A developmental ocular anomaly in which the primary VITREOUS BODY and its surrounding hyaloid vasculature failed to regress. It is usually unilateral and characterized by CATARACT; MICROPHTHALMOS (small eyeballs), and retrolenticular fibrovascular tissue. (from Yanoff: Ophthalmology, 2nd ed.)
Congenital absence of or defects in structures of the eye; may also be hereditary.
The transparent, semigelatinous substance that fills the cavity behind the CRYSTALLINE LENS of the EYE and in front of the RETINA. It is contained in a thin hyaloid membrane and forms about four fifths of the optic globe.
Procedures performed to remove CAPSULE OPACIFICATION that develops on the POSTERIOR CAPSULE OF THE LENS following removal of a primary CATARACT.
An increase in the number of cells in a tissue or organ without tumor formation. It differs from HYPERTROPHY, which is an increase in bulk without an increase in the number of cells.
A transparent, biconvex structure of the EYE, enclosed in a capsule and situated behind the IRIS and in front of the vitreous humor (VITREOUS BODY). It is slightly overlapped at its margin by the ciliary processes. Adaptation by the CILIARY BODY is crucial for OCULAR ACCOMMODATION.
Partial or complete opacity on or in the lens or capsule of one or both eyes, impairing vision or causing blindness. The many kinds of cataract are classified by their morphology (size, shape, location) or etiology (cause and time of occurrence). (Dorland, 27th ed)

Prenatal ultrasonographic diagnosis of persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous. (1/13)

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A nonautonomous role for retinal frizzled-5 in regulating hyaloid vitreous vasculature development. (2/13)

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Bilateral persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous. (3/13)

A case of bilateral persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous (PHPV) in a 3-month-old male infant, who had bilateral leukokoria, is presented. The child was referred for imaging with a clinical suspicion of retinoblastoma. Gray-scale ultrasound evaluation revealed an echogenic band in the posterior segment of both globes, extending from the posterior surface of the lens capsule to the optic disc. Doppler examination revealed the presence of arterial flow in the band in both globes. Associated echogenic hemorrhage was also seen, which was confirmed by computed tomography. Most cases of PHPV are sporadic and unilateral, and bilateral PHPV is rare. The imaging features in this case suggest the diagnosis of bilateral PHPV and differentiate it from retinoblastoma. This entity, although infrequent, should be considered in the differential diagnosis while evaluating bilateral leukokoria.  (+info)

A developmental defect in astrocytes inhibits programmed regression of the hyaloid vasculature in the mammalian eye. (4/13)

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Infant Aphakia Treatment Study: effects of persistent fetal vasculature on outcome at 1 year of age. (5/13)

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Congenital fibrovascular pupillary membranes: clinical and histopathologic findings. (6/13)

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The deletion of Math5 disrupts retinal blood vessel and glial development in mice. (7/13)

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Deletion of HIF-1alpha partially rescues the abnormal hyaloid vascular system in Cited2 conditional knockout mouse eyes. (8/13)

PURPOSE: Cited2 (CBP/p300-interacting transactivators with glutamic acid (E) and aspartic acid (D)-rich tail 2) is a member of a new family of transcriptional modulators. Cited2 null embryos exhibit hyaloid hypercellularity consisting of aberrant vasculature in the eye. The purpose of the study is to address whether abnormal lenticular development is a primary defect of Cited2 deletion and whether deletion of hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1alpha or an HIF-1alpha target gene, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), could rescue abnormal hyaloid vascular system (HVS) in Cited2 deficient adult eyes. METHODS: Le-Cre specific Cited2 knockout (Cited2(CKO)) mice with or without deletion of HIF-1alpha or VEGF were generated by standard Cre-Lox methods. Eyes collected from six-eight weeks old mice were characterized by Real Time PCR and immunohistological staining. RESULTS: Cited2(CKO) mice had smaller lenses, abnormal lens stalk formation, and failed regression of the HVS in the adult eye. The eye phenotype had features similar to persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous (PHPV), a human congenital eye disorder leading to abnormal lenticular development. Deletion of HIF-1alpha or VEGF in Cited2 knockout eyes partially rescued the abnormal HVS but had no effect on the smaller lens and abnormal lens stalk differentiation. Intravitreal injection of Topotecan (TPT), a compound that inhibits HIF-1alpha expression, partially eliminated HVS defects in Cited2(CKO) lenses. CONCLUSIONS: Abnormal HVS is a primary defect in Cited2 knockout mice, resulting in part from dysregulated functions of HIF-1 and VEGF. The Cited2(CKO) mouse line could be used as a novel disease model for PHPV and as an in vivo model for testing potential HIF-1 inhibitors.  (+info)

