Pesticides: Chemicals used to destroy pests of any sort. The concept includes fungicides (FUNGICIDES, INDUSTRIAL); INSECTICIDES; RODENTICIDES; etc.Poisoning: A condition or physical state produced by the ingestion, injection, inhalation of or exposure to a deleterious agent.Pesticide Residues: Pesticides or their breakdown products remaining in the environment following their normal use or accidental contamination.Carbon Monoxide Poisoning: Toxic asphyxiation due to the displacement of oxygen from oxyhemoglobin by carbon monoxide.Poison Control Centers: Facilities which provide information concerning poisons and treatment of poisoning in emergencies.Organophosphate Poisoning: Poisoning due to exposure to ORGANOPHOSPHORUS COMPOUNDS, such as ORGANOPHOSPHATES; ORGANOTHIOPHOSPHATES; and ORGANOTHIOPHOSPHONATES.Insecticides: Pesticides designed to control insects that are harmful to man. The insects may be directly harmful, as those acting as disease vectors, or indirectly harmful, as destroyers of crops, food products, or textile fabrics.Agricultural Workers' Diseases: Diseases in persons engaged in cultivating and tilling soil, growing plants, harvesting crops, raising livestock, or otherwise engaged in husbandry and farming. The diseases are not restricted to farmers in the sense of those who perform conventional farm chores: the heading applies also to those engaged in the individual activities named above, as in those only gathering harvest or in those only dusting crops.Agriculture: The science, art or practice of cultivating soil, producing crops, and raising livestock.Drug Overdose: Accidental or deliberate use of a medication or street drug in excess of normal dosage.Mushroom Poisoning: Poisoning from ingestion of mushrooms, primarily from, but not restricted to, toxic varieties.Cholinesterase Reactivators: Drugs used to reverse the inactivation of cholinesterase caused by organophosphates or sulfonates. They are an important component of therapy in agricultural, industrial, and military poisonings by organophosphates and sulfonates.Household Products: Substances or materials used in the course of housekeeping or personal routine.Agrochemicals: Chemicals used in agriculture. These include pesticides, fumigants, fertilizers, plant hormones, steroids, antibiotics, mycotoxins, etc.AccidentsAntidotes: Agents counteracting or neutralizing the action of POISONS.Herbicides: Pesticides used to destroy unwanted vegetation, especially various types of weeds, grasses (POACEAE), and woody plants. Some plants develop HERBICIDE RESISTANCE.Occupational Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents that occurs as a result of one's occupation.Dextropropoxyphene: A narcotic analgesic structurally related to METHADONE. Only the dextro-isomer has an analgesic effect; the levo-isomer appears to exert an antitussive effect.Pest Control: The reduction or regulation of the population of noxious, destructive, or dangerous plants, insects, or other animals. This includes control of plants that serve as habitats or food sources for animal pests.Drug Packaging: Containers, packaging, and packaging materials for drugs and BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS. These include those in ampule, capsule, tablet, solution or other forms. Packaging includes immediate-containers, secondary-containers, and cartons. In the United States, such packaging is controlled under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act which also stipulates requirements for tamper-resistance and child-resistance. Similar laws govern use elsewhere. (From Code of Federal Regulations, 21 CFR 1 Section 210, 1993) DRUG LABELING is also available.Accidents, HomeHydrocarbons, Chlorinated: Hydrocarbon compounds with one or more of the hydrogens replaced by CHLORINE.Gastric Lavage: Medical procedure involving the emptying of contents in the stomach through the use of a tube inserted through the nose or mouth. It is performed to remove poisons or relieve pressure due to intestinal blockages or during surgery.Fishes, PoisonousHarmful Algal Bloom: An algal bloom where the algae produce powerful toxins that can kill fish, birds, and mammals, and ultimately cause illness in humans. The harmful bloom can also cause oxygen depletion in the water due to the death and decomposition of non-toxic algae species.Gas PoisoningPralidoxime Compounds: Various salts of a quaternary ammonium oxime that reconstitute inactivated acetylcholinesterase, especially at the neuromuscular junction, and may cause neuromuscular blockade. They are used as antidotes to organophosphorus poisoning as chlorides, iodides, methanesulfonates (mesylates), or other salts.Chlorpyrifos: An organothiophosphate cholinesterase inhibitor that is used as an insecticide and as an acaricide.Environmental Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents in the environment or to environmental factors that may include ionizing radiation, pathogenic organisms, or toxic chemicals.Suicide: The act of killing oneself.Amanita: A genus of fungi of the family Agaricaceae, order Agaricales; most