Health Records, Personal: Longitudinal patient-maintained records of individual health history and tools that allow individual control of access.Disabled Persons: Persons with physical or mental disabilities that affect or limit their activities of daily living and that may require special accommodations.Personal Health Services: Health care provided to individuals.Personal Space: Invisible boundaries surrounding the individual's body which are maintained in relation to others.United StatesQuestionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Occupational Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents that occurs as a result of one's occupation.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Computers, Handheld: A type of MICROCOMPUTER, sometimes called a personal digital assistant, that is very small and portable and fitting in a hand. They are convenient to use in clinical and other field situations for quick data management. They usually require docking with MICROCOMPUTERS for updates.Air Pollutants, Occupational: Air pollutants found in the work area. They are usually produced by the specific nature of the occupation.Environmental Monitoring: The monitoring of the level of toxins, chemical pollutants, microbial contaminants, or other harmful substances in the environment (soil, air, and water), workplace, or in the bodies of people and animals present in that environment.Personal Autonomy: Self-directing freedom and especially moral independence. An ethical principle holds that the autonomy of persons ought to be respected. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Homeless Persons: Persons who have no permanent residence. The concept excludes nomadic peoples.Mentally Ill Persons: Persons with psychiatric illnesses or diseases, particularly psychotic and severe mood disorders.Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Inhalation Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents by inhaling them.Mentally Disabled Persons: Persons diagnosed as having significantly lower than average intelligence and considerable problems in adapting to everyday life or lacking independence in regard to activities of daily living.Air Pollution, Indoor: The contamination of indoor air.Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Protective Devices: Devices designed to provide personal protection against injury to individuals exposed to hazards in industry, sports, aviation, or daily activities.Personal Satisfaction: The individual's experience of a sense of fulfillment of a need or want and the quality or state of being satisfied.Microcomputers: Small computers using LSI (large-scale integration) microprocessor chips as the CPU (central processing unit) and semiconductor memories for compact, inexpensive storage of program instructions and data. They are smaller and less expensive than minicomputers and are usually built into a dedicated system where they are optimized for a particular application. "Microprocessor" may refer to just the CPU or the entire microcomputer.Environmental Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents in the environment or to environmental factors that may include ionizing radiation, pathogenic organisms, or toxic chemicals.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Visually Impaired Persons: Persons with loss of vision such that there is an impact on activities of daily living.Attitude to Health: Public attitudes toward health, disease, and the medical care system.HIV Infections: Includes the spectrum of human immunodeficiency virus infections that range from asymptomatic seropositivity, thru AIDS-related complex (ARC), to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).Protective Clothing: Clothing designed to protect the individual against possible exposure to known hazards.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Confidentiality: The privacy of information and its protection against unauthorized disclosure.Self Concept: A person's view of himself.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Attitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.Population Surveillance: Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.Financing, Personal: Payment by individuals or their family for health care services which are not covered by a third-party payer, either insurance or medical assistance.Homemaker Services: Non-medical support services, such as food preparation and bathing, given by trained personnel to disabled, sick or convalescent individuals in their home.Interpersonal Relations: The reciprocal interaction of two or more persons.Physician-Patient Relations: The interactions between physician and patient.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Air Pollutants: Any substance in the air which could, if present in high enough concentration, harm humans, animals, vegetation or material. Substances include GASES; PARTICULATE MATTER; and volatile ORGANIC CHEMICALS.Health Status: The level of health of the individual, group, or population as subjectively assessed by the individual or by more objective measures.Qualitative Research: Any type of research that employs nonnumeric information to explore individual or group characteristics, producing findings not arrived at by statistical procedures or other quantitative means. (Qualitative Inquiry: A Dictionary of Terms Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 1997)Adaptation, Psychological: A state of harmony between internal needs and external demands and the processes used in achieving this condition. (From APA Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)Longitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.Dust: Earth or other matter in fine, dry particles. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Burnout, Professional: An excessive stress reaction to one's occupational or professional environment. It is manifested by feelings of emotional and physical exhaustion coupled with a sense of frustration and failure.Computer Security: Protective measures against unauthorized access to or interference with computer operating systems, telecommunications, or data structures, especially the modification, deletion, destruction, or release of data in computers. It includes methods of forestalling interference by computer viruses or so-called computer hackers aiming to compromise stored data.Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Hygiene: The science dealing with the establishment and maintenance of health in the individual and the group. It includes the conditions and practices conducive to health. (Webster, 3d ed)Workplace: Place or physical location of work or employment.Personhood: The state or condition of being a human individual accorded moral and/or legal rights. Criteria to be used to determine this status are subject to debate, and range from the requirement of simply being a human organism to such requirements as that the individual be self-aware and capable of rational thought and moral agency.Disease Outbreaks: Sudden increase in the incidence of a disease. The concept includes EPIDEMICS and PANDEMICS.Internet: A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.Patient Access to Records: The freedom of patients to review their own medical, genetic, or other health-related records.Occupational Diseases: Diseases caused by factors involved in one's employment.Quality of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Decision Making: The process of making a selective intellectual judgment when presented with several complex alternatives consisting of several variables, and usually defining a course of action or an idea.History, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.Physicians: Individuals licensed to practice medicine.Netherlands: Country located in EUROPE. It is bordered by the NORTH SEA, BELGIUM, and GERMANY. Constituent areas are Aruba, Curacao, Sint Maarten, formerly included in the NETHERLANDS ANTILLES.Attitude: An enduring, learned predisposition to behave in a consistent way toward a given class of objects, or a persistent mental and/or neural state of readiness to react to a certain class of objects, not as they are but as they are conceived to be.Age Distribution: The frequency of different ages or age groups in a given population. The distribution may refer to either how many or what proportion of the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Ventilation: Supplying a building or house, their rooms and corridors, with fresh air. The controlling of the environment thus may be in public or domestic sites and in medical or non-medical locales. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Urban Population: The inhabitants of a city or town, including metropolitan areas and suburban areas.Stress, Psychological: Stress wherein emotional factors predominate.Focus Groups: A method of data collection and a QUALITATIVE RESEARCH tool in which a small group of individuals are brought together and allowed to interact in a discussion of their opinions about topics, issues, or questions.Rural Population: The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.Occupational Health: The promotion and maintenance of physical and mental health in the work environment.Motivation: Those factors which cause an organism to behave or act in either a goal-seeking or satisfying manner. They may be influenced by physiological drives or by external stimuli.Social Values: Abstract standards or empirical variables in social life which are believed to be important and/or desirable.Respiratory Protective Devices: Respirators to protect individuals from breathing air contaminated with harmful dusts, fogs, fumes, mists, gases, smokes, sprays, or vapors.Housing: Living facilities for humans.Narration: The act, process, or an instance of narrating, i.e., telling a story. In the context of MEDICINE or ETHICS, narration includes relating the particular and the personal in the life story of an individual.Pilot Projects: Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.Employment: The state of being engaged in an activity or service for wages or salary.Caregivers: Persons who provide care to those who need supervision or assistance in illness or disability. They may provide the care in the home, in a hospital, or in an institution. Although caregivers include trained medical, nursing, and other health personnel, the concept also refers to parents, spouses, or other family members, friends, members of the clergy, teachers, social workers, fellow patients.Great BritainHealth Behavior: Behaviors expressed by individuals to protect, maintain or promote their health status. For example, proper diet, and appropriate exercise are activities perceived to influence health status. Life style is closely associated with health behavior and factors influencing life style are socioeconomic, educational, and cultural.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.CaliforniaSelf Care: Performance of activities or tasks traditionally performed by professional health care providers. The concept includes care of oneself or one's family and friends.Family: A social group consisting of parents or parent substitutes and children.Patient Acceptance of Health Care: The seeking and acceptance by patients of health service.Job Satisfaction: Personal satisfaction relative to the work situation.Mass Screening: Organized periodic procedures performed on large groups of people for the purpose of detecting disease.Stereotyping: An oversimplified perception or conception especially of persons, social groups, etc.Smoking: Inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning TOBACCO.Patient Education as Topic: The teaching or training of patients concerning their own health needs.Health Services Accessibility: The degree to which individuals are inhibited or facilitated in their ability to gain entry to and to receive care and services from the health care system. Factors influencing this ability include geographic, architectural, transportational, and financial considerations, among others.Communication: The exchange or transmission of ideas, attitudes, or beliefs between individuals or groups.Freedom: The rights of individuals to act and make decisions without external constraints.Cosmetics: Substances intended to be applied to the human body for cleansing, beautifying, promoting attractiveness, or altering the appearance without affecting the body's structure or functions. Included in this definition are skin creams, lotions, perfumes, lipsticks, fingernail polishes, eye and facial makeup preparations, permanent waves, hair colors, toothpastes, and deodorants, as well as any material intended for use as a component of a cosmetic product. (U.S. Food & Drug Administration Center for Food Safety & Applied Nutrition Office of Cosmetics Fact Sheet (web page) Feb 1995)Educational Status: Educational attainment or level of education of individuals.Mental Disorders: Psychiatric illness or diseases manifested by breakdowns in the adaptational process expressed primarily as abnormalities of thought, feeling, and behavior producing either distress or impairment of function.Culture: A collective expression for all behavior patterns acquired and socially transmitted through symbols. Culture includes customs, traditions, and language.Sex Distribution: The number of males and females in a given population. The distribution may refer to how many men or women or what proportion of either in the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.New York CityFamily Practice: A medical specialty concerned with the provision of continuing, comprehensive primary health care for the entire family.Canada: The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.Philosophy, MedicalStudents, Medical: Individuals enrolled in a school of medicine or a formal educational program in medicine.Public Opinion: The attitude of a significant portion of a population toward any given proposition, based upon a measurable amount of factual evidence, and involving some degree of reflection, analysis, and reasoning.Patient Participation: Patient involvement in the decision-making process in matters pertaining to health.Health Promotion: Encouraging consumer behaviors most likely to optimize health potentials (physical and psychosocial) through health information, preventive programs, and access to medical care.