically, refers to the endothelial cells that line the blood vessels. These cells play a crucial role in maintaining vascular homeostasis by regulating vasomotor tone, coagulation, platelet activation, inflammation, and permeability of the vessel wall. They also contribute to the growth and repair of the vascular system and are involved in various pathological processes such as atherosclerosis, hypertension, and diabetes.

Calcium is an essential mineral that is vital for various physiological processes in the human body. The medical definition of calcium is as follows:

Calcium (Ca2+) is a crucial cation and the most abundant mineral in the human body, with approximately 99% of it found in bones and teeth. It plays a vital role in maintaining structural integrity, nerve impulse transmission, muscle contraction, hormonal secretion, blood coagulation, and enzyme activation.

Calcium homeostasis is tightly regulated through the interplay of several hormones, including parathyroid hormone (PTH), calcitonin, and vitamin D. Dietary calcium intake, absorption, and excretion are also critical factors in maintaining optimal calcium levels in the body.

Hypocalcemia refers to low serum calcium levels, while hypercalcemia indicates high serum calcium levels. Both conditions can have detrimental effects on various organ systems and require medical intervention to correct.

NG-Nitroarginine Methyl Ester (L-NAME) is not a medication, but rather a research chemical used in scientific studies. It is an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase, an enzyme that synthesizes nitric oxide, a molecule involved in the relaxation of blood vessels.

Therefore, L-NAME is often used in experiments to investigate the role of nitric oxide in various physiological and pathophysiological processes. It is important to note that the use of L-NAME in humans is not approved for therapeutic purposes due to its potential side effects, which can include hypertension, decreased renal function, and decreased cerebral blood flow.

I believe there may be some confusion in your question. "Rabbits" is a common name used to refer to the Lagomorpha species, particularly members of the family Leporidae. They are small mammals known for their long ears, strong legs, and quick reproduction.

However, if you're referring to "rabbits" in a medical context, there is a term called "rabbit syndrome," which is a rare movement disorder characterized by repetitive, involuntary movements of the fingers, resembling those of a rabbit chewing. It is also known as "finger-chewing chorea." This condition is usually associated with certain medications, particularly antipsychotics, and typically resolves when the medication is stopped or adjusted.

Vasopressin, also known as antidiuretic hormone (ADH), is a hormone that helps regulate water balance in the body. It is produced by the hypothalamus and stored in the posterior pituitary gland. When the body is dehydrated or experiencing low blood pressure, vasopressin is released into the bloodstream, where it causes the kidneys to decrease the amount of urine they produce and helps to constrict blood vessels, thereby increasing blood pressure. This helps to maintain adequate fluid volume in the body and ensure that vital organs receive an adequate supply of oxygen-rich blood. In addition to its role in water balance and blood pressure regulation, vasopressin also plays a role in social behaviors such as pair bonding and trust.

In the context of human anatomy, the term "tail" is not used to describe any part of the body. Humans are considered tailless primates, and there is no structure or feature that corresponds directly to the tails found in many other animals.

However, there are some medical terms related to the lower end of the spine that might be confused with a tail:

1. Coccyx (Tailbone): The coccyx is a small triangular bone at the very bottom of the spinal column, formed by the fusion of several rudimentary vertebrae. It's also known as the tailbone because it resembles the end of an animal's tail in its location and appearance.
2. Cauda Equina (Horse's Tail): The cauda equina is a bundle of nerve roots at the lower end of the spinal cord, just above the coccyx. It got its name because it looks like a horse's tail due to the numerous rootlets radiating from the conus medullaris (the tapering end of the spinal cord).

These two structures are not tails in the traditional sense but rather medical terms related to the lower end of the human spine.

A pupil, in medical terms, refers to the circular opening in the center of the iris (the colored part of the eye) that allows light to enter and reach the retina. The size of the pupil can change involuntarily in response to light intensity and emotional state, as well as voluntarily through certain eye exercises or with the use of eye drops. Pupillary reactions are important in clinical examinations as they can provide valuable information about the nervous system's functioning, particularly the brainstem and cranial nerves II and III.

Phenoxybenzamine is an antihypertensive medication that belongs to a class of drugs known as non-selective alpha blockers. It works by blocking both alpha-1 and alpha-2 receptors, which results in the relaxation of smooth muscle tissue in blood vessel walls and other organs. This leads to a decrease in peripheral vascular resistance and a reduction in blood pressure.

Phenoxybenzamine is primarily used for the preoperative management of patients with pheochromocytoma, a rare tumor that produces excessive amounts of catecholamines, such as adrenaline and noradrenaline. By blocking alpha receptors, phenoxybenzamine prevents the hypertensive crisis that can occur during surgery to remove the tumor.

It's important to note that phenoxybenzamine has a long duration of action (up to 14 days) and can cause orthostatic hypotension, tachycardia, and other side effects. Therefore, it should be used with caution and under the close supervision of a healthcare professional.

Enzyme inhibitors are substances that bind to an enzyme and decrease its activity, preventing it from catalyzing a chemical reaction in the body. They can work by several mechanisms, including blocking the active site where the substrate binds, or binding to another site on the enzyme to change its shape and prevent substrate binding. Enzyme inhibitors are often used as drugs to treat various medical conditions, such as high blood pressure, abnormal heart rhythms, and bacterial infections. They can also be found naturally in some foods and plants, and can be used in research to understand enzyme function and regulation.

Oxymetazoline is a direct-acting mainly α1-adrenergic receptor agonist, which is primarily used as a nasal decongestant and an ophthalmic vasoconstrictor. It constricts blood vessels, reducing swelling and fluid accumulation in the lining of the nose, thereby providing relief from nasal congestion due to allergies or colds. Oxymetazoline is available over-the-counter in various forms, such as nasal sprays, drops, and creams. It's important to follow the recommended usage guidelines, as prolonged use of oxymetazoline can lead to a rebound effect, causing further congestion.

Regional blood flow (RBF) refers to the rate at which blood flows through a specific region or organ in the body, typically expressed in milliliters per minute per 100 grams of tissue (ml/min/100g). It is an essential physiological parameter that reflects the delivery of oxygen and nutrients to tissues while removing waste products. RBF can be affected by various factors such as metabolic demands, neural regulation, hormonal influences, and changes in blood pressure or vascular resistance. Measuring RBF is crucial for understanding organ function, diagnosing diseases, and evaluating the effectiveness of treatments.

A chemical stimulation in a medical context refers to the process of activating or enhancing physiological or psychological responses in the body using chemical substances. These chemicals can interact with receptors on cells to trigger specific reactions, such as neurotransmitters and hormones that transmit signals within the nervous system and endocrine system.

Examples of chemical stimulation include the use of medications, drugs, or supplements that affect mood, alertness, pain perception, or other bodily functions. For instance, caffeine can chemically stimulate the central nervous system to increase alertness and decrease feelings of fatigue. Similarly, certain painkillers can chemically stimulate opioid receptors in the brain to reduce the perception of pain.

It's important to note that while chemical stimulation can have therapeutic benefits, it can also have adverse effects if used improperly or in excessive amounts. Therefore, it's essential to follow proper dosing instructions and consult with a healthcare provider before using any chemical substances for stimulation purposes.

Angiotensin II is a potent vasoactive peptide hormone that plays a critical role in the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), which is a crucial regulator of blood pressure and fluid balance in the body. It is formed from angiotensin I through the action of an enzyme called angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE).

Angiotensin II has several physiological effects on various organs, including:

1. Vasoconstriction: Angiotensin II causes contraction of vascular smooth muscle, leading to an increase in peripheral vascular resistance and blood pressure.
2. Aldosterone release: Angiotensin II stimulates the adrenal glands to release aldosterone, a hormone that promotes sodium reabsorption and potassium excretion in the kidneys, thereby increasing water retention and blood volume.
3. Sympathetic nervous system activation: Angiotensin II activates the sympathetic nervous system, leading to increased heart rate and contractility, further contributing to an increase in blood pressure.
4. Thirst regulation: Angiotensin II stimulates the hypothalamus to increase thirst, promoting water intake and helping to maintain intravascular volume.
5. Cell growth and fibrosis: Angiotensin II has been implicated in various pathological processes, such as cell growth, proliferation, and fibrosis, which can contribute to the development of cardiovascular and renal diseases.

Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) are two classes of medications commonly used in clinical practice to target the RAAS by blocking the formation or action of angiotensin II, respectively. These drugs have been shown to be effective in managing hypertension, heart failure, and chronic kidney disease.

Nitric Oxide Synthase (NOS) is a group of enzymes that catalyze the production of nitric oxide (NO) from L-arginine. There are three distinct isoforms of NOS, each with different expression patterns and functions:

1. Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase (nNOS or NOS1): This isoform is primarily expressed in the nervous system and plays a role in neurotransmission, synaptic plasticity, and learning and memory processes.
2. Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase (iNOS or NOS2): This isoform is induced by various stimuli such as cytokines, lipopolysaccharides, and hypoxia in a variety of cells including immune cells, endothelial cells, and smooth muscle cells. iNOS produces large amounts of NO, which functions as a potent effector molecule in the immune response, particularly in the defense against microbial pathogens.
3. Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase (eNOS or NOS3): This isoform is constitutively expressed in endothelial cells and produces low levels of NO that play a crucial role in maintaining vascular homeostasis by regulating vasodilation, inhibiting platelet aggregation, and preventing smooth muscle cell proliferation.