Persistent Hyperplastic Primary Vitreous (PHPV) is a rare congenital eye condition that occurs during fetal development. It is characterized by the failure of the primary vitreous, a gel-like substance in the eye, to completely regress or disappear. Instead, the primary vitreous persists and undergoes hyperplasia, leading to the formation of abnormal tissue within the eye.

In PHPV, this persistent tissue can cause various problems, including a small pupil, a cloudy area in the center of the lens (cataract), a white mass behind the lens, and abnormal blood vessels growing from the retina towards the center of the eye. These abnormalities can lead to visual impairment or even blindness, depending on the severity of the condition.

PHPV is typically diagnosed during infancy or early childhood, through a comprehensive eye examination that includes a detailed view of the internal structures of the eye using a specialized lens (slit lamp) and other diagnostic tests. Treatment options may include surgery to remove the abnormal tissue and improve vision, but the success of treatment depends on the extent and location of the PHPV.

Eye abnormalities refer to any structural or functional anomalies that affect the eye or its surrounding tissues. These abnormalities can be present at birth (congenital) or acquired later in life due to various factors such as injury, disease, or aging. Some examples of eye abnormalities include:

1. Strabismus: Also known as crossed eyes, strabismus is a condition where the eyes are misaligned and point in different directions.
2. Nystagmus: This is an involuntary movement of the eyes that can be horizontal, vertical, or rotatory.
3. Cataracts: A cataract is a clouding of the lens inside the eye that can cause vision loss.
4. Glaucoma: This is a group of eye conditions that damage the optic nerve and can lead to vision loss.
5. Retinal disorders: These include conditions such as retinal detachment, macular degeneration, and diabetic retinopathy.
6. Corneal abnormalities: These include conditions such as keratoconus, corneal ulcers, and Fuchs' dystrophy.
7. Orbital abnormalities: These include conditions such as orbital tumors, thyroid eye disease, and Graves' ophthalmopathy.
8. Ptosis: This is a condition where the upper eyelid droops over the eye.
9. Color blindness: A condition where a person has difficulty distinguishing between certain colors.
10. Microphthalmia: A condition where one or both eyes are abnormally small.

These are just a few examples of eye abnormalities, and there are many others that can affect the eye and its functioning. If you suspect that you have an eye abnormality, it is important to consult with an ophthalmologist for proper diagnosis and treatment.

The vitreous body, also known simply as the vitreous, is the clear, gel-like substance that fills the space between the lens and the retina in the eye. It is composed mainly of water, but also contains collagen fibers, hyaluronic acid, and other proteins. The vitreous helps to maintain the shape of the eye and provides a transparent medium for light to pass through to reach the retina. With age, the vitreous can become more liquefied and may eventually separate from the retina, leading to symptoms such as floaters or flashes of light.

A posterior capsulotomy is a surgical procedure that involves making an opening in the back part (posterior) of the lens capsule, which is a thin, clear membrane that holds the lens in place inside the eye. This procedure is typically performed to treat after-cataract, also known as posterior capsular opacification (PCO), which can cause vision loss or disturbance after cataract surgery. During cataract surgery, the cloudy natural lens of the eye is removed and replaced with an artificial intraocular lens (IOL). However, sometimes the back part of the lens capsule may become hazy or opaque over time, leading to visual symptoms similar to those experienced before cataract surgery.

