Nerve Compression Syndromes: Mechanical compression of nerves or nerve roots from internal or external causes. These may result in a conduction block to nerve impulses (due to MYELIN SHEATH dysfunction) or axonal loss. The nerve and nerve sheath injuries may be caused by ISCHEMIA; INFLAMMATION; or a direct mechanical effect.Ulnar Nerve Compression Syndromes: Ulnar neuropathies caused by mechanical compression of the nerve at any location from its origin at the BRACHIAL PLEXUS to its terminations in the hand. Common sites of compression include the retroepicondylar groove, cubital tunnel at the elbow (CUBITAL TUNNEL SYNDROME), and Guyon's canal at the wrist. Clinical features depend on the site of injury, but may include weakness or paralysis of wrist flexion, finger flexion, and ulnar innervated intrinsic hand muscles, and impaired sensation over the ulnar aspect of the hand, fifth finger, and ulnar half of the ring finger. (Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1995, Ch51, p43)Peripheral Nerves: The nerves outside of the brain and spinal cord, including the autonomic, cranial, and spinal nerves. Peripheral nerves contain non-neuronal cells and connective tissue as well as axons. The connective tissue layers include, from the outside to the inside, the epineurium, the perineurium, and the endoneurium.Particle Size: Relating to the size of solids.Peripheral Nervous System Diseases: Diseases of the peripheral nerves external to the brain and spinal cord, which includes diseases of the nerve roots, ganglia, plexi, autonomic nerves, sensory nerves, and motor nerves.Drug Compounding: The preparation, mixing, and assembling of a drug. (From Remington, The Science and Practice of Pharmacy, 19th ed, p1814)Drug Carriers: Forms to which substances are incorporated to improve the delivery and the effectiveness of drugs. Drug carriers are used in drug-delivery systems such as the controlled-release technology to prolong in vivo drug actions, decrease drug metabolism, and reduce drug toxicity. Carriers are also used in designs to increase the effectiveness of drug delivery to the target sites of pharmacological actions. Liposomes, albumin microspheres, soluble synthetic polymers, DNA complexes, protein-drug conjugates, and carrier erythrocytes among others have been employed as biodegradable drug carriers.Chemistry, Pharmaceutical: Chemistry dealing with the composition and preparation of agents having PHARMACOLOGIC ACTIONS or diagnostic use.Peripheral Vascular Diseases: Pathological processes involving any one of the BLOOD VESSELS in the vasculature outside the HEART.Popliteal Artery: The continuation of the femoral artery coursing through the popliteal fossa; it divides into the anterior and posterior tibial arteries.Peripheral Nervous System: The nervous system outside of the brain and spinal cord. The peripheral nervous system has autonomic and somatic divisions. The autonomic nervous system includes the enteric, parasympathetic, and sympathetic subdivisions. The somatic nervous system includes the cranial and spinal nerves and their ganglia and the peripheral sensory receptors.Liposomes: Artificial, single or multilaminar vesicles (made from lecithins or other lipids) that are used for the delivery of a variety of biological molecules or molecular complexes to cells, for example, drug delivery and gene transfer. They are also used to study membranes and membrane proteins.Nanoparticles: Nanometer-sized particles that are nanoscale in three dimensions. They include nanocrystaline materials; NANOCAPSULES; METAL NANOPARTICLES; DENDRIMERS, and QUANTUM DOTS. The uses of nanoparticles include DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEMS and cancer targeting and imaging.Technology, Pharmaceutical: The application of scientific knowledge or technology to pharmacy and the pharmaceutical industry. It includes methods, techniques, and instrumentation in the manufacture, preparation, compounding, dispensing, packaging, and storing of drugs and other preparations used in diagnostic and determinative procedures, and in the treatment of patients.Ulnar Nerve: A major nerve of the upper extremity. In humans, the fibers of the ulnar nerve originate in the lower cervical and upper thoracic spinal cord (usually C7 to T1), travel via the medial cord of the brachial plexus, and supply sensory and motor innervation to parts of the hand and forearm.Nanocapsules: Nanometer-sized, hollow, spherically-shaped objects that can be utilized to encapsulate small amounts of pharmaceuticals, enzymes, or other catalysts (Glossary of Biotechnology and Nanobiotechnology, 4th ed).Peripheral Nerve Injuries: Injuries to the PERIPHERAL NERVES.Tendon Entrapment: Narrowing or stenosis of a tendon's retinacular sheath. It occurs most often in the hand or wrist but can also be found in the foot or ankle. The most common types are DE QUERVAIN DISEASE and TRIGGER FINGER DISORDER.Chitosan: Deacetylated CHITIN, a linear polysaccharide of deacetylated beta-1,4-D-glucosamine. It is used in HYDROGEL and to treat WOUNDS.Polyglycolic Acid: A biocompatible polymer used as a surgical suture material.Delayed-Action Preparations: Dosage forms of a drug that act over a period of time by controlled-release processes or technology.Constriction, Pathologic: The condition of an anatomical structure's being constricted beyond normal dimensions.Scapula: Also called the shoulder blade, it is a flat triangular bone, a pair of which form the back part of the shoulder girdle.Emulsions: Colloids formed by the combination of two immiscible liquids such as oil and water. Lipid-in-water emulsions are usually liquid, like milk or lotion. Water-in-lipid emulsions tend to be creams. The formation of emulsions may be aided by amphiphatic molecules that surround one component of the system to form MICELLES.Leukocytes, Mononuclear: Mature LYMPHOCYTES and MONOCYTES transported by the blood to the body's extravascular space. They are morphologically distinguishable from mature granulocytic leukocytes by their large, non-lobed nuclei and lack of coarse, heavily stained cytoplasmic granules.Acridine Orange: A cationic cytochemical stain specific for cell nuclei, especially DNA. It is used as a supravital stain and in fluorescence cytochemistry. It may cause mutations in microorganisms.Drug Stability: The chemical and physical integrity of a pharmaceutical product.Drug