Pharmacology: The study of the origin, nature, properties, and actions of drugs and their effects on living organisms.Pharmacology, Clinical: The branch of pharmacology that deals directly with the effectiveness and safety of drugs in humans.Drug Discovery: The process of finding chemicals for potential therapeutic use.International Agencies: International organizations which provide health-related or other cooperative services.Pharmacokinetics: Dynamic and kinetic mechanisms of exogenous chemical and DRUG LIBERATION; ABSORPTION; BIOLOGICAL TRANSPORT; TISSUE DISTRIBUTION; BIOTRANSFORMATION; elimination; and DRUG TOXICITY as a function of dosage, and rate of METABOLISM. LADMER, ADME and ADMET are abbreviations for liberation, absorption, distribution, metabolism, elimination, and toxicology.Pharmaceutical Preparations: Drugs intended for human or veterinary use, presented in their finished dosage form. Included here are materials used in the preparation and/or formulation of the finished dosage form.Dose-Response Relationship, Drug: The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.Receptors, G-Protein-Coupled: The largest family of cell surface receptors involved in SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION. They share a common structure and signal through HETEROTRIMERIC G-PROTEINS.Terminology as Topic: The terms, expressions, designations, or symbols used in a particular science, discipline, or specialized subject area.Ligands: A molecule that binds to another molecule, used especially to refer to a small molecule that binds specifically to a larger molecule, e.g., an antigen binding to an antibody, a hormone or neurotransmitter binding to a receptor, or a substrate or allosteric effector binding to an enzyme. Ligands are also molecules that donate or accept a pair of electrons to form a coordinate covalent bond with the central metal atom of a coordination complex. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Radioligand Assay: Quantitative determination of receptor (binding) proteins in body fluids or tissue using radioactively labeled binding reagents (e.g., antibodies, intracellular receptors, plasma binders).Societies, Pharmaceutical: Societies whose membership is limited to pharmacists.Drug Design: The molecular designing of drugs for specific purposes (such as DNA-binding, enzyme inhibition, anti-cancer efficacy, etc.) based on knowledge of molecular properties such as activity of functional groups, molecular geometry, and electronic structure, and also on information cataloged on analogous molecules. Drug design is generally computer-assisted molecular modeling and does not include pharmacokinetics, dosage analysis, or drug administration analysis.Therapeutics: Procedures concerned with the remedial treatment or prevention of diseases.Webcasts as Topic: Transmission of live or pre-recorded audio or video content via connection or download from the INTERNET.Education, Pharmacy, Continuing: Educational programs designed to inform graduate pharmacists of recent advances in their particular field.Drug Evaluation, Preclinical: Preclinical testing of drugs in experimental animals or in vitro for their biological and toxic effects and potential clinical applications.History, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.Psychopharmacology: The study of the effects of drugs on mental and behavioral activity.Pharmacy Administration: The business and managerial aspects of pharmacy in its broadest sense.Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions: Disorders that result from the intended use of PHARMACEUTICAL PREPARATIONS. Included in this heading are a broad variety of chemically-induced adverse conditions due to toxicity, DRUG INTERACTIONS, and metabolic effects of pharmaceuticals.Pharmacogenetics: A branch of genetics which deals with the genetic variability in individual responses to drugs and drug metabolism (BIOTRANSFORMATION).Psychology, Experimental: The branch of psychology which seeks to learn more about the fundamental causes of behavior by studying various psychologic phenomena in controlled experimental situations.Receptors, GABA: Cell-surface proteins that bind GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID with high affinity and trigger changes that influence the behavior of cells. GABA-A receptors control chloride channels formed by the receptor complex itself. They are blocked by bicuculline and usually have modulatory sites sensitive to benzodiazepines and barbiturates. GABA-B receptors act through G-proteins on several effector systems, are insensitive to bicuculline, and have a high affinity for L-baclofen.Neuropharmacology: The branch of pharmacology dealing especially with the action of drugs upon various parts of the nervous system.Receptors, GABA-A: Cell surface proteins which bind GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID and contain an integral membrane chloride channel. Each receptor is assembled as a pentamer from a pool of at least 19 different possible subunits. The receptors belong to a superfamily that share a common CYSTEINE loop.Binding, Competitive: The interaction of two or more substrates or ligands with the same binding site. The displacement of one by the other is used in quantitative and selective affinity measurements.CHO Cells: CELL LINE derived from the ovary of the Chinese hamster, Cricetulus griseus (CRICETULUS). The species is a favorite for cytogenetic studies because of its small chromosome number. The cell line has provided model systems for the study of genetic alterations in cultured mammalian cells.Drug Evaluation: Any process by which toxicity, metabolism, absorption, elimination, preferred route of administration, safe dosage range, etc., for a drug or group of drugs is determined through clinical assessment in humans or veterinary animals.Rats, Sprague-Dawley: A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.Education, Pharmacy: Formal instruction, learning, or training in the preparation, dispensing, and proper utilization of drugs in the field of medicine.Receptors, Nicotinic: One of the two major classes of cholinergic receptors. Nicotinic receptors were originally distinguished by their preference for NICOTINE over MUSCARINE. They are generally divided into muscle-type and neuronal-type (previously ganglionic) based on pharmacology, and subunit composition of the receptors.Receptors, Serotonin: Cell-surface proteins that bind SEROTONIN and trigger intracellular changes which influence the behavior of cells. Several types of serotonin receptors have been recognized which differ in their pharmacology, molecular biology, and mode of action.Education, Medical, Undergraduate: The period of medical education in a medical school. In the United States it follows the baccalaureate degree and precedes the granting of the M.D.Clinical Trials as Topic: Works about pre-planned studies of the safety, efficacy, or optimum dosage schedule (if appropriate) of one or more diagnostic, therapeutic, or prophylactic drugs, devices, or techniques selected according to predetermined criteria of eligibility and observed for predefined evidence of favorable and unfavorable effects. This concept includes clinical trials conducted both in the U.S. and in other countries.Benzodiazepines: A group of two-ring heterocyclic compounds consisting of a benzene ring fused to a diazepine ring.Structure-Activity Relationship: The relationship between the chemical structure of a compound and its biological or pharmacological activity. Compounds are often classed together because they have structural characteristics in common including shape, size, stereochemical arrangement, and distribution of functional groups.Problem-Based Learning: Instructional use of examples or cases to teach using problem-solving skills and critical thinking.Cardiovascular System: The HEART and the BLOOD VESSELS by which BLOOD is pumped and circulated through the body.Cricetinae: A subfamily in the family MURIDAE, comprising the hamsters. Four of the more common genera are Cricetus, CRICETULUS; MESOCRICETUS; and PHODOPUS.Curriculum: A course of study offered by an educational institution.Piperidines: A family of hexahydropyridines.Half-Life: The time it takes for a substance (drug, radioactive nuclide, or other) to lose half of its pharmacologic, physiologic, or radiologic activity.Molecular Structure: The location of the atoms, groups or ions relative to one another in a molecule, as well as the number, type and location of covalent bonds.Allergy and Immunology: A medical specialty concerned with the hypersensitivity of the individual to foreign substances and protection from the resultant infection or disorder.Cannabinoids: Compounds having the cannabinoid structure. They were originally extracted from Cannabis sativa L. The most pharmacologically active constituents are TETRAHYDROCANNABINOL; CANNABINOL; and CANNABIDIOL.Drug Interactions: The action of a drug that may affect the activity, metabolism, or toxicity of another drug.Education, Pharmacy, Graduate: Educational programs for pharmacists who have a bachelor's degree or a Doctor of Pharmacy degree entering a specific field of pharmacy. They may lead to an advanced degree.Patch-Clamp Techniques: An electrophysiologic technique for studying cells, cell membranes, and occasionally isolated organelles. All patch-clamp methods rely on a very high-resistance seal between a micropipette and a membrane; the seal is usually attained by gentle suction. The four most common variants include on-cell patch, inside-out patch, outside-out patch, and whole-cell clamp. Patch-clamp methods are commonly used to voltage clamp, that is control the voltage across the membrane and measure current flow, but current-clamp methods, in which the current is controlled and the voltage is measured, are also used.Pharmacological Processes: The metabolism of drugs and their mechanisms of action.Receptors, Drug: Proteins that bind specific drugs with high affinity and trigger intracellular changes influencing the behavior of cells. Drug receptors are generally thought to be receptors for some endogenous substance not otherwise specified.Allosteric Regulation: The modification of the reactivity of ENZYMES by the binding of effectors to sites (ALLOSTERIC SITES) on the enzymes other than the substrate BINDING SITES.Piperoxan: A benzodioxane alpha-adrenergic blocking agent with considerable stimulatory action. It has been used to diagnose PHEOCHROMOCYTOMA and as an antihypertensive agent.Teaching: The educational process of instructing.Analgesics, Opioid: Compounds with activity like OPIATE ALKALOIDS, acting at OPIOID RECEPTORS. Properties include induction of ANALGESIA or NARCOSIS.gamma-Aminobutyric Acid: The most common inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system.Antineoplastic Agents: Substances that inhibit or prevent the proliferation of NEOPLASMS.Guinea Pigs: A common name used for the genus Cavia. The most common species is Cavia porcellus which is the domesticated guinea pig used for pets and biomedical research.Toxicology: The science concerned with the detection, chemical composition, and biological action of toxic substances or poisons and the treatment and prevention of toxic manifestations.Drug Therapy: The use of DRUGS to treat a DISEASE or its symptoms. One example is the use of ANTINEOPLASTIC AGENTS to treat CANCER.Membrane Potentials: The voltage differences across a membrane. For cellular membranes they are computed by subtracting the voltage measured outside the membrane from the voltage measured inside the membrane. They result from differences of inside versus outside concentration of potassium, sodium, chloride, and other ions across cells' or ORGANELLES membranes. For excitable cells, the resting membrane potentials range between -30 and -100 millivolts. Physical, chemical, or electrical stimuli can make a membrane potential more negative (hyperpolarization), or less negative (depolarization).Neoplasms: New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.Pyridines: Compounds with a six membered aromatic ring containing NITROGEN. The saturated version is PIPERIDINES.Signal Transduction: The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.GABA Agonists: Endogenous compounds and drugs that bind to and activate GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID receptors (RECEPTORS, GABA).Neurons: The basic cellular units of nervous tissue. Each neuron consists of a body, an axon, and dendrites. Their purpose is to receive, conduct, and transmit impulses in the NERVOUS SYSTEM.Nobel PrizeIon Channel Gating: The opening and closing of ion channels due to a stimulus. The stimulus can be a change in membrane potential (voltage-gated), drugs or chemical transmitters (ligand-gated), or a mechanical deformation. Gating is thought to involve conformational changes of the ion channel which alters selective permeability.Mitragyna: A plant genus of the family RUBIACEAE. Members contain antimalarial (ANTIMALARIALS) and analgesic (ANALGESICS) indole alkaloids.Education, Professional: Formal education and training in preparation for the practice of a profession.Prostaglandins I: A class of cyclic prostaglandins that contain the 6,9-epoxy bond. Endogenous members of this family are biosynthesized enzymatically from PROSTAGLANDIN ENDOPEROXIDES.Kinetics: The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.Injections, Intravenous: Injections made into a vein for therapeutic or experimental purposes.Administration, Oral: The giving of drugs, chemicals, or other substances by mouth.Electrophysiology: The study of the generation and behavior of electrical charges in living organisms particularly the nervous system and the effects of electricity on living organisms.Nicotinic Antagonists: Drugs that bind to nicotinic cholinergic receptors (RECEPTORS, NICOTINIC) and block the actions of acetylcholine or cholinergic agonists. Nicotinic antagonists block synaptic transmission at autonomic ganglia, the skeletal neuromuscular junction, and at central nervous system nicotinic synapses.Receptors, Histamine H3: A class of histamine receptors discriminated by their pharmacology and mode of action. Histamine H3 receptors were first recognized as inhibitory autoreceptors on histamine-containing nerve terminals and have since been shown to regulate the release of several neurotransmitters in the central and peripheral nervous systems. (From Biochem Soc Trans 1992 Feb;20(1):122-5)History, 21st Century: Time period from 2001 through 2100 of the common era.History, 19th Century: Time period from 1801 through 1900 of the common era.Drug Delivery Systems: Systems for the delivery of drugs to target sites of pharmacological actions. Technologies employed include those concerning drug preparation, route of administration, site targeting, metabolism, and toxicity.Designer Drugs: Drugs designed and synthesized, often for illegal street use, by modification of existing drug structures (e.g., amphetamines). Of special interest are MPTP (a reverse ester of meperidine), MDA (3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine), and MDMA (3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine). Many drugs act on the aminergic system, the physiologically active biogenic amines.GABA Modulators: Substances that do not act as agonists or antagonists but do affect the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID receptor-ionophore complex. GABA-A receptors (RECEPTORS, GABA-A) appear to have at least three allosteric sites at which modulators act: a site at which BENZODIAZEPINES act by increasing the opening frequency of GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-activated chloride channels; a site at which BARBITURATES act to prolong the duration of channel opening; and a site at which some steroids may act. GENERAL ANESTHETICS probably act at least partly by potentiating GABAergic responses, but they are not included here.History, 18th Century: Time period from 1701 through 1800 of the common era.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Hypnotics and Sedatives: Drugs used to induce drowsiness or sleep or to reduce psychological excitement or anxiety.Serotonin Antagonists: Drugs that bind to but do not activate serotonin receptors, thereby blocking the actions of serotonin or SEROTONIN RECEPTOR AGONISTS.Receptors, Islet Amyloid Polypeptide: G-protein coupled receptors that are formed through the dimerization of the CALCITONIN RECEPTOR with a RECEPTOR ACTIVITY-MODIFYING PROTEIN. Their affinity for ISLET AMYLOID POLYPEPTIDE is dependent upon which of several receptor activity-modifying protein subtypes they are bound to.Cricetulus: A genus of the family Muridae consisting of eleven species. C. migratorius, the grey or Armenian hamster, and C. griseus, the Chinese hamster, are the two species used in biomedical research.Calcium: A basic element found in nearly all organized tissues. It is a member of the alkaline earth family of metals with the atomic symbol Ca, atomic number 20, and atomic weight 40. Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the body and combines with phosphorus to form calcium phosphate in the bones and teeth. It is essential for the normal functioning of nerves and muscles and plays a role in blood coagulation (as factor IV) and in many enzymatic processes.Nicotine: Nicotine is highly toxic alkaloid. It is the prototypical agonist at nicotinic cholinergic receptors where it dramatically stimulates neurons and ultimately blocks synaptic transmission. Nicotine is also important medically because of its presence in tobacco smoke.Adrenergic alpha-1 Receptor Antagonists: Drugs that bind to and block the activation of ADRENERGIC ALPHA-1 RECEPTORS.GABA Antagonists: Drugs that bind to but do not activate GABA RECEPTORS, thereby blocking the actions of endogenous GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID and GABA RECEPTOR AGONISTS.Education, Graduate: Studies beyond the bachelor's degree at an institution having graduate programs for the purpose of preparing for entrance into a specific field, and obtaining a higher degree.Dequalinium: A topical bacteriostat that is available as various salts. It is used in wound dressings and mouth infections and may also have antifungal action, but may cause skin ulceration.Cell Line: Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.Drug Partial Agonism: Drug agonism involving selective binding but reduced effect. This can result in some degree of DRUG ANTAGONISM.Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.Drug Industry: That segment of commercial enterprise devoted to the design, development, and manufacture of chemical products for use in the diagnosis and treatment of disease, disability, or other dysfunction, or to improve function.Receptors, Cannabinoid: A class of G-protein-coupled receptors that are specific for CANNABINOIDS such as those derived from CANNABIS. They also bind a structurally distinct class of endogenous factors referred to as ENDOCANNABINOIDS. The receptor class may play a role in modulating the release of signaling molecules such as NEUROTRANSMITTERS and CYTOKINES.Strychnine: An alkaloid found in the seeds of STRYCHNOS NUX-VOMICA. It is a competitive antagonist at glycine receptors and thus a convulsant. It has been used as an analeptic, in the treatment of nonketotic hyperglycinemia and sleep apnea, and as a rat poison.Dogs: The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)Bicyclo Compounds, Heterocyclic: A class of saturated compounds consisting of two rings only, having two or more atoms in common, containing at least one hetero atom, and that take the name of an open chain hydrocarbon containing the same total number of atoms. (From Riguady et al., Nomenclature of Organic Chemistry, 1979, p31)Potassium Channels: Cell membrane glycoproteins that are selectively permeable to potassium ions. At least eight major groups of K channels exist and they are made up of dozens of different subunits.Analgesics: Compounds capable of relieving pain without the loss of CONSCIOUSNESS.Picrotoxin: A noncompetitive antagonist at GABA-A receptors and thus a convulsant. Picrotoxin blocks the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-activated chloride ionophore. Although it is most often used as a research tool, it has been used as a CNS stimulant and an antidote in poisoning by CNS depressants, especially the barbiturates.