In a posterior capsulotomy, a laser (usually a YAG laser) is used to create an opening in the cloudy posterior capsule, allowing light to pass through and restoring clear vision. The procedure is typically quick, painless, and performed as an outpatient procedure in a doctor's office or clinic. Patients may experience some side effects such as floaters, glare, or flashes of light after the procedure, but these usually resolve within a few days or weeks.

Hyperplasia is a medical term that refers to an abnormal increase in the number of cells in an organ or tissue, leading to an enlargement of the affected area. It's a response to various stimuli such as hormones, chronic irritation, or inflammation. Hyperplasia can be physiological, like the growth of breast tissue during pregnancy, or pathological, like in the case of benign or malignant tumors. The process is generally reversible if the stimulus is removed. It's important to note that hyperplasia itself is not cancerous, but some forms of hyperplasia can increase the risk of developing cancer over time.

The crystalline lens is a biconvex transparent structure in the eye that helps to refract (bend) light rays and focus them onto the retina. It is located behind the iris and pupil and is suspended by small fibers called zonules that connect it to the ciliary body. The lens can change its shape to accommodate and focus on objects at different distances, a process known as accommodation. With age, the lens may become cloudy or opaque, leading to cataracts.

A cataract is a clouding of the natural lens in the eye that affects vision. This clouding can cause vision to become blurry, faded, or dim, making it difficult to see clearly. Cataracts are a common age-related condition, but they can also be caused by injury, disease, or medication use. In most cases, cataracts develop gradually over time and can be treated with surgery to remove the cloudy lens and replace it with an artificial one.