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Life Style: Typical way of life or manner of living characteristic of an individual or group. (From APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)Ethics, Medical: The principles of professional conduct concerning the rights and duties of the physician, relations with patients and fellow practitioners, as well as actions of the physician in patient care and interpersonal relations with patient families.Industry: Any enterprise centered on the processing, assembly, production, or marketing of a line of products, services, commodities, or merchandise, in a particular field often named after its principal product. Examples include the automobile, fishing, music, publishing, insurance, and textile industries.Medical Records: Recording of pertinent information concerning patient's illness or illnesses.Famous PersonsGermanyHealth Care Surveys: Statistical measures of utilization and other aspects of the provision of health care services including hospitalization and ambulatory care.Patient Satisfaction: The degree to which the individual regards the health care service or product or the manner in which it is delivered by the provider as useful, effective, or beneficial.Single Person: The unmarried man or woman.Health Personnel: Men and women working in the provision of health services, whether as individual practitioners or employees of health institutions and programs, whether or not professionally trained, and whether or not subject to public regulation. (From A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, 1976)Health Education: Education that increases the awareness and favorably influences the attitudes and knowledge relating to the improvement of health on a personal or community basis.Odds Ratio: The ratio of two odds. The exposure-odds ratio for case control data is the ratio of the odds in favor of exposure among cases to the odds in favor of exposure among noncases. The disease-odds ratio for a cohort or cross section is the ratio of the odds in favor of disease among the exposed to the odds in favor of disease among the unexposed. The prevalence-odds ratio refers to an odds ratio derived cross-sectionally from studies of prevalent cases.Social Environment: The aggregate of social and cultural institutions, forms, patterns, and processes that influence the life of an individual or community.Multivariate Analysis: A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.Aging: The gradual irreversible changes in structure and function of an organism that occur as a result of the passage of time.Goals: The end-result or objective, which may be specified or required in advance.Ego: The conscious portion of the personality structure which serves to mediate between the demands of the primitive instinctual drives, (the id), of internalized parental and social prohibitions or the conscience, (the superego), and of reality.Privacy: The state of being free from intrusion or disturbance in one's private life or affairs. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed, 1993)SwedenAccess to Information: Individual's rights to obtain and use information collected or generated by others.Empathy: An individual's objective and insightful awareness of the feelings and behavior of another person. It should be distinguished from sympathy, which is usually nonobjective and noncritical. It includes caring, which is the demonstration of an awareness of and a concern for the good of others. (From Bioethics Thesaurus, 1992)Self-Help Devices: Devices, not affixed to the body, designed to help persons having musculoskeletal or neuromuscular disabilities to perform activities involving movement.Medical Records Systems, Computerized: Computer-based systems for input, storage, display, retrieval, and printing of information contained in a patient's medical record.Self Efficacy: Cognitive mechanism based on expectations or beliefs about one's ability to perform actions necessary to produce a given effect. It is also a theoretical component of behavior change in various therapeutic treatments. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 1994)History, 21st Century: Time period from 2001 through 2100 of the common era.Risk: The probability that an event will occur. It encompasses a variety of measures of the probability of a generally unfavorable outcome.Occupations: Crafts, trades, professions, or other means of earning a living.Insect Repellents: Substances causing insects to turn away from them or reject them as food.Ethnic Groups: A group of people with a common cultural heritage that sets them apart from others in a variety of social relationships.Travel: Aspects of health and disease related to travel.Dementia: An acquired organic mental disorder with loss of intellectual abilities of sufficient severity to interfere with social or occupational functioning. The dysfunction is multifaceted and involves memory, behavior, personality, judgment, attention, spatial relations, language, abstract thought, and other executive functions. The intellectual decline is usually progressive, and initially spares the level of consciousness.Cost of Illness: The personal cost of acute or chronic disease. The cost to the patient may be an economic, social, or psychological cost or personal loss to self, family, or immediate community. The cost of illness may be reflected in absenteeism, productivity, response to treatment, peace of mind, or QUALITY OF LIFE. It differs from HEALTH CARE COSTS, meaning the societal cost of providing services related to the delivery of health care, rather than personal impact on individuals.Air Movements: The motion of air currents.Disclosure: Revealing of information, by oral or written communication.Genetic Testing: Detection of a MUTATION; GENOTYPE; KARYOTYPE; or specific ALLELES associated with genetic traits, heritable diseases, or predisposition to a disease, or that may lead to the disease in descendants. It includes prenatal genetic testing.Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome: An acquired defect of cellular immunity associated with infection by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), a CD4-positive T-lymphocyte count under 200 cells/microliter or less than 14% of total lymphocytes, and increased susceptibility to opportunistic infections and malignant neoplasms. Clinical manifestations also include emaciation (wasting) and dementia. These elements reflect criteria for AIDS as defined by the CDC in 1993.Particulate Matter: Particles of any solid substance, generally under 30 microns in size, often noted as PM30. There is special concern with PM1 which can get down to PULMONARY ALVEOLI and induce MACROPHAGE ACTIVATION and PHAGOCYTOSIS leading to FOREIGN BODY REACTION and LUNG DISEASES.Perception: The process by which the nature and meaning of sensory stimuli are recognized and interpreted.Income: Revenues or receipts accruing from business enterprise, labor, or invested capital.Prejudice: A preconceived judgment made without factual basis.Social Perception: The perceiving of attributes, characteristics, and behaviors of one's associates or social groups.