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.PyridazinesReceptors, Histamine: Cell-surface proteins that bind histamine and trigger intracellular changes influencing the behavior of cells. Histamine receptors are widespread in the central nervous system and in peripheral tissues. Three types have been recognized and designated H1, H2, and H3. They differ in pharmacology, distribution, and mode of action.Pregnanediones: Pregnane derivatives in which two side-chain methyl groups or two methylene groups in the ring skeleton (or a combination thereof) have been oxidized to keto groups.Central Nervous System: The main information-processing organs of the nervous system, consisting of the brain, spinal cord, and meninges.Histamine Antagonists: Drugs that bind to but do not activate histamine receptors, thereby blocking the actions of histamine or histamine agonists. Classical antihistaminics block the histamine H1 receptors only.HEK293 Cells: A cell line generated from human embryonic kidney cells that were transformed with human adenovirus type 5.Nicotinic Agonists: Drugs that bind to and activate nicotinic cholinergic receptors (RECEPTORS, NICOTINIC). Nicotinic agonists act at postganglionic nicotinic receptors, at neuroeffector junctions in the peripheral nervous system, and at nicotinic receptors in the central nervous system. Agents that function as neuromuscular depolarizing blocking agents are included here because they activate nicotinic receptors, although they are used clinically to block nicotinic transmission.Research Personnel: Those individuals engaged in research.Xenopus laevis: The commonest and widest ranging species of the clawed "frog" (Xenopus) in Africa. This species is used extensively in research. There is now a significant population in California derived from escaped laboratory animals.Serotonin: A biochemical messenger and regulator, synthesized from the essential amino acid L-TRYPTOPHAN. In humans it is found primarily in the central nervous system, gastrointestinal tract, and blood platelets. Serotonin mediates several important physiological functions including neurotransmission, gastrointestinal motility, hemostasis, and cardiovascular integrity. Multiple receptor families (RECEPTORS, SEROTONIN) explain the broad physiological actions and distribution of this biochemical mediator.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Receptors, Opioid: Cell membrane proteins that bind opioids and trigger intracellular changes which influence the behavior of cells. The endogenous ligands for opioid receptors in mammals include three families of peptides, the enkephalins, endorphins, and dynorphins. The receptor classes include mu, delta, and kappa receptors. Sigma receptors bind several psychoactive substances, including certain opioids, but their endogenous ligands are not known.Sulfonamides: A group of compounds that contain the structure SO2NH2.Protein Binding: The process in which substances, either endogenous or exogenous, bind to proteins, peptides, enzymes, protein precursors, or allied compounds. Specific protein-binding measures are often used as assays in diagnostic assessments.Membrane Transport Modulators: Agents that affect ION PUMPS; ION CHANNELS; ABC TRANSPORTERS; and other MEMBRANE TRANSPORT PROTEINS.Protein Subunits: Single chains of amino acids that are the units of multimeric PROTEINS. Multimeric proteins can be composed of identical or non-identical subunits. One or more monomeric subunits may compose a protomer which itself is a subunit structure of a larger assembly.Pain: An unpleasant sensation induced by noxious stimuli which are detected by NERVE ENDINGS of NOCICEPTIVE NEURONS.Receptors, Calcitonin: Cell surface proteins that bind calcitonin and trigger intracellular changes which influence the behavior of cells. Calcitonin receptors outside the nervous system mediate the role of calcitonin in calcium homeostasis. The role of calcitonin receptors in the brain is not well understood.Acetylcholine: A neurotransmitter found at neuromuscular junctions, autonomic ganglia, parasympathetic effector junctions, a subset of sympathetic effector junctions, and at many sites in the central nervous system.Potassium Channel Blockers: A class of drugs that act by inhibition of potassium efflux through cell membranes. Blockade of potassium channels prolongs the duration of ACTION POTENTIALS. They are used as ANTI-ARRHYTHMIA AGENTS and VASODILATOR AGENTS.Systems Biology: Comprehensive, methodical analysis of complex biological systems by monitoring responses to perturbations of biological processes. Large scale, computerized collection and analysis of the data are used to develop and test models of biological systems.Nerium: A plant genus of the family APOCYNACEAE. It is a very poisonous plant that contains cardioactive agents.Behavior, Animal: The observable response an animal makes to any situation.Biological Availability: The extent to which the active ingredient of a drug dosage form becomes available at the site of drug action or in a biological medium believed to reflect accessibility to a site of action.Serotonin Receptor Agonists: Endogenous compounds and drugs that bind to and activate SEROTONIN RECEPTORS. Many serotonin receptor agonists are used as ANTIDEPRESSANTS; ANXIOLYTICS; and in the treatment of MIGRAINE DISORDERS.Neuromuscular Blocking Agents: Drugs that interrupt transmission of nerve impulses at the skeletal neuromuscular junction. They can be of two types, competitive, stabilizing blockers (NEUROMUSCULAR NONDEPOLARIZING AGENTS) or noncompetitive, depolarizing agents (NEUROMUSCULAR DEPOLARIZING AGENTS). Both prevent acetylcholine from triggering the muscle contraction and they are used as anesthesia adjuvants, as relaxants during electroshock, in convulsive states, etc.Biomedical Research: Research that involves the application of the natural sciences, especially biology and physiology, to medicine.Inhibitory Concentration 50: The concentration of a compound needed to reduce population growth of organisms, including eukaryotic cells, by 50% in vitro. Though often expressed to denote in vitro antibacterial activity, it is also used as a benchmark for cytotoxicity to eukaryotic cells in culture.Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Central Nervous System Agents: A class of drugs producing both physiological and psychological effects through a variety of mechanisms. They can be divided into "specific" agents, e.g., affecting an identifiable molecular mechanism unique to target cells bearing receptors for that agent, and "nonspecific" agents, those producing effects on different target cells and acting by diverse molecular mechanisms. Those with nonspecific mechanisms are generally further classed according to whether they produce behavioral depression or stimulation. Those with specific mechanisms are classed by locus of action or specific therapeutic use. (From Gilman AG, et al., Goodman and Gilman's The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, 8th ed, p252)QuinolizinesMecamylamine: A nicotinic antagonist that is well absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract and crosses the blood-brain barrier. Mecamylamine has been used as a ganglionic blocker in treating hypertension, but, like most ganglionic blockers, is more often used now as a research tool.Calcium Channel Blockers: A class of drugs that act by selective inhibition of calcium influx through cellular membranes.Species Specificity: The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.Synaptic Transmission: The communication from a NEURON to a target (neuron, muscle, or secretory cell) across a SYNAPSE. In chemical synaptic transmission, the presynaptic neuron releases a NEUROTRANSMITTER that diffuses across the synaptic cleft and binds to specific synaptic receptors, activating them. The activated receptors modulate specific ion channels and/or second-messenger systems in the postsynaptic cell. In electrical synaptic transmission, electrical signals are communicated as an ionic current flow across ELECTRICAL SYNAPSES.Synephrine: Sympathetic alpha-adrenergic agonist with actions like PHENYLEPHRINE. It is used as a vasoconstrictor in circulatory failure, asthma, nasal congestion, and glaucoma.Ascaris suum: A species of parasitic nematode usually found in domestic pigs and a few other animals. Human infection can also occur, presumably as result of handling pig manure, and can lead to intestinal obstruction.Tissue Distribution: Accumulation of a drug or chemical substance in various organs (including those not relevant to its pharmacologic or therapeutic action). This distribution depends on the blood flow or perfusion rate of the organ, the ability of the drug to penetrate organ membranes, tissue specificity, protein binding. The distribution is usually expressed as tissue to plasma ratios.Receptors, Adrenergic, alpha-1: A subclass of alpha-adrenergic receptors that mediate contraction of SMOOTH MUSCLE in a variety of tissues such as ARTERIOLES; VEINS; and the UTERUS. They are usually found on postsynaptic membranes and signal through GQ-G11 G-PROTEINS.Conotoxins: Peptide neurotoxins from the marine fish-hunting snails of the genus CONUS. They contain 13 to 29 amino acids which are strongly basic and are highly cross-linked by disulfide bonds. There are three types of conotoxins, omega-, alpha-, and mu-. OMEGA-CONOTOXINS inhibit voltage-activated entry of calcium into the presynaptic membrane and therefore the release of ACETYLCHOLINE. Alpha-conotoxins inhibit the postsynaptic acetylcholine receptor. Mu-conotoxins prevent the generation of muscle action potentials. (From Concise Encyclopedia Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 3rd ed)Hallucinogens: Drugs capable of inducing illusions, hallucinations, delusions, paranoid ideations, and other alterations of mood and thinking. Despite the name, the feature that distinguishes these agents from other classes of drugs is their capacity to induce states of altered perception, thought, and feeling that are not experienced otherwise.Binding Sites: The parts of a macromolecule that directly participate in its specific combination with another molecule.Dopamine: One of the catecholamine NEUROTRANSMITTERS in the brain. It is derived from TYROSINE and is the precursor to NOREPINEPHRINE and EPINEPHRINE. Dopamine is a major transmitter in the extrapyramidal system of the brain, and important in regulating movement. A family of receptors (RECEPTORS, DOPAMINE) mediate its action.Organizational Affiliation: Formal relationships established between otherwise independent organizations. These include affiliation agreements, interlocking boards, common controls, hospital medical school affiliations, etc.Oocytes: Female germ cells derived from OOGONIA and termed OOCYTES when they enter MEIOSIS. The primary oocytes begin meiosis but are arrested at the diplotene state until OVULATION at PUBERTY to give rise to haploid secondary oocytes or ova (OVUM).Receptor, Cannabinoid, CB1: A subclass of cannabinoid receptor found primarily on central and peripheral NEURONS where it may play a role modulating NEUROTRANSMITTER release.Cholinergic Agents: Any drug used for its actions on cholinergic systems. Included here are agonists and antagonists, drugs that affect the life cycle of ACETYLCHOLINE, and drugs that affect the survival of cholinergic neurons. The term cholinergic agents is sometimes still used in the narrower sense of MUSCARINIC AGONISTS, although most modern texts discourage that usage.Glutamic Acid: A non-essential amino acid naturally occurring in the L-form. Glutamic acid is the most common excitatory neurotransmitter in the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM.Animal Rights: The moral and ethical bases of the protection of animals from cruelty and abuse. The rights are extended to domestic animals, laboratory animals, and wild animals.Receptors, Opioid, mu: A class of opioid receptors recognized by its pharmacological profile. Mu opioid receptors bind, in decreasing order of affinity, endorphins, dynorphins, met-enkephalin, and leu-enkephalin. They have also been shown to be molecular receptors for morphine.Computer-Assisted Instruction: A self-learning technique, usually online, involving interaction of the student with programmed instructional materials.Adrenergic beta-3 Receptor Antagonists: Drugs that bind to and block the activation of ADRENERGIC BETA-3 RECEPTORS.Adrenergic alpha-1 Receptor Agonists: Compounds that bind to and activate ADRENERGIC ALPHA-1 RECEPTORS.Receptors, Dopamine: Cell-surface proteins that bind dopamine with high affinity and trigger intracellular changes influencing the behavior of cells.Pharmaceutical Preparations, Dental: Drugs intended for DENTISTRY.Leukemia L1210Receptors, Bombesin: Cell surface proteins that bind bombesin or closely related peptides with high affinity and trigger intracellular changes influencing the behavior of cells. Gastrin- releasing peptide (GRP); GRP 18-27 (neuromedin C), and neuromedin B are endogenous ligands of bombesin receptors in mammals.Crotonates: Derivatives of BUTYRIC ACID that include a double bond between carbon 2 and 3 of the aliphatic structure. Included under this heading are a broad variety of acid forms, salts, esters, and amides that include the aminobutryrate structure.Neurosciences: The scientific disciplines concerned with the embryology, anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, pharmacology, etc., of the nervous system.Biotransformation: The chemical alteration of an exogenous substance by or in a biological system. The alteration may inactivate the compound or it may result in the production of an active metabolite of an inactive parent compound. The alterations may be divided into METABOLIC DETOXICATION, PHASE I and METABOLIC DETOXICATION, PHASE II.Receptors, Dopamine D2: A subfamily of G-PROTEIN-COUPLED RECEPTORS that bind the neurotransmitter DOPAMINE and modulate its effects. D2-class receptor genes contain INTRONS, and the receptors inhibit ADENYLYL CYCLASES.IndianaTransfection: The uptake of naked or purified DNA by CELLS, usually meaning the process as it occurs in eukaryotic cells. It is analogous to bacterial transformation (TRANSFORMATION, BACTERIAL) and both are routinely employed in GENE TRANSFER TECHNIQUES.GABA-A Receptor Agonists: Endogenous compounds and drugs that bind to and activate GABA-A RECEPTORS.Great BritainCarubicin: A very toxic anthracycline-type antineoplastic related to DAUNORUBICIN, obtained from Actinomadura carminata.Stereoisomerism: The phenomenon whereby compounds whose molecules have the same number and kind of atoms and the same atomic arrangement, but differ in their spatial relationships. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 5th ed)Rabbits: The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.Molecular Targeted Therapy: Treatments with drugs which interact with or block synthesis of specific cellular components characteristic of the individual's disease in order to stop or interrupt the specific biochemical dysfunction involved in progression of the disease.Tubocurarine: A neuromuscular blocker and active ingredient in CURARE; plant based alkaloid of Menispermaceae.Biological Science Disciplines: All of the divisions of the natural sciences dealing with the various aspects of the phenomena of life and vital processes. The concept includes anatomy and physiology, biochemistry and biophysics, and the biology of animals, plants, and microorganisms. It should be differentiated from BIOLOGY, one of its subdivisions, concerned specifically with the origin and life processes of living organisms.PiperazinesStudents, Nursing: Individuals enrolled in a school of nursing or a formal educational program leading to a degree in nursing.Trientine: An ethylenediamine derivative used as stabilizer for EPOXY RESINS, as ampholyte for ISOELECTRIC FOCUSING and as chelating agent for copper in HEPATOLENTICULAR DEGENERATION.Spider Venoms: Venoms of arthropods of the order Araneida of the ARACHNIDA. The venoms usually contain several protein fractions, including ENZYMES, hemolytic, neurolytic, and other TOXINS, BIOLOGICAL.Phenethylamines: A group of compounds that are derivatives of beta- aminoethylbenzene which is structurally and pharmacologically related to amphetamine. (From Merck Index, 11th ed)OxadiazolesHerb-Drug Interactions: The effect of herbs, other PLANTS, or PLANT EXTRACTS on the activity, metabolism, or toxicity of drugs.Geriatrics: The branch of medicine concerned with the physiological and pathological aspects of the aged, including the clinical problems of senescence and senility.Adrenergic alpha-Antagonists: Drugs that bind to but do not activate alpha-adrenergic receptors thereby blocking the actions of endogenous or exogenous adrenergic agonists. Adrenergic alpha-antagonists are used in the treatment of hypertension, vasospasm, peripheral vascular disease, shock, and pheochromocytoma.ThiadiazolesEducational Measurement: The assessing of academic or educational achievement. It includes all aspects of testing and test construction.Rats, Wistar: A strain of albino rat developed at the Wistar Institute that has spread widely at other institutions. This has markedly diluted the original strain.Histamine Agonists: Drugs that bind to and activate histamine receptors. Although they have been suggested for a variety of clinical applications histamine agonists have so far been more widely used in research than therapeutically.Receptors, Neuropeptide: Cell surface receptors that bind specific neuropeptides with high affinity and trigger intracellular changes influencing the behavior of cells. Many neuropeptides are also hormones outside of the nervous system.Adrenergic Antagonists: Drugs that bind to but do not activate ADRENERGIC RECEPTORS. Adrenergic antagonists block the actions of the endogenous adrenergic transmitters EPINEPHRINE and NOREPINEPHRINE.Atropine: An alkaloid, originally from Atropa belladonna, but found in other plants, mainly SOLANACEAE. Hyoscyamine is the 3(S)-endo isomer of atropine.Lysergic Acid Diethylamide: Semisynthetic derivative of ergot (Claviceps purpurea). It has complex effects on serotonergic systems including antagonism at some peripheral serotonin receptors, both agonist and antagonist actions at central nervous system serotonin receptors, and possibly effects on serotonin turnover. It is a potent hallucinogen, but the mechanisms of that effect are not well understood.Sisomicin: Antibiotic produced by Micromonospora inyoensis. It is closely related to gentamicin C1A, one of the components of the gentamicin complex (GENTAMICINS).Cells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.Parasympathomimetics: Drugs that mimic the effects of parasympathetic nervous system activity. Included here are drugs that directly stimulate muscarinic receptors and drugs that potentiate cholinergic activity, usually by slowing the breakdown of acetylcholine (CHOLINESTERASE INHIBITORS). Drugs that stimulate both sympathetic and parasympathetic postganglionic neurons (GANGLIONIC STIMULANTS) are not included here.Cannabinoid Receptor Agonists: Compounds that interact with and stimulate the activity of CANNABINOID RECEPTORS.Calcium Channels: Voltage-dependent cell membrane glycoproteins selectively permeable to calcium ions. They are categorized as L-, T-, N-, P-, Q-, and R-types based on the activation and inactivation kinetics, ion specificity, and sensitivity to drugs and toxins. The L- and T-types are present throughout the cardiovascular and central nervous systems and the N-, P-, Q-, & R-types are located in neuronal tissue.Isoquinolines: A group of compounds with the heterocyclic ring structure of benzo(c)pyridine. The ring structure is characteristic of the group of opium alkaloids such as papaverine. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Pyrazoles: Azoles of two nitrogens at the 1,2 positions, next to each other, in contrast with IMIDAZOLES in which they are at the 1,3 positions.