Overall, NOS plays an essential role in various physiological processes, including neurotransmission, immune response, cardiovascular function, and respiratory regulation. Dysregulation of NOS activity has been implicated in several pathological conditions such as hypertension, atherosclerosis, neurodegenerative diseases, and inflammatory disorders.

The penis is a part of the male reproductive and urinary systems. It has three parts: the root, the body, and the glans. The root attaches to the pelvic bone and the body makes up the majority of the free-hanging portion. The glans is the cone-shaped end that protects the urethra, the tube inside the penis that carries urine from the bladder and semen from the testicles.

The penis has a dual function - it acts as a conduit for both urine and semen. During sexual arousal, the penis becomes erect when blood fills two chambers inside its shaft. This process is facilitated by the relaxation of the smooth muscles in the arterial walls and the trappping of blood in the corpora cavernosa. The stiffness of the penis enables sexual intercourse. After ejaculation, or when the sexual arousal passes, the muscles contract and the blood flows out of the penis back into the body, causing it to become flaccid again.

The foreskin, a layer of skin that covers the glans, is sometimes removed in a procedure called circumcision. Circumcision is often performed for religious or cultural reasons, or as a matter of family custom. In some countries, it's also done for medical reasons, such as to treat conditions like phimosis (an inability to retract the foreskin) or balanitis (inflammation of the glans).

It's important to note that any changes in appearance, size, or function of the penis should be evaluated by a healthcare professional, as they could indicate an underlying medical condition.

I believe there might be a misunderstanding in your question. "Dogs" is not a medical term or condition. It is the common name for a domesticated carnivore of the family Canidae, specifically the genus Canis, which includes wolves, foxes, and other extant and extinct species of mammals. Dogs are often kept as pets and companions, and they have been bred in a wide variety of forms and sizes for different purposes, such as hunting, herding, guarding, assisting police and military forces, and providing companionship and emotional support.

If you meant to ask about a specific medical condition or term related to dogs, please provide more context so I can give you an accurate answer.

Vascular resistance is a measure of the opposition to blood flow within a vessel or a group of vessels, typically expressed in units of mmHg/(mL/min) or sometimes as dynes*sec/cm^5. It is determined by the diameter and length of the vessels, as well as the viscosity of the blood flowing through them. In general, a decrease in vessel diameter, an increase in vessel length, or an increase in blood viscosity will result in an increase in vascular resistance, while an increase in vessel diameter, a decrease in vessel length, or a decrease in blood viscosity will result in a decrease in vascular resistance. Vascular resistance is an important concept in the study of circulation and cardiovascular physiology because it plays a key role in determining blood pressure and blood flow within the body.

Metaproterenol is a short-acting, selective beta-2 adrenergic receptor agonist. It is primarily used as a bronchodilator to treat and prevent bronchospasms associated with reversible obstructive airway diseases such as asthma, chronic bronchitis, and emphysema. Metaproterenol works by relaxing the smooth muscles in the airways, thereby opening up the air passages and making it easier to breathe. It is available in oral (tablet or liquid) and inhalation (aerosol or solution for nebulization) forms. Common side effects include tremors, nervousness, headache, tachycardia, and palpitations.

In medical terms, the heart is a muscular organ located in the thoracic cavity that functions as a pump to circulate blood throughout the body. It's responsible for delivering oxygen and nutrients to the tissues and removing carbon dioxide and other wastes. The human heart is divided into four chambers: two atria on the top and two ventricles on the bottom. The right side of the heart receives deoxygenated blood from the body and pumps it to the lungs, while the left side receives oxygenated blood from the lungs and pumps it out to the rest of the body. The heart's rhythmic contractions and relaxations are regulated by a complex electrical conduction system.

Quinoxalines are not a medical term, but rather an organic chemical compound. They are a class of heterocyclic aromatic compounds made up of a benzene ring fused to a pyrazine ring. Quinoxalines have no specific medical relevance, but some of their derivatives have been synthesized and used in medicinal chemistry as antibacterial, antifungal, and antiviral agents. They are also used in the production of dyes and pigments.

Alpha-2 adrenergic receptors are a type of G protein-coupled receptor that binds catecholamines, such as norepinephrine and epinephrine. These receptors are widely distributed in the central and peripheral nervous system, as well as in various organs and tissues throughout the body.

Activation of alpha-2 adrenergic receptors leads to a variety of physiological responses, including inhibition of neurotransmitter release, vasoconstriction, and reduced heart rate. These receptors play important roles in regulating blood pressure, pain perception, and various cognitive and emotional processes.

There are several subtypes of alpha-2 adrenergic receptors, including alpha-2A, alpha-2B, and alpha-2C, which may have distinct physiological functions and be targeted by different drugs. For example, certain medications used to treat hypertension or opioid withdrawal target alpha-2 adrenergic receptors to produce their therapeutic effects.

Cardiomegaly is a medical term that refers to an enlarged heart. It can be caused by various conditions such as high blood pressure, heart valve problems, cardiomyopathy, or fluid accumulation around the heart (pericardial effusion). Cardiomegaly can be detected through imaging tests like chest X-rays or echocardiograms. Depending on the underlying cause, treatment options may include medications, lifestyle changes, or in some cases, surgery. It is important to consult with a healthcare professional for proper diagnosis and treatment.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "myography" is not a recognized term in the field of medicine or medical terminology. It may be possible that you have misspelled or misremembered a related term. If you meant "myology," that refers to the study of muscles, their structure, function, and disorders. If you had a different term in mind, please provide it so I can give you a more accurate response.

Nitro-L-arginine or Nitroarginine is not a medical term per se, but it is a chemical compound that is sometimes used in medical research and experiments. It is a salt of nitric acid and L-arginine, an amino acid that is important for the functioning of the body.

Nitroarginine is known to inhibit the production of nitric oxide, a molecule that plays a role in various physiological processes such as blood flow regulation, immune response, and neurotransmission. As a result, nitroarginine has been used in research to study the effects of reduced nitric oxide levels on different systems in the body.

It's worth noting that nitroarginine is not approved for use as a medication in humans, and its use is generally limited to laboratory settings.

Hemodynamics is the study of how blood flows through the cardiovascular system, including the heart and the vascular network. It examines various factors that affect blood flow, such as blood volume, viscosity, vessel length and diameter, and pressure differences between different parts of the circulatory system. Hemodynamics also considers the impact of various physiological and pathological conditions on these variables, and how they in turn influence the function of vital organs and systems in the body. It is a critical area of study in fields such as cardiology, anesthesiology, and critical care medicine.

Cardiotonic agents are a type of medication that have a positive inotropic effect on the heart, meaning they help to improve the contractility and strength of heart muscle contractions. These medications are often used to treat heart failure, as they can help to improve the efficiency of the heart's pumping ability and increase cardiac output.

Cardiotonic agents work by increasing the levels of calcium ions inside heart muscle cells during each heartbeat, which in turn enhances the force of contraction. Some common examples of cardiotonic agents include digitalis glycosides (such as digoxin), which are derived from the foxglove plant, and synthetic medications such as dobutamine and milrinone.

While cardiotonic agents can be effective in improving heart function, they can also have potentially serious side effects, including arrhythmias, electrolyte imbalances, and digestive symptoms. As a result, they are typically used under close medical supervision and their dosages may need to be carefully monitored to minimize the risk of adverse effects.

Smooth muscle, also known as involuntary muscle, is a type of muscle that is controlled by the autonomic nervous system and functions without conscious effort. These muscles are found in the walls of hollow organs such as the stomach, intestines, bladder, and blood vessels, as well as in the eyes, skin, and other areas of the body.

Smooth muscle fibers are shorter and narrower than skeletal muscle fibers and do not have striations or sarcomeres, which give skeletal muscle its striped appearance. Smooth muscle is controlled by the autonomic nervous system through the release of neurotransmitters such as acetylcholine and norepinephrine, which bind to receptors on the smooth muscle cells and cause them to contract or relax.

Smooth muscle plays an important role in many physiological processes, including digestion, circulation, respiration, and elimination. It can also contribute to various medical conditions, such as hypertension, gastrointestinal disorders, and genitourinary dysfunction, when it becomes overactive or underactive.

Muscle tonus, also known as muscle tone, refers to the continuous and passive partial contraction of the muscles, which helps to maintain posture and stability. It is the steady state of slight tension that is present in resting muscles, allowing them to quickly respond to stimuli and move. This natural state of mild contraction is maintained by the involuntary activity of the nervous system and can be affected by factors such as injury, disease, or exercise.

It's important to note that muscle tone should not be confused with muscle "tone" in the context of physical appearance or body sculpting, which refers to the amount of muscle definition and leanness seen in an individual's physique.

Adrenergic receptors are a type of G protein-coupled receptor that binds and responds to catecholamines, such as epinephrine (adrenaline) and norepinephrine (noradrenaline). Beta adrenergic receptors (β-adrenergic receptors) are a subtype of adrenergic receptors that include three distinct subclasses: β1, β2, and β3. These receptors are widely distributed throughout the body and play important roles in various physiological functions, including cardiovascular regulation, bronchodilation, lipolysis, and glucose metabolism.