species are poisonous.Organophosphorus Compounds: Organic compounds that contain phosphorus as an integral part of the molecule. Included under this heading is broad array of synthetic compounds that are used as PESTICIDES and DRUGS.Diazinon: A cholinesterase inhibitor that is used as an organothiophosphorus insecticide.IowaDieldrin: An organochlorine insecticide whose use has been cancelled or suspended in the United States. It has been used to control locusts, tropical disease vectors, in termite control by direct soil injection, and non-food seed and plant treatment. (From HSDB)Endosulfan: A polychlorinated compound used for controlling a variety of insects. It is practically water-insoluble, but readily adheres to clay particles and persists in soil and water for several years. Its mode of action involves repetitive nerve-discharges positively correlated to increase in temperature. This compound is extremely toxic to most fish. (From Comp Biochem Physiol (C) 1993 Jul;105(3):347-61)Organophosphates: Carbon-containing phosphoric acid derivatives. Included under this heading are compounds that have CARBON atoms bound to one or more OXYGEN atoms of the P(=O)(O)3 structure. Note that several specific classes of endogenous phosphorus-containing compounds such as NUCLEOTIDES; PHOSPHOLIPIDS; and PHOSPHOPROTEINS are listed elsewhere.Rodenticides: Substances used to destroy or inhibit the action of rats, mice, or other rodents.Islands: Tracts of land completely surrounded by water.Fungicides, Industrial: Chemicals that kill or inhibit the growth of fungi in agricultural applications, on wood, plastics, or other materials, in swimming pools, etc.PolandPoisons: Substances which, when ingested, inhaled, or absorbed, or when applied to, injected into, or developed within the body in relatively small amounts may, by their chemical action, cause damage to structure or disturbance of function. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Chemical Warfare Agents: Chemicals that are used to cause the disturbance, disease, or death of humans during WARFARE.Prescription Drugs: Drugs that cannot be sold legally without a prescription.Accident Prevention: Efforts and designs to reduce the incidence of unexpected undesirable events in various environments and situations.Carbofuran: A cholinesterase inhibitor that is used as a systemic insecticide, an acaricide, and nematocide. (From Merck Index, 11th ed)Ships: Large vessels propelled by power or sail used for transportation on rivers, seas, oceans, or other navigable waters. Boats are smaller vessels propelled by oars, paddles, sail, or power; they may or may not have a deck.Organothiophosphorus Compounds: Compounds containing carbon-phosphorus bonds in which the phosphorus component is also bonded to one or more sulfur atoms. Many of these compounds function as CHOLINERGIC AGENTS and as INSECTICIDES.Maneb: Manganese derivative of ethylenebisdithiocarbamate. It is used in agriculture as a fungicide and has been shown to cause irritation to the eyes, nose, skin, and throat.Parathion: A highly toxic cholinesterase inhibitor that is used as an acaricide and as an insecticide.Lindane: An organochlorine insecticide that has been used as a pediculicide and a scabicide. It has been shown to cause cancer.Shellfish Poisoning: Poisoning from toxins present in bivalve mollusks that have been ingested. Four distinct types of shellfish poisoning are recognized based on the toxin involved.Environmental Monitoring: The monitoring of the level of toxins, chemical pollutants, microbial contaminants, or other harmful substances in the environment (soil, air, and water), workplace, or in the bodies of people and animals present in that environment.Environmental Pollutants: Substances or energies, for example heat or light, which when introduced into the air, water, or land threaten life or health of individuals or ECOSYSTEMS.Charcoal: An amorphous form of carbon prepared from the incomplete combustion of animal or vegetable matter, e.g., wood. The activated form of charcoal is used in the treatment of poisoning. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Carbaryl: A carbamate insecticide and parasiticide. It is a potent anticholinesterase agent belonging to the carbamate group of reversible cholinesterase inhibitors. It has a particularly low toxicity from dermal absorption and is used for control of head lice in some countries.Spatio-Temporal Analysis: Techniques which study entities using their topological, geometric, or geographic properties and include the dimension of time in the analysis.Plant Poisoning: Poisoning by the ingestion of plants or its leaves, berries, roots or stalks. The manifestations in both humans and animals vary in severity from mild to life threatening. In animals, especially domestic animals, it is usually the result of ingesting moldy or fermented forage.Foodborne Diseases: Acute illnesses, usually affecting the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT, brought on by consuming contaminated food or beverages. Most of these diseases are infectious, caused by a