Target concentration intervention: beyond Y2K. (1/152)

Target concentration intervention (TCI) is proposed as an alternative conceptual strategy to therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM). It is argued that the idea of a therapeutic range has limited the interpretation of measured drug concentrations and diminished the anticipated clinical benefit to patients by use of an oversimplified pharmacodynamic model. TCI on the other hand embraces pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic concepts and uses the idea of a target effect and associated target concentration to make rational individual dose decisions.  (+info)

Application of complementary DNA microarray technology to carcinogen identification, toxicology, and drug safety evaluation. (2/152)

One major challenge facing today's cancer researchers and toxicologists is the development of new approaches for the identification of carcinogens and other environmental hazards. Here, we describe the potential impact of emerging technologies for measuring gene expression profiles on carcinogen identification and on the general field of toxicology. An example of one of these technologies is the use of cDNA microarray chips. We provide an overview to the key questions that are confronting investigators charged with determining the relative safety of natural or synthetic chemicals to which humans are exposed, followed by a discussion of how cDNA microarray technology may be applied to these questions. Gene chip technology is still a relatively new technology, and only a handful of studies have demonstrated its utility. However, as the technical hurdles to development are passed, the use of this methodology in addressing the questions raised here will be critical to increase the sensitivity of detection of the potential toxic effects of environmental chemicals and to understand their risks to humans.  (+info)

Journal impact factors: a 'bioequivalence' issue? (3/152)

AIMS: Journal impact factors (IMFs) are used increasingly by institutions as performance indicators of the quality of 'individual research output'. Although the need for discretion when using the numbers has been emphasized, there has been little formal analysis of the issues. We therefore investigated citation profiles for three clinical pharmacology journals to assess the validity of using IMF as a measure of 'individual research'. METHODS: We compared the pattern of individual citations for random samples of 120 papers published in Clin Pharmacol Ther (CPT), Br J Clin Pharmacol (BJCP) and Eur J Clin Pharmacol (EJCP) in 1981, 1991, 1995 and 1996. Using an analogy between citation-time profiles of papers and concentration-time profiles of drugs, it was possible to define 'lag-time', Cmax, tmax, t(1/2) and AUC(t), and to investigate 'bioequivalence'. RESULTS: Citation distributions for individual publications were widely variable and skewed (skewness = 1.47, 2.16 and 1.37 for CPT, BJCP and EJCP, respectively). The 90% CI values for the IMF of a publication in each journal (i.e. 90% CI for an observation as opposed to 90% CI for the mean) were 0.24-16.94, 0.08-10.3 and 0.09-5.68. CONCLUSIONS: IMF does not represent the impact of an individual paper. Furthermore, if the comparison of journals is treated as a bioequivalence issue, the citation data should be log transformed prior to calculating IMF such that they represent the likelihood of citation for the median article. After such transformation, absolute differences between the IMF of clinical pharmacology journals become much smaller.  (+info)

Best practice in therapeutic drug monitoring. (4/152)

It is the goal of Therapeutic Drug Monitoring (TDM) to use drug concentrations to manage a patient's medication regime and optimise outcome. Limited resources require that drug assays should only be performed when they do contribute to patient management. For this to be the case a therapeutic drug monitoring service has a far greater role than just therapeutic drug measuring. This article describes the roles and functions of a Best Practice TDM service. The features which can and should be strived for in each step of the TDM process-the decision to request a drug level, the biological sample, the request, laboratory measurement, communication of results by the laboratory, clinical interpretation and therapeutic management-are discussed.  (+info)

Target concentration intervention: beyond Y2K. (5/152)

Target concentration intervention (TCI) is proposed as an alternative conceptual strategy to therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM). It is argued that the idea of a therapeutic range has limited the interpretation of measured drug concentrations and diminished the anticipated clinical benefit to patients by use of an oversimplified pharmacodynamic model. TCI on the other hand embraces pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic concepts and uses the idea of a target effect and associated target concentration to make rational individual dose decisions.  (+info)

Therapeutic drug monitoring in a developing country: an overview. (6/152)

Therapeutic Drug Monitoring (TDM) was introduced in India in the mid and late 1980s and the last 10 years have seen it grow, together with the growth of separate Clinical Pharmacology departments. The TDM service in the country is broadly of two types: in large teaching hospitals where the service is available through departments of Clinical Pharmacology, and in the private sector, where drug estimations are done by clinical biochemistry departments with minimal interpretation. This article is based on literature review and our own experiences over a 10 year period in a department of Clinical Pharmacology. It focuses on the evolution of TDM, its problems such as lack of funding, special aspects such as the impact of ethnic differences, nutritional deficiencies, quality of medicines and availability of generic products; its utility as a research tool and its future.  (+info)

Searching for pharmacogenomic markers: the synergy between omic and hypothesis-driven research. (7/152)

With 35,000 genes and hundreds of thousands of protein states to identify, correlate, and understand, it no longer suffices to rely on studies of one gene, gene product, or process at a time. We have entered the "omic" era in biology. But large-scale omic studies of cellular molecules in aggregate rarely can answer interesting questions without the assistance of information from traditional hypothesis-driven research. The two types of science are synergistic. A case in point is the set of pharmacogenomic studies that we and our collaborators have done with the 60 human cancer cell lines of the National Cancer Institute's drug discovery program. Those cells (the NCI-60) have been characterized pharmacologically with respect to their sensitivity to >70,000 chemical compounds. We are further characterizing them at the DNA, RNA, protein, and functional levels. Our major aim is to identify pharmacogenomic markers that can aid in drug discovery and design, as well as in individualization of cancer therapy. The bioinformatic and chemoinformatic challenges of this study have demanded novel methods for analysis and visualization of high-dimensional data. Included are the color-coded "clustered image map" and also the MedMiner program package, which captures and organizes the biomedical literature on gene-gene and gene-drug relationships. Microarray transcript expression studies of the 60 cell lines reveal, for example, a gene-drug correlation with potential clinical implications--that between the asparagine synthetase gene and the enzyme-drug L-asparaginase in ovarian cancer cells.  (+info)

Candidate genes and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the study of human disease. (8/152)

The genomic revolution has generated an extraordinary resource, the catalog of variation within the human genome, for investigating biological, evolutionary and medical questions. Together with new, more efficient platforms for high-throughput genotyping, it is possible to begin to dissect genetic contributions to complex trait diseases, specifically examining common variants, such as the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP). At the same time, these tools will make it possible to identify determinants of disease with the expectation of eventually, tailoring therapies based upon specific profiles. However, a number of methodological, practical and ethical issues must be addressed before the analysis of genetic variation becomes a standard of clinical medicine. The currents of variation in human biology are reviewed here, with a specific emphasis on future challenges and directions.  (+info)

*GABAA receptor positive allosteric modulator

This hypothesis places the GABA system in a central role in the pathophysiology of depression and in addition to that clinical ... In pharmacology, GABAA receptor positive allosteric modulators are positive allosteric modulator (PAM) molecules that increase ... doi:10.1016/S1522-8401(00)90040-5. Möhler H, Fritschy JM, Rudolph U (Jan 2002). "A new benzodiazepine pharmacology". The ... Hosie AM, Wilkins ME, Smart TG (Oct 2007). "Neurosteroid binding sites on GABA(A) receptors". Pharmacology & Therapeutics. 116 ...