Eye Wiki: Persistent Hyperplastic Primary Vitreous GeneReviews/NIH/NCBI/UW entry on NDP-Related Retinopathies Algernon B. "AB" ... Young J. "Persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous". Archived from the original on 2017-12-12. Retrieved 2009-05-11. Payabvash ... "Persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous - EyeWiki". eyewiki.aao.org. Retrieved 2023-01-03. Apushkin MA, Apushkin MA, Shapiro ... Hunt A, Rowe N, Lam A, Martin F (July 2005). "Outcomes in persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous". The British Journal of ...
... and persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous: role of MR imaging and CT. Radiol Clin North Am 1998; 36(6): 1119- ... vitreous and subretinal hemorrhage may often be observed. On CT, the globe appears hyperdense compared to normal vitreous due ... Persistent color patterns may also be perceived in the affected eye. Initially, these may be mistaken for psychological ... Mild to moderate linear enhancement may be seen between the exudate and the remaining vitreous. The exudate shows a large peak ...
"Case of chromosome 6p25 terminal deletion associated with Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome and persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous ... Kleinmann, R. E., Kazarian, E. L., Raptopoulos, V., & Braverman, L. E. (1981). Primary Empty Sella and Rieger's Anomaly of the ... atrial septal defects or persistent truncus arteriosus. Other alterations described are craniofacial anomalies associated with ...
... for Cataract Secondary To Persistent Hyperplastic Tunica Vasculosa Lentis And Persistent Hyperplastic Primary Vitreous in a ... The main causes of death were similar in both breeds; the primary causes were canine cancer and old age. However, the Pembroke ...
Drexel was born with persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous in her right eye, which required several surgeries and rendered ...
"Persistent Hyperplastic Primary Vitreous" by people in Harvard Catalyst Profiles by year, and whether "Persistent Hyperplastic ... Persistent Hyperplastic Primary Vitreous [C11.250.616]. *Congenital, Hereditary, and Neonatal Diseases and Abnormalities [C16] ... "Persistent Hyperplastic Primary Vitreous" is a descriptor in the National Library of Medicines controlled vocabulary thesaurus ... Persistent Hyperplastic Primary Vitreous*Persistent Hyperplastic Primary Vitreous. *Persistent Hyaloid Vasculature. *Persistent ...
Eye Wiki: Persistent Hyperplastic Primary Vitreous GeneReviews/NIH/NCBI/UW entry on NDP-Related Retinopathies Algernon B. "AB" ... Young J. "Persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous". Archived from the original on 2017-12-12. Retrieved 2009-05-11. Payabvash ... "Persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous - EyeWiki". eyewiki.aao.org. Retrieved 2023-01-03. Apushkin MA, Apushkin MA, Shapiro ... Hunt A, Rowe N, Lam A, Martin F (July 2005). "Outcomes in persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous". The British Journal of ...
Bilateral persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous: an Egyptian family supporting a rare autosomal dominant inheritance. Galal ... Bilateral persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous: an Egyptian family supporting a rare autosomal dominant inheritance. Genet ...
Persistent primary hyperplastic vitreous. *Retinoblastoma. *Toxocara canis (infection caused by a parasite) ...
This entity does not include other childhood glaucomas outlined below in the listing of other primary developmental and ... Persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous. * Congenital pupillary-iris-lens membrane. * Topiramate therapy. * Ciliary body cysts ... Differential diagnoses of the primary developmental glaucomas. Primary congenital glaucoma. * Newborn primary congenital ... Genetics of primary glaucoma. Curr Opin Ophthalmol. 2011 Sep. 22(5):347-55. [QxMD MEDLINE Link]. ...
Persistent Hyperplastic Primary Vitreous. Glial remnants anterior to the optic disc, Cataract, Corneal opacity, Hyaloid ... Developmental cataract, Megalocornea, Persistent pupillary membrane. OMIM:178900. Coronary Artery Disease, Autosomal Dominant, ... Aplasia/Hypoplasia of the iris, Cataract, Corneal opacity, Persistent pupillary membrane. ORPHA:1067. ... Cataract, Elevated circulating creatine kinase concentration, Buphthalmos, Persistent pupillary m.... OMIM:613150. ...
Blind in her right eye, Brittanee has persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous, or PHPV, and had had several surgeries, the ...
Persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous. * Nanophthalmos. * Posterior polymorphous dystrophy. Glaucomas associated with ...
persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous DOID:0060282 * WHCR http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/gene/7467 ...
Persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous. *Goniodysgenesis/pectinate ligament abnormality/primary closed angle glaucoma ... 2 = Moderate or a primary lesion with no osteoarthritis. 3 = Sever OA or primary lesion with osteoarthritis. It is strongly ...