variety of bacteria, viruses, or parasites that can be foodborne. Sometimes the diseases are caused by harmful toxins from the microbes or other chemicals present in the food. Especially in the latter case, the condition is often called food poisoning.North CarolinaDDT: A polychlorinated pesticide that is resistant to destruction by light and oxidation. Its unusual stability has resulted in difficulties in residue removal from water, soil, and foodstuffs. This substance may reasonably be anticipated to be a carcinogen: Fourth Annual Report on Carcinogens (NTP-85-002, 1985). (From Merck Index, 11th ed)Dimethoate: An organothiophosphorus cholinesterase inhibitor that is used as a systemic and contact insecticide.Wounds and Injuries: Damage inflicted on the body as the direct or indirect result of an external force, with or without disruption of structural continuity.Zineb: An agricultural fungicide of the dithiocarbamate class. It has relatively low toxicity and there is little evidence of human injury from exposure.Malathion: A wide spectrum aliphatic organophosphate insecticide widely used for both domestic and commercial agricultural purposes.Oximes: Compounds that contain the radical R2C=N.OH derived from condensation of ALDEHYDES or KETONES with HYDROXYLAMINE. Members of this group are CHOLINESTERASE REACTIVATORS.Suicide, Attempted: The unsuccessful attempt to kill oneself.Psychotropic Drugs: A loosely defined grouping of drugs that have effects on psychological function. Here the psychotropic agents include the antidepressive agents, hallucinogens, and tranquilizing agents (including the antipsychotics and anti-anxiety agents).Sri LankaDichlorvos: An organophosphorus insecticide that inhibits ACETYLCHOLINESTERASE.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.NorwayPhosmet: An organothiophosphorus insecticide that has been used to control pig mange.Protective Clothing: Clothing designed to protect the individual against possible exposure to known hazards.Carbamates: Derivatives of carbamic acid, H2NC(=O)OH. Included under this heading are N-substituted and O-substituted carbamic acids. In general carbamate esters are referred to as urethanes, and polymers that include repeating units of carbamate are referred to as POLYURETHANES. Note however that polyurethanes are derived from the polymerization of ISOCYANATES and the singular term URETHANE refers to the ethyl ester of carbamic acid.Occupational Diseases: Diseases caused by factors involved in one's employment.United StatesMonocrotophos: An organophosphate insecticide that inhibits monoamine oxidase and acetylcholinesterase. It has been shown to be genotoxic.Paternal Exposure: Exposure of the male parent, human or animal, to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents in the environment or to environmental factors that may include ionizing radiation, pathogenic organisms, or toxic chemicals that may affect offspring.Pyrethrins: The active insecticidal constituent of CHRYSANTHEMUM CINERARIIFOLIUM flowers. Pyrethrin I is the pyretholone ester of chrysanthemummonocarboxylic acid and pyrethrin II is the pyretholone ester of chrysanthemumdicarboxylic acid monomethyl ester.United States Environmental Protection Agency: An agency in the Executive Branch of the Federal Government. It was created as an independent regulatory agency responsible for the implementation of federal laws designed to protect the environment. Its mission is to protect human health and the ENVIRONMENT.Water Pollutants, Chemical: Chemical compounds which pollute the water of rivers, streams, lakes, the sea, reservoirs, or other bodies of water.Cause of Death: Factors which produce cessation of all vital bodily functions. They can be analyzed from an epidemiologic viewpoint.Methoxychlor: An insecticide. Methoxychlor has estrogenic effects in mammals, among other effects.Methyl Parathion: The methyl homolog of parathion. An effective, but highly toxic, organothiophosphate insecticide and cholinesterase inhibitor.Heptachlor: A man-made compound previously used to control termites and other insects. Even though production of heptachlor was phased out of use in the United States during the late 1980's it remains in soil and hazardous waste sites. It is clearly toxic to animals and humans but, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) has determined that heptachlor is not classifiable as to its carcinogenicity to humans. (From ATSDR Public Heath Statement, April 1989)Hospitalization: The confinement of a patient in a hospital.Chlordan: A highly poisonous organochlorine insecticide. The EPA has cancelled registrations of pesticides containing this compound with the exception of its use through subsurface ground insertion for termite control and the dipping of roots or tops of non-food plants. (From Merck Index, 11th ed)Captan: One of the phthalimide fungicides.Azinphosmethyl: An organothiophosphorus cholinesterase inhibitor. It has been used as an acaricide and as an insecticide.CholinesterasesAcetaminophen: Analgesic antipyretic derivative of acetanilide. It has weak anti-inflammatory properties and is used as a common analgesic, but may cause liver, blood cell, and kidney damage.Causality: The relating of causes to the effects they produce. Causes are termed necessary when they must always precede an effect and sufficient when they initiate or produce an effect. Any of several factors may be associated with the potential disease causation or outcome, including predisposing factors, enabling factors, precipitating factors, reinforcing factors, and risk factors.Food Contamination: The presence in food of harmful, unpalatable, or otherwise objectionable foreign substances, e.g. chemicals, microorganisms or diluents, before, during, or after processing or storage.Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions: Disorders that result from the intended use of PHARMACEUTICAL PREPARATIONS. Included in this heading are a broad variety of chemically-induced adverse conditions due to toxicity, DRUG INTERACTIONS, and metabolic effects of pharmaceuticals.Atrazine: A selective triazine herbicide. Inhalation hazard is low and there are no apparent skin manifestations or other toxicity in humans. Acutely poisoned sheep and cattle may show muscular spasms, fasciculations, stiff gait, increased respiratory rates, adrenal degeneration, and congestion of the lungs, liver, and kidneys. (From The Merck Index, 11th ed)Maternal Exposure: Exposure of the female parent, human or animal, to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents in the environment or to environmental factors that may include ionizing radiation, pathogenic organisms, or toxic chemicals that may affect offspring. It includes pre-conception maternal exposure.Housing: Living facilities for humans.Sex Distribution: The number of males and females in a given population. The distribution may refer to how many men or women or what proportion of either in the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Chlordecone: A highly chlorinated polycyclic hydrocarbon insecticide whose large number of chlorine atoms makes it resistant to degradation. It has been shown to be toxic to mammals and causes abnormal cellular changes in laboratory animals.Cholinesterase Inhibitors: Drugs that inhibit cholinesterases. The neurotransmitter ACETYLCHOLINE is rapidly hydrolyzed, and thereby inactivated, by cholinesterases. When cholinesterases are inhibited, the action of endogenously released acetylcholine at cholinergic synapses is potentiated. Cholinesterase inhibitors are widely used clinically for their potentiation of cholinergic inputs to the gastrointestinal tract and urinary bladder, the eye, and skeletal muscles; they are also used for their effects on the heart and the central nervous system.Registries: The systems and processes involved in the establishment, support, management, and operation of registers, e.g., disease registers.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Coumaphos: A organothiophosphorus cholinesterase inhibitor that is used as an anthelmintic, insecticide, and as a nematocide.Emergency Treatment: First aid or other immediate intervention for accidents or medical conditions requiring immediate care and treatment before definitive medical and surgical management can be procured.Population Surveillance: Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.Acetylcholinesterase: An enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of ACETYLCHOLINE to CHOLINE and acetate. In the CNS, this enzyme plays a role in the function of peripheral neuromuscular junctions. EC 3.1.1.7.Age Distribution: The frequency of different ages or age groups in a given population. The distribution may refer to either how many or what proportion of the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Seasons: Divisions of the year according to some regularly recurrent phenomena usually astronomical or climatic. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Emergency Medical Services: Services specifically designed, staffed, and equipped for the emergency care of patients.Acute Disease: Disease having a short and relatively severe course.Rural Population: The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.Analgesics: Compounds capable of relieving pain without the loss of CONSCIOUSNESS.Butyrylcholinesterase: An aspect of cholinesterase (EC 3.1.1.8).Polychlorinated Biphenyls: Industrial products consisting of a mixture of chlorinated biphenyl congeners and isomers. These compounds are highly lipophilic and tend to accumulate in fat stores of animals. Many of these compounds are considered toxic and potential environmental pollutants.