*Fenmetozole

Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics. 24 (3): 350-3. doi:10.1002/cpt1978243350. PMID 357069. Frye GD, Breese GR, Mailman RB, ... Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics. 17 (6): 735-7. doi:10.1002/cpt1975176735. PMID 1095283. Griffis LC, Bright TP, Cerimele ... Clinical and Experimental Research. 5 (3): 386-92. doi:10.1111/j.1530-0277.1981.tb04921.x. PMID 6792942. Frye GD, Breese GR ( ...

*GPER

International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. GPER protein at the US National Library of Medicine Medical Subject ... Emerging clinical importance of the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor GPER". Steroids. doi:10.1016/j.steroids.2016.02.016. ...

*G protein-coupled receptor

International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. Retrieved 11 August 2008. "GPCRdb". Data, diagrams and web tools for G ... British Journal of Pharmacology. 173 (14): 2195-207. doi:10.1111/bph.13509. PMC 4919580 . PMID 27155948. "G Protein-Coupled ... "International Union of Pharmacology. XLVI. G protein-coupled receptor list". Pharmacological Reviews. 57 (2): 279-88. doi: ... Annual Review of Pharmacology and Toxicology. 44 (1): 559-609. doi:10.1146/annurev.pharmtox.44.101802.121558. PMID 14744258. ...

*Munir Pirmohamed

Professor Pirmohamed gained the position of Personal Chair in Clinical Pharmacology at The University of Liverpool in 2001, and ... British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology. 59 (3): 365-70. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2125.2005.02229.x. PMC 1884787 . PMID 15752383. ... British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology. 60 (4): 448-51. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2125.2005.02440.x. PMC 1884821 . PMID 16187979. ... British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology. 62 (2): 237-42. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2125.2006.02587.x. PMC 1885083 . PMID 16842400. ...

*Adhesion G protein-coupled receptor

"International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. XCIV. Adhesion G Protein-Coupled Receptors". Pharmacological Reviews. ... Phylogenetic analysis, paralogon groups, and fingerprints". Molecular Pharmacology. 63 (6): 1256-72. doi:10.1124/mol.63.6.1256 ...

*NPU terminology

Clinical Chemistry Clinical Haematology Clinical Immunology and Blood Banking Clinical Microbiology Clinical Pharmacology ... is a patient centered clinical laboratory terminology for use in the clinical laboratory sciences. Its function is to enable ... In 2014, Norway declared the NPU terminology mandatory on a national scale for most clinical laboratory fields. Nordin G, ... In a clinical laboratory terminology such as the NPU terminology the system of interest is assumed to be (part of) the patient ...

*Clovoxamine

Clinical pharmacology and therapeutics. 34 (2): 266-271. doi:10.1038/clpt.1983.164. PMID 6872422. Saletu; Grünberger, J.; Rajna ... Hurst; Jones, D. R.; Wright, J. H.; Jarboe, C. H. (1983). "Clovoxamine kinetics in an early clinical trial". ... Freeman; Wakelin, J. S.; Calanca, A.; Hole, G. (1982). "Initial clinical evaluation of a new nontricyclic antidepressant: ...

*Clinical pharmacology

... is the science of drugs and their clinical use. It is underpinned by the basic science of pharmacology, ... Dutch Society on Clinical Pharmacology and Biopharmaceutics (NVKF&B) American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and ... Therefore, clinical pharmacology is not specific to medicine. Clinical pharmacologists usually have a rigorous medical and ... Clinical pharmacology connects the gap between medical practice and laboratory science. The main objective is to promote the ...

*Clinical Pharmacology & Therapeutics

... is a monthly peer-reviewed medical journal which covers research on the nature, action, ... It is the official journal of the American Society for Clinical Pharmacology & Therapeutics. The journal is abstracted and ... "Pharmacology & Pharmacy". "Journals Ranked by Impact: Pharmacology & Pharmacy". 2014 Journal Citation Reports. Web of Science ( ... indexed in: Chemical Abstracts Service Current Contents/Clinical Medicine Current Contents/Life Sciences BIOSIS Previews EBSCO ...

*Clinical Pharmacology: Advances and Applications

... is a peer-reviewed medical journal covering research in pharmacology. The ...

*The Journal of Clinical Pharmacology

Sons in association with the American College of Clinical Pharmacology. The Journal of Clinical Pharmacology is abstracted and ... The Journal of Clinical Pharmacology is a peer-reviewed medical journal that covers the field of pharmacology. The editor-in- ... "Pharmacology & Pharmacy". "Journals Ranked by Impact: Pharmacology & Pharmacy". 2014 Journal Citation Reports. Web of Science ( ... Official website American College of Clinical Pharmacology. ...

*Expert Review of Clinical Pharmacology

... is a monthly peer-reviewed medical journal covering all aspects of clinical pharmacology ...

*European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology

It covers all aspects of clinical pharmacology and drug therapy in humans. According to the Journal Citation Reports, the ... The European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology is a peer-reviewed medical journal published by Springer Science+Business Media ... "Journals Ranked by Impact: Pharmacology & Pharmacy". 2014 Journal Citation Reports. Web of Science (Sciences ed.). Thomson ... journal received a 2014 impact factor of 2.966, ranking it 84th out of 254 journals in the category Pharmacology & Pharmacy. " ...

*American College of Clinical Pharmacology

... Official Site The Journal of Clinical Pharmacology Clinical Pharmacology in Drug ... The Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, published by ACCP is the main journal of the College. Clinical Pharmacology in Drug ... The American College of Clinical Pharmacology (ACCP) is a national organization of clinical pharmacology healthcare ... Within clinical pharmacology its programs focus on: translational medicine, biomarkers, clinical pharmacokinetics and ...

*British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology

The British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology is a monthly peer-reviewed medical journal published by Wiley-Blackwell on behalf ... ranking it 45th out of 254 journals in the category Pharmacology & Pharmacy. "Journals Ranked by Impact: Pharmacology & ...

*European Association for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics

"European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology becomes the official organ of European Association for Clinical Pharmacology and ... The European Association for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics (EACPT) is a learned society in the field of clinical ... It is the leading society in Europe serving the European and global clinical pharmacology and therapeutics community. It has ... "EACPT Historical Make up of Exec Comm Sept 2007 , European Association for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics". Eacpt.org. ...

*International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology

... (IUPHAR) The Guide to Pharmacology The IUPHAR/BPS Guide to PHARMACOLOGY ... "Pediatric Clinical Pharmacology". IUPHAR Pediatric Clinical Pharmacology Section. Retrieved 16 September 2015. " ... and clinical pharmacology core competencies among its many WHO-related activities. The Division of Clinical Pharmacology ... Canada was the last IUPHAR meeting to present clinical pharmacology separately. The World Congress of Basic and Clinical ...

*Clinical and Experimental Pharmacology and Physiology

... is a peer-reviewed scientific journal that publishes articles relating to ... Clinical Medicine Dairy Science Abstracts Forestry Abstracts Global Health Journal Citation Reports/ Science Edition Science ... pharmacology and physiology. Academic Search Abstracts in Anthropology Elsevier BIOBASE CAB Abstracts Chemical Abstracts ...

*Meclizine

Clinical Pharmacology. Clinical Pharmacology, revised November 20, 2009, accessed November 7, 2010.[full citation needed] ... Clinical Pharmacology And Therapeutics [Clin Pharmacol Ther] 1984 Jul; Vol. 36 (1), pp. 116-20. Available from: MEDLINE: ...

*Placebo-controlled study

"Clinical pharmacology". Proc. R. Soc. Med. 47 (3): 195-204. PMC 1918604 . PMID 13155508. Chambless DL, Hollon SD (February 1998 ... Academic clinical trials Bioethics Clinical data acquisition Clinical trial management Confounding factor Experimental design ... see also Patulin Clinical Trials Committee, Medical Research Council (April 2004). "Clinical trial of patulin in the common ... In certain clinical trials of particular drugs, it may happen that the level of the "placebo responses" manifested by the ...

*Fluorescence polarization immunoassay

"Urine Drug Screening Results from Volunteers in Phase I Clinical Pharmacology Studies: Are We Being Misled?". Clinical ... Pharmacology. 38: 413-416 - via Wiley Online Library. Edmonds, Dan (December 12, 2000). "Fluorescence polarization immunoassay ...

*Discovery and development of direct Xa inhibitors

Clinical Pharmacology. 6: 179-187. doi:10.2147/CPAA.S61131. Parasrampuriam, D.A.; Truitt, K. (2016). "Pharmacokinetics and ... It entered clinical trials in 1935 and the first drug was launched in 1936. Chains of natural heparin can vary from 5.000 to ... Recent clinical trials on a new antidote, andexanet alfa, against Xa inhibitors have shown promising results. Andexanet alfa ... In 2008 the first direct Xa inhibitor was approved for clinical use. Direct Xa inhibitors are just as efficacious as LMWH and ...

*Strain (injury)

"Clinical Pharmacology". www.clinicalpharmacology-ip.com. Retrieved 2017-06-25. TJ Noonan and WE Garrett, Jr, "Muscle strain ...

*Melarsoprol

Clinical Pharmacology. 67: 478-88. doi:10.1067/mcp.2000.105990. Pharmacy and pharmacology portal Medicine portal. ...

*Prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2

Studies with human pharmacology and genetics, genetically manipulated rodents, and other animal models and randomized trials ... evidence for potential clinical utility of COX-2 inhibitors in epithelial cancers". Prostaglandins Leukot. Essent. Fatty Acids ... better source needed] O'Banion MK (1999). "Cyclooxygenase-2: molecular biology, pharmacology, and neurobiology". Crit Rev ...