β1-adrenergic receptors are primarily located in the heart and regulate cardiac contractility, chronotropy (heart rate), and relaxation. β2-adrenergic receptors are found in various tissues, including the lungs, vascular smooth muscle, liver, and skeletal muscle. They mediate bronchodilation, vasodilation, glycogenolysis, and lipolysis. β3-adrenergic receptors are mainly expressed in adipose tissue, where they stimulate lipolysis and thermogenesis.

Agonists of β-adrenergic receptors include catecholamines like epinephrine and norepinephrine, as well as synthetic drugs such as dobutamine (a β1-selective agonist) and albuterol (a non-selective β2-agonist). Antagonists of β-adrenergic receptors are commonly used in the treatment of various conditions, including hypertension, angina pectoris, heart failure, and asthma. Examples of β-blockers include metoprolol (a β1-selective antagonist) and carvedilol (a non-selective β-blocker with additional α1-adrenergic receptor blocking activity).

Adrenergic alpha-2 receptor agonists are a class of medications that bind to and activate adrenergic alpha-2 receptors, which are found in the nervous system and other tissues. These receptors play a role in regulating various bodily functions, including blood pressure, heart rate, and release of certain hormones.

When adrenergic alpha-2 receptor agonists bind to these receptors, they can cause a variety of effects, such as:

* Vasoconstriction (narrowing of blood vessels), which can increase blood pressure
* Decreased heart rate and force of heart contractions
* Suppression of the release of norepinephrine (a hormone and neurotransmitter involved in the "fight or flight" response) from nerve endings
* Analgesia (pain relief)

Adrenergic alpha-2 receptor agonists are used in a variety of medical conditions, including:

* High blood pressure
* Glaucoma (to reduce pressure in the eye)
* Anesthesia (to help prevent excessive bleeding and to provide sedation)
* Opioid withdrawal symptoms (to help manage symptoms such as anxiety, agitation, and muscle aches)

Examples of adrenergic alpha-2 receptor agonists include clonidine, brimonidine, and dexmedetomidine.

A Cesarean section, often referred to as a C-section, is a surgical procedure used to deliver a baby. It involves making an incision through the mother's abdomen and uterus to remove the baby. This procedure may be necessary when a vaginal delivery would put the mother or the baby at risk.

There are several reasons why a C-section might be recommended, including:

* The baby is in a breech position (feet first) or a transverse position (sideways) and cannot be turned to a normal head-down position.
* The baby is too large to safely pass through the mother's birth canal.
* The mother has a medical condition, such as heart disease or high blood pressure, that could make vaginal delivery risky.
* The mother has an infection, such as HIV or herpes, that could be passed to the baby during a vaginal delivery.
* The labor is not progressing and there are concerns about the health of the mother or the baby.

C-sections are generally safe for both the mother and the baby, but like any surgery, they do carry some risks. These can include infection, bleeding, blood clots, and injury to nearby organs. In addition, women who have a C-section are more likely to experience complications in future pregnancies, such as placenta previa or uterine rupture.

If you have questions about whether a C-section is necessary for your delivery, it's important to discuss your options with your healthcare provider.

Endothelin-1 is a small peptide (21 amino acids) and a potent vasoconstrictor, which means it narrows blood vessels. It is primarily produced by the endothelial cells that line the interior surface of blood vessels. Endothelin-1 plays a crucial role in regulating vascular tone, cell growth, and inflammation. Its dysregulation has been implicated in various cardiovascular diseases, such as hypertension and heart failure. It exerts its effects by binding to specific G protein-coupled receptors (ETA and ETB) on the surface of target cells.

Ritodrine is a medication that was previously used to prevent or delay premature labor in women at high risk. It is a beta-2 adrenergic agonist, which works by relaxing uterine muscles and slowing down contractions. However, its use in clinical practice has been largely discontinued due to the availability of more effective and safer alternatives for tocolysis (the suppression of premature labor). It's important to note that Ritodrine is not currently a commonly used medication in obstetrics.

Ganglionectomy is a surgical procedure that involves the removal of a ganglion, which is a small, benign cyst-like structure that typically forms on or near a joint capsule or tendon sheath. These ganglia are filled with a jelly-like substance known as synovial fluid, and they can cause pain, discomfort, or limitation of movement when they press on nearby nerves.

Ganglionectomy is usually performed under local or general anesthesia, depending on the location and size of the ganglion. The surgeon makes an incision over the affected area, carefully dissects the tissue surrounding the ganglion, and removes it completely. The incision is then closed with sutures or staples, and a dressing is applied to protect the wound during healing.

This procedure is generally recommended for patients who have persistent symptoms that do not respond to non-surgical treatments such as aspiration (draining the fluid from the ganglion) or immobilization with a splint or brace. Ganglionectomy has a high success rate, with most patients experiencing relief of their symptoms and a low risk of recurrence. However, as with any surgical procedure, there are potential risks and complications, including infection, nerve damage, and scarring.

The myocardium is the middle layer of the heart wall, composed of specialized cardiac muscle cells that are responsible for pumping blood throughout the body. It forms the thickest part of the heart wall and is divided into two sections: the left ventricle, which pumps oxygenated blood to the rest of the body, and the right ventricle, which pumps deoxygenated blood to the lungs.

The myocardium contains several types of cells, including cardiac muscle fibers, connective tissue, nerves, and blood vessels. The muscle fibers are arranged in a highly organized pattern that allows them to contract in a coordinated manner, generating the force necessary to pump blood through the heart and circulatory system.

Damage to the myocardium can occur due to various factors such as ischemia (reduced blood flow), infection, inflammation, or genetic disorders. This damage can lead to several cardiac conditions, including heart failure, arrhythmias, and cardiomyopathy.

Perfusion, in medical terms, refers to the process of circulating blood through the body's organs and tissues to deliver oxygen and nutrients and remove waste products. It is a measure of the delivery of adequate blood flow to specific areas or tissues in the body. Perfusion can be assessed using various methods, including imaging techniques like computed tomography (CT) scans, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and perfusion scintigraphy.

Perfusion is critical for maintaining proper organ function and overall health. When perfusion is impaired or inadequate, it can lead to tissue hypoxia, acidosis, and cell death, which can result in organ dysfunction or failure. Conditions that can affect perfusion include cardiovascular disease, shock, trauma, and certain surgical procedures.

Ergonovine is a medication that belongs to a class of drugs called ergot alkaloids. It is derived from the ergot fungus and is used in medical settings as a uterotonic agent, which means it causes the uterus to contract. Ergonovine is often used after childbirth to help the uterus return to its normal size and reduce bleeding.

Ergonovine works by binding to specific receptors in the smooth muscle of the uterus, causing it to contract. It has a potent effect on the uterus and can also cause vasoconstriction (narrowing of blood vessels) in other parts of the body. This is why ergonovine is sometimes used to treat severe bleeding caused by conditions such as uterine fibroids or ectopic pregnancy.

Like other ergot alkaloids, ergonovine can have serious side effects if not used carefully. It should be administered under the close supervision of a healthcare provider and should not be used in women with certain medical conditions, such as high blood pressure or heart disease. Ergonovine can also interact with other medications, so it's important to inform your healthcare provider of all medications you are taking before receiving this drug.

Adrenergic beta-antagonists, also known as beta blockers, are a class of medications that block the effects of adrenaline and noradrenaline (also known as epinephrine and norepinephrine) on beta-adrenergic receptors. These receptors are found in various tissues throughout the body, including the heart, lungs, and blood vessels.

Beta blockers work by binding to these receptors and preventing the activation of certain signaling pathways that lead to increased heart rate, force of heart contractions, and relaxation of blood vessels. As a result, beta blockers can lower blood pressure, reduce heart rate, and decrease the workload on the heart.

Beta blockers are used to treat a variety of medical conditions, including hypertension (high blood pressure), angina (chest pain), heart failure, irregular heart rhythms, migraines, and certain anxiety disorders. Some common examples of beta blockers include metoprolol, atenolol, propranolol, and bisoprolol.

It is important to note that while beta blockers can have many benefits, they can also cause side effects such as fatigue, dizziness, and shortness of breath. Additionally, sudden discontinuation of beta blocker therapy can lead to rebound hypertension or worsening chest pain. Therefore, it is important to follow the dosing instructions provided by a healthcare provider carefully when taking these medications.

Indomethacin is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) that is commonly used to reduce pain, inflammation, and fever. It works by inhibiting the activity of certain enzymes in the body, including cyclooxygenase (COX), which plays a role in producing prostaglandins, chemicals involved in the inflammatory response.

Indomethacin is available in various forms, such as capsules, suppositories, and injectable solutions, and is used to treat a wide range of conditions, including rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, gout, and bursitis. It may also be used to relieve pain and reduce fever in other conditions, such as dental procedures or after surgery.

Like all NSAIDs, indomethacin can have side effects, including stomach ulcers, bleeding, and kidney damage, especially when taken at high doses or for long periods of time. It may also increase the risk of heart attack and stroke. Therefore, it is important to use indomethacin only as directed by a healthcare provider and to report any unusual symptoms or side effects promptly.

Myocardial contraction refers to the rhythmic and forceful shortening of heart muscle cells (myocytes) in the myocardium, which is the muscular wall of the heart. This process is initiated by electrical signals generated by the sinoatrial node, causing a wave of depolarization that spreads throughout the heart.