Delivery Systems: Systems for the delivery of drugs to target sites of pharmacological actions. Technologies employed include those concerning drug preparation, route of administration, site targeting, metabolism, and toxicity.Microspheres: Small uniformly-sized spherical particles, of micrometer dimensions, frequently labeled with radioisotopes or various reagents acting as tags or markers.Median Neuropathy: Disease involving the median nerve, from its origin at the BRACHIAL PLEXUS to its termination in the hand. Clinical features include weakness of wrist and finger flexion, forearm pronation, thenar abduction, and loss of sensation over the lateral palm, first three fingers, and radial half of the ring finger. Common sites of injury include the elbow, where the nerve passes through the two heads of the pronator teres muscle (pronator syndrome) and in the carpal tunnel (CARPAL TUNNEL SYNDROME).Peripheral Arterial Disease: Lack of perfusion in the EXTREMITIES resulting from atherosclerosis. It is characterized by INTERMITTENT CLAUDICATION, and an ANKLE BRACHIAL INDEX of 0.9 or less.Excipients: Usually inert substances added to a prescription in order to provide suitable consistency to the dosage form. These include binders, matrix, base or diluent in pills, tablets, creams, salves, etc.Equipment Failure: Failure of equipment to perform to standard. The failure may be due to defects or improper use.Device Removal: Removal of an implanted therapeutic or prosthetic device.Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: Entrapment of the MEDIAN NERVE in the carpal tunnel, which is formed by the flexor retinaculum and the CARPAL BONES. This syndrome may be associated with repetitive occupational trauma (CUMULATIVE TRAUMA DISORDERS); wrist injuries; AMYLOID NEUROPATHIES; rheumatoid arthritis (see ARTHRITIS, RHEUMATOID); ACROMEGALY; PREGNANCY; and other conditions. Symptoms include burning pain and paresthesias involving the ventral surface of the hand and fingers which may radiate proximally. Impairment of sensation in the distribution of the median nerve and thenar muscle atrophy may occur. (Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1995, Ch51, p45)Neural Conduction: The propagation of the NERVE IMPULSE along the nerve away from the site of an excitation stimulus.Enzymes, Immobilized: Enzymes which are immobilized on or in a variety of water-soluble or water-insoluble matrices with little or no loss of their catalytic activity. Since they can be reused continuously, immobilized enzymes have found wide application in the industrial, medical and research fields.Wrist: The region of the upper limb between the metacarpus and the FOREARM.Orbital Fractures: Fractures of the bones in the orbit, which include parts of the frontal, ethmoidal, lacrimal, and sphenoid bones and the maxilla and zygoma.Pudendal Neuralgia: Pain associated with a damaged PUDENDAL NERVE. Clinical features may include positional pain with sitting in the perineal and genital areas, sexual dysfunction and FECAL INCONTINENCE and URINARY INCONTINENCE.Radial Nerve: A major nerve of the upper extremity. In humans the fibers of the radial nerve originate in the lower cervical and upper thoracic spinal cord (usually C5 to T1), travel via the posterior cord of the brachial plexus, and supply motor innervation to extensor muscles of the arm and cutaneous sensory fibers to extensor regions of the arm and hand.Cells, Immobilized: Microbial, plant, or animal cells which are immobilized by attachment to solid structures, usually a column matrix. A common use of immobilized cells is in biotechnology for the bioconversion of a substrate to a particular product. (From Singleton & Sainsbury, Dictionary of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, 2d ed)Median Nerve: A major nerve of the upper extremity. In humans, the fibers of the median nerve originate in the lower cervical and upper thoracic spinal cord (usually C6 to T1), travel via the brachial plexus, and supply sensory and motor innervation to parts of the forearm and hand.Paresthesia: Subjective cutaneous sensations (e.g., cold, warmth, tingling, pressure, etc.) that are experienced spontaneously in the absence of stimulation.Sciatic Nerve: A nerve which originates in the lumbar and sacral spinal cord (L4 to S3) and supplies motor and sensory innervation to the lower extremity. The sciatic nerve, which is the main continuation of the sacral plexus, is the largest nerve in the body. It has two major branches, the TIBIAL NERVE and the PERONEAL NERVE.Intermittent Claudication: A symptom complex characterized by pain and weakness in SKELETAL MUSCLE group associated with exercise, such as leg pain and weakness brought on by walking. Such muscle limpness disappears after a brief rest and is often relates to arterial STENOSIS; muscle ISCHEMIA; and accumulation of LACTATE.Ulnar Artery: The larger of the two terminal branches of the brachial artery, beginning about one centimeter distal to the bend of the elbow. Like the RADIAL ARTERY, its branches may be divided into three groups corresponding to their locations in the forearm, wrist, and hand.Solubility: The ability of a substance to be dissolved, i.e. to form a solution with another substance. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Elbow: Region of the body immediately surrounding and including the ELBOW JOINT.Gels: Colloids with a solid continuous phase and liquid as the dispersed phase; gels may be unstable when, due to temperature or other cause, the solid phase liquefies; the resulting colloid is called a sol.Administration, Ophthalmic: Application of pharmaceutically active agents on the tissues of the EYE.Arterial Occlusive Diseases: Pathological processes which result in the partial or complete obstruction of ARTERIES. They are characterized by greatly reduced or absence of blood flow through these vessels. They are also known as arterial insufficiency.Lymphoma, T-Cell, Peripheral: A group of malignant lymphomas thought to derive from peripheral T-lymphocytes in lymph nodes and other nonlymphoid sites. They include a broad spectrum of lymphocyte morphology, but in all instances express T-cell markers admixed with epithelioid histiocytes, plasma cells, and eosinophils. Although markedly similar to large-cell immunoblastic lymphoma (LYMPHOMA, LARGE-CELL, IMMUNOBLASTIC), this group's unique features warrant separate treatment.Calorimetry, Differential Scanning: Differential thermal analysis in which the sample compartment of the apparatus is a differential calorimeter, allowing an exact measure of the heat of transition independent of the specific heat, thermal conductivity, and other variables of the sample.Decompression, Surgical: A surgical operation for the relief of pressure in a body compartment or on a body part. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Skin Diseases, Vascular: Skin diseases affecting or involving the cutaneous blood vessels and generally manifested as inflammation, swelling, erythema, or necrosis in the affected area.Pharmaceutical Vehicles: A carrier or inert medium used as a solvent (or diluent) in which the medicinally active agent is formulated and or administered. (Dictionary of Pharmacy, 1986)Renal Veins: Short thick veins which return blood from the kidneys to the vena cava.Freeze Drying: Method of tissue preparation in which the tissue specimen is frozen and then dehydrated at low temperature in a high vacuum. This method is also used for dehydrating pharmaceutical and food products.Polymers: Compounds formed by the joining of smaller, usually repeating, units linked by covalent bonds. These compounds often form large macromolecules (e.g., BIOPOLYMERS; PLASTICS).Poloxamer: A nonionic polyoxyethylene-polyoxypropylene block co-polymer with the general formula HO(C2H4O)a(-C3H6O)b(C2H4O)aH. It is available in different grades which vary from liquids to solids. It is used as an emulsifying agent, solubilizing agent, surfactant, and wetting agent for antibiotics. Poloxamer is also used in ointment and suppository bases and as a tablet binder or coater. (Martindale The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 31st ed)Cells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.Trichinella: A genus of parasitic nematodes that causes TRICHINELLOSIS in man and other animal.Emulsifying Agents: SURFACE-ACTIVE AGENTS that induce a dispersion of undissolved material throughout a liquid.Sciatic Neuropathy: Disease or damage involving the SCIATIC NERVE, which divides into the PERONEAL NERVE and TIBIAL NERVE (see also PERONEAL NEUROPATHIES and TIBIAL NEUROPATHY). Clinical manifestations may include SCIATICA or pain localized to the hip, PARESIS or PARALYSIS of posterior thigh muscles and muscles innervated by the peroneal and tibial nerves, and sensory loss involving the lateral and posterior thigh, posterior and lateral leg, and sole of the foot. The sciatic nerve may be affected by trauma; ISCHEMIA; COLLAGEN DISEASES; and other conditions. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1363)Lymphocytes: White blood cells formed in the body's lymphoid tissue. The nucleus is round or ovoid with coarse, irregularly clumped chromatin while the cytoplasm is typically pale blue with azurophilic (if any) granules. Most lymphocytes can be classified as either T or B (with subpopulations of each), or NATURAL KILLER CELLS.Radial Neuropathy: Disease involving the RADIAL NERVE. Clinical features include weakness of elbow extension, elbow flexion, supination of the forearm, wrist and finger extension, and thumb abduction. Sensation may be impaired over regions of the dorsal forearm. Common sites of compression or traumatic injury include the AXILLA and radial groove of the HUMERUS.Nymphaeaceae: The sour gum plant family of the order Nymphaeales, subclass Magnoliidae, class Magnoliopsida. All have horizontal or hanging branches and broad alternate leaves, and they are dioecious (male and female flowers on different plants).Microscopy, Electron, Scanning: Microscopy in which the object is examined directly by an electron beam scanning the specimen point-by-point. The image is constructed by detecting the products of specimen interactions that are projected above the plane of the sample, such as backscattered electrons. Although SCANNING TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY also scans the specimen point by point with the electron beam, the image is constructed by detecting the electrons, or their interaction products that are transmitted through the sample plane, so that is a form of TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY.Polyethylene Glycols: Polymers of ETHYLENE OXIDE and water, and their ethers. They vary in consistency from liquid to solid depending on the molecular weight indicated by a number following the name. They are used as SURFACTANTS, dispersing agents, solvents, ointment and suppository bases, vehicles, and tablet excipients. Some specific groups are NONOXYNOLS, OCTOXYNOLS, and POLOXAMERS.Hexuronic Acids: Term used to designate tetrahydroxy aldehydic acids obtained by oxidation of hexose sugars, i.e. glucuronic acid, galacturonic acid, etc. Historically, the name hexuronic acid was originally given to ascorbic acid.Skin Absorption: Uptake of substances through the SKIN.Glucuronic Acid: A sugar acid formed by the oxidation of the C-6 carbon of GLUCOSE. In addition to being a key intermediate metabolite of the uronic acid pathway, glucuronic acid also plays a role in the detoxification of certain drugs and toxins by conjugating with them to form GLUCURONIDES.Surface-Active Agents: Agents that modify interfacial tension of water; usually substances that have one lipophilic and one hydrophilic group in the molecule; includes soaps, detergents, emulsifiers, dispersing and wetting agents, and several groups of antiseptics.Spinal Nerve Roots: Paired bundles of NERVE FIBERS entering and leaving the SPINAL CORD at each segment. The dorsal and ventral nerve roots join to form the mixed segmental spinal nerves. The dorsal roots are generally afferent, formed by the central projections of the spinal (dorsal root) ganglia sensory cells, and the ventral roots are efferent, comprising the axons of spinal motor and PREGANGLIONIC AUTONOMIC FIBERS.Elbow Joint: A hinge joint connecting the FOREARM to the ARM.T-Lymphocytes: Lymphocytes responsible for cell-mediated immunity. Two types have been identified - cytotoxic (T-LYMPHOCYTES, CYTOTOXIC) and helper T-lymphocytes (T-LYMPHOCYTES, HELPER-INDUCER). They are formed when lymphocytes circulate through the THYMUS GLAND and differentiate to thymocytes. When exposed to an antigen, they divide rapidly and produce large numbers of new T cells sensitized to that antigen.Lactic Acid: A normal intermediate in the fermentation (oxidation, metabolism) of sugar. The concentrated form is used internally to prevent gastrointestinal fermentation. (From Stedman, 26th ed)Hereditary Sensory and Motor Neuropathy: A group of slowly progressive inherited disorders affecting motor and sensory peripheral nerves. Subtypes include HMSNs I-VII. HMSN I and II both refer to CHARCOT-MARIE-TOOTH DISEASE. HMSN III refers to hypertrophic neuropathy of infancy. HMSN IV refers to REFSUM DISEASE. HMSN V refers to a condition marked by a hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy associated with spastic paraplegia (see SPASTIC PARAPLEGIA, HEREDITARY). HMSN VI refers to HMSN associated with an inherited optic atrophy (OPTIC ATROPHIES, HEREDITARY), and HMSN VII refers to HMSN associated with retinitis pigmentosa. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1343)Ulnar Neuropathies: Disease involving the ULNAR NERVE from its origin in the BRACHIAL PLEXUS to its termination in the hand. Clinical manifestations may include PARESIS or PARALYSIS of wrist flexion, finger flexion, thumb adduction, finger abduction, and finger adduction. Sensation over the medial palm, fifth finger, and ulnar aspect of the ring finger may also be impaired. Common sites of injury include the AXILLA, cubital tunnel at the ELBOW, and Guyon's canal at the wrist. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1995, Ch51 pp43-5)Foramen Ovale: An opening in the wall between the right and the left upper chambers (HEART ATRIA) of a fetal heart. Oval foramen normally closes soon after birth; when it fails to close the condition is called PATENT OVAL FORAMEN.Fascia: Layers of connective tissue of variable thickness. The superficial fascia is found immediately below the skin; the deep fascia invests MUSCLES, nerves, and other organs.Microscopy, Electron, Transmission: Electron microscopy in which the ELECTRONS or their reaction products that pass down through the specimen are imaged below the plane of the specimen.Cumulative Trauma Disorders: Harmful and painful condition caused by overuse or overexertion of some part of the musculoskeletal system, often resulting from work-related physical activities. It is characterized by inflammation, pain, or dysfunction of the involved joints, bones, ligaments, and nerves.Fluorophotometry: Measurement of light given off by fluorescein in order to assess the integrity of various ocular barriers. The method is used to investigate the blood-aqueous barrier, blood-retinal barrier, aqueous flow measurements, corneal endothelial permeability, and tear flow dynamics.Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome: Entrapment of the distal branches of the posterior TIBIAL NERVE (which divides into the medial plantar, lateral plantar, and calcanial nerves) in the tarsal tunnel, which lies posterior to the internal malleolus and beneath the retinaculum of the flexor muscles of the foot. Symptoms include ankle pain radiating into the foot which tends to be aggravated by walking. Examination may reveal Tinel's sign (radiating pain following nerve percussion) over the tibial nerve at the ankle, weakness and atrophy of the small foot muscles, or loss of sensation in the foot. (From Foot Ankle 1990;11(1):47-52)Capsules: Hard or soft soluble containers used for the oral administration of medicine.Neuroma: A tumor made up of nerve cells and nerve fibers. (Dorland, 27th ed)Polycarboxylate Cement: Water-soluble low-molecular-weight polymers of acrylic or methacrylic acid that form solid, insoluble products when mixed with specially prepared ZnO powder. The resulting cement adheres to dental enamel and is also used as a luting agent.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Alginates: Salts of alginic acid that are extracted from marine kelp and used to make dental impressions and as absorbent material for surgical dressings.Supination: Applies to movements of the forearm in turning the palm forward or upward. When referring to the foot, a combination of adduction and inversion movements of the foot.Shoulder: Part of the body in humans and primates where the arms connect to the trunk. The shoulder has five joints; ACROMIOCLAVICULAR joint, CORACOCLAVICULAR joint, GLENOHUMERAL joint, scapulathoracic joint, and STERNOCLAVICULAR joint.Peroneal Nerve: The lateral of the two terminal branches of the sciatic nerve. The peroneal (or fibular) nerve provides motor and sensory innervation to parts of the leg and foot.Diffusion: The tendency of a gas or solute to pass from a point of higher pressure or concentration to a point of lower pressure or concentration and to distribute itself throughout the available space. Diffusion, especially FACILITATED DIFFUSION, is a major mechanism of BIOLOGICAL TRANSPORT.Asphyxia: A pathological condition caused by lack of oxygen, manifested in impending or actual cessation of life.Lymphocyte Activation: Morphologic alteration of small B LYMPHOCYTES or T LYMPHOCYTES in culture into large blast-like cells able to synthesize DNA and RNA and to divide mitotically. It is induced by INTERLEUKINS; MITOGENS such as PHYTOHEMAGGLUTININS, and by specific ANTIGENS. It may also occur in vivo as in GRAFT REJECTION.Leukocytes: White blood cells. These include granular leukocytes (BASOPHILS; EOSINOPHILS; and NEUTROPHILS) as well as non-granular leukocytes (LYMPHOCYTES and MONOCYTES).Flow Cytometry: Technique using an instrument system for making, processing, and displaying one or more measurements on individual cells obtained from a cell suspension. Cells are usually stained with one or more fluorescent dyes specific to cell components of interest, e.g., DNA, and fluorescence of each cell is measured as it rapidly transverses the excitation beam (laser or mercury arc lamp). Fluorescence provides a quantitative measure of various biochemical and biophysical properties of the cell, as well as a basis for cell sorting. Other measurable optical parameters include light absorption and light scattering, the latter being applicable to the measurement of cell size, shape, density, granularity, and stain uptake.Surface Properties: Characteristics or attributes of the outer boundaries of objects, including molecules.Leg: The inferior part of the lower extremity between the KNEE and the ANKLE.