*Warfarin

2008). "Pharmacology and management of the vitamin K antagonists: American College of Chest Physicians evidence-based clinical ... Laurence, D.R. (1973). Clinical Pharmacology. Peter Kneebone. Edinburgh, London and New York: Churchill Livingstone. pp. 23.4- ... The target INR level varies from case to case depending on the clinical indicators, but tends to be 2-3 in most conditions. In ... Thus, common clinical indications for warfarin use are atrial fibrillation, the presence of artificial heart valves, deep ...
Research at the Centre for Tropical Clinical Pharmacology & Therapeutics. The Centre for Tropical Clinical Pharmacology & Therapeutics (CTCPT) carries out studies on drugs used for treatment of tropical diseases, especially malaria, and onchocerchiasis, but also sickle cell disease, as well as HIV/AIDS.. The Centre conducts studies in the areas of clinical trials, pharmacogenetics, pharmacovigilance, pharmacoepidemiology, pharmacokinetics and clinical ethics. The Centre is also involved in research on interventions to improve rational use of drugs, drug safety, as well as risk communication. In July 2012, the CTCPT in collaboration with the International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology (IUPHAR) hosted the 5th All African Conference on Pharmacology in Accra, Ghana. The conference was well attended and laid the foundation for a strong African participation in the next World Congress of Pharmacology scheduled for July 2014 in Cape Town, South Africa.. Ongoing projects at the Centre - ...
August 07, 2017 NDA Partners Chairman Carl Peck, MD, announced today that Dr. Michael A. Eldon, the former Vice President of Clinical Pharmacology at Nektar Therapeutics, and a clinical pharmacology, pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics and pharmacometrics expert with more than thirty-five years of experience in the pharmaceutical industry, has joined the firm as an Expert Consultant. As Vice President of Clinical Pharmacology at Nektar Therapeutics, Dr. Eldon was responsible for clinical and preclinical pharmacokinetics, ADME, pharmacometrics and systems biology in drug development and discovery.. Prior to Nektar, Dr. Eldon worked at Parke-Davis Pharmaceutical Research where he participated in the development and registration of Lipitor (atorvastatin), Neurontin (gabapentin), Rezulin (troglitazone), Lyrica (pregabalin), Pro-Air (procaterol), Lopid (gemfibrozil), Loestrin (oral contraceptive), Estrostep (oral contraceptive), Procanbid (procainamide extended release), FemPatch (transdermal ...
Current Clinical Pharmacology publishes frontier reviews on all the latest advances in clinical pharmacology. The journals aim is to publish the highest quality review articles in the field. Topics covered include: pharmacokinetics; therapeutic trials; adverse drug reactions; drug interactions; drug metabolism; pharmacoepidemiology; and drug development. The journal is essential reading for all researchers in clinical pharmacology.. ...
Information on 30th Annual Meeting of the American College of Clinical Pharmacology - Clinical Pharmacology Conference to be held in Tysons Corner, VA, United States on Sep 23, 2001
Looking to attend a Clinical Pharmacology Medical Conference in order to earn required CME credits? Browse our database of Clinical Pharmacology Medical Conferences and register today.
Background: At the present time, teaching pharmacology for medical students mainly focuses on the basic principles of pharmacology. This study was conducted to assess the current situation of pharmacology teaching and the necessity of developing clinical pharmacology from the viewpoint of medical interns and externs in Tabriz University of Medical Sciences. Methods: This descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted in 2009 on extern and intern medical students of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences. The subjects were a convenience sample of students. Each participant filled out a questionnaire and the data was analyzed by SPSS-16 software. Results: The mean obtained from students viewpoints toward necessity of clinical pharmacology was 90 percent. The proper time section was provided during the internship training or at the end of the externship period. At present, the students satisfaction on teaching pharmaceutical dosage forms were approximately 30%, prescribing writing skills were 17% and
The most up-to-date, comprehensive, and authoritative pharmacology text in health medicine Enhanced by more than three hundred illustrations -- many in full color Organized to reflect the syllabi in many pharmacology courses and in integrated curricula, Basic & Clinical Pharmacology, 12e covers the important concepts students need to know about the science of pharmacology and its application to clinical practice. Selection of the subject matter and order of its presentation are based on the authors many years experience in teaching this material to thousands of medical, pharmacy, dental, podiatry, nursing, and other health science students. To be as clinically relevant as possible, the book includes sections that specifically address the clinical choice and use of drugs in patients and the monitoring of their effects, and case studies that introduce clinical problems in many chapters. Presented in full color and enhanced by more than three hundred illustrations, Basic & Clinical Pharmacology features
Clinical pharmacology and therapeutics encompasses a body of medical knowledge that has expanded at a dramatic rate. New drugs are being introduced with such frequency that their evaluation has become a daunting task for the clinician in general practice. This book, first published in 1976, was the first major attempt to deal with this problem by creating a comprehensive disease-oriented reference on clinical pharmacology and therapeutics that would provide practitioners with an understanding of the basis for rational selection and use of drugs. In comparison to other books, this edition is probably the most successful effort to incorporate, within a ...
The Journal of Clinical Pharmacology is the flagship publication of the American College of Clinical Pharmacology. Published since 1961, the journal has been providing readers with access to original research, special reviews, commentaries, and case reports on all phases of drug development.
... - Bethesda North Marriott Hotel & Conference Center - North Bethesda - Maryland - United States - United States - Event Overview:\r\nACCP focused on an exciting mix of current topics guided by globally-recognized experts in the field of clinical pharmacology, resulting in a series of Pre-meeting Workshops and Symposia that balance laboratory and clinical pharmacologic science and include a special focus on biologics as a rapidly expanding therapeutic area. The meeting is organized into topic tracks that allow attendees to match content to their individual interests. A detailed listing provides you with presentation titles and Faculty. CME and CPE credits for ACCP events are offered at no additional cost.\r\nEDUCATIONAL TOPICS SOLICITED FOR THE 2016 ACCP ANNUAL MEETING INCLUDE:\r\n
PURPOSE: To evaluate the clinical pharmacology of exogenous alkaline phosphatase (AP). METHODS: Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled sequential protocols of (1) ascending doses and infusion duration (volunteers) and (2) fixed dose and duration (patients) were conducted at clinical pharmacology and intensive care units. A total of 103 subjects (67 male volunteers and 36 patients with severe sepsis) were administered exogenous, 10-min IV infusions (three ascending doses) or 24-72 h continuous (132.5-200 U kg(-1) 24 h(-1)) IV infusion with/without preceding loading dose and experimental endotoxemia for evaluations of pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, safety parameters, antigenicity, inflammatory markers, and outcomes. RESULTS: Linearity and dose-proportionality were shown during 10-min infusions. The relatively short elimination half-life necessitated a loading dose to achieve stable enzyme levels. Pharmacokinetic parameters in volunteers and patients were similar. Innate immunity ...
Stage 1 Seminar: Clinical Pharmacology of the Nervous System. Dr Fraz Mir Clinical Pharmacology Unit Department of Medicine University of Cambridge. Topics to be Covered. Anti-epileptic medicines Anti-parkinsonian drugs Anti-depressants And briefly - Anti-psychotics Slideshow 85308 by RexAlvis
Basic and Clinical pharmacology , Basic and Clinical pharmacology , کتابخانه دیجیتال دانشگاه علوم پزشکی تهران
Guest Editors who wish to submit an issue proposal to Current Clinical Pharmacology are requested to complete the following online form. The proposal of thematic issue will then be immediately forwarded to the Editor-in-Chief/Co-Editors/Executive Editor(s) of Current Clinical Pharmacology who will then inform Guest Editors with a decision about the submitted proposal.. ...
PHARMACOLOGISTS study the effects of drugs and other chemical agents of therapeutic value on biological systems. Pharmacologists conduct clinical research trials for new drugs. They study the effects of a medicine over a period of time. Pharmacologists work closely with other scientists and health professionals to ensure that new products are as safe and effective as possible. Pharmacologists may also evaluate new drugs for pharmaceutical companies. They may develop new or improved drugs and medicines. They work to standardize procedures for the manufacture of drugs and medicinal compounds.. ...
Our journals promote pharmacology in all its forms by disseminating the latest high quality research in our peer reviewed scientific journals.
Supported by US National Institutes of Health (NIH) grants, P60 AR056116, HL65082, HL67964, GM07569, UL1RR024975 from National Center for Research Resources/NIH and the Dan May Chair in Medicine. From the Divisions of Clinical Pharmacology and Rheumatology, Departments of Medicine and Pharmacology; Department of Biostatistics; Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee, USA. S. Manavathongchai, MD, Divisions of Clinical Pharmacology and Rheumatology, Departments of Medicine and Pharmacology; A. Bian, MPH, Department of Biostatistics; Y.H. Rho, MD, PhD; A. Oeser, BS; J.F. Solus, PhD, Divisions of Clinical Pharmacology and Rheumatology, Departments of Medicine and Pharmacology; T. Gebretsadik, MPH; A. Shintani, MPH, PhD, Department of Biostatistics; C.M. Stein, MBChB, Divisions of Clinical Pharmacology and Rheumatology, Departments of Medicine and Pharmacology, Vanderbilt University. Address correspondence to Dr. C.M. Stein, 560 RRB, Division of Clinical Pharmacology, School of Medicine, ...
Dr. Uppugunduri is currently working at Onco-Hematology unit, Department of Paediatrics, Gynaecology and Obstetrics, University of Geneva. He is also affiliated to a foundation supporting the research in pediatric onco-hematology (www.cansearch.ch). Dr. Uppugunduri is a recognized Clinical Pharmacologist (NON MD title by Swiss Society of Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology) and participates in the implementation of therapeutic drug monitoring. He works with multidisciplinary team at his unit and laboratory, has strong collaboration with the teams of Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology Division (https://www.hug-ge.ch/pharmacologie-toxicologie-cliniques) at University Hospitals of Geneva (University of Geneva). Dr. Uppugunduri is working with the objective of developing, evaluating, interpreting new/existing pharmacogenetics markers with clinical utility. He is also participating in teaching /education of medical doctors/allied health professionals in training on topics in clinical pharmacology ...
Doing crossword puzzles regularly may help to keep the brain up to 10 years younger late in life. And the more frequently you engage in crossword puzzles or other word games, the better your brain function may be.. Those are the findings of a study from researchers at the University of Exeter Medical School and Kings College London in Britain. They add to a growing body of evidence that mentally challenging activities may help to keep the mind sharp as we age.. For the study, the researchers surveyed more than 17,000 healthy men and women aged 50 and older who were part of a large and ongoing research initiative. They filled out questionnaires about how often they played word games such as crossword puzzles.. Participants were also given a research test to assess various aspects of memory and thinking skills. The investigators found that the more regularly participants engaged with word puzzles throughout life, the better they performed on tasks assessing attention, reasoning and memory.. From ...
Learning Geography is easier when using fun school crossword puzzles. Test your knowledge of body of water and land in this kids crossword puzzle. This is great material to use for reviewing kids geography lesson, let them solve this online or download and print.
Given that clinical "education" has long been part of Pharmas marketing strategy, this seems disgraceful. And most of the doctors I know and respect refuse to see reps altogether. It is hopelessly optimistic to think that can an industry person can teach clinical pharmacology without bias in favour of his own companys products. The BPS has many members who teach pharmacology. Can they really cope so badly that we need to have industry to educate clinicians? Its fine, and sometimes desirable, for academics and industry to work together on drug development. But only as long as the industry partner has no say in how, or whether, the results are published. Without that proviso we can expect more corruption of the sort thats been seen at the University of Sheffield (3). This is very sad, because I have great reason to like the drug industry. Ive benefitted from several of their products myself. But the industry is in trouble. Many of its products provide only marginal benefits. Furthermore, some ...
We gathered and sorted all La Times Crossword Puzzle Answers for today, in this article. If the displayed solution didnt solve your clue, just click the clue name on the left and you will find more solutions for that La Times Crossword Clue. Crossword puzzles are fun to play, The LA Times Crossword in particular is a lot of fun. It is a daily puzzle that sometimes can get very tricky to solve. Our little community here is always able to solve all the la times crossword puzzles, so whenever you are in need of some help, just remember our website. Besides todays puzzle answers on our homepage you will also find the answers of previous days puzzles in case you missed any of them. For another La Times Crossword Solution go to home.. ...
Clinical pharmacologists in the pharmaceutical industry usually take up these posts after they have acquired an MRCP (or equivalent) and have some experience of academic clinical pharmacology or a disease specialty. At present there is a dearth of appropriately trained individuals, and most major companies offer attractive career opportunities and training. The main responsibilities in industry are to work with the research scientists in the selection of potential new drugs to test in man, and in the design and execution of phase I clinical studies.. The role of the clinical pharmacologist in the pharmaceutical industry needs to be distinguished from that of the clinical research physician and medical adviser (see Career Focus, 31 August 1996). The clinical research physician is concerned with the organisation and interpretation of large scale phase IIb and III trials, to confirm the dose range, comparative efficacy, and relative safety of new drugs. The stress of the job is on management of ...
Welcome to Crossword Puzzle Answers. Our website is dedicated to Crossword Answers. We solve all the clues from publishers such as New York Times, LA Times, USA Today etc. Since you arrived at this particular page you are looking for the answer to La Times June 17th 2017 Crossword Clues so without wasting your time…