Persistent Hyperplastic Primary Vitreous, Autosomal Recessive. Cataract, Iris coloboma, Buphthalmos, Persistent pupillary ... Megalocornea, Developmental cataract, Persistent pupillary membrane. OMIM:178900. Spinal Muscular Atrophy-Dandy-Walker ... Cataract, Corneal opacity, Persistent pupillary membrane, Aplasia/Hypoplasia of the iris. ORPHA:1067. ... Cataract, Buphthalmos, Persistent pupillary membrane, Shallow anterior chamber, Corneal opacity, .... ORPHA:91495. ...
persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous,. *toxocara endophthalmitis and *exudative retinopathy.. In all cases both eyes should ... Treatment of group A to D tumors include multimodal therapy comprising primary systemic chemotherapy for chemoreduction ... Radiotherapy is very effective against localised vitreous disease and for the elevated tumors when laser is ineffective. ... vitreous or subretinal spaceInvasion of post laminar optic nerve,choroid (,2mm),sclera,orbit,anterior chamber Tumor touching ...
In Asia, Africa, and South America, where uveal melanoma is relatively rare, it probably is the most common primary intraocular ... 12-17. Persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous. A. Inwardly drawn ciliary processes adhere to the margin of vascularized ... persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous (PHPV), and Coats disease (see Table 12-2). ... Extensive vitreous seeding is present. B. Leukocoria is caused by tumor in vitreous cavity. C. Exophytic retinoblastoma. ...
persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous DOID:0060282 * no_name DOID:8953 * Joubert syndrome ...
PHPV (persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous). Albinism. Albinism is another side effect of the Merle gene, as these dogs ...
Persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous, autosomal recessive. Persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous (PHPV), also termed ... Genetic Heterogeneity of Persistent Hyperplastic Primary Vitreous A dominant form of PHPV has been described (PHPVAD; 611308 ... persistent fetal vasculature, is a developmental malformation of the eye in which the primary vitreous fails to regress in ... Primary congenital glaucoma (PCG) is characterized by elevated intraocular pressure (IOP), enlargement of the globe ( ...
persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous (PHPV), hyaloid artery Description. Here we show a persistent hyperplastic primary ...
Litter eye screening for Persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous (PHPV).. Ask the breeder to show you the certificates for the ... Cataracts; Persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous (PHPV) (severe lesions can cause visual loss) ... Eye disease: Hereditary cataract (HC); Persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous (PHPV) (litter screening) ...
Case Study 187 Advanced Persistent Hyperplastic Primary Vitreous . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 423. Case Study ... Case Study 176 Persistent Hyperplastic Primary Vitreous . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 399. Case ... Case Study 194 Persistent Hyperplastic Primary Vitreous . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 437. Case ... Case Study 7 Posterior Vitreous Detachment and Retinal Tear . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17. Case Study ...
Unilateral neonatal glaucoma (buphthalmos) with persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous Shashi Kumar Bhasker, Astha Jain, P K ...
Visual acuity results following treatment of persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous. Arch Ophthalmol. 1986;104(5):662-7. 22. ...
Bilateral Persistent Hyperplastic Primary Vitreous: A Close Mimic of Retinoblastoma. Seminars in Ophthalmology 2013. [PUBMED/ ... Akhtar J, Siddiqui MA, Shahid M, Khan NA, Shameem M, Bhargava R. A 24 year-old female with ruptured primary pulmonary teratoma ... Khalid M, Siddiqui MA, Qaseem SMD, Ahmad M, Khalid S. Multifocal primary lymphoma of the cranial vault in a ...
Persistent Pupillary Membrane, Persistent Primary (Hyperplastic) Vitreous, Persistent Posterior Tunica. Vasculosa Lentis, and ...
Most common complication after lens extraction in persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous is Retinal detachment. ... 19-year-old patient has primary amenorrhea, well-developed breasts and pubic hair but absent vagina and uterus. Most likely ... Fibrinoid necrosis and onion peel appearance of kidney is seen in Hyperplastic arteriosclerosis. ...
Talipes equinovarus, non-obstructive cardiomyopathy and persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous were additional findings in ...
Detecting persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous is of paramount importance, as it is a differential diagnosis for ... ABSTRACT Hyperplastic primary vitreous persistence, currently referred to as fetal vasculature persistence, is a congenital ... Primary success rate was obtained in 90.82% of eyes (95%CI 87.58-94.06). 9.18% of eyes (95%CI 5.94-12.42) re-detached. In 3.27 ... Four years after the primary surgery, she presented a large macular hole, and was treated with membrane of plasm rich in growth ...