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Emergency Service, Hospital: Hospital department responsible for the administration and provision of immediate medical or surgical care to the emergency patient.Dichlorodiphenyl Dichloroethylene: An organochlorine pesticide, it is the ethylene metabolite of DDT.Environmental Pollution: Contamination of the air, bodies of water, or land with substances that are harmful to human health and the environment.Trichlorfon: An organochlorophosphate cholinesterase inhibitor that is used as an insecticide for the control of flies and roaches. It is also used in anthelmintic compositions for animals. (From Merck, 11th ed)Mirex: An organochlorine insecticide that is carcinogenic.Floors and Floorcoverings: The surface of a structure upon which one stands or walks.Pentachlorophenol: An insecticide and herbicide that has also been used as a wood preservative. Pentachlorphenol is a widespread environmental pollutant. Both chronic and acute pentachlorophenol poisoning are medical concerns. The range of its biological actions is still being actively explored, but it is clearly a potent enzyme inhibitor and has been used as such as an experimental tool.Chlorfenvinphos: An organophosphorus cholinesterase inhibitor that is used as an insecticide and an acaricide.Protective Devices: Devices designed to provide personal protection against injury to individuals exposed to hazards in industry, sports, aviation, or daily activities.Epidemiologic Studies: Studies designed to examine associations, commonly, hypothesized causal relations. They are usually concerned with identifying or measuring the effects of risk factors or exposures. The common types of analytic study are CASE-CONTROL STUDIES; COHORT STUDIES; and CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDIES.CaliforniaDisease Outbreaks: Sudden increase in the incidence of a disease. The concept includes EPIDEMICS and PANDEMICS.Soil Pollutants: Substances which pollute the soil. Use for soil pollutants in general or for which there is no specific heading.Toxaphene: A very complex, but reproducible mixture of at least 177 C10 polychloro derivatives, having an approximate overall empirical formula of C10-H10-Cl8. It is used as an insecticide and may reasonably be anticipated to be a carcinogen: Fourth Annual Report on Carcinogens (NTP 85-002, 1985). (From Merck Index, 11th ed)Urban Population: The inhabitants of a city or town, including metropolitan areas and suburban areas.Hexachlorobenzene: An agricultural fungicide and seed treatment agent.Permethrin: A pyrethroid insecticide commonly used in the treatment of LICE INFESTATIONS and SCABIES.Nitro Compounds: Compounds having the nitro group, -NO2, attached to carbon. When attached to nitrogen they are nitramines and attached to oxygen they are NITRATES.
  • There were further cases of poisoning in Maharashtra in 2018. (publiceye.ch)
  • Experts met in FAO on 19 - 23 November 2018 to discuss ciguatera fish poisoning (CFP) and develop scientific advice for the Codex Committee on Contaminants in Food. (fao.org)
  • What are some ways to help reduce the risk of food poisoning from pesticides? (nutritionfacts.org)
  • Incidences of food poisoning in the US affect 14% of the population annually, says the Soil Association. (fwi.co.uk)
  • Ciguatera is one of the most common forms of food poisoning , which occurs after the consumption of fish contaminated with neurotoxins produced by certain microalgae that build up the food chain. (vegsource.com)
  • Salmonella causes a million cases of food poisoning every year in the U.S., and over the last decade or so the. (vegsource.com)
  • Although the most serious causes of food poisoning like Salmonella come largely from animal products (for example, most food borne-related deaths have been attributed to poultry), millions of Americans are sickened by produce every year, thanks to noroviruses. (vegsource.com)
  • Food poisoning is sometimes called bacterial gastroenteritis or infectious diarrhea and is sometimes incorrectly called ptomaine poisoning. (encyclopedia.com)
  • According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), up to 33 million cases of food poisoning are reported in the United States each year. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Although the food supply in the United States is probably one of the safest in the world, anyone can get food poisoning. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Environmental toxins (heavy metals) in foods or water, and poisonous substances in certain foods such mushrooms and shellfish are other causes of food poisoning. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Institutional food preparation also increases the risk of food poisoning, especially if food is allowed to stand on warming trays, under warming lights, or at room temperature before being served. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Food poisoning is not spread from one individual to another but through direct contact with the causative bacteria, viruses, or other toxins in consumed food. (encyclopedia.com)
  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that there are from six to 33 million cases of food poisoning in the United States annually, affecting men, women, and children. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Food poisoning by E. coli occurs in three out of every 10,000 people. (encyclopedia.com)
  • SAN FRANCISCO (AP) - Environmentalists are accusing the federal government of failing to prevent the pesticide poisonings of California condors and more than 200 other endangered and threatened species. (cbslocal.com)