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Continuity of Patient Care: Health care provided on a continuing basis from the initial contact, following the patient through all phases of medical care.Physician's Role: The expected function of a member of the medical profession.Geriatric Assessment: Evaluation of the level of physical, physiological, or mental functioning in the older population group.Public Health: Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.Depression: Depressive states usually of moderate intensity in contrast with major depression present in neurotic and psychotic disorders.Disability Evaluation: Determination of the degree of a physical, mental, or emotional handicap. The diagnosis is applied to legal qualification for benefits and income under disability insurance and to eligibility for Social Security and workmen's compensation benefits.EnglandCareer Choice: Selection of a type of occupation or profession.Spirituality: Sensitivity or attachment to religious values, or to things of the spirit as opposed to material or worldly interests. (from Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary, 10th ed, and Oxford English Dictionary, 2nd ed)Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Australia: The smallest continent and an independent country, comprising six states and two territories. Its capital is Canberra.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Choice Behavior: The act of making a selection among two or more alternatives, usually after a period of deliberation.Nursing Homes: Facilities which provide nursing supervision and limited medical care to persons who do not require hospitalization.Social Responsibility: The obligations and accountability assumed in carrying out actions or ideas on behalf of others.Professional-Patient Relations: Interactions between health personnel and patients.African Americans: Persons living in the United States having origins in any of the black groups of Africa.Altruism: Consideration and concern for others, as opposed to self-love or egoism, which can be a motivating influence.Sampling Studies: Studies in which a number of subjects are selected from all subjects in a defined population. Conclusions based on sample results may be attributed only to the population sampled.Patient Compliance: Voluntary cooperation of the patient in following a prescribed regimen.Nitrogen Dioxide: Nitrogen oxide (NO2). A highly poisonous gas. Exposure produces inflammation of lungs that may only cause slight pain or pass unnoticed, but resulting edema several days later may cause death. (From Merck, 11th ed) It is a major atmospheric pollutant that is able to absorb UV light that does not reach the earth's surface.Wounds and Injuries: Damage inflicted on the body as the direct or indirect result of an external force, with or without disruption of structural continuity.Counseling: The giving of advice and assistance to individuals with educational or personal problems.Cellular Phone: Analog or digital communications device in which the user has a wireless connection from a telephone to a nearby transmitter. It is termed cellular because the service area is divided into multiple "cells." As the user moves from one cell area to another, the call is transferred to the local transmitter.Seasons: Divisions of the year according to some regularly recurrent phenomena usually astronomical or climatic. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Physicians, Family: Those physicians who have completed the education requirements specified by the American Academy of Family Physicians.NorwayDelivery of Health Care: The concept concerned with all aspects of providing and distributing health services to a patient population.Epidemiological Monitoring: Collection, analysis, and interpretation of data about the frequency, distribution, and consequences of disease or health conditions, for use in the planning, implementing, and evaluating public health programs.ConnecticutDemography: Statistical interpretation and description of a population with reference to distribution, composition, or structure.Polycyclic Hydrocarbons, Aromatic: A major group of unsaturated cyclic hydrocarbons containing two or more rings. The vast number of compounds of this important group, derived chiefly from petroleum and coal tar, are rather highly reactive and chemically versatile. The name is due to the strong and not unpleasant odor characteristic of most substances of this nature. (From Hawley's Condensed Chemical Dictionary, 12th ed, p96)Hazardous Substances: Elements, compounds, mixtures, or solutions that are considered severely harmful to human health and the environment. They include substances that are toxic, corrosive, flammable, or explosive.Informed Consent: Voluntary authorization, by a patient or research subject, with full comprehension of the risks involved, for diagnostic or investigative procedures, and for medical and surgical treatment.Home Care Services: Community health and NURSING SERVICES providing coordinated multiple services to the patient at the patient's homes. These home-care services are provided by a visiting nurse, home health agencies, HOSPITALS, or organized community groups using professional staff for care delivery. It differs from HOME NURSING which is provided by non-professionals.Models, Psychological: Theoretical representations that simulate psychological processes and/or social processes. These include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.WisconsinComorbidity: The presence of co-existing or additional diseases with reference to an initial diagnosis or with reference to the index condition that is the subject of study. Comorbidity may affect the ability of affected individuals to function and also their survival; it may be used as a prognostic indicator for length of hospital stay, cost factors, and outcome or survival.Attitude to Death: Conceptual response of the person to the various aspects of death, which are based on individual psychosocial and cultural experience.Family Health: The health status of the family as a unit including the impact of the health of one member of the family on the family as a unit and on individual family members; also, the impact of family organization or disorganization on the health status of its members.Psychometrics: Assessment of psychological variables by the application of mathematical procedures.Religion: A set of beliefs concerning the nature, cause, and purpose of the universe, especially when considered as the creation of a superhuman agency. It usually involves devotional and ritual observances and often a moral code for the conduct of human affairs. (Random House Collegiate Dictionary, rev. ed.)Students: Individuals enrolled in a school or formal educational program.Linear Models: Statistical models in which the value of a parameter for a given value of a factor is assumed to be equal to a + bx, where a and b are constants. The models predict a linear regression.