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Rats, Sprague-Dawley: A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.Micelles: Particles consisting of aggregates of molecules held loosely together by secondary bonds. The surface of micelles are usually comprised of amphiphatic compounds that are oriented in a way that minimizes the energy of interaction between the micelle and its environment. Liquids that contain large numbers of suspended micelles are referred to as EMULSIONS.Nanotechnology: The development and use of techniques to study physical phenomena and construct structures in the nanoscale size range or smaller.Polymethacrylic Acids: Poly-2-methylpropenoic acids. Used in the manufacture of methacrylate resins and plastics in the form of pellets and granules, as absorbent for biological materials and as filters; also as biological membranes and as hydrogens. Synonyms: methylacrylate polymer; poly(methylacrylate); acrylic acid methyl ester polymer.Acrylic ResinsMonocytes: Large, phagocytic mononuclear leukocytes produced in the vertebrate BONE MARROW and released into the BLOOD; contain a large, oval or somewhat indented nucleus surrounded by voluminous cytoplasm and numerous organelles.Polysorbates: Sorbitan mono-9-octadecanoate poly(oxy-1,2-ethanediyl) derivatives; complex mixtures of polyoxyethylene ethers used as emulsifiers or dispersing agents in pharmaceuticals.Methylcellulose: Methylester of cellulose. Methylcellulose is used as an emulsifying and suspending agent in cosmetics, pharmaceutics and the chemical industry. It is used therapeutically as a bulk laxative.Peripheral Nervous System Neoplasms: Neoplasms which arise from peripheral nerve tissue. This includes NEUROFIBROMAS; SCHWANNOMAS; GRANULAR CELL TUMORS; and malignant peripheral NERVE SHEATH NEOPLASMS. (From DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, pp1750-1)Leg Injuries: General or unspecified injuries involving the leg.Pain: An unpleasant sensation induced by noxious stimuli which are detected by NERVE ENDINGS of NOCICEPTIVE NEURONS.Nanostructures: Materials which have structured components with at least one dimension in the range of 1 to 100 nanometers. These include NANOCOMPOSITES; NANOPARTICLES; NANOTUBES; and NANOWIRES.Spectroscopy, Fourier Transform Infrared: A spectroscopic technique in which a range of wavelengths is presented simultaneously with an interferometer and the spectrum is mathematically derived from the pattern thus obtained.Nanomedicine: The branch of medicine concerned with the application of NANOTECHNOLOGY to the prevention and treatment of disease. It involves the monitoring, repair, construction, and control of human biological systems at the molecular level, using engineered nanodevices and NANOSTRUCTURES. (From Freitas Jr., Nanomedicine, vol 1, 1999).Skin: The outer covering of the body that protects it from the environment. It is composed of the DERMIS and the EPIDERMIS.Ulna Fractures: Fractures of the larger bone of the forearm.Mice, Inbred C57BLTransducers, Pressure: Transducers that are activated by pressure changes, e.g., blood pressure.Syndrome: A characteristic symptom complex.Popliteal Vein: The vein formed by the union of the anterior and posterior tibial veins; it courses through the popliteal space and becomes the femoral vein.Angiography: Radiography of blood vessels after injection of a contrast medium.Spinal Canal: The cavity within the SPINAL COLUMN through which the SPINAL CORD passes.Powders: Substances made up of an aggregation of small particles, as that obtained by grinding or trituration of a solid drug. In pharmacy it is a form in which substances are administered. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Equipment Design: Methods of creating machines and devices.Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation: Transplantation of stem cells collected from the peripheral blood. It is a less invasive alternative to direct marrow harvesting of hematopoietic stem cells. Enrichment of stem cells in peripheral blood can be achieved by inducing mobilization of stem cells from the BONE MARROW.Blood Cells: The cells found in the body fluid circulating throughout the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM.Biological Availability: The extent to which the active ingredient of a drug dosage form becomes available at the site of drug action or in a biological medium believed to reflect accessibility to a site of action.Muscle, Skeletal: A subtype of striated muscle, attached by TENDONS to the SKELETON. Skeletal muscles are innervated and their movement can be consciously controlled. They are also called voluntary muscles.Dosage Forms: Completed forms of the pharmaceutical preparation in which prescribed doses of medication are included. They are designed to resist action by gastric fluids, prevent vomiting and nausea, reduce or alleviate the undesirable taste and smells associated with oral administration, achieve a high concentration of drug at target site, or produce a delayed or long-acting drug effect.Renal Nutcracker Syndrome: Left RENAL VEIN compression between the AORTA, ABDOMINAL and the SUPERIOR MESENTERIC ARTERY. Variable symptoms include HYPERTENSION, RENOVASCULAR; HEMATURIA; and VARICOSE VEINS.Oils: Unctuous combustible substances that are liquid or easily liquefiable on warming, and are soluble in ether but insoluble in water. Such substances, depending on their origin, are classified as animal, mineral, or vegetable oils. Depending on their behavior on heating, they are volatile or fixed. (Dorland, 28th ed)Kinetics: The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.Polyglactin 910: A polyester used for absorbable sutures & surgical mesh, especially in ophthalmic surgery. 2-Hydroxy-propanoic acid polymer with polymerized hydroxyacetic acid, which forms 3,6-dimethyl-1,4-dioxane-dione polymer with 1,4-dioxane-2,5-dione copolymer of molecular weight about 80,000 daltons.Foreign Bodies: Inanimate objects that become enclosed in the body.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Schwann Cells: Neuroglial cells of the peripheral nervous system which form the insulating myelin sheaths of peripheral axons.Lipids: A generic term for fats and lipoids, the alcohol-ether-soluble constituents of protoplasm, which are insoluble in water. They comprise the fats, fatty oils, essential oils, waxes, phospholipids, glycolipids, sulfolipids, aminolipids, chromolipids (lipochromes), and fatty acids. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Arteritis: INFLAMMATION of any ARTERIES.Suspensions: Colloids with liquid continuous phase and solid dispersed phase; the term is used loosely also for solid-in-gas (AEROSOLS) and other colloidal systems; water-insoluble drugs may be given as suspensions.Ischemia: A hypoperfusion of the BLOOD through an organ or tissue caused by a PATHOLOGIC CONSTRICTION or obstruction of its BLOOD VESSELS, or an absence of BLOOD CIRCULATION.Trichinellosis: An infection with TRICHINELLA. It is caused by eating raw or undercooked meat that is infected with larvae of nematode worms TRICHINELLA genus. All members of the TRICHINELLA genus can infect human in addition to TRICHINELLA SPIRALIS, the traditional etiological agent. It is distributed throughout much of the world and is re-emerging in some parts as a public health hazard and a food safety problem.CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes: A critical subpopulation of T-lymphocytes involved in the induction of most immunological functions. The HIV virus has selective tropism for the T4 cell which expresses the CD4 phenotypic marker, a receptor for HIV. In fact, the key element in the profound immunosuppression seen in HIV infection is the depletion of this subset of T-lymphocytes.Motor Neuron Disease: Diseases characterized by a selective degeneration of the motor neurons of the spinal cord, brainstem, or motor cortex. Clinical subtypes are distinguished by the major site of degeneration. In AMYOTROPHIC LATERAL SCLEROSIS there is involvement of upper, lower, and brainstem motor neurons. In progressive muscular atrophy and related syndromes (see MUSCULAR ATROPHY, SPINAL) the motor neurons in the spinal cord are primarily affected. With progressive bulbar palsy (BULBAR PALSY, PROGRESSIVE), the initial degeneration occurs in the brainstem. In primary lateral sclerosis, the cortical neurons are affected in isolation. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1089)Microscopy, Electron: Microscopy using an electron beam, instead of light, to visualize the sample, thereby allowing much greater magnification. The interactions of ELECTRONS with specimens are used to provide information about the fine structure of that specimen. In TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY the reactions of the electrons that are transmitted through the specimen are imaged. In SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY an electron beam falls at a non-normal angle on the specimen and the image is derived from the reactions occurring above the plane of the specimen.B-Lymphocytes: Lymphoid cells concerned with humoral immunity. They are short-lived cells resembling bursa-derived lymphocytes of birds in their production of immunoglobulin upon appropriate stimulation.Leukocyte Count: The number of WHITE BLOOD CELLS per unit volume in venous BLOOD. A differential leukocyte count measures the relative numbers of the different types of white cells.Catheterization, Peripheral: Insertion of a catheter into a peripheral artery, vein, or airway for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes.Magnetic Resonance Angiography: Non-invasive method of vascular imaging and determination of internal anatomy without injection of contrast media or radiation exposure. The technique is used especially in CEREBRAL ANGIOGRAPHY as well as for studies of other vascular structures.Administration, Cutaneous: The application of suitable drug dosage forms to the skin for either local or systemic effects.Cell Line: Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.Varicocele: A condition characterized by the dilated tortuous veins of the SPERMATIC CORD with a marked left-sided predominance. Adverse effect on male fertility occurs when varicocele leads to an increased scrotal (and testicular) temperature and reduced testicular volume.Antigens, CD: Differentiation antigens residing on mammalian leukocytes. CD stands for cluster of differentiation, which refers to groups of monoclonal antibodies that show similar reactivity with certain subpopulations of antigens of a particular lineage or differentiation stage. The subpopulations of antigens are also known by the same CD designation.Forearm: Part of the arm in humans and primates extending from the ELBOW to the WRIST.Vascular Surgical Procedures: Operative procedures for the treatment of vascular disorders.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Hernia: Protrusion of tissue, structure, or part of an organ through the bone, muscular tissue, or the membrane by which it is normally contained. Hernia may involve tissues such as the ABDOMINAL WALL or the respiratory DIAPHRAGM. Hernias may be internal, external, congenital, or acquired.Cell Survival: The span of viability of a cell characterized by the capacity to perform certain functions such as metabolism, growth, reproduction, some form of responsiveness, and adaptability.Mucus: The viscous secretion of mucous membranes. It contains mucin, white blood cells, water, inorganic salts, and exfoliated cells.RNA, Messenger: RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.Immunophenotyping: Process of classifying cells of the immune system based on structural and functional differences. The process is commonly used to analyze and sort T-lymphocytes into subsets based on CD antigens by the technique of flow cytometry.Administration, Topical: The application of drug preparations to the surfaces of the body, especially the skin (ADMINISTRATION, CUTANEOUS) or mucous membranes. This method of treatment is used to avoid systemic side effects when high doses are required at a localized area or as an alternative systemic administration route, to avoid hepatic processing for example.Ultrasonography, Doppler, Duplex: Ultrasonography applying the Doppler effect combined with real-time imaging. The real-time image is created by rapid movement of the ultrasound beam. A powerful advantage of this technique is the ability to estimate the velocity of flow from the Doppler shift frequency.Mice, Inbred BALB CGelatin: A product formed from skin, white connective tissue, or bone COLLAGEN. It is used as a protein food adjuvant, plasma substitute, hemostatic, suspending agent in pharmaceutical preparations, and in the manufacturing of capsules and suppositories.Electromyography: Recording of the changes in electric potential of muscle by means of surface or needle electrodes.Polyesters: Polymers of organic acids and alcohols, with ester linkages--usually polyethylene terephthalate; can be cured into hard plastic, films or tapes, or fibers which can be woven into fabrics, meshes or velours.Hydrogen-Ion Concentration: The normality of a solution with respect to HYDROGEN ions; H+. It is related to acidity measurements in most cases by pH = log 1/2[1/(H+)], where (H+) is the hydrogen ion concentration in gram equivalents per liter of solution. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Filtration: A process of separating particulate matter from a fluid, such as air or a liquid, by passing the fluid carrier through a medium that will not pass the particulates. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Tissue Distribution: Accumulation of a drug or chemical substance in various organs (including those not relevant to its pharmacologic or therapeutic action). This distribution depends on the blood flow or perfusion rate of the organ, the ability of the drug to penetrate organ membranes, tissue specificity, protein binding. The distribution is usually expressed as tissue to plasma ratios.X-Ray Diffraction: The scattering of x-rays by matter, especially crystals, with accompanying variation in intensity due to interference effects. Analysis of the crystal structure of materials is performed by passing x-rays through them and registering the diffraction image of the rays (CRYSTALLOGRAPHY, X-RAY). (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)T-Lymphocyte Subsets: A classification of T-lymphocytes, especially into helper/inducer, suppressor/effector, and cytotoxic subsets, based on structurally or functionally different populations of cells.Cytokines: Non-antibody proteins secreted by inflammatory leukocytes and some non-leukocytic cells, that act as intercellular mediators. They differ from classical hormones in that they are produced by a number of tissue or cell types rather than by specialized glands. They generally act locally in a paracrine or autocrine rather than endocrine manner.Administration, Oral: The giving of drugs, chemicals, or other substances by mouth.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Cadaver: A dead body, usually a human body.Rats, Wistar: A strain of albino rat developed at the Wistar Institute that has spread widely at other institutions. This has markedly diluted the original strain.Solvents: Liquids that dissolve other substances (solutes), generally solids, without any change in chemical composition, as, water containing sugar. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Nerve Sheath Neoplasms: Neoplasms which arise from nerve sheaths formed by SCHWANN CELLS in the PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM or by OLIGODENDROCYTES in the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors, NEUROFIBROMA, and NEURILEMMOMA are relatively common tumors in this category.Silicon Dioxide: Transparent, tasteless crystals found in nature as agate, amethyst, chalcedony, cristobalite, flint, sand, QUARTZ, and tridymite. The compound is insoluble in water or acids except hydrofluoric acid.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.alpha-Macroglobulins: Glycoproteins with a molecular weight of approximately 620,000 to 680,000. Precipitation by electrophoresis is in the alpha region. They include alpha 1-macroglobulins and alpha 2-macroglobulins. These proteins exhibit trypsin-, chymotrypsin-, thrombin-, and plasmin-binding activity and function as hormonal transporters.Diabetic Neuropathies: Peripheral, autonomic, and cranial nerve disorders that are associated with DIABETES MELLITUS. These conditions usually result from diabetic microvascular injury involving small blood vessels that supply nerves (VASA NERVORUM). Relatively common conditions which may be associated with diabetic neuropathy include third nerve palsy (see OCULOMOTOR NERVE DISEASES); MONONEUROPATHY; mononeuropathy multiplex; diabetic amyotrophy; a painful POLYNEUROPATHY; autonomic neuropathy; and thoracoabdominal neuropathy. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1325)Nerve Regeneration: Renewal or physiological repair of damaged nerve tissue.Phytohemagglutinins: Mucoproteins isolated from the kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris); some of them are mitogenic to lymphocytes, others agglutinate all or certain types of erythrocytes or lymphocytes. They are used mainly in the study of immune mechanisms and in cell culture.Permeability: Property of membranes and other structures to permit passage of light, heat, gases, liquids, metabolites, and mineral ions.Peripheral Tolerance: The mechanism, in peripheral lymphoid organs (LYMPH NODES; SPLEEN; TONSILS; and mucosal-associated lymphoid tissue), that prevents mature lymphocytes from reacting to SELF-ANTIGENS. This is accomplished through a variety of means including CLONAL ANERGY and CLONAL DELETION.Injections, Intravenous: Injections made into a vein for therapeutic or experimental purposes.Rabbits: The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Antibodies, Monoclonal: Antibodies produced by a single clone of cells.Retinal Vessels: The blood vessels which supply and drain the RETINA.Polymerase Chain Reaction: In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.Ganglia, Spinal: Sensory ganglia located on the dorsal spinal roots within the vertebral column. The spinal ganglion cells are pseudounipolar. The single primary branch bifurcates sending a peripheral process to carry sensory information from the periphery and a central branch which relays that information to the spinal cord or brain.Interferon-gamma: The major interferon produced by mitogenically or antigenically stimulated LYMPHOCYTES. It is structurally different from TYPE I INTERFERON and its major activity is immunoregulation. It has been implicated in the expression of CLASS II HISTOCOMPATIBILITY ANTIGENS in cells that do not normally produce them, leading to AUTOIMMUNE DISEASES.Fluorescent Dyes: Agents that emit light after excitation by light. The wave length of the emitted light is usually longer than that of the incident light. Fluorochromes are substances that cause fluorescence in other substances, i.e., dyes used to mark or label other compounds with fluorescent tags.Axons: Nerve fibers that are capable of rapidly conducting impulses away from the neuron cell body.