  • According to the Center for Food Safety , at least seven states have established no-spray buffer zones, eight states have established notification requirements for agricultural pesticide applications, and California counties play a leading role in local pesticide regulation. (civileats.com)
  • As the program currently stands, there's no way of knowing whether or not it's working, and PSR-LA along with Pesticide Action Networks of North America and the Association of Public Health Officers is sponsoring legislation to fix it: AB 1963 (Nava), Tracking Pesticide Poisoning in California. (psr-la.org)
  • Although the use of OP and CB pesticides has decreased by about 50% in recent years, the use of these compounds is still dangerously high - in 2008 alone 5 million pounds of OPs and CB pesticides were applied to California fields. (psr-la.org)
  • Simply, with the current system, organizations such as the California Department of Public Health (DPH), Department of Pesticide Regulation (DPR), and the Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment (OEHHA) don't have a way of reviewing the records of workers cholinesterase levels to take preventative action. (psr-la.org)
  • The California Department of Pesticide Regulation (DPR), according to a new lawsuit, has also been negligent in its approvals of pesticides that are harming bees. (eastbayexpress.com)
  • California can take very progressive steps to help protect bees and restrict hazardous pesticide use," said Paul Towers, organizing and media director of Pesticide Action Network, which is based in Oakland. (eastbayexpress.com)
  • But instead of restricting or limiting the use of dangerous pesticides, California has continued to expand applications, despite evidence suggesting substantial risks to pollinators. (eastbayexpress.com)
  • and providing information and technical assistance to employers, workers, physicians, and others to prevent lead poisoning among workers in California. (pressreleasepoint.com)
  • As a result of the September 2015 poisoning, the California Department of Food and Agriculture revoked Western Millings' commercial fee license "for repeated and multiple violations," Paboojian said. (fresnobee.com)
  • Why after the tragedy of the Pakistani family a year and a half ago, when there were calls by experts for more rigorous controls on the sale and use of such deadly pesticides, was nothing substantial done? (arabnews.com)
  • It is estimated that at least 200 to 300 persons have been hospitalised in the past two months after exposure to deadly pesticides, and at least six deaths have occurred, in 3 districts of Tamil Nadu. (kisanswaraj.in)
  • Stopping of sales licenses on deadly pesticides has been done by neighboring state government, Kerala. (kisanswaraj.in)
  • Blood disorders such as leukemia, anemia, etc. have increased with the use of deadly pesticides. (mind-body-soul.us)
  • The EPA takes the regulation of pesticides seriously, and if pesticides are improperly applied it can severely damage health and the environment. (mercola.com)
  • However, the Bill has been reviewed by several attorneys and public interest experts specializing in pesticide and GMO regulation who have encouraging words on the Bill's legal standing, and the County's powers to protect the health and welfare of its residents and natural resources. (civileats.com)
  • There has been documented large-scale failure of state and federal agencies responsible for the regulation, monitoring and protection of people's health in relation to pesticide use by the agrochemical/GMO operations on the island. (civileats.com)
  • Because use as recommended on the label cannot be ensured in the context of low literacy and poor enforcement, or in the absence of availability and use of personal protective equipment, the United Nations Food and Agricultural Organization and the WHO are actively encouraging the governments of developing countries not to register or re-register highly hazardous pesticides. (scielo.org.za)
  • Integrated Vector Management (IVM) is an approach that can reduce or even eliminate the use of the most hazardous pesticides while controlling the populations of disease-carrying insects like mosquitoes. (panna.org)
  • The catchy name conceals the ingredient Diafenthiuron, one of the 40 Syngenta pesticides classed as "highly hazardous" by the international Pesticide Action Network. (publiceye.ch)
  • Syngenta would be legally required to identify risks linked to its highly hazardous pesticides and to take measures to mitigate them. (publiceye.ch)
  • Therefore highly hazardous pesticides should be taken off the market. (publiceye.ch)
  • This indicates that the pesticide is a potential hazard through all three routes of entry, and that skin and eye contact are particularly hazardous. (headlice.org)
  • Stop Pesticide Poisonings depicts why a growing number of individuals and organisations no longer believe that training can achieve so called safe use of hazardous pesticides. (org.in)