During myocardial contraction, calcium ions flow into the myocytes, triggering the interaction between actin and myosin filaments, which are the contractile proteins in the muscle cells. This interaction causes the myofilaments to slide past each other, resulting in the shortening of the sarcomeres (the functional units of muscle contraction) and ultimately leading to the contraction of the heart muscle.

Myocardial contraction is essential for pumping blood throughout the body and maintaining adequate circulation to vital organs. Any impairment in myocardial contractility can lead to various cardiac disorders, such as heart failure, cardiomyopathy, and arrhythmias.

Catecholamines are a group of hormones and neurotransmitters that are derived from the amino acid tyrosine. The most well-known catecholamines are dopamine, norepinephrine (also known as noradrenaline), and epinephrine (also known as adrenaline). These hormones are produced by the adrenal glands and are released into the bloodstream in response to stress. They play important roles in the "fight or flight" response, increasing heart rate, blood pressure, and alertness. In addition to their role as hormones, catecholamines also function as neurotransmitters, transmitting signals in the nervous system. Disorders of catecholamine regulation can lead to a variety of medical conditions, including hypertension, mood disorders, and neurological disorders.

Methylene Blue is a heterocyclic aromatic organic compound with the molecular formula C16H18ClN3S. It is primarily used as a medication, but can also be used as a dye or as a chemical reagent. As a medication, it is used in the treatment of methemoglobinemia (a condition where an abnormal amount of methemoglobin is present in the blood), as well as in some forms of poisoning and infections. It works by acting as a reducing agent, converting methemoglobin back to hemoglobin, which is the form of the protein that is responsible for carrying oxygen in the blood. Methylene Blue has also been used off-label for other conditions, such as vasculitis and Alzheimer's disease, although its effectiveness for these uses is not well established.

It is important to note that Methylene Blue should be used with caution, as it can cause serious side effects in some people, particularly those with kidney or liver problems, or those who are taking certain medications. It is also important to follow the instructions of a healthcare provider when using this medication, as improper use can lead to toxicity.

Ganglionic blockers are a type of medication that blocks the activity of the ganglia, which are clusters of nerve cells located outside the central nervous system. These medications work by blocking the transmission of nerve impulses between the ganglia and the effector organs they innervate, such as muscles or glands.

Ganglionic blockers were once used in the treatment of various conditions, including hypertension (high blood pressure), peptic ulcers, and certain types of pain. However, their use has largely been abandoned due to their significant side effects, which can include dry mouth, blurred vision, constipation, difficulty urinating, and dizziness or lightheadedness upon standing.

There are two main types of ganglionic blockers: nicotinic and muscarinic. Nicotinic ganglionic blockers block the action of acetylcholine at nicotinic receptors in the ganglia, while muscarinic ganglionic blockers block the action of acetylcholine at muscarinic receptors in the ganglia.

Examples of ganglionic blockers include trimethaphan, hexamethonium, and pentolinium. These medications are typically administered intravenously in a hospital setting due to their short duration of action and potential for serious side effects.

Phosphorylase a is an enzyme that plays a crucial role in the breakdown and metabolism of glycogen, a complex carbohydrate stored primarily in the liver and muscles. It is a phosphorylated form of the enzyme glycogen phosphorylase, which is activated by the addition of a phosphate group.

Phosphorylase a catalyzes the rate-limiting step in glycogenolysis, the process of breaking down glycogen into glucose-1-phosphate, which can then be converted into glucose and used for energy production. The activation of phosphorylase a is mediated by hormones such as adrenaline (epinephrine) and glucagon, which stimulate the enzyme phosphorylase kinase to add a phosphate group to inactive phosphorylase b, converting it to active phosphorylase a.

Phosphorylase a is composed of two identical subunits, each containing a catalytic site and a regulatory site that binds to ATP, glucose, and other molecules. The enzyme's activity is regulated by several factors, including the concentration of glucose, the presence of calcium ions, and the phosphorylation state of the enzyme.

In summary, Phosphorylase a is a key enzyme in glycogen metabolism that catalyzes the breakdown of glycogen into glucose-1-phosphate, providing energy for the body's cells. Its activity is regulated by hormones and other factors, making it an important component of the body's energy homeostasis.

Trimethaphan is a ganglionic blocker drug that is used primarily in the treatment of hypertensive emergencies. It works by blocking the transmission of nerve impulses at the ganglionic synapse, leading to decreased sympathetic and parasympathetic tone. This results in a decrease in peripheral vascular resistance, heart rate, and blood pressure.

Trimethaphan is administered intravenously and its effects are rapid in onset but also short-lived, typically lasting only 5-10 minutes after discontinuation of the infusion. It is therefore necessary to continuously monitor blood pressure during administration and adjust the dose as needed to maintain a stable blood pressure.

Common side effects of trimethaphan include flushing, diaphoresis, dizziness, headache, and blurred vision. More serious side effects can include bronchospasm, myocardial ischemia, and anaphylaxis. Trimethaphan should be used with caution in patients with preexisting respiratory or cardiovascular disease.

Xylazine is a central alpha-2 adrenergic agonist, often used in veterinary medicine as a sedative and analgesic. It can produce profound sedation, muscle relaxation, and analgesia. Xylazine is not approved for use in humans in many countries, including the United States, due to its potential for severe side effects such as respiratory depression, bradycardia (slow heart rate), and hypotension (low blood pressure).

Adrenergic antagonists, also known as beta blockers or sympatholytic drugs, are a class of medications that block the effects of adrenaline and noradrenaline (also known as epinephrine and norepinephrine) on the body. These neurotransmitters are part of the sympathetic nervous system and play a role in the "fight or flight" response, increasing heart rate, blood pressure, and respiratory rate.

Adrenergic antagonists work by binding to beta-adrenergic receptors in the body, preventing the neurotransmitters from activating them. This results in a decrease in heart rate, blood pressure, and respiratory rate. These medications are used to treat various conditions such as hypertension, angina, heart failure, arrhythmias, glaucoma, and anxiety disorders.

There are two types of adrenergic antagonists: beta blockers and alpha blockers. Beta blockers selectively bind to beta-adrenergic receptors, while alpha blockers bind to alpha-adrenergic receptors. Some medications, such as labetalol, have both beta and alpha blocking properties.

It is important to note that adrenergic antagonists can interact with other medications and may cause side effects, so it is essential to use them under the guidance of a healthcare professional.

The vagus nerve, also known as the 10th cranial nerve (CN X), is the longest of the cranial nerves and extends from the brainstem to the abdomen. It has both sensory and motor functions and plays a crucial role in regulating various bodily functions such as heart rate, digestion, respiratory rate, speech, and sweating, among others.

The vagus nerve is responsible for carrying sensory information from the internal organs to the brain, and it also sends motor signals from the brain to the muscles of the throat and voice box, as well as to the heart, lungs, and digestive tract. The vagus nerve helps regulate the body's involuntary responses, such as controlling heart rate and blood pressure, promoting relaxation, and reducing inflammation.

Dysfunction in the vagus nerve can lead to various medical conditions, including gastroparesis, chronic pain, and autonomic nervous system disorders. Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is a therapeutic intervention that involves delivering electrical impulses to the vagus nerve to treat conditions such as epilepsy, depression, and migraine headaches.

Isometric contraction is a type of muscle activation where the muscle contracts without any change in the length of the muscle or movement at the joint. This occurs when the force generated by the muscle matches the external force opposing it, resulting in a balanced state with no visible movement. It is commonly experienced during activities such as holding a heavy object in static position or trying to push against an immovable object. Isometric contractions are important in maintaining posture and providing stability to joints.

Nasal decongestants are medications that are used to relieve nasal congestion, or a "stuffy nose," by narrowing the blood vessels in the lining of the nose, which helps to reduce swelling and inflammation. This can help to make breathing easier and can also help to alleviate other symptoms associated with nasal congestion, such as sinus pressure and headache.

There are several different types of nasal decongestants available, including over-the-counter (OTC) and prescription options. Some common OTC nasal decongestants include pseudoephedrine (Sudafed) and phenylephrine (Neo-Synephrine), which are available in the form of tablets, capsules, liquids, and nasal sprays. Prescription nasal decongestants may be stronger than OTC options and may be prescribed for longer periods of time.

It is important to follow the instructions on the label when using nasal decongestants, as they can have side effects if not used properly. Some potential side effects of nasal decongestants include increased heart rate, blood pressure, and anxiety. It is also important to note that nasal decongestants should not be used for longer than a few days at a time, as prolonged use can actually make nasal congestion worse (this is known as "rebound congestion"). If you have any questions about using nasal decongestants or if your symptoms persist, it is best to speak with a healthcare provider.

A reflex is an automatic, involuntary and rapid response to a stimulus that occurs without conscious intention. In the context of physiology and neurology, it's a basic mechanism that involves the transmission of nerve impulses between neurons, resulting in a muscle contraction or glandular secretion.

Reflexes are important for maintaining homeostasis, protecting the body from harm, and coordinating movements. They can be tested clinically to assess the integrity of the nervous system, such as the knee-j jerk reflex, which tests the function of the L3-L4 spinal nerve roots and the sensitivity of the stretch reflex arc.

Electric stimulation, also known as electrical nerve stimulation or neuromuscular electrical stimulation, is a therapeutic treatment that uses low-voltage electrical currents to stimulate nerves and muscles. It is often used to help manage pain, promote healing, and improve muscle strength and mobility. The electrical impulses can be delivered through electrodes placed on the skin or directly implanted into the body.