The twelfth edition of Basic & Clinical Pharmacology continues the important changes inaugurated in the eleventh edition, with extensive use of full-color illustrations and expanded coverage of transporters, pharmacogenomics, and new drugs. Case studies have been added to several chapters and answers to questions posed in the case studies now appear at the end of each chapter. As in prior editions, the book is designed to provide a comprehensive, authoritative, and readable pharmacology textbook for students in the health sciences. Frequent revision is necessary to keep pace with the rapid changes in pharmacology and therapeutics; the 2-3 year revision cycle of the printed text is among the shortest in the field and the availability of an online version provides even greater currency. In addition to the full-color illustrations, other new features have been introduced. The Case Study Answer section at the end of chapters will make the learning process even more interesting and efficient. The ...
Information on Neonatal Pharmacology Course - Clinical Pharmacology Conference to be held in La Jolla, CA, United States on Oct 28, 2001
Clinical Pharmacology Animation: Online Review is a dynamic web-based tutorial to help pharmacy students gain an understanding of the key concepts of pharmacology and test their comprehension and retention.
Buy, download and read Basic and Clinical Pharmacology, 11th Edition ebook online in format for iPhone, iPad, Android, Computer and Mobile readers. Author: Bertram G. Katzung; Susan B. Masters; Anthony J. Trevor. ISBN: . Publisher: McGraw-Hill Education. The most trusted and up-to-date pharmacology text in medicine -- completely redesigned to make the learning process even more interesting and efficient5 Star Doodys Review!This is the most widely us
Tramèr MR, Moore RA, Reynolds DJ, McQuay HJ. Quantitative estimation of rare adverse events which follow a biological progression: a new model applied to chronic NSAID use. Pain 2000; 85: 169-82 ...
Prof. Velo was secretary of the Italian Society of Pharmacology (SIF) from 1988 to 1992, chairman of the Section of Clinical Pharmacology of SIF (1994-1996 and 2003-2007) and councilor of IUPHAR, Clinical Pharmacology Division (1992-2000). Cofounder of EACPT, he was vice Chairman (1995-1999) and then Chairman (1999-2003). He was also president of the International Society of Pharmacovigilance (ISoP) from 2003 to 2006. He was the organizer of CPT 2000-Seventh Conference on Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics and Fourth Congress of the European Association for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics, held in Florence, July 2000. ...
Prof. Velo was secretary of the Italian Society of Pharmacology (SIF) from 1988 to 1992, chairman of the Section of Clinical Pharmacology of SIF (1994-1996 and 2003-2007) and councilor of IUPHAR, Clinical Pharmacology Division (1992-2000). Cofounder of EACPT, he was vice Chairman (1995-1999) and then Chairman (1999-2003). He was also president of the International Society of Pharmacovigilance (ISoP) from 2003 to 2006. He was the organizer of CPT 2000-Seventh Conference on Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics and Fourth Congress of the European Association for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics, held in Florence, July 2000. ...
Prof. Velo was secretary of the Italian Society of Pharmacology (SIF) from 1988 to 1992, chairman of the Section of Clinical Pharmacology of SIF (1994-1996 and 2003-2007) and councilor of IUPHAR, Clinical Pharmacology Division (1992-2000). Cofounder of EACPT, he was vice Chairman (1995-1999) and then Chairman (1999-2003). He was also president of the International Society of Pharmacovigilance (ISoP) from 2003 to 2006. He was the organizer of CPT 2000-Seventh Conference on Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics and Fourth Congress of the European Association for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics, held in Florence, July 2000. ...
Get this from a library! Melmon and Morrellis clinical pharmacology : basic principles in therapeutics.. [Kenneth L Melmon; Howard F Morrelli; G Carruthers;]
Two important goals of the discipline of clinical pharmacology are (1) to provide a description of conditions under which drug actions vary among human subjects; and (2) to determine mechanisms underlying this variability, with the goal of improving therapy with available drugs as well as pointing to new drug mechanisms that may be effective in the treatment of human disease. The first steps in the discipline were empirical descriptions of the influence of disease on drug actions and of individuals or families with unusual sensitivities to adverse drug effects. These important descriptive findings are now being replaced by an understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying variability in drug actions. Thus, the effects of disease, drug coadministration, or familial factors in modulating drug action can now be reinterpreted as variability in expression or function of specific genes whose products determine pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. Nevertheless, it is often the personal ...
Get the facts about CSU Extension clinical pharmacology. Seek out accredited nursing programs for the best training. Given a brief hospital internship or prior work experience, you can expect a great return on your medical education.
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Building Global HIV/AIDS Clinical Pharmacology Research Capacity. Welcome Acknowledgement: NIH Fogarty International Center AIDS Training and Research Program. Gene D. Morse, PharmD, FCCP, BCPS Professor, University at Buffalo Associate Director Slideshow 2214632 by zach
Find information about Texas Southern University clinical pharmacology. There are accredited nursing certificate programs that can help launch your career, performing a variety of medical services within a hospital setting.
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Suessmuth, SD; Haider, S; Landwehrmeyer, GB; Farmer, R; Frost, C; Tripepi, G; Andersen, CA; di Bacco, M; Lamanna, C; Diodato, E; +18 more... Massai, L; Diamanti, D; Mori, E; Magnoni, L; Dreyhaupt, J; Schiefele, K; Craufurd, D; Saft, C; Rudzinska, M; Ryglewicz, D; Orth, M; Brzozy, S; Baran, A; Pollio, G; Andre, R; Tabrizi, SJ; Darpo, B; Westerberg, G; (2014) An exploratory double-blind, randomized clinical trial with selisistat, a SirT1 inhibitor, in patients with Huntingtons disease. British journal of clinical pharmacology, 79 (3). pp. 465-476. ISSN 0306-5251 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/bcp.12512 Full text not available from this repository ...
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Get the facts about Kennedy King College clinical pharmacology. There are accredited nursing certificate programs that can help launch your career, performing a variety of medical services within a hospital setting.
Clinical Pharmacology: Current Topics and Case Studies, 9781283074599, available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide.
Learn about Egerton University clinical pharmacology. Nursing is one of the fastest-growing job areas, and for good reason. As the population ages, medical care will continue to expand rapidly.
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This research programme investigates the influence of genetic variability on the clinical pharmacology of carbamazepine (CBZ) and lamotrigine (LTG).. Common polymorphisms in genes that may influence the response to CBZ and LTG include CYP3A4 g.-392A,G, CYP3A5 g.6986A,G, CYP1A2 g.5734C,A, EPHX1 c.337T,C, EPHX1 c.416A,G, UGT2B7 c.802C,T, ABCB1 c.1236C,T, ABCB1 c.2677G,T/A, ABCB1 c.3435C,T and SCN2A c.56G,A.. The prevalence of these common polymorphisms was evaluated in a 400-strong study population from a single research unit. Minor allele frequency ranged between 3.5% (CYP3A4 -392G) and 48.0% (ABCB1 1236T). Allele and genotype distributions were comparable to published data for other Caucasian populations.. The influence of common polymorphisms in drug metabolising enzyme (DME) and sodium channel genes on the optimal dose of CBZ was assessed in a cohort of 70 patients. This study revealed that age and common polymorphisms in the EPHX1 gene (c.337T,C and c.416A,G) are potential predictors for ...
books.google.comhttps://books.google.com/books/about/The_scientific_basis_of_clinical_pharmac.html?id=6upsAAAAMAAJ&utm_source=gb-gplus-shareThe scientific basis of clinical pharmacology ...
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Purchase Antidiabetic Agents: Recent Advances in their Molecular and Clinical Pharmacology, Volume 27 - 1st Edition. Print Book & E-Book. ISBN 9780120133277, 9780080526706
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The proposed clinical pharmacology study is aimed to investigate the systemic availability of BDP/B17MP (active metabolite of BDP) and formoterol after single oral inhalation of CHF 1535 100/6 pMDI (to reach a total dose of BDP 400 µg and formoterol 24 µg) with and without spacer device (AeroChamber Plus™) and in comparison to a free combination of BDP pMDI plus formoterol pMDI licensed products (to reach the same total dose of BDP and formoterol) in adolescent asthmatic patients. The systemic exposure to BDP/B17MP and formoterol after inhalation of CHF 1535 pMDI in adolescents will be additionally compared to the systemic exposure in adults without the spacer device.. The chosen doses correspond to the maximum daily dose of the two components administered as fixed combination. ...
Sarpogrelate is an antiplatelet agent that decreases 5-hydroxytryptamine( 5-HT )levels in platelets via blockade of 5-HT2 receptors, has been used in atherosclerotic peripheral arterial disease.. The present double-blind controlled clinical pharmacology study was performed on 45 patients with cerebral infarction, who were given 75, 150, or 300 mg three times daily of sarpogrelate for 7 days in order to evaluate the dose-response relationship in terms of the precisely measured inhibition of platelet aggregation. ...
The American College of Veterinary Clinical Pharmacology certified Dr. Brian V. Lubbers, Manhattan, Kan., as a new diplomate following
: Residency, CHARITÉ, DEPARTMENT OF NEUROSURGERY AT THE CHARITÉ FACULTY OF MEDICINE. Mar 2008 - Present: Clinical Pharmacologist/Clinical Trial Leader, Actelion Pharmaceuticals Ltd. Jun 2005 - Feb 2008: Head of Physicians - Phase II, Clinical Pharmacology, PAREXEL International GmbH. Jun 2004 - May 2005: Scientist in Toxicology, CHARITÉ BERLIN - INSTITUTE OF CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY AND TOXICOLOGY. Jan 2004 - May 2004: Medical Advisor - Phase II-IV, PAREXEL International GmbH. Mar 2002 - Dec 2003: Study Director, PAREXEL International GmbH. Sep 2000 - Feb 2002: Associate Study Director, PAREXEL International GmbH. Aug 1999 - Aug 2000: Medical Writer, Max-Bürger-Zentrum. Jun 1997 - Nov 1998: Internship - Department of Neurology & Neurosurgery, Median Clinic Grünheide, Germany. - Switzerland
Below is the solution for Fentanyl cousin informally crossword clue. This clue was last seen on Jan 11 2018 in the Wall Street Journal crossword puzzle. While searching our database we found 1 possible solution matching the query "Fentanyl cousin informally". Please check the answer provided below and if its not what you are looking for then head over to the main post and use the search function. You can always go back at Wall Street Journal Crossword Puzzles crossword puzzle and find the other solutions for todays crossword clues. ...
Physical activity (PA) is a cornerstone of disease prevention and treatment. There is, however, a considerable disparity between public health policy, clinical guidelines and the delivery of physical activity promotion within the National Health Service in the UK. If this is to be addressed in the battle against non-communicable diseases, it is vital that tomorrows doctors understand the basic science and health benefits of physical activity. The aim of this study was to assess the provision of physical activity teaching content in the curricula of all medical schools in the UK. Our results, with responses from all UK medical schools, uncovered some alarming findings, showing that there is widespread omission of basic teaching elements, such as the Chief Medical Officer recommendations and guidance on physical activity. There is an urgent need for physical activity teaching to have dedicated time at medical schools, to equip tomorrows doctors with the basic knowledge, confidence and skills to ...
For lantent B, an antibiotic known as isoniazid NIH boss." It will inculcate respect for you, since people will find out protective sheath that covers nerves is damaged. It may indicate whCoping cough, bacterial or high paying job as an obstetrician in any healthcare organization. A midwife often gives special personal will be conducted to confirm pulmonary embolism? Depending upon the study of the physical condition of a patient, so that he can frame a healthy dietary plan for you, if required.. ... [...] Read more ...
Health & Medicine is hosting two important upcoming facilitator training sessions by Girls Circle Learn Skills to Lead Engaging Support Groups for Girls with Girls Circle Facilitator Training : May 19th - 20th Promote Healthy Bonds between Mothers & Daughters with Mother-Daughter Circle Training : May 21st (Training Location: Mental Health America of Illinois 70 E. Lake Street, Ste. 900, Chicago, IL 60601) Download the flyer to learn how you can become a Girls Circle facilitator and bring this evidenced-based program into your girl-serving agencies and organizations to improve the resilience of girls and young women Questions? Email Sarah Schriber, Senior Policy Consultant Health & Medicine Policy Research Group ...
Australias National Medicines Policy is a cooperative endeavour to bring about better health outcomes for all Australians, focusing especially on peoples access to, and wise use of, medicines. The term
Are you an avid crossword solver but get a little stumped every now and then? Well youve reached the right place! Here we will help you find the answer to the clue Eyeball covering from Universal crossword. Once weve looked for any additional hints from inside the Universal crossword puzzle and gathered any other information that can help us find the answer to the clue Eyeball covering, we can finally conclude that the possible answers for the clue Eyeball covering are: ...
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Professor Sir Munir Pirmohamed is a clinical pharmacologist, geneticist and the NHS Chair of Pharmacogenetics. Munir Pirmohamed studied Medicine at the University of Liverpool from 1980 to 1985, Professor Pirmohamed then went on to study a PhD in Pharmacology in 1993, and began working as a Consultant Physician at the Royal Liverpool University Hospital in 1996. Professor Pirmohamed gained the position of Personal Chair in Clinical Pharmacology at The University of Liverpool in 2001, and went on to become the NHS Chair of Pharmacogenetics in 2007. Professor Pirmohamed is a member of the Commission on Human Medicines and Chair of its Pharmacovigilance Expert Advisory Group, in addition to the role of Deputy Director for the MRC Centre for Drug Safety Sciences in Liverpool. Alongside these responsibilities Professor Pirmohamed also sits on the advisory board for precision medicine company Geneix. Pharmacogenetics and drug safety are the main areas of Professor Pirmohameds research. With a ...
Weapon usually fired between a 45ï and 90ï angle - See more at: http://crosswordpuzzlehelps.com/clue/New-York-Times-Crossword-Puzzle-Solutions-February-26th-2017-#sthash.QUojGvKJ.dpuf. Grinds to a halt ...
Developing drugs for rare disease can be challenging due to specific rare disease characteristics. The French Medical Pharmacology is structured and positioned to play a major role in orphan drug research and development due to the required expertise concentrated into pharmacology departments, exclusively implemented within the French university hospitals, public hospitals that are linked to a medical school (and often a pharmacy school) with numerous INSERM or CNRS labelled research units. In addition, these structures allow a close collaboration between researchers, academic institutions and biotech start-up (most of them being spin-off of the academic structures). Also, within university hospitals are located the clinical investigation centres, linking to the F-CRIN network and also to Inserm and hospitals, that enable care staff and researchers to be associated and clinical research protocols to be carried out on site, in full respect with ethic and regulatory aspects. As a consequence, this ...