  • Check with your local public works, environmental agency or health department to find out if your community has a household hazardous waste collection program for getting rid of unwanted, leftover pesticides. (tn.gov)
  • Ghana, for example, reported that application of various hazardous pesticides such as paraquat (WHO class II) and aluminum phosphide (a toxic fumigant) by farm workers without adequate protective clothing was a key cause of pesticide poisoning in the country. (publiceye.ch)
  • We encourage all participants to order The Recognition and Management of Pesticide Poisonings , 6th ed. prior to attending this webinar. (migrantclinician.org)
  • Fifteen (15) in-depth interviews were conducted with doctors who were directly involved in management of pesticide poisoning patients in the accident and emergency, Medicine, Pediatrics and Intensive Care Unit wards in 5 hospitals in Kampala, Uganda. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The implications of hospital structures and clinical process to the quality of the outcomes of care demonstrates their importance in improving management of pesticide poisoning cases in hospitals in Kampala, Uganda. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Management of pesticide poisonings involves immediate resuscitation including circulatory support and mechanical ventilation [ 8 , 9 ]. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Please visit the Recognition and Management of Pesticide Poisonings website to download the most recent version of the manual. (nmhealth.org)
  • The body can rapidly absorb certain pesticides splashed into the eyes during mixing or when sprayed onto the eyes during application. (musc.edu)
  • That means the DPR could follow in the footsteps of regulatory agencies in Europe, which, unlike their counterparts in the United States, have temporarily banned the use of certain pesticides due to concerns about bees. (eastbayexpress.com)
  • Scientists have discovered that hemp extract can help bees survive poisoning by pesticides. (jackherer.com)
  • The team from Lublin's Maria Curie-Skłodowska University are the first in the world to test the longevity of bees who have been exposed to pesticides after receiving hemp extract. (jackherer.com)
  • For now, we know that the extract extends the life of bees that have been exposed to pesticides. (jackherer.com)
  • Environmental groups and beekeepers have increasingly blamed the US Environmental Protection Agency for failing to restrict certain toxic pesticides that a growing body of research suggests are weakening and killing bees and other pollinators (see "What's Poisoning the Bees" 6/3). (eastbayexpress.com)
  • Environmental groups concerned about the declining health of bees - which are indirectly responsible for roughly one-third of all food we eat - argue that state officials have a unique opportunity to proactively protect pollinators through stricter pesticide regulations. (eastbayexpress.com)
  • I don't care about spots on my apples, leave me the birds and the bees… this was the Joni Mitchell song in the 70s when DDT was a common pesticide. (greenprophet.com)
  • The survey notes that pesticide exposure and colony damage incidents during the past five years are raising beekeepers' concerns about neonicotinoids. (rabble.ca)
  • The suit, filed in Alameda County Superior Court, specifically challenges the department's decision in June to expand the use of two neonicotinoids (neonics for short), a widely used class of pesticides that researchers believe is a key culprit in the bee crisis. (eastbayexpress.com)
  • Reporting on the Task Force on Systemic Pesticide's latest comprehensive study on the dangerous effects that a class of pesticides called neonicotinoids have on our pollinator populations, Damian Carrington of the Guardian gives a wonderful synopsis of the findings. (wellnesswarrior.org)
  • Events C, D, and E. During July 2007, IPC notified IDPH of three additional events involving five cases of acute pesticide poisoning associated with pyraclostrobin exposure that resulted from off-target drift of pyraclostrobin from nearby aerial applications. (cdc.gov)
  • The Agromedicine Program has reported on hospitalized and non-hospitalized cases of acute pesticide poisoning in the state over the past 25 years. (musc.edu)
  • Others consider that the dosage regimen was not ideal, with therapeutic concentrations being obtained rarely during the treatment.3,4 Furthermore, many patients presented late and had taken dimethyl pesticides - a class that does not respond well to oximes after several hours - biasing the study against finding benefit. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • This means that in general, more people in Hawai'i live in close proximity to field test sites than residents of Midwestern states like Illinois, putting them at a much higher risk for pesticide exposure. (civileats.com)
  • These findings add to an increasing body of evidence of the association between low levels of pesticide exposure and deficits in neurobehavioral performance. (absta.info)