In a medical context, electric stimulation may be used for various purposes such as:

1. Pain management: Electric stimulation can help to block pain signals from reaching the brain and promote the release of endorphins, which are natural painkillers produced by the body.
2. Muscle rehabilitation: Electric stimulation can help to strengthen muscles that have become weak due to injury, illness, or surgery. It can also help to prevent muscle atrophy and improve range of motion.
3. Wound healing: Electric stimulation can promote tissue growth and help to speed up the healing process in wounds, ulcers, and other types of injuries.
4. Urinary incontinence: Electric stimulation can be used to strengthen the muscles that control urination and reduce symptoms of urinary incontinence.
5. Migraine prevention: Electric stimulation can be used as a preventive treatment for migraines by applying electrical impulses to specific nerves in the head and neck.

It is important to note that electric stimulation should only be administered under the guidance of a qualified healthcare professional, as improper use can cause harm or discomfort.

Glucagon is a hormone produced by the alpha cells of the pancreas. Its main function is to regulate glucose levels in the blood by stimulating the liver to convert stored glycogen into glucose, which can then be released into the bloodstream. This process helps to raise blood sugar levels when they are too low, such as during hypoglycemia.

Glucagon is a 29-amino acid polypeptide that is derived from the preproglucagon protein. It works by binding to glucagon receptors on liver cells, which triggers a series of intracellular signaling events that lead to the activation of enzymes involved in glycogen breakdown.

In addition to its role in glucose regulation, glucagon has also been shown to have other physiological effects, such as promoting lipolysis (the breakdown of fat) and inhibiting gastric acid secretion. Glucagon is often used clinically in the treatment of hypoglycemia, as well as in diagnostic tests to assess pancreatic function.

Cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) is a important second messenger molecule that plays a crucial role in various biological processes within the human body. It is synthesized from guanosine triphosphate (GTP) by the enzyme guanylyl cyclase.

Cyclic GMP is involved in regulating diverse physiological functions, such as smooth muscle relaxation, cardiovascular function, and neurotransmission. It also plays a role in modulating immune responses and cellular growth and differentiation.

In the medical field, changes in cGMP levels or dysregulation of cGMP-dependent pathways have been implicated in various disease states, including pulmonary hypertension, heart failure, erectile dysfunction, and glaucoma. Therefore, pharmacological agents that target cGMP signaling are being developed as potential therapeutic options for these conditions.

A drug interaction is the effect of combining two or more drugs, or a drug and another substance (such as food or alcohol), which can alter the effectiveness or side effects of one or both of the substances. These interactions can be categorized as follows:

1. Pharmacodynamic interactions: These occur when two or more drugs act on the same target organ or receptor, leading to an additive, synergistic, or antagonistic effect. For example, taking a sedative and an antihistamine together can result in increased drowsiness due to their combined depressant effects on the central nervous system.
2. Pharmacokinetic interactions: These occur when one drug affects the absorption, distribution, metabolism, or excretion of another drug. For example, taking certain antibiotics with grapefruit juice can increase the concentration of the antibiotic in the bloodstream, leading to potential toxicity.
3. Food-drug interactions: Some drugs may interact with specific foods, affecting their absorption, metabolism, or excretion. An example is the interaction between warfarin (a blood thinner) and green leafy vegetables, which can increase the risk of bleeding due to enhanced vitamin K absorption from the vegetables.
4. Drug-herb interactions: Some herbal supplements may interact with medications, leading to altered drug levels or increased side effects. For instance, St. John's Wort can decrease the effectiveness of certain antidepressants and oral contraceptives by inducing their metabolism.
5. Drug-alcohol interactions: Alcohol can interact with various medications, causing additive sedative effects, impaired judgment, or increased risk of liver damage. For example, combining alcohol with benzodiazepines or opioids can lead to dangerous levels of sedation and respiratory depression.

It is essential for healthcare providers and patients to be aware of potential drug interactions to minimize adverse effects and optimize treatment outcomes.

The vasomotor system is a part of the autonomic nervous system that controls the diameter of blood vessels, particularly the smooth muscle in the walls of arterioles and precapillary sphincters. It regulates blood flow to different parts of the body by constricting or dilating these vessels. The vasomotor center located in the medulla oblongata of the brainstem controls the system, receiving input from various sensory receptors and modulating the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems' activity. Vasoconstriction decreases blood flow, while vasodilation increases it.

Liver glycogen is the reserve form of glucose stored in hepatocytes (liver cells) for the maintenance of normal blood sugar levels. It is a polysaccharide, a complex carbohydrate, that is broken down into glucose molecules when blood glucose levels are low. This process helps to maintain the body's energy needs between meals and during periods of fasting or exercise. The amount of glycogen stored in the liver can vary depending on factors such as meal consumption, activity level, and insulin regulation.

Azepines are heterocyclic chemical compounds that contain a seven-membered ring with one nitrogen atom and six carbon atoms. The term "azepine" refers to the basic structure, and various substituted azepines exist with different functional groups attached to the carbon and nitrogen atoms.

Azepines are not typically used in medical contexts as a therapeutic agent or a target for drug design. However, some azepine derivatives have been investigated for their potential biological activities, such as anti-inflammatory, antiviral, and anticancer properties. These compounds may be the subject of ongoing research, but they are not yet established as medical treatments.

It's worth noting that while azepines themselves are not a medical term, some of their derivatives or analogs may have medical relevance. Therefore, it is essential to consult medical literature and databases for accurate and up-to-date information on the medical use of specific azepine compounds.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "autonomic agents" is not a medical term or concept that has a specific definition in the field of medicine. The term "autonomic" refers to the part of the nervous system that regulates involuntary physiological functions, such as heart rate, digestion, and respiratory rate. The term "agents," on the other hand, is often used in computer science and artificial intelligence to refer to software entities that can act on behalf of a user or another entity.

Therefore, "autonomic agents" might refer to software programs that are designed to regulate physiological functions autonomously, but this would be more related to the field of biomedical engineering or artificial intelligence than to medicine itself. If you have more context or information about where you encountered this term, I may be able to provide a more specific answer.

Nifedipine is an antihypertensive and calcium channel blocker medication. It works by relaxing the muscles of the blood vessels, which helps to lower blood pressure and improve the supply of oxygen and nutrients to the heart. Nifedipine is used to treat high blood pressure (hypertension), angina (chest pain), and certain types of heart rhythm disorders.

In medical terms, nifedipine can be defined as: "A dihydropyridine calcium channel blocker that is used in the treatment of hypertension, angina pectoris, and Raynaud's phenomenon. It works by inhibiting the influx of calcium ions into vascular smooth muscle and cardiac muscle, which results in relaxation of the vascular smooth muscle and decreased workload on the heart."

Synephrine is an alkaloid compound that naturally occurs in some plants, such as bitter orange (Citrus aurantium). It is similar in structure to ephedrine and is often used as a dietary supplement for weight loss, as a stimulant, and to treat low blood pressure. Synephrine acts on the adrenergic receptors, particularly the α1-adrenergic receptor, leading to vasoconstriction and increased blood pressure. It also has mild stimulatory effects on the central nervous system.

It is important to note that synephrine can have potential side effects, including increased heart rate, elevated blood pressure, and interactions with other medications. Its use should be under the guidance of a healthcare professional.

Hypertension is a medical term used to describe abnormally high blood pressure in the arteries, often defined as consistently having systolic blood pressure (the top number in a blood pressure reading) over 130 mmHg and/or diastolic blood pressure (the bottom number) over 80 mmHg. It is also commonly referred to as high blood pressure.

Hypertension can be classified into two types: primary or essential hypertension, which has no identifiable cause and accounts for about 95% of cases, and secondary hypertension, which is caused by underlying medical conditions such as kidney disease, hormonal disorders, or use of certain medications.

If left untreated, hypertension can lead to serious health complications such as heart attack, stroke, heart failure, and chronic kidney disease. Therefore, it is important for individuals with hypertension to manage their condition through lifestyle modifications (such as healthy diet, regular exercise, stress management) and medication if necessary, under the guidance of a healthcare professional.

Deoxyepinephrine is not a recognized or established medical term or concept in the field of pharmacology, physiology, or clinical medicine. It appears to be a variation or misspelling of "deoxyepinephrines," which refers to a group of biogenic amines that are structurally related to catecholamines (such as epinephrine and norepinephrine) but lack a hydroxyl group (-OH) in the beta-carbon position of their side chain.

Deoxyepinephrines have been studied in laboratory settings for their potential roles in various physiological processes, such as neurotransmission and vasoconstriction, but they are not commonly used or discussed in clinical contexts. Therefore, there is no established medical definition for "deoxyepinephrine" as a standalone term.

SHR (Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats) are an inbred strain of rats that were originally developed through selective breeding for high blood pressure. They are widely used as a model to study hypertension and related cardiovascular diseases, as well as neurological disorders such as stroke and dementia.

Inbred strains of animals are created by mating genetically identical individuals (siblings or offspring) for many generations, resulting in a population that is highly homozygous at all genetic loci. This means that the animals within an inbred strain are essentially genetically identical to one another, which makes them useful for studying the effects of specific genes or environmental factors on disease processes.