A gene for nonsyndromic persistant hyperplastic primary vitreous maps to chromosome 10q11-21 in a Pakistani family. Invest. ...
"Familial exudative vitreoretinopathy mimicking persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous.." Am. J. Ophthalmol.. 1999 Apr;127(4): ... "Surgical management of the lens and retrolenticular fibrotic membranes associated with persistent fetal vasculature.." J ... "Response of retinoblastoma with vitreous tumor seeding to adenovirus-mediated delivery of thymidine kinase followed by ...
High frequency of persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous and cataracts in p53-deficient mice. Cell Death Differ. 1998, 5 (2 ... and is transcriptionally active within the nucleus of differentiating primary hippocampal neurons and oligodendrocytes [18], ...
  • The vitreo-retinal manifestations of persistent hyperplasic primary vitreous (PHPV) and their management. (harvard.edu)
  • Persistent fetal vasculature (PFV), also known as persistent fetal vasculature syndrome (PFSV), and until 1997 known primarily as persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous (PHPV), is a rare congenital anomaly which occurs when blood vessels within the developing eye, known as the embryonic hyaloid vasculature network, fail to regress as they normally would in-utero after the eye is fully developed. (wikipedia.org)
  • Here we show a persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous (PHPV) documented with smartphone fundoscopy technique. (asrs.org)
  • Litter eye screening for Persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous (PHPV). (sbt1935.com)
  • Bilateral Persistent Hyperplastic Primary Vitreous: A Close Mimic of Retinoblastoma. (ommegaonline.org)
  • Persistent fetal vasculature heightens the lifelong risk of glaucoma, cataracts, intraocular hemorrhages, and Retinal detachments, accounting for the visual loss of nearly 5% of the blind community in the developed world. (wikipedia.org)
  • This entity is one of a group of pediatric glaucomas known as primary developmental glaucoma. (medscape.com)
  • Isolated trabeculodysgenesis is the usual finding in primary congenital glaucoma. (medscape.com)
  • Primary congenital glaucoma (PCG) is characterized by elevated intraocular pressure (IOP), enlargement of the globe ( buphthalmos ), edema, and opacification of the cornea with rupture of Descemet's membrane (Haab's striae), thinning of the anterior sclera and iris atrophy, anomalously deep anterior chamber, and structurally normal posterior segment except for progressive glaucomatous optic atrophy. (beds.ac.uk)
  • Bilateral persistent fetal vasculature and a chromosome 10 mutation including COX15. (harvard.edu)
  • The white pupillary reflex is caused by tumor in the vitreous cavity (endophytic tumors) or the detached retina (exophytic tumors). (entokey.com)
  • It has recently been hypothesized that Miniature Schnauzer dogs affected with retinal dysplasia and associated persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous have a decreased amount of Tfam and several mtDNA transcripts in the retina and RPE. (usask.ca)
  • Inflammation can involve only the anterior eye (iritis), vitreous (intermediate uveitis), retina and/or choroid (posterior uveitis), or the entire eye (panuveitis). (entokey.com)
  • The presentation of persistent fetal vasculature is generally classified into three forms: purely anterior, purely posterior, or a mix of both. (wikipedia.org)
  • Vitreous: Inflammatory cells in the vitreous imply involvement of the posterior segment. (entokey.com)
  • A gene for nonsyndromic persistant hyperplastic primary vitreous maps to chromosome 10q11-21 in a Pakistani family. (neglectedscience.com)
  • The most common cause of leukocoria is the primary vitreous used in the formation of the eye during fetal development, which in PFV remains in part or in whole within the eye upon birth, and whose tissue is hazy and scarred. (wikipedia.org)
  • B. Leukocoria is caused by tumor in vitreous cavity. (entokey.com)
  • A developmental ocular anomaly in which the primary VITREOUS BODY and its surrounding hyaloid vasculature failed to regress. (harvard.edu)
  • A retrospective analysis, including a cohort of 126 women with persistent PP among 27,975 pregnancies between 2008 and 2020, was performed. (karger.com)
  • A transparent, biconvex structure of the EYE, enclosed in a capsule and situated behind the IRIS and in front of the vitreous humor (VITREOUS BODY). (lookformedical.com)
  • Persistent fetal vasculature manifests exclusively in newborn infants, generally within two weeks of birth, although it may not be diagnosed until much later. (wikipedia.org)
  • In Asia, Africa, and South America, where uveal melanoma is relatively rare, it probably is the most common primary intraocular tumor. (entokey.com)
  • Primary Ewing sarcoma affecting the calvarium is extremely rare, making just 1% of the cases. (blogspot.com)