Peripheral Nerve Entrapments: Clinical Diagnosis and Management. ...
Peripheral artery disease and arthritis can also cause leg pain but this usually gets worse with movement. Other than ... Crotti, Francesco Maria; Carai, A.; Carai, M.; Sgaramella, E.; Sias, W. (2005). "Entrapment of crural branches of the common ... peripheral neuropathy, Parkinson's disease, POTS, and certain autoimmune diseases such as Sjögren's syndrome, celiac disease, ... peroneal nerve". Advanced Peripheral Nerve Surgery and Minimal Invasive Spinal Surgery. Acta Neurochirurgica. 97. pp. 69-70. ...
"Incidence of and risk factors for asymptomatic peripheral arterial occlusive disease: a longitudinal study". Am J Epidemiol ... Popliteal artery entrapment syndrome. Portal hypertension. Portosystemic shunt. Pseudoaneurysm. Covered stent Surgical ligation ...
Numerous other types of nerve entrapment conditions and other problems with the peripheral nervous system are treated as well.[ ... and peripheral nervous system tumors) skull base surgery spinal neurosurgery peripheral nerve surgery pediatric neurosurgery ( ... Spinal cord trauma Traumatic injuries of peripheral nerves Tumors of the spine, spinal cord and peripheral nerves Intracerebral ... This includes the central nervous system and the peripheral nervous system. Tissue analysis comes from either surgical biopsies ...
Peripheral nerve injury may occur during operations on the hip as a result of operative trauma associated with stretching and ... Inferior gluteal entrapment neuropathy is rarely reported but is recognized as a complication of the posterior approach to hip ... Injuries to the peripheral nerves occur in 0.5% to 8% of patients undergoing total hip displacement. The posterior approach has ... Entrapment neuropathy is an underrecognized cause of pain and functional impairment caused by acute or chronic injury to ...
Note that pain is not a common symptom of nerve entrapment. A nerve may be compressed by prolonged or repeated external force, ... This may be due to weight gain or peripheral oedema (especially in pregnancy), or to a specific condition such as acromegaly, ... Nerve compression syndrome or compression neuropathy, also known as entrapment neuropathy, is a medical condition caused by ... Drug treatment may be useful for an underlying condition (including peripheral oedema), or for ameliorating neuropathic pain. ...
Wartenberg's syndrome: Radial nerve entrapment at the forearm. Wartenberg wheel: A medical device for neurological use. ... numbness and parasthesias in the sensory and peripheral nerves.. ...
... epicondylitis and peripheral nerve entrapment. A study of was done comparing the performance of swimming competitors at the ...
... epicondylitis and peripheral nerve entrapment. In relay events involving T40s classes, no baton is used. Instead, a hand off ...
... epicondylitis and peripheral nerve entrapment. One of the disability groups in this classification is swimmers with cerebral ...
... epicondylitis and peripheral nerve entrapment. A study of was done comparing the performance of athletics competitors at the ...
... epicondylitis and peripheral nerve entrapment. A study was undertaken comparing the performance of athletics competitors at the ...
... epicondylitis and peripheral nerve entrapment. People in this class are not required to use a starting block. They have an ...
... epicondylitis and peripheral nerve entrapment. CP7 and CP8 class swimmers are sometimes found in this class. CP7 sportspeople ...
... epicondylitis and peripheral nerve entrapment. A3 swimmers in this class have a similar stroke length and stroke rate ... epicondylitis and peripheral nerve entrapment. This class includes people with several disability types include cerebral palsy ...
one report must be for a patient demonstrating a peripheral nerve entrapment, and one report must be for a patient ...
Shrive et al. further studied the effects of a radial cut in the peripheral rim of the menisci during loading. In joints with ... Contraction by the popliteus during knee flexion pulls the lateral meniscus posteriorly, avoiding entrapment within the joint ... A meniscal repair has a higher success rate if there is an adequate blood supply to the peripheral rim.[25] The interior of the ... Therefore, meniscus tears that occur near the peripheral rim are able to heal after a meniscal repair. A study conducted by ...
Diabetic peripheral neuropathy can be diagnosed with a history and physical examination. The diagnosis is considered in people ... Diabetics have a higher incidence of entrapment neuropathies, such as carpal tunnel syndrome. ... Kanji JN, Anglin RE, Hunt DL, Panju A (April 2010). "Does this patient with diabetes have large-fiber peripheral neuropathy?". ... Diabetic neuropathy can affect any peripheral nerves including sensory neurons, motor neurons, and the autonomic nervous system ...
... nerve entrapment, corneal clouding, and some loss of peripheral and night vision. Other symptoms include short stature, some ... This results from compression of nerves or nerve roots in the spinal cord or in the peripheral nervous system, the part of the ...
... peripheral-nerve compression (e