SHR rats develop high blood pressure spontaneously, without any experimental manipulation, and show many features of human hypertension, such as increased vascular resistance, left ventricular hypertrophy, and renal dysfunction. They also exhibit a number of behavioral abnormalities, including hyperactivity, impulsivity, and cognitive deficits, which make them useful for studying the neurological consequences of hypertension and other cardiovascular diseases.

Overall, inbred SHR rats are an important tool in biomedical research, providing a valuable model for understanding the genetic and environmental factors that contribute to hypertension and related disorders.

Cardiac myocytes are the muscle cells that make up the heart muscle, also known as the myocardium. These specialized cells are responsible for contracting and relaxing in a coordinated manner to pump blood throughout the body. They differ from skeletal muscle cells in several ways, including their ability to generate their own electrical impulses, which allows the heart to function as an independent rhythmical pump. Cardiac myocytes contain sarcomeres, the contractile units of the muscle, and are connected to each other by intercalated discs that help coordinate contraction and ensure the synchronous beating of the heart.

Nitroglycerin, also known as glyceryl trinitrate, is a medication used primarily for the treatment of angina pectoris (chest pain due to coronary artery disease) and hypertensive emergencies (severe high blood pressure). It belongs to a class of drugs called nitrates or organic nitrites.

Nitroglycerin works by relaxing and dilating the smooth muscle in blood vessels, which leads to decreased workload on the heart and increased oxygen delivery to the myocardium (heart muscle). This results in reduced symptoms of angina and improved cardiac function during hypertensive emergencies.

The drug is available in various forms, including sublingual tablets, sprays, transdermal patches, ointments, and intravenous solutions. The choice of formulation depends on the specific clinical situation and patient needs. Common side effects of nitroglycerin include headache, dizziness, and hypotension (low blood pressure).

I must clarify that the term "Guinea Pigs" is not typically used in medical definitions. However, in colloquial or informal language, it may refer to people who are used as the first to try out a new medical treatment or drug. This is known as being a "test subject" or "in a clinical trial."

In the field of scientific research, particularly in studies involving animals, guinea pigs are small rodents that are often used as experimental subjects due to their size, cost-effectiveness, and ease of handling. They are not actually pigs from Guinea, despite their name's origins being unclear. However, they do not exactly fit the description of being used in human medical experiments.

Sympatholytics are a class of drugs that block the action of the sympathetic nervous system, which is the part of the autonomic nervous system responsible for preparing the body for the "fight or flight" response. Sympatholytics achieve this effect by binding to and blocking alpha-adrenergic receptors or beta-adrenergic receptors located in various organs throughout the body, including the heart, blood vessels, lungs, gastrointestinal tract, and urinary system.

Examples of sympatholytic drugs include:

* Alpha blockers (e.g., prazosin, doxazosin)
* Beta blockers (e.g., propranolol, metoprolol)
* Centrally acting sympatholytics (e.g., clonidine, methyldopa)

Sympatholytics are used to treat a variety of medical conditions, including hypertension, angina, heart failure, arrhythmias, and certain neurological disorders. They may also be used to manage symptoms associated with anxiety or withdrawal from alcohol or other substances.

"Cells, cultured" is a medical term that refers to cells that have been removed from an organism and grown in controlled laboratory conditions outside of the body. This process is called cell culture and it allows scientists to study cells in a more controlled and accessible environment than they would have inside the body. Cultured cells can be derived from a variety of sources, including tissues, organs, or fluids from humans, animals, or cell lines that have been previously established in the laboratory.

Cell culture involves several steps, including isolation of the cells from the tissue, purification and characterization of the cells, and maintenance of the cells in appropriate growth conditions. The cells are typically grown in specialized media that contain nutrients, growth factors, and other components necessary for their survival and proliferation. Cultured cells can be used for a variety of purposes, including basic research, drug development and testing, and production of biological products such as vaccines and gene therapies.

It is important to note that cultured cells may behave differently than they do in the body, and results obtained from cell culture studies may not always translate directly to human physiology or disease. Therefore, it is essential to validate findings from cell culture experiments using additional models and ultimately in clinical trials involving human subjects.

Ophthalmic solutions are sterile, single-use or multi-dose preparations in a liquid form that are intended for topical administration to the eye. These solutions can contain various types of medications, such as antibiotics, anti-inflammatory agents, antihistamines, or lubricants, which are used to treat or prevent ocular diseases and conditions.

The pH and osmolarity of ophthalmic solutions are carefully controlled to match the physiological environment of the eye and minimize any potential discomfort or irritation. The solutions may be packaged in various forms, including drops, sprays, or irrigations, depending on the intended use and administration route.

It is important to follow the instructions for use provided by a healthcare professional when administering ophthalmic solutions, as improper use can lead to eye injury or reduced effectiveness of the medication.

Omega-N-Methylarginine (also known as NG, NG-dimethyl-L-arginine) is not a commonly used medical term and it's not a well-known compound in medicine. However, it is a form of methylated arginine that can be found in the body.

Methylated arginines are a group of compounds that are generated through the post-translational modification of proteins by enzymes called protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs). These modifications play important roles in various cellular processes, including gene expression and signal transduction.

Omega-N-Methylarginine is a specific type of methylated arginine that has two methyl groups attached to the nitrogen atom at the end of the side chain (omega position) of the amino acid arginine. It can be formed by the action of PRMTs on proteins, and it may have various biological functions in the body. However, its specific medical significance is not well-established, and more research is needed to fully understand its role in health and disease.

Moxisylyte is a muscle relaxant that is primarily used in the form of a topical cream or ointment to help relieve pain and discomfort associated with minor strains, sprains, and bruises. It works by blocking the signals that are sent from the nerves to the brain, which can help to reduce the sensation of pain. Moxisylyte is also known as a vasodilator, meaning that it causes the blood vessels to widen, which can improve blood flow and help to promote healing in the affected area. It is important to note that moxisylyte is not typically used as an oral medication, and it should only be used under the guidance of a healthcare professional.

Protein Kinase C (PKC) is a family of serine-threonine kinases that play crucial roles in various cellular signaling pathways. These enzymes are activated by second messengers such as diacylglycerol (DAG) and calcium ions (Ca2+), which result from the activation of cell surface receptors like G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs).

Once activated, PKC proteins phosphorylate downstream target proteins, thereby modulating their activities. This regulation is involved in numerous cellular processes, including cell growth, differentiation, apoptosis, and membrane trafficking. There are at least 10 isoforms of PKC, classified into three subfamilies based on their second messenger requirements and structural features: conventional (cPKC; α, βI, βII, and γ), novel (nPKC; δ, ε, η, and θ), and atypical (aPKC; ζ and ι/λ). Dysregulation of PKC signaling has been implicated in several diseases, such as cancer, diabetes, and neurological disorders.

WKY (Wistar Kyoto) is not a term that refers to "rats, inbred" in a medical definition. Instead, it is a strain of laboratory rat that is widely used in biomedical research. WKY rats are an inbred strain, which means they are the result of many generations of brother-sister matings, resulting in a genetically uniform population.

WKY rats originated from the Wistar Institute in Philadelphia and were established as a normotensive control strain to contrast with other rat strains that exhibit hypertension. They have since been used in various research areas, including cardiovascular, neurological, and behavioral studies. Compared to other commonly used rat strains like the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR), WKY rats are known for their lower blood pressure, reduced stress response, and greater emotionality.

In summary, "WKY" is a designation for an inbred strain of laboratory rat that is often used as a control group in biomedical research due to its normotensive characteristics.

Methacholine compounds are medications that are used as a diagnostic tool to help identify and confirm the presence of airway hyperresponsiveness in patients with respiratory symptoms such as cough, wheeze, or shortness of breath. These compounds act as bronchoconstrictors, causing narrowing of the airways in individuals who have heightened sensitivity and reactivity of their airways, such as those with asthma.

Methacholine is a synthetic derivative of acetylcholine, a neurotransmitter that mediates nerve impulse transmission in the body. When inhaled, methacholine binds to muscarinic receptors on the smooth muscle surrounding the airways, leading to their contraction and narrowing. The degree of bronchoconstriction is then measured to assess the patient's airway responsiveness.

It is important to note that methacholine compounds are not used as therapeutic agents but rather as diagnostic tools in a controlled medical setting under the supervision of healthcare professionals.

In medical terms, the iris refers to the colored portion of the eye that surrounds the pupil. It is a circular structure composed of thin, contractile muscle fibers (radial and circumferential) arranged in a regular pattern. These muscles are controlled by the autonomic nervous system and can adjust the size of the pupil in response to changes in light intensity or emotional arousal. By constricting or dilating the iris, the amount of light entering the eye can be regulated, which helps maintain optimal visual acuity under various lighting conditions.

The color of the iris is determined by the concentration and distribution of melanin pigments within the iris stroma. The iris also contains blood vessels, nerves, and connective tissue that support its structure and function. Anatomically, the iris is continuous with the ciliary body and the choroid, forming part of the uveal tract in the eye.

Etilefrine is a synthetic, sympathomimetic amine drug that acts as a direct-acting adrenergic agonist. It primarily stimulates alpha-1 and beta-1 adrenergic receptors, leading to increased heart rate, cardiac contractility, and blood pressure. Etilefrine is used clinically as a vasopressor agent to treat hypotension (low blood pressure) in certain conditions, such as shock or during surgical procedures. It should be administered under the supervision of a healthcare professional due to its potential serious side effects, including cardiac arrhythmias and hypertension.