"Bits about Person". The Worker. 13 (634). Brisbane. 27 June 1903. p. 9. Retrieved 29 June 2016 - via National Library of ... "Purely Personal". The Truth (629). Brisbane. 3 March 1912. p. 4. Retrieved 29 June 2016 - via National Library of Australia. " ...
"IN PERSON; Some Build Castles. She Writes Novels.", The New York Times, June 15, 2003. Accessed March 10, 2011. "Ms. ... Mary Lechleidner's Personal Website. ...
Barron, F. X. (1968). Creativity and personal freedom. New York: Van Nostrand. Barron, F. X. (1969). Creative Person, Creative ...
p. 3. "Vice President". Members > People. Liberal International. Archived from the original on 2007-11-09. Retrieved 2008-04-06 ... 6th Legislative Yuan Personal Info) (in Chinese). ROC Legislative Yuan. Retrieved 2008-04-07. Hsu, Crystal (21 Jul 2002). "DPP ... and other DPP representatives were followed throughout their visit to Bulgaria by two unidentified persons sent by the People's ... "Personal Profile" (in Chinese). 立法委員蕭美琴虛擬服務處 (Legislator Hsiao Bi-khim's website). Retrieved 2008-04-06. %5bhttp://www.bikhim. ...
Jane E. Brody (November 17, 1988). "HEALTH; Personal Health". The New York Times. Retrieved February 23, 2010. Anne Longley ( ... August 1, 1994). "A Glimpse Beyond: A Psychiatrist Plumbs the Near-Death Experience". People. 42 (5). Retrieved February 23, ...
He capped a successful World Cup outing on personal front with a commentary stint during the World Cup Final which resulted in ... as a player and as a person. Rahul Dravid, reflecting back on his Test debut 15 years later, during India tour of England, 2011 ... However, after the series against England, he stepped down as the Indian captain due to personal reasons. MS Dhoni took over as ... "Dravid's personal choices". Dravidthewall. Archived from the original on 23 October 2013. Retrieved 22 October 2013. " ...
"Professor Michael Proctor". People. Department of Pure Mathematics and Mathematical Statistics. Retrieved 2014-05-03. "Awards ... "Michael Proctor ScD FRS FIMA". Personal website. Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics. Retrieved 2014-05- ... "Michael Richard Edward PROCTOR". People of Today. Debrett's. Archived from the original on 24 September 2015. Retrieved 3 May ...
"Opera Group > People". University of Cambridge Computer Laboratory. Retrieved 18 August 2015. "Jean Bacon (personal web page ...
"Mystery of people who hear the hum". New Scientist. 13 December 1979. pp. 868-870. "Hmmmmmmmmmmmm...?". People. 21 September ... "Auckland North Shore Hum". T.J.Moir Personal pages. 15 November 2006. "Mystery humming sound captured". Sydney Morning Herald. ... Some people notice the Hum only at home, while others hear it everywhere they go. Some sufferers report that it is made worse ... Some people hear the Hum only, or much more, inside buildings as compared with outdoors. Some perceive vibrations that can be ...
"People". cpdp.uzh.ch. The Chintang and Puma Documentation Project. Retrieved August 16, 2016. Profile at Max Planck Institute ... "Professor Elena Lieven - personal details". manchester.ac.uk. University of Manchester. Retrieved August 17, 2016. LuCiD. " ...
"Prof David Voas - personal details". People. University of Manchester. Retrieved 21 January 2015. ...
Third-person personal pronouns: masc. [toj], fem. [ˈtaja], neut. [to], pl. [ˈtija] ('he, she, it, they'). The dialect is ...
44, 118-123 Forer BR (1968). Personal validation and the person. Psychol Rep. 1968 Dec;23(3):1214. PMID 5717433 Forer BR, ... The Forer effect shows that people tend to accept generalised descriptions of their personalities without realising that the ... The fallacy of personal validation: A classroom demonstration of gullibility Journal of Abnormal and Social Psychology. ... same evaluation could apply to nearly anyone else, because people want the results to be true. This experiment is frequently ...