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BUFFALO, N.Y. - With the support of a $400,000 grant from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), a University at Buffalo researcher will investigate how therapeutic antibodies are handled in the human lung.. The study, led by Javier G. Blanco, PhD, associate professor in the UB School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, will examine FcRn, a receptor in the lungs that is key to transporting antibodies in and out of various tissues.. Understanding this receptor and the epigenetic factors that control its expression may help pharmacologists improve the delivery of medications used to treat pulmonary diseases, particularly, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), a group of drugs that have revolutionized treatment for a variety of diseases.. There are 47 mAbs in the U.S. and Europe, the vast majority of which are delivered by injection, a method that may be uncomfortable for some patients or problematic for ensuring appropriate mAbs levels in tissues, says Blanco.. His ...
With the support of a $400,000 grant from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), a UB researcher will investigate how therapeutic antibodies are handled in the human lung.. The study, led by Javier G. Blanco, associate professor in the School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, will examine FcRn, a receptor in the lungs that is key to transporting antibodies in and out of various tissues.. Understanding this receptor and the epigenetic factors that control its expression may help pharmacologists improve delivery of medications used to treat pulmonary diseases, particularly monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), a group of drugs that have revolutionized treatment for a variety of diseases.. There are 47 mAbs in the U.S. and Europe, the vast majority of which are delivered by injection, a method that may be uncomfortable for some patients or problematic for ensuring appropriate mAbs levels in tissues, Blanco says.. His research is a small step toward initial development ...
Abstract The increase of herbal medicine use led many scientists to contribute to the research in this field. Also a few pharmacologists, after an initial phase of correct criticisms, today recognize the possibility of investigating the scientific value of medicinal products composed essentially of vegetable extracts. However, it is logical to pose the questions: (i)…
A UC Davis pharmacologist has been awarded a two-year, $95,000 Innovation Award from the American Diabetes Association to find out if blocking the pancreatic hormone amylin can reduce diabetic heart failure.
A UC Davis pharmacologist has been awarded a two-year, $95,000 Innovation Award from the American Diabetes Association to find out if blocking the pancreatic hormone amylin can reduce diabetic heart failure.
Feel free to print out this crossword puzzle for your personal use. You may also link to it. However, this web page and puzzle are copyrighted and may not be distributed without prior written consent. ...
Feel free to print out this crossword puzzle for your personal use. You may also link to it. However, this web page and puzzle are copyrighted and may not be distributed without prior written consent. ...
Biology Classification of Living Things Taxonomy Science Crossword Puzzle is fabulous for science vocabulary review or test prep and works well for early finishers, as a bell ringer, for homework or as a substitute assignment! Vocabulary words include: BINOMIAL NOMENCLATURE, CLASS, CLASSIFICATION, DIVISION, FAMILY, GENUS, KINGDOM, ORDER, PHYLUM, SPECIFIC EPITHET, TAXONOMY
Students visit an interactive Web site to research the planets and Sun in Earths solar system, then create original crossword puzzles based on their research.
This crossword puzzle on biomes is a fun vocabulary review for students and contains the following: 1. Blank Version without word bank 2. Blank Version with word bank 3. Answer Key Vocabulary Words: ♦ Alpine ♦ Climate ♦ Deciduous ♦ Desert ♦ Grassland ♦ Rainforest ♦ Savannah ♦ Taiga ♦ Temperate Forest ♦ Tundra Important:
This custom crossword puzzle forJuly 22, 2012, has a science and engineering theme. Only relevant engineering and science words are used.
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How well did you do on the Gaia Herbs crossword puzzle? Find the answers below. Across: 1. PEPPER 3. BURDOCK 5. CONNECT 9. MILKTHISTLE 10. OATS 11. CACAO 13. CIN...
International Journal of Basic & Clinical Pharmacology (IJBCP) is an open access, international, peer-reviewed journal. The journals full text is available online at http://www.ijbcp.com. The journal allows free access to its contents. IJBCP publishes important advances in pharmacology that include basic and clinical studies of all aspects of pharmacology in human, animal and cell-line studies. The journal also accepts articles on traditional medicine. The journal has a broad coverage of relevant topics across pharmacology including ethics, research methodology, data management, drug utilisation, regulatory, teaching and biostatistics. IJBCP is one of the fastest communication journals and articles are published online within short time after acceptance of manuscripts. The types of articles accepted include original research articles, review articles, case reports, conference abstracts, general articles in the field of basic and clinical pharmacology, new drug updates and letters to the editor. It is
Dr. Kohn received an A.B. degree from Harvard in 1952 with majors in Chemistry and Physics, an M.D. degree from Columbia College of Physicians and Surgeons in 1956, and a Ph.D. in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology from Harvard in 1965. After internship at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York, Kohn came to the National Cancer Institute and served as Clinical Associate in the
Authors: Bertram Katzung , Anthony Trevor Pages: 1216. Edition: 13th (December 2014). ISBN-13: 978-0071825054. ISBN-10: 0071825053. Description: A comprehensive textbook for the medical and nursing students which covers all basic and clinical aspects of pharmacology. There are over 400 colored illustrations and new drugs are covered in this latest edition.. Buy it from Amazon.com for $49.94. Kindle version price is $47.44. ...
Cancer Clinical Pharmacology provides a comprehensive account of the scientific basis of anti-cancer therapy in patients with solid tumours and haematological malignancies. An international group of experts have brought together information on the basic principles of pharmacology and tumour biology, bioanalytical aspects, pharmacokinetics, and the pharmacodynamics of anti-cancer agents.
Drug-induced blood dyscrasias, while uncommon compared with other reported ADRs, are associated with significant drug-related fatalities, varying from mild thrombocytopenia through to life-threatening aplastic anaemia and thrombosis. An understanding of the mechanism is essential for effective management and identification of possible causal agents. Anaemia, together with neutropenia and thrombocytopenia, are common presentations of drug-induced dyscrasias. A basis for understanding the pathogenesis, clinical presentation, and differential diagnosis of primary drug-induced anaemias is the focus of this article.
Clinical Pharmacology Consulting Services, Inc.. Clinical Pharmacology is the scientific discipline that involves all aspects of the relationship between drugs and humans. It is a multidisciplinary science that encompasses professionals with a wide variety of scientific skills including medicine, pharmacology, and pharmacy. Our primary goal is improving patient care, directly or indirectly, by developing better medicine regimens and promoting the safer and more effective use of drugs. One way by which a pharmacist can improve the quality of life of patients is medication management. Specifically, to look for deficiencies caused by medicines, and in particular, chronic medication therapy.. While pharmaceuticals have lifesaving benefits, many can have serious side effects. Millions of Americans suffer from an almost completely ignored epidemic of drug-induced nutrient depletion that can cause grave and complicated health problems. Some scientists have estimated that 25% of pharmaceutical side ...
Cross Listing: PHARMAC 7596. Description: Capstone project or internship for students in Clinical Pharmacology specialization of the MS Applied Clinical and Preclinical Research Program. Culminating learning activity integrating core and specialization coursework. Capstone project or internship performed at an organization involved with clinical research drug studies with the oversight of a faculty advisor and a site mentor.. Prerequisite(s): Completion of all required didactic clinical pharmacology courses in the Master of Applied Clinical and Preclinical Research program, or permission of program director.. Semester Offered: Offered all semesters. Credits: Graduate 1-12 units. Course Director: Joseph Kitzmiller, PhD & Marjorie Neidecker, PhD. Textbook(s): TBD. ...
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The Oncologist Clinical Pharmacology Update on Chemotherapeutic Agents Utilized for Perioperative Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy PAUL H. SUGARBAKER, a JORGE TORRES MORA, b PABLO CARMIGNANI, a O. ANTHONY
Dr Kashuba is a clinical pharmacologist and Associate Professor at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC-CH) School of Pharmacy. She is Director of the UNC Center for AIDS Research Clinical Pharmacology and Analytical Chemistry Core, and Director and Pharmacologist for the UNC AIDS Clinical Trials Group Pharmacology Support Laboratory. In addition to her research program, Dr Kashuba teaches drug metabolism, pharmacokinetics, and antiretroviral pharmacology. Her research interests include antiretroviral pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic relationships in sanctuary sites, and understanding and predicting drug-drug interactions. ...
Pharmacogenetics in neuropsychopharmacology [Elektronische Ressource] : from clinical associations to intermediate phenotypes of drug response / submitted by Elena Lebedeva : Ulm University Institute of Pharmacology of Natural Products and Clinical Pharmacology Department of Clinical Pharmacology Supervisor: Professor for Clinical Pharmacology Dr. Julia Kirchheiner Pharmacogenetics in neuropsychopharmacology: from clinical associations to intermediate phenotypes of drug response THESIS Presented to the Faculty of Medicine, Ulm University, to obtain
International consultant in essential medicine programs and promoting rational use of medicines in Fiji (2009), Mongolia (2006-2007), Philippines (2006-2007), Bangladesh (2006-2007), China (2006-2007), Cambodia (2001-2005), Lao PDR (2001-2003). International consultant in medicine policy and drug evaluation in Cambodia (2003, 2005, 2007), Indonesia (2005-2006), China (2003), Vietnam (2003). Facilitators in various international training courses in medicine policy and promoting rational use of medicines, WHO/INRUD Courses in Promoting Rational Use of Medicines (Yogyakarta 1994, Manila 1996, Dhaka 1997, New Delhi 1999, Padang 2000, Teheran 2002, Teheran 2003, Islamabad/Bhurban 2004, Brunei 2007), Training Courses on Hospital Drugs and Therapeutics Committee (Penang 2001, Yogyakarta 2001, Mumbai 2002, Jinan/China 2007), WHO/Boston University International Courses on Medicine Policy in Developing Countries (Yogyakarta 2002, Tashken/Samarkand 2003). Hosting international scientific training courses, ...
Bictegravir (BIC) is an investigational, once-daily, unboosted HIV integrase strand transfer inhibitor (INSTI) with potent in vitro activity against most INSTI-resistant variants. BIC is currently in development as a single tablet regimen (STR) coformulated with FTC/TAF for treatment of HIV-1 infection in adults and adolescents. Clinical pharmacology assessments of the PK, ADME and DDI potential were performed.. A single- (SD) and multiple-dose (MD) randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled (6 active; 2 placebo/cohort) of staggered dose-escalation evaluated SD BIC 5, 25, 50, 100, 300 or 600 mg; or once-daily MD 5, 25, 50, 100 or 300 mg for 14 days (fasted) in healthy volunteers. An ADME/ mass balance study included 8 healthy male subjects dosed with a SD 100 mg plus 100 µCi [14C]-labeled BIC. Blood, urine and feces samples were analyzed for total radioactivity and pooled plasma and excreta samples were radio-profiled. An open-label, six cohort (n=15/cohort), fixed sequence and cross-over ...
Edited by Geoffrey Hanks, Nathan I. Cherny, Nicholas A. Christakis, Marie Fallon, Stein Kaasa and Russell K. Portenoy.. P ublished online March 2011 . Book. Subjects: Palliative Medicine; History of Medicine; Pharmacology; Public Health and Epidemiology; Infectious Diseases; Epidemiology; Medical Statistics and Methodology; Medical Oncology; Medical Ethics; Nursing Skills; Occupational Therapy; Arts Therapies; Dietetics; Physiotherapy; Speech and Language Therapy; Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics; Paediatrics; Communication Skills; Clinical Science; Pain Medicine; Clinical Radiology; Interventional Radiology; Psychiatry; Gastroenterology; Dermatology; Genito-urinary Medicine; Endocrinology and Diabetes; Respiratory Medicine and Pulmonology; Neurology; Cardiovascular Medicine; Nephrology; Critical Care; Geriatric Medicine; Rehabilitation Medicine; Professional Development in Medicine. 1704 pages. ...
Edited by Geoffrey Hanks, Nathan I. Cherny, Nicholas A. Christakis, Marie Fallon, Stein Kaasa and Russell K. Portenoy.. P ublished online March 2011 . Book. Subjects: Palliative Medicine; History of Medicine; Pharmacology; Public Health and Epidemiology; Infectious Diseases; Epidemiology; Medical Statistics and Methodology; Medical Oncology; Medical Ethics; Nursing Skills; Occupational Therapy; Arts Therapies; Dietetics and Nutrition; Physiotherapy; Speech and Language Therapy; Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics; Paediatrics; Communication Skills; Clinical Science; Pain Medicine; Clinical Radiology; Interventional Radiology; Psychiatry; Gastroenterology; Dermatology; Genito-urinary Medicine; Endocrinology and Diabetes; Respiratory Medicine and Pulmonology; Neurology; Cardiovascular Medicine; Nephrology; Critical Care; Geriatric Medicine; Rehabilitation Medicine; Professional Development in Medicine. 1704 pages. ...
Naftifine (brand name Exoderil) is an allylamine antifungal drug for the topical treatment of tinea pedis, tinea cruris, and tinea corporis (fungal infections). Naftifine has triple action: antifungal, antibacterial and anti-inflammatory. Its precise mechanism of action is unknown, but may involve selectively blocking sterol biosynthesis via inhibition of the squalene 2,3-epoxidase enzyme. The half-life is approximately 2-3 days. The metabolites are excreted in the urine and feces. Robertson Dirk B, Maibach Howard I, "Chapter 61. Dermatologic Pharmacology" (Chapter). Bertram G. Katzung, Susan B. Masters, Anthony J. Trevor: Basic & Clinical Pharmacology, 11e: http://www.accesspharmacy.com/content.aspx?aID=4517257. Micromedex DRUGDEX Drug Point: Naftifine Hydrochloride. Accessed at www.thomsonhc.com/../BeginWith#secN10184, February 18, 2010. AccessPharmacy: Drug Monographs: Naftifine. Accessed at http://www.accesspharmacy.com/drugContentPopup.aspx?mid=6620§ion=10, February 18, 2010 ...
One of the primary reasons behind the enduring rift between conventional medical science and chiropractic is the contrasting nature of their basic philosophies. Philosophical "truths" in Western civilization are validated through a process employing scientific methodology. "Truths" related to health science, until recently, have only been generated through research conducted by organismal, cellular and molecular biologists, biochemists, pharmacologists and medical doctors. Consequently, chiropractic has been at a distinct disadvantage in acquiring recognition as a valid healing art. However, the leading edge of cellular and molecular biology research is heralding a radical departure from its traditional theories and is in turn, creating a new philosophy.. The mission statement of Modern Science was defined by English philosopher Francis Bacon and adopted shortly after the Scientific Revolution (1543). Accordingly, sciences purpose was to "control and dominate Nature." The primary purpose of ...