Phosphorylases are enzymes that catalyze the phosphorolytic cleavage of a bond, often a glycosidic bond, in a carbohydrate molecule, releasing a sugar moiety and a phosphate group. This reaction is important in metabolic pathways such as glycogenolysis, where glycogen is broken down into glucose-1-phosphate by the action of glycogen phosphorylase. The resulting glucose-1-phosphate can then be further metabolized to produce energy. Phosphorylases are widely found in nature and play a crucial role in various biological processes, including energy metabolism and signal transduction.

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This includes oxymetazoline (e.g., Afrin), phenylephrine (e.g., Neo-Synephrine), naphazoline (e.g., Privine), and l- ...
Adrenergic decongestants, e.g. phenylephrine. Combined use with atropine increases the risk of severe hypertension. Alzheimer's ...
Decongestants like ephedrine and phenylephrine. These medications tighten the bladder neck muscles and prevent semen from going ...
α1 selective: phenylephrine, methoxamine, midodrine, oxymetazoline. α2 selective: α-methyldopa, clonidine, brimonidine, ...
Stimulants phenylephrine and pseudoephedrine aren't banned. The most common abused stimulant by athletes is amphetamine. ...
Common decongestants include pseudoephedrine and phenylephrine. Pseudoephedrine is an alpha-adrenergic receptor agonist that ...
Vasopressors used include phenylephrine, dopamine, or norepinephrine. Mean arterial blood pressure is measured and kept at 85 ...
The effectiveness of phenylephrine by mouth as a nasal decongestant is questionable. Gee's Linctus is a cough medicine which ... Examples are ephedrine, phenylephrine, pseudoephedrine, and oxymetazoline. Fever or pain medication. Examples are paracetamol ( ...
Other examples include phenylephrine, isoproterenol, and dobutamine. Stimulation of the D1 receptor by dopaminergic agonists ...
Adrenergic agonists, such as phenylephrine and cyclomydril. Adrenergic agonists may be used if strong mydriasis is needed in ... the role of combined therapy using phenylephrine and ketorolac". Patient Preference and Adherence. 10: 1795-1801. doi:10.2147/ ...
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Phenylephrine Ganellin CR, Triggle DJ (21 November 1996). Dictionary of Pharmacological Agents. CRC Press. pp. 615-. ISBN 978-0 ...
Hatton RC, Winterstein AG, McKelvey RP, Shuster J, Hendeles L (March 2007). "Efficacy and safety of oral phenylephrine: ... February 2009). "A placebo-controlled study of the nasal decongestant effect of phenylephrine and pseudoephedrine in the Vienna ... Eccles R (January 2007). "Substitution of phenylephrine for pseudoephedrine as a nasal decongeststant. An illogical way to ... Theraflu (made by Novartis) - previously contained pseudoephedrine, now contains phenylephrine. Unifed (made by United ...
Ephedrine and phenylephrine, as amine hydrochlorides, are used as decongestants. Amphetamine, methamphetamine, and ...
Oct 2007). "Phenylephrine-induced microvascular occlusion syndrome in a patient with a heterozygous factor V Leiden mutation". ... It has been suggested that phenylephrine may be a cause. Jean L. Bolognia; Joseph L. Jorizzo; Ronald P. Rapini (27 August 2003 ...
"Α1A-Adrenoceptors mediate contractions to phenylephrine in rabbit penile arteries". British Journal of Pharmacology. 150 (1): ...
Atalik KE, Sahin AS, Doğan N (April 2000). "Interactions between phenylephrine, clonidine and xylazine in rat and rabbit aortas ... Methoxamine Midodrine Metaraminol Phenylephrine Amidephrine Sdz-nvi-085 [104195-17-7]. α2 agonist: inhibits adenylyl cyclase ... "The alpha 1-agonist phenylephrine inhibits voltage-gated Ca2(+)-channels in vascular smooth muscle cells of rabbit ear artery ...
... knockout mice exhibited blunted MAP response to phenylephrine administration. There is a large collection of in ... Matrix metalloproteinase-2 proteolysis of calponin 1 resulted in vascular hypocontractility to phenylephrine. Vas deferens ...
As a pharmaceutical, m-synephrine (phenylephrine) is still used as a sympathomimetic (i.e. for its hypertensive and ... Although there are chemical and pharmacological similarities between synephrine and phenylephrine, they are nevertheless ... while phenylephrine has also been called m-Sympatol. The synephrine with which this article deals is sometimes referred to as p ... or with phenylephrine, often with the implication that the perceived similarities in structure should result in similarities in ...
Phenylephrine may be used in those with very low blood pressure. If untreated, severe symptomatic aortic stenosis carries a ... Nitroprusside or phenylephrine may be used in those with decompensated heart failure depending on the blood pressure. Aortic ...
It is no longer marketed.[why?] Sertraline Phenylephrine Synephrine Phentolamine Midodrine Pazdernik TL, Kerecsen L (2007) [ ...
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Other causes are side effects of topical decongestants such as oxymetazoline and phenylephrine. Both of these medications ...
Görnemann T, Villalón CM, Centurión D, Pertz HH (June 2009). "Phenylephrine contracts porcine pulmonary veins via alpha(1B)-, ...
Side effects of phenylephrine may include: high blood pressure, slow heart rate, and arrhythmia. If this medication is used, it ... If this is not sufficient, the corpus cavernosum may be irrigated with cold, normal saline or injected with phenylephrine. ... If aspiration is not sufficient, a small dose of phenylephrine may be injected into the corpus cavernosum. ...
Taylor JM, Rovin JD, Parsons JT (June 2000). "A role for focal adhesion kinase in phenylephrine-induced hypertrophy of rat ... Treatment of cardiomyocytes with the hypertrophic agonist, phenylephrine stimulated a rapid increase in tyrosine ...
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Vitamin D3 was what was studied.. Whats the difference between ordinary calcium with Vitamin D and calcium with Vitamin D3?. The calcium with Vitamin D contains D3 but its too low, in my opinion. If you buy an individual vitamin D product and it should say D3.. What brand should I buy?. Any brand that is reliable. Actually if it says USP (which stands for US Pharacopia) it has to have met its standards for potency and dissolution rate. Its like the Underwriters Laboratory approval so that would be OK. House brand vitamins from major stores are, in my experience, always OK as they have a reputation to stand by.. How much should I take each day?. I would recommend 1000 IU (international units) of D3. A bottle of 100 cost about $7 or $8.. Can I get Vitamin D through natural sources (i.e. sun, food)?. You can get it from the sun, but its very hard to get enough unless you live in the sun and play in the sun. And too much time in the sun can increase risk for skin cancer. Its best to get it ...
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  • Chlorpheniramine maleate 1 mg + Paracetamol 100 mg + Phenylephrine 2.5 mg is a combination medicine used to relieve symptoms associated with allergies, colds, flu, and sinus infections. (pharmanewstoday.com)
  • There have been clinical studies and trials that demonstrate the efficacy and safety of chlorpheniramine maleate, paracetamol, and phenylephrine in relieving cold and allergy symptoms. (pharmanewstoday.com)
  • By providing comprehensive information on the active ingredients, pharmacological properties, indications, dosage, side effects, drug interactions, patient counseling, and clinical evidence of Chlorpheniramine Maleate 1 mg + Paracetamol 100 mg + Phenylephrine 2.5 mg, this medication page aims to help users make informed decisions about their healthcare. (pharmanewstoday.com)
  • Aspirin, chlorpheniramine, dextromethorphan, and phenylephrine is a combination medicine used in adults and children at least 12 years old to temporarily relieve minor aches and pains, headaches, runny nose, sinus congestion and pressure, sneezing, sore throat, nasal congestion and fever caused by the common cold. (everydayhealth.com)
  • Aspirin, chlorpheniramine, dextromethorphan, and phenylephrine may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide. (everydayhealth.com)
  • You should not use aspirin, chlorpheniramine, dextromethorphan, and phenylephrine if you are allergic to it, or to any other pain reliever or fever reducer. (everydayhealth.com)
  • Do not use aspirin, chlorpheniramine, dextromethorphan, and phenylephrine if you have used an MAO inhibitor in the past 14 days. (everydayhealth.com)
  • Can I take Aspirin, Chlorpheniramine, Dextromethorphan, And Phenylephrine (Oral) if I'm pregnant or breastfeeding? (everydayhealth.com)
  • Use Aspirin, Chlorpheniramine, Dextromethorphan, And Phenylephrine (Oral) exactly as directed on the label, or as prescribed by your doctor. (everydayhealth.com)
  • Chlorpheniramine, dextromethorphan, and phenylephrine may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide. (health32.com)
  • Chlorpheniramine, dextromethorphan, and phenylephrine can cause side effects that may impair your thinking or reactions. (health32.com)
  • Chlorpheniramine, dextromethorphan, and phenylephrine can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. (health32.com)
  • For intravascular bolus administration, the investigators will prepare a solution containing 100 mcg/mL of phenylephrine hydrochloride, by withdrawing 10 mg (1ml of 10mg/mL) of phenylephrine injection and diluting with 99 mL of 5% dextrose injection or 0.9% sodium chloride injection. (veeva.com)
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  • Phenylephrine is a medication used as a decongestant for uncomplicated nasal congestion, used to dilate the pupil, used to increase blood pressure (given intravenously in cases of hypotension), and used to relieve hemorrhoids. (wikipedia.org)
  • Phenylephrine is used as an alternative to pseudoephedrine as a decongestant, whose availability has been restricted due to a potential for use in the illicit synthesis of methamphetamine. (wikipedia.org)