... "a person who commences an action". The New Shorter Oxford English Dictionary defines person as "an individual human being". ... Amy Reiter (May 19, 1999). "Funny thing is, Groskaufmanis is known to be a common Martian surname". Nothing Personal. Salon ... It follows that if the plaintiff is not a person in that he is neither a human being nor a corporation, he cannot be a ... Section 29 of the Interpretation Act provides that a person includes a corporation. ...
"PERSONAL". Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957). 1916-05-24. p. 8. Retrieved 2017-06-25. "ABOUT PEOPLE". Age (Melbourne, Vic ...
"Personal". The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931). Adelaide, SA: National Library of Australia. 24 February 1903. p. 4. ... "Concerning People". Adelaide Observer (SA : 1843 - 1904). SA: National Library of Australia. 5 August 1899. p. 10. Retrieved 14 ...
"PERSONAL". The Sydney Morning Herald. National Library of Australia. 13 March 1914. p. 8. Retrieved 27 August 2012. Heritage ... "CONCERNING PEOPLE". The Register. Adelaide: National Library of Australia. 20 January 1921. p. 6. Retrieved 30 August 2012. " ...
"Personal". The Argus. Melbourne: National Library of Australia. 30 January 1918. p. 8. Retrieved 26 November 2012. "Personal". ... "Concerning People". The Register. Adelaide: National Library of Australia. 17 April 1914. p. 8. Retrieved 26 November 2012. " ... "Personal". The Argus. Melbourne: National Library of Australia Webb was based in Flinders Street, Melbourne at this time. 14 ... "Personal". The Advertiser. Adelaide: National Library of Australia. 29 June 1927. p. 13. Retrieved 24 November 2012. "Late Mr. ...
"A couple of personal stories". Carlow People. 29 June 2010. Archived from the original on 26 July 2013. Retrieved 26 July 2013 ... "His time with Mount Sion and Waterford". Carlow People. 29 June 2010. Archived from the original on 26 July 2013. Retrieved 26 ... "Jimmy led his adopted Carlow to promised land". Carlow People. 29 June 2010. Archived from the original on 26 July 2013. ... "Scoring hero of the 'thunder and lightning' final". Carlow People. 29 June 2010. Archived from the original on 12 April 2013. ...
"Dorit Cypis , Transart People". Retrieved 2015-05-14. Cypis, Dorit (2014). "Dorit Cypis". Dorit Cypis. Dorit Cypis. Retrieved ... knowledge and personal experience in relation to psychology, body and society. Cypis lived in Minneapolis through the 1990s, ... Leading the People), Noga Gallery, Tel Aviv, Israel (solo, 2003) Consider This..., Los Angeles County Museum of Art (group, ... "Guiding individuals through critical personal engagement with conflict and building capacity to develop reciprocal and ...
"About People". The Age (15238). Victoria, Australia. 11 January 1904. p. 4. Retrieved 30 December 2016 - via National Library ... "Personal". The Advertiser. XLVI, (14,111). South Australia. 9 January 1904. p. 6. Retrieved 30 December 2016 - via National ... "Concerning People". The Register (Adelaide). LXXIV, (19,628). South Australia. 9 October 1909. p. 13. Retrieved 30 December ...
"Personal". The Recorder (7,822). South Australia. 3 March 1924. p. 2. Retrieved 15 May 2016 - via National Library of Australia ... "Concerning People". The Register. LXVI, (16,976). South Australia. 11 April 1901. p. 5. Retrieved 18 May 2016 - via National ... "Concerning People". The Observer. LXII, (3,310). South Australia. 11 March 1905. p. 31. Retrieved 17 May 2016 - via National ...
"Concerning People". South Australian Register (Adelaide, SA : 1839 - 1900). Adelaide, SA: National Library of Australia. 18 ... website "PERSONAL". The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931). Adelaide, SA: National Library of Australia. 10 December 1904 ... "Concerning People". South Australian Register (Adelaide, SA : 1839 - 1900). Adelaide, SA: National Library of Australia. 18 ...
"Mainly about People". The Daily News. Perth: National Library of Australia. 4 September 1905. p. 3 Edition: Second. Retrieved ... "Personal". The Recorder. Port Pirie, SA: National Library of Australia. 16 January 1925. p. 2. Retrieved 18 January 2015. Wilde ... "Out among the People". The Advertiser. Adelaide: National Library of Australia. 24 February 1937. p. 25. Retrieved 18 January ... "Personal". The West Australian. Perth: National Library of Australia. 18 October 1941. p. 6. Retrieved 18 January 2015. " ...
"About People". The Age. Victoria, Australia. 4 July 1923. p. 9. Retrieved 19 October 2016 - via National Library of Australia ... "Personal". Bendigo Advertiser. LXII, (18,300). Victoria, Australia. 6 April 1914. p. 5. Retrieved 19 October 2016 - via ... While at Chatswood he acted as Secretary of the New South Wales Congregational Union Young People's Department. In 1937 he was ...