Basic & Clinical Pharmacology - Google BooksBasic & Clinical Pharmacology - Google Books

... this pharmacology course book presents the essential concepts that students need to know about the science of pharmacology and ... Focuses on the basic principles of each drug group as well as the clinical choice and use of drugs in patients and the ... and comprehensive pharmacology book for medical, pharmacy, and other health science students. Widely respected for its clarity ... Clinical_Pharmacology.html?id=P2pqAAAAMAAJ&utm_source=gb-gplus-shareBasic & Clinical Pharmacology. ...
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Clinical PharmacologyClinical Pharmacology

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Pharmacology Clinical Practice Guidelines SummariesPharmacology Clinical Practice Guidelines Summaries

Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium guidelines for HLA-B genotype and abacavir dosing. *Published By Clinical ... Of Supportive Care In CancerNational Academy Of Clinical BiochemistryNational Clinical Guideline CentreNational Clinical ... Clinical practice guidelines for antimicrobial prophylaxis in surgery. *Published By American Society Of Health-system ... ASPEN clinical guidelines: nutrition support of adult patients with hyperglycemia. *Published By American Society For ...
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Division of Clinical PharmacologyDivision of Clinical Pharmacology

MMed Clinical Pharmacology/FCCP (SA). Our DoE and HPCSA-accredited 4 year full-time registrar training programme in Clinical ... the Clinical Pharmacology Division, together with Tiervlei Trial Centre (TTC), launched a fully accredited two-year, part-time ...
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Clinical Pharmacology ScholarshipsClinical Pharmacology Scholarships

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Clinical Pharmacology | Prospects.ac.ukClinical Pharmacology | Prospects.ac.uk

... fees and contact details for Clinical Pharmacology at Kings College London on prospects.ac.uk ... The Clinical Pharmacology course will give you the advanced skills and knowledge to evaluate the safety of new medicinal ... clinical scientists and allied health professionals interested in the clinical development process. ... Applicants require either a medical degree (such as an MBBS) or a 2:1 first degree in pharmacy, pharmacology, biology, ...
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Medical Pharmacology Clinical Case:  Adrenergic Pharmacology Issues in 
Local AnesthesiaMedical Pharmacology Clinical Case: Adrenergic Pharmacology Issues in Local Anesthesia

This case considers both adrenergic and opioid pharmacology issues in patient management subsequent to motor vehicle accident ...
more infohttps://pharmacology2000.com/Autonomics/Adrenergics1/case7/caseset7a.htm

Clinical Pharmacology - University of Kansas Medical CenterClinical Pharmacology - University of Kansas Medical Center

The Division of Clinical Pharmacologys primary focus is the prevention and treatment of Atherosclerosis and ... Clinical Pharmacology. Our division specializes in the treatment and prevention of atherosclerosis, the leading cause of heart ... Clinical trials. Our division is also involved in clinical studies of new investigational medications for the treatment and ...
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Small Animal Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics - 2nd EditionSmall Animal Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics - 2nd Edition

Purchase Small Animal Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics - 2nd Edition. Print Book & E-Book. ISBN 9780721605555, ... Associate Professor, Department of Veterinary Physiology and Pharmacology, and Veterinary Teaching Hospital; Director, Clinical ... Small Animal Pharmacology and Therapeutics, 2nd Edition helps you understand both the therapeutic uses of common ... pharmaceuticals and the pharmacology behind them, giving you all of the information you need to design and modify dosing ...
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Current Clinical Pharmacology | BenthamScienceCurrent Clinical Pharmacology | BenthamScience

Current Clinical Pharmacology. Emerging Sources Citation Index (ESCI), MEDLINE/PubMed/PubMed Central, Scopus, EMBASE, Chemical ...
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Current Clinical Pharmacology | BenthamScienceCurrent Clinical Pharmacology | BenthamScience

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Clinical Pharmacology at CROI 2015Clinical Pharmacology at CROI 2015

Commentary. We were happy to see an increase in work on HAND and CNS pharmacology at CROI 2015. One particular clinical need is ... In these Phase 3 clinical trials, TAF was non-inferior to TDF, and the renal and BMD safety profile was better. This appears to ... ART, Pharmacology and Resistance. Abstract 117 was a retrospective analysis of patients with low-level viremia (50-999 HIV RNA ... Hopefully we have seen the end of discovering poor adherence in large, expensive clinical trials, after the fact. III. Drug- ...
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Fundamental and Clinical PharmacologyFundamental and Clinical Pharmacology

Pulmonary Pharmacology. Renal Pharmacology. Thrombosis & Hemostasis. Clinical research, including clinical studies and clinical ... Pulmonary Pharmacology. Renal Pharmacology. Thrombosis & Hemostasis. Clinical research, including clinical studies and clinical ... Clinical Pharmacology publishes reports describing important and novel developments in fundamental as well as clinical research ... Clinical Pharmacology publishes reports describing important and novel developments in fundamental as well as clinical research ...
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Medical Witness Summit - Clinical Pharmacology ConferenceMedical Witness Summit - Clinical Pharmacology Conference

Clinical Pharmacology Conference to be held in Charlotte, NC, United States on Oct 13, 2001 ... Clinical Neuropharmacology , Clinical Pharmacology , Clinical trial , Colo-Rectal , Complementary / Alternative Medicine , ... Pharmacology/Drugs & Therapeutics , Physical therapy , Plastic Surgery , Psychiatry , Psychology , Public Health/Community ...
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Neonatal Pharmacology Course - Clinical Pharmacology ConferenceNeonatal Pharmacology Course - Clinical Pharmacology Conference

Clinical Pharmacology Conference to be held in La Jolla, CA, United States on Oct 28, 2001 ... Clinical Neuropharmacology , Clinical Pharmacology , Clinical trial , Colo-Rectal , Complementary / Alternative Medicine , ... Pharmacology/Drugs & Therapeutics , Physical therapy , Plastic Surgery , Psychiatry , Psychology , Public Health/Community ...
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Clinical Pharmacology and Cardiovascular Safety of Naproxen | SpringerLinkClinical Pharmacology and Cardiovascular Safety of Naproxen | SpringerLink

2 Clinical Pharmacology of NSAIDs. 2.1 Pharmacodynamics of NSAIDs. The major mechanism of action of NSAIDs is the blockage of ... Reappraisal of the clinical pharmacology of low-dose aspirin by comparing novel direct and traditional indirect biomarkers of ... Clinical pharmacology of platelet, monocyte, and vascular cyclooxygenase inhibition by naproxen and low-dose aspirin in healthy ... Clinical trials are typically the most robust evidence of drug associations to outcomes. However, the two clinical studies ...
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Opportunities for a career in clinical pharmacology | The BMJOpportunities for a career in clinical pharmacology | The BMJ

Clinical pharmacology or, more precisely, clinical pharmacology and therapeutics is a relatively young specialty concerned with ... Clinical pharmacology was born out of pharmacology - drug action in animals and in in vitro systems and out of the explosion in ... Virtually all British medical schools have departments of clinical pharmacology. Most of the professors of pharmacology as well ... also certified in clinical pharmacology are likely to be increasingly sought after by trusts wanting some clinical pharmacology ...
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Current Clinical Pharmacology: Ingenta Connect Table Of ContentsCurrent Clinical Pharmacology: Ingenta Connect Table Of Contents

Current Clinical Pharmacology publishes frontier reviews on all the latest advances in clinical pharmacology. The journals aim ... State of the Art Clinical Efficacy and Safety Evaluation of N-Acetylcarnosine Dipeptide Ophthalmic Prodrug. Principles for the ...
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Current Clinical Pharmacology publishes frontier reviews on all the latest advances in clinical pharmacology. The journals aim ...
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Clinical pharmacology: the European challengeClinical pharmacology: the European challenge

The main part of the book consists of brief reports on the organization and teaching of clinical pharmacology in the medical ... Reports the results of a survey on the academic status of clinical pharmacology in the medical schools and health ministries of ... The book opens with three articles assessing the status of clinical pharmacology in Europe. These articles discuss the main ... Points covered include the recognition of clinical pharmacology as a specialty, number of posts and departments, future plans, ...
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Clinical Pharmacology Training Program - Mayo ClinicClinical Pharmacology Training Program - Mayo Clinic

The Clinical Pharmacology Training Program at Mayo Clinic supports training in clinical pharmacology in the laboratory-based ... Clinical Pharmacology Training Program. Director. Wang, Liewei M.D., Ph.D.. Weinshilboum, Richard M.D.. ... Clinical pharmacology involves the study and understanding of the interactions between therapeutic agents and people. This ... Training is recommended for a two-year period, and trainees are eligible to become board certified in clinical pharmacology. ...
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Clinical Pharmacology of Cyclophosphamide | Cancer ResearchClinical Pharmacology of Cyclophosphamide | Cancer Research

Clinical Pharmacology of Cyclophosphamide. Charles M. Bagley Jr., Frieda W. Bostick and Vincent T. DeVita Jr. ... The human pharmacology of cyclophosphamide was investigated in 26 patients who received cyclophosphamide 14C in doses of 6 to ...
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Category:Clinical pharmacology - GanfydCategory:Clinical pharmacology - Ganfyd

Clinical pharmacology is the study of pharmacology in relation to man. Ganfyd is not intended as an exhaustive or authoritative ... Pages in category "Clinical pharmacology". The following 114 pages are in this category, out of 114 total. ... reference on pharmacology. If thats what you are looking for, you might like to try Pharmacology references. ... Retrieved from "http://www.ganfyd.org/index.php?title=Category:Clinical_pharmacology" ...
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Genentech: Amit Garg | Senior Scientist, Clinical PharmacologyGenentech: Amit Garg | Senior Scientist, Clinical Pharmacology

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Clinical Pharmacology | Postgraduate Taught Degrees | Study Here | The University of AberdeenClinical Pharmacology | Postgraduate Taught Degrees | Study Here | The University of Aberdeen

Our Clinical Pharmacology MSc aims to develop your research skills, your knowledge of clinical drugs and their use in the real ... Why Study Clinical Pharmacology?. *You will be taught by world-leading researchers and qualified clinicians on-site and you ... An MSc in Clinical Pharmacology from the University of Aberdeen will prove a rewarding platform towards a career in the ... Completing the MSc programme in Clinical Pharmacology at the University of Aberdeen will equip you with a range of essential ...
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  • Risk of new primary non-breast cancers after breast cancer treatment: a Dutch population-based study," Journal of Clinical Oncology , vol. 26, no. 8, pp. 1239-1246, 2008. (hindawi.com)
  • Toxicity of older and younger patients treated with adjuvant chemotherapy for node-positive breast cancer: the Cancer and Leukemia Group B experience," Journal of Clinical Oncology , vol. 25, no. 24, pp. 3699-3704, 2007. (hindawi.com)
  • Gemcitabine plus vinorelbine versus vinorelbine alone in elderly patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer," Journal of Clinical Oncology , vol. 18, no. 13, pp. 2529-2536, 2000. (hindawi.com)
  • Continuous ambulatory ECG monitoring during fluorouracil therapy: a prospective study," Journal of Clinical Oncology , vol. 7, no. 4, pp. 509-514, 1989. (hindawi.com)
  • Senior adult oncology clinical practice guidelines in oncology," JNCCN Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network , vol. 3, no. 4, pp. 572-590, 2005. (hindawi.com)
  • Here is a useful reminder from the original FDA-approved package insert for TDF from October 26, 2001: "Although tenofovir-associated renal toxicity has not been observed in pooled clinical studies for up to one year, long term renal effects are unknown. (natap.org)
  • Firstly, the recognition that clinical studies must be properly designed, executed, and analysed in order to be certain that observed drug effects are real and not due to chance, bias, or a placebo effect. (bmj.com)
  • It is one of three modular programmes in Pharmaceutical Medicine designed for working physicians, clinical scientists and allied health professionals interested in the clinical development process. (prospects.ac.uk)
  • Thirdly, the development of techniques to measure dynamic responses to drugs has allowed clinical pharmacologists to better define the dose effect or response relationship and to understand the mechanism of action of many important drugs. (bmj.com)
  • Clinical pharmacology was born out of pharmacology - drug action in animals and in in vitro systems and out of the explosion in the number of new drugs which were emerging about 20 years ago. (bmj.com)
  • As we move into the era where every gene and, in theory, every drug target is known, there is a challenge to, and demand for, clinical pharmacologists who are able to marry up disease with the right genes and drugs. (bmj.com)
  • Many young doctors who will become clinical pharmacologists will have shown some interest in drug action and usage by taking an intercalated BSc (or equivalent) in the subject. (bmj.com)
  • The human pharmacology of cyclophosphamide was investigated in 26 patients who received cyclophosphamide 14 C in doses of 6 to 80 mg/kg i.v. Levels of the intact drug in plasma and urine and excretion of 14 C label in breath and stools were determined by liquid scintillation counting. (aacrjournals.org)
  • The utility of molecular pharmacology will be highlighted in the context of current and future drug discovery for cardiovascular, neurological and metabolic diseases and cancer. (abdn.ac.uk)
  • It includes the importance of drug transporters in the drug discovery process, regulatory issues and molecular toxicology and pharmacology at an advanced level. (abdn.ac.uk)
  • The importance of understand drug mechanisms of action and associated risk as well as benefit will be emphasised in a clinical setting. (abdn.ac.uk)
  • Molecular Pharmacology - studying drug action at the molecular level. (wikipedia.org)
  • Most of the professors of pharmacology as well as the small number of clinical pharmacologists in health service posts are responsible for clinical pharmacology firms and outpatient clinics. (bmj.com)
  • Clinical pharmacologists are usually practical hands on people. (bmj.com)
  • Clinical pharmacologists usually have a rigorous medical and scientific training that enables them to evaluate evidence and produce new data through well-designed studies. (wikipedia.org)
  • Our division is also involved in clinical studies of new investigational medications for the treatment and prevention of cardiovascular disease. (kumc.edu)
  • Firstly, the assessment of safety and tolerability of drugs has been systematised, again through the randomised controlled clinical trial, but also through spontaneous adverse event reporting and postmarketing surveillance. (bmj.com)
  • What sort of physicians, then, would want a career in clinical pharmacology, what are the opportunities, and what do they actually do? (bmj.com)