  • An FDA panel voted unanimously to withdraw the decongestant phenylephrine (PE) because it shows no benefit, something Sudafed PE users probably learned years ago. (acsh.org)
  • Phenylephrine, the mainstay in many OTC nasal decongestant preparations such as Dayquil and Sudafed, and some nasal sprays, was recently deemed by the FDA as "ineffective. (fhea.com)
  • Phenylephrine is a decongestant that shrinks blood vessels in the nasal passages. (health32.com)
  • Phenylephrine is a decongestant medication that narrows blood vessels to relieve symptoms of nasal congestion, stuffy nose, and allergic rhinitis by reducing inflammation and congestion in the nasal passages. (wyndly.com)
  • Phenylephrine is a decongestant that shrinks blood vessels in the nasal passages to reduce nasal congestion. (pharmanewstoday.com)
  • Two studies published in 2009, examined the effects of phenylephrine on symptoms of allergic rhinitis by exposing people to pollen in a controlled, indoor environment. (wikipedia.org)
  • Neither study was able to distinguish between the effects of phenylephrine or a placebo. (wikipedia.org)
  • isocarboxazid increases effects of phenylephrine by pharmacodynamic synergism. (medscape.com)
  • linezolid increases effects of phenylephrine by pharmacodynamic synergism. (medscape.com)
  • selegiline transdermal increases effects of phenylephrine by pharmacodynamic synergism. (medscape.com)
  • What are the possible side effects of phenylephrine? (wyndly.com)
  • Common side effects of phenylephrine may include increased heart rate, headache, nausea, and nervousness. (wyndly.com)
  • Sagent Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today announced the voluntary nationwide recall of three lots of Phenylephrine Hydrochloride Injection, USP (10 mg/mL). (fda.gov)
  • This product was manufactured by Indoco Remedies Ltd. and distributed by Sagent Pharmaceuticals, Inc. Sagent has initiated this voluntary recall of Phenylephrine Hydrochloride Injection, USP to the user level as the result of a customer complaint due to potentially loose crimped vial overseals. (fda.gov)
  • Phenylephrine Hydrochloride Injection, USP is an alpha-1 adrenergic receptor agonist indicated for the treatment of clinically important low blood pressure resulting primarily from the dilation of blood vessels, which decreases blood pressure in the setting of anesthesia. (fda.gov)
  • Healthcare workers who have medical questions about Phenylephrine Hydrochloride Injection, USP, may contact Medical Affairs (866-625-1618, Option 3) M-F, 8am-5pm CST. (fda.gov)
  • Phenylephrine is available as phenylephrine hydrochloride injection, 10 mg/mL in 1 mL vial. (veeva.com)
  • Unlike pseudoephedrine, abuse of phenylephrine is very uncommon. (wikipedia.org)
  • Pseudoephedrine and loratadine-montelukast therapy were found to be significantly more effective than both phenylephrine and placebo. (wikipedia.org)
  • tell your doctor and pharmacist if you are allergic to phenylephrine, any other medications, or any of the ingredients in phenylephrine nasal spray. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Phenylephrine is in a class of medications called nasal decongestants. (medlineplus.gov)
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  • A 2007 study by Wyeth Consumer Healthcare notes that 7 studies available in 1976 support the efficacy of phenylephrine at a 10 mg dosage. (wikipedia.org)
  • What is the recommended dosage of phenylephrine for children with allergies? (wyndly.com)
  • The dosage of phenylephrine for children with allergies should be determined by a doctor. (wyndly.com)
  • Phenylephrine can help relieve common allergy symptoms such as nasal congestion, stuffy or runny nose, and sinus pressure. (wyndly.com)
  • Sudafed PE Head Congestion + Pain also contains 10 mg of phenylephrine HCl to relieve sinus pressure and nasal congestion by reducing nasal passage swelling and restoring freer breathing through the nose. (metromarket.net)
  • Phenylephrine can be taken by mouth, given by injection into a vein or muscle, or applied to the skin. (wikipedia.org)
  • Phenylephrine has been used as an intracameral injection into the anterior chamber of the eye to arrest intraocular bleeding occurring during cataract and glaucoma surgery. (wikipedia.org)
  • If your doctor has told you to use phenylephrine regularly, use the missed dose as soon as you remember it. (medlineplus.gov)
  • The FDA however, does state that the OTC dose of phenylephrine is safe and for some people, there may be the benefit of relief of nasal congestion when combined with other ingredients. (fhea.com)
  • The predicted environmental concentration in the surface water (PEC surfacewater ) of PE (phenylephrine HCl ed. note) and KE (ketorolac trometanol ed. note) was calculated based on a dose of 49.5 mg and 17 mg, respectively, to be below the action limit of 0.01 μg/L. For this calculation, the Fpen was refined based on the estimated number cataract surgeries from a recent OECD analysis evaluating data for European countries in 2010. (janusinfo.se)
  • Changes in nasal flow resistance, induced by aerosols of histamine and phenylephrine hydrochloride, had little effect on the process. (cdc.gov)
  • Phenylephrine can be used topically to prevent symptoms of hemorrhoids. (wikipedia.org)
  • Phenylephrine nasal spray will relieve symptoms but will not treat the cause of the symptoms or speed recovery. (medlineplus.gov)
  • If your symptoms do not get better after 3 days of treatment, stop using phenylephrine and call your doctor. (medlineplus.gov)
  • What are the common allergy symptoms that phenylephrine can help relieve? (wyndly.com)
  • Phenylephrine is used for the temporary relief of stuffy nose, sinus, and ear symptoms caused by the common cold, flu, allergies, or other breathing illnesses (e.g., sinusitis, bronchitis). (hindustanpharma.net)
  • In this radio discussion, Lars Larson and I discuss the efficacy of over-the-counter cold and allergy medications, specifically those containing phenylephrine. (acsh.org)
  • The advisory is only for the oral preparation of phenylephrine and not the topical nasal sprays. (fhea.com)
  • Phenylephrine nasal spray is used to relieve nasal discomfort caused by colds, allergies, and hay fever. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Phenylephrine is a medicine that helps relieve nasal congestion caused by allergies, colds, or sinus problems by shrinking blood vessels in the nasal passages. (wyndly.com)
  • If you become pregnant while using phenylephrine nasal spray, call your doctor. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Phenylephrine eye drops are applied to the eye after a topical anesthetic is applied. (wikipedia.org)
  • With phenylephrine off pharmacy shelves, the ACSH advisor explores what this means. (acsh.org)
  • But the real story is why phenylephrine was on pharmacy shelves at all. (acsh.org)
  • It now remains to be seen if the FDA makes the decision to remove products containing phenylephrine from the shelves. (fhea.com)
  • The information about bioaccumulation for ketorolac comes from assessment report for Omidria (phenylephrine, ketorolac). (janusinfo.se)
  • By using phenylephrine during transesophageal echocardiography, the study intends to offset the hemodynamic variation that occurs with sedation and better assess the severity of mitral regurgitation, which would further assist in clinical decision-making regarding treatment. (veeva.com)
  • The goal of this study is to compare the severity of mitral regurgitation grade before and after the administration of phenylephrine during transesophageal echocardiography and to demonstrate a 25% increase in severity of mitral regurgitation grade compared to the baseline conditions, following the administration of phenylephrine. (veeva.com)
  • On the other hand, phenylephrine and noradrenaline can significantly raise both systolic (SP) and diastolic (DP) pressure. (bvsalud.org)
  • Phenylephrine comes as a 0.125%, 0.25%, 0.5%, and 1% solution (liquid) to spray into the nose. (medlineplus.gov)
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  • 39cm2) on baseline TEE evaluation will not be given phenylephrine and excluded from the study. (veeva.com)
  • however, the fact that GSK markets many products containing phenylephrine has raised some speculation regarding selective publishing and other controversial techniques. (wikipedia.org)
  • Phenylephrine is commonly used as a vasopressor to increase the blood pressure in unstable patients with hypotension, especially resulting from septic shock. (wikipedia.org)
  • Phenylephrine should not be used by individuals with high blood pressure, heart disease, or certain medical conditions. (wyndly.com)
  • What are the possible side effects of Ed A-Hist DM (Chlorpheniramine/Dextromethorp/Phenylephrine)? (health32.com)
  • Phenylephrine is used to increase systemic vascular resistance. (medscape.com)
  • In more severe episodes, additional pharmacologic interventions may include beta-blocker therapy to reduce right ventricular infundibular spasm and phenylephrine to increase systemic vascular resistance. (medscape.com)
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  • Phenylephrine works by constricting blood vessels in the nasal passages, reducing swelling and congestion to make breathing easier. (wyndly.com)
  • Phenylephrine was patented in 1927 and came into medical use in 1938. (wikipedia.org)
  • Are there any alternative treatments for allergies besides phenylephrine? (wyndly.com)
  • Phenylephrine causes the constriction of vascular smooth muscle and is often used in the treatment of hemorrhoids presumably to narrow the swollen veins and relieve the attendant pain. (wikipedia.org)
  • Can phenylephrine be used to treat other allergies besides nasal allergies? (wyndly.com)