  • The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) is holding a panel discussion to review and discuss health effects associated with asbestos and synthetic (man-made) vitreous fibers (SVFs), especially those of less than 5 microns in length. (cdc.gov)
  • Visual acuity results following treatment of persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous. (symptoma.com)
  • Surgical resection is the primary treatment of choice. (blogspot.com)
  • This graph shows the total number of publications written about "Persistent Hyperplastic Primary Vitreous" by people in Harvard Catalyst Profiles by year, and whether "Persistent Hyperplastic Primary Vitreous" was a major or minor topic of these publication. (harvard.edu)
  • You will receive an email whenever topic 'Vitreous Disorders' is updated. (iovs.org)
  • Persistent fetal vasculature heightens the lifelong risk of glaucoma, cataracts, intraocular hemorrhages, and Retinal detachments, accounting for the visual loss of nearly 5% of the blind community in the developed world. (wikipedia.org)
  • The presentation of persistent fetal vasculature is generally classified into three forms: purely anterior, purely posterior, or a mix of both. (wikipedia.org)
  • Persistent fetal vasculature manifests exclusively in newborn infants, generally within two weeks of birth, although it may not be diagnosed until much later. (wikipedia.org)
  • The spectrum of NDP -related retinopathies appears to be a continuum with considerable overlap, ranging from Norrie disease, NDP -related persistent fetal vasculature, NDP -related familial exudative vitreoretinopathy, NDP -related advanced retinopathy of prematurity, and NDP -related Coats disease. (nih.gov)
  • A developmental ocular anomaly in which the primary VITREOUS BODY and its surrounding hyaloid vasculature failed to regress. (nih.gov)
  • The indications included congenital rubella cataract with microphthalmos, traumatic cataract, persistent anterior and posterior hyperplastic primary vitreous, postcataract pupillary membranes, and postcataract vitreous prolapse with cystoid mascular edema. (nih.gov)
  • It has previously been called persistent tunica vasculosa lentis, persistent posterior fetal fibrovascular sheath of the lens, congenital retinal septum, and ablatio falciformis congenita. (institut-vision.org)
  • It is characterized by persistence of various portions of the primary vitreous (embryonic hyaloid vascular system) with hyperplasia of the associated embryonic connective tissue, and associated with microphthalmia, cataract and glaucoma. (institut-vision.org)
  • Peripheral anterior synechia reduce extent of angle widening after laser peripheral iridotomy in eyes with primary angle closure. (medscape.com)
  • Abnormalities of the zonular fibers that normally hold the lens in position may occur, resulting in luxation of the lens from its normal position into the anterior chamber or into the vitreous humor. (vin.com)
  • Mashayekhi A., Ahamdieh H., soheilian M.,Azarmina M., Dehghan M.H. 5th Iranian congress of ophthalmology Thran IR iran 1995 9 - Primary capsulectomy and anterior vitrectomy combined with lensectomy and PCIOL implantation in children: limbal VS pars plana approach. (drugstorepdfsearch.com)
  • Anomalía del desarrollo ocular en la que no regresan el CUERPO VÍTREO primario y su vascularización hialoidea circundante. (bvsalud.org)
  • There are two types of inherited glaucoma, Primary Closed Angle Glaucoma (PCAG/PACG) and Primary Open Angle Glaucoma (POAG). (bva.co.uk)
  • Elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) is the only modifiable risk factor for primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG). (bvsalud.org)
  • Persistent hyperplastic main vitreous and recessive oculo-dento-osseous dysplasia. (thequantumdrift.com)
  • The lens is seated in the patellar fossa, a shallow depression in the vitreous body. (vin.com)
  • Research undertaken in this lab examined the role of p19Arf in vascular remodeling and development of the disease persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous. (nih.gov)
  • A 54-year-old male presented with persistent foreign body sensation that was partially relieved with artificial tears eye drops in his right eye. (aao.org)
  • Your experience may be different from others, and you should consult your primary care provider (PCP) for more information. (nih.gov)
  • Phacoemulsification and goniosynechialysis in the management of unresponsive primary angle closure. (medscape.com)
  • The second day of the meeting will be devoted to critical assessment of the health effects that can be justifiably attributed to asbestos and vitreous fibers and to identifying critical data gaps and research needs that would further enlighten this subject (Topics #2 and #3). (cdc.gov)
  • The most common cause of leukocoria is the primary vitreous used in the formation of the eye during fetal development, which in PFV remains in part or in whole within the eye upon birth, and whose tissue is hazy and scarred. (wikipedia.org)
  • The SBT is currently a popular breed in the UK, recently identified as the second most common purebred in the wider general dog population under primary veterinary care [ 2 ]. (biomedcentral.com)