The early historical roots of the field can be traced to the work of people such as Louis Lapicque, Hodgkin & Huxley, Hubel & ...
People are looking for ideas when they type into a Google search bar cat runs around at night. Theyre really .... Read More ... Cats personal space - it is a requirement. Published September 15, 2017 at 918 × 615 in Do cats need personal space? ... Home→Cat Behavior→cat relationships in multi-cat house→Do cats need personal space? →Cats personal space - it is a requirement ... People ask Messrs Google if it is a good idea to adopt a jaguarundi as a pet cat. I guess .... Read More ...
It is hard not to take things personally, especially since angry people often say very personal things. But it is essential to ... Allow the person to release as much energy as possible by venting verbally. When a person is venting, there will be peaks and ... If the person objects, decide if: 1) the procedure can wait until the person is less anxious; 2) someone else might be better ... Standing at an angle to the person and off to the side is much less likely to escalate an agitated persons behaviour. ...
"Personal space" is the private area of control inside an imaginary line or boundary that defines each person as separate. ... Ideally, that boundary helps us stay in charge of our own personal space. It helps keep out the things that make us ... Personal space. *Makes others uncomfortable by ignoring social, emotional or physical boundaries or limits? ... Turns to a child for emotional or physical comfort by sharing personal or private information or activities, normally shared ...
For example, you commit murder in Colorado if you intend "to cause the death of another person." If "person" becomes "unborn ... McCafferty: Questions about when life begins are personal. For some, its based on faith, for others its a matter of science ... "Offenses Against the Person." The Brady Amendment recognizes that all human beings, not just those who are born, are persons ... "Offenses Against the Person." The Brady Amendment recognizes that all human beings, not just those who are born, are persons ...
Social perception is that part of perception that allows people to understand the other people in their social world. This sort ... Social perception gives individuals the tools to recognize how others affect their personal lives. They help individuals to ... Implicit personality theories state that if an individual observes certain traits in another person, s/he tends to assume that ... It also helps us to "categorize" people so that we can infer additional information about them and predict their behavior. ...
Building socially engaging robots and interactive technologies to help people live healthier lives, connect with others, and ... Building socially engaging robots and interactive technologies to help people live healthier lives, connect with others, and ...
It brings together a community of researchers and practitioners interested in personal informatics and the design of ... This book presents cutting-edge information about the areas of Personal Data, Adaptive Architecture and Human Building ... People, Personal Data and the Built Environment is ideal for researchers and practitioners interested in Architecture, Computer ... People, Personal Data and the Built Environment. Editors: Schnädelbach, Holger, Kirk, David (Eds.) ...
People in Quandaries: The Semantics of Personal Adjustment. Wendell Johnson. Snippet view - 1946. ... People in quandaries: the semantics of personal adjustment. Wendell Johnson. Snippet view - 1946. ... books.google.comhttps://books.google.com/books/about/People_in_Quandaries.html?id=8ewWAAAAIAAJ&utm_source=gb-gplus-sharePeople ... means measure method non-fluency non-identity non-verbal levels normal observations ones orientation particular personal ...
When you return home, tell the important people in your life that you might need several days to recover so it is best not to ... Personal Strategies to Promote Good Sleep and Alertnessplus icon *Relaxation Techniques ... Over time, this could damage personal relationships. Here are some suggestions to remain connected during deployment. ... extended work hours can reduce the time you have available to communicate with the important people in your life. In many cases ...
People Are Willing to Trade Personal Data for Edible Cookies. Hundreds of New Yorkers handed over personal data like ... As it turns out, peoples attitude and behavior towards personal security varies wildly, even if they value privacy. While some ... She asked hungry New Yorkers to hand over personal data in exchange for cookies. The result? About 380 people were willing to ... Traded all my personal data for a social media cookie at #PleaseEnableCookies by @risapuno #DAF14 pic.twitter.com/il27O10p60 ...
Reassure the person that you wont let them be hurt.. Overhead showers can be frightening to some people. If you have no bath ... Going to the toilet (toileting) is an important part of personal hygiene, regardless of whether you or the person youre ... the locks are removed from the door - you or the person you care for may want privacy, but other people may need access in an ... Find out more about dental treatment for people with special needs.. Help with washing and bathing. For most people, washing is ...
Older peoples experiences of personal budgets. 22 March 2011 Dont make assumptions about what care and support may suit ... Older people see personal budgets as offering them more independence, choice and control,. says David Walden, SCIEs Director ... For example, some older people are offered a personal budget following home care reablement or a major life event such as a ... Social workers and healthcare staff need to improve their knowledge about personal budgets and work with older people to ...
Some people have difficulty handling floss, but there are many types of interdental cleaners that accomplish the same thing as ... Taking good care of ones teeth is one of the smartest investments a person can make in their health, helping to ensure that ... To make the most of brushing, a person should choose a soft-bristled toothbrush with a shape that suits ones mouth and allows ...
Using volunteers to support people on personal budgets. Live-in volunteers are helping people with disabilities pursue ... Its latest model, however, is particularly suited to people on personal budgets as it chimes with modern principles of self- ... "You get to know another persons needs and its raised my awareness of other peoples lives." ... The support can be organised around the needs of the disabled person and a volunteer is on call 24 hours a day. This additional ...
Prestige Care is about people helping people, and is rooted in a philosophy of caring based on our core values - respect, ... Personal Care Attendant (CNA) - WA at Prestige Care, Inc Posted in Other 15 days ago. ... Personal Care Attendant provides direct resident care, completes assignments as a universal worker, assists in maintaining a ... High School diploma or equivalent with one or more years of personal care experience with older adults preferred. Must be ...
Have you dolls ever sent a personal text to the wrong person? Or maybe youve left a voicemail for the wrong person? I once ... My Most Awkward Sexual Experience: I Sent a Super Personal Text to the Wrong Person!. By Rosemary Brennan ...
... or even if you are a personal trainer looking to advertise yourself to prospective clients, neighborhoodtrainer.com is an ... Whether you are wondering how to find a personal trainer, ... personal trainer. new york personal trainer. personal trainer ... New York Personal Trainers dedicated to helping people reach their fitness goals. ... Whether you are wondering how to find a personal trainer, or even if you are a personal trainer looking to advertise yourself ...
People Reveal The Exact Moment They Knew Their Partner Wasnt The One. They werent going to marry the person and it suddenly ... But for many people, they can pinpoint the exact time they knew they were not going to marry the person they were dating. ... "When some money fell out of the pocket of the person in front of us in line at the movies and she picked it up and put it in ... "We went to a wedding, and at the reception I got to meet all her old friends.Really nice people. One of them was talking about ...
Are essential oils better for you than candles? Aromatherapy is a big part of wellness trends in the home and products we buy for the home, so consider ditching candles for essential oil diffusers. Check out the health benefits of essential oils and see which diffusers we love at HGTV.com.
People who may not be able to communicate symptoms of illness. *People who may not be monitored closely for symptoms of illness ... 2009 H1N1 Flu Information for People with Disabilities and Their Caregivers or Personal Assistants. April 8, 2010 10:00 AM ET ... persons aged 6 months--24 years, and *persons aged 25--64 years who have medical conditions that put them at higher risk for ... 5 Things People with Disabilities Need To Know About the Flu. *5 Things Caregivers of People with Disabilities Need To Know ...
People experiencing homelessness who also engage in these activities may be among the most difficult to reach for intervention ... While the obstacles to personal hygiene associated with homelessness may increase risk of infectious disease, hygiene-related ... behaviors among people experiencing homelessness has received limited attention. We conducted a cross-sectional study of ... Persons experiencing homelessness in the United States experience significant barriers to self-care and personal hygiene, ...
1 to 4 person models in sizes to fit any home and prices to fit any budget! We also have sauna accessories. ... Soothe aches and pains with your own personal sauna. Enjoy the many health benefits of a personal infrared sauna in your own ... 1 product in Swimming Pools and Accessories › Personal Infrared Home Saunas. Refine. ... 3 subcategories found in Swimming Pools and Accessories › Personal Infrared Home Saunas ...
The background behind the implementation of integrated personal budgets. The three policy areas examined are recovery, ... Integrated personal budgets should aim to give people the flexibility and choice to purchase what they feel will support their ... The evidence from personal budgets in social care suggests that people with mental health problems can benefit significantly ... 11] However, the uptake of personal budgets has been lowest among people with mental health problems, partly due to the effects ...
If you let people get to know your personal brand by knowing you, you will have the ears of a lot more people. ... People often fail to believe what they expect others to believe about their personal brand. Do not say you are an authority: be ... Poor Personal Management. How will you expect people to trust your capability to manage their affairs or to meet their needs ... People make the mistake of expecting results too quickly when it comes to their personal brands. You have probably heard that ...
... Originally a comment by John Horstman on A horribly ... Im seeing an ongoing problem with people uncritically generalizing their personal experience, and Im sorry to say that doing ... To every trans* person Ive talked to, thats a morally reprehensible concern. AFAB segregated spaces harm trans women, and ... Her response was basically, "Why would I want to be around a bunch of people who dont want me there?" She doesnt think AFAB- ...
  • Civil masks that prevent the spread of droplets but do not protect the wearer from external factors are not considered personal protective equipment (PPE). (tukes.fi)
  • Examples of respiratory protective equipment include filtering facepieces that conform to the standard EN 149. (tukes.fi)
  • Contracting the coronavirus is possible also from handling materials and surfaces contaminated with the sputum of an infected person, and infection cannot fully be prevented with respiratory protective equipment. (tukes.fi)
  • Implicit personality theories state that if an individual observes certain traits in another person, s/he tends to assume that his or her other personality traits are concurrent with the initial trait. (definitions.net)
  • Personal space" is the private area of control inside an imaginary line or boundary that defines each person as separate. (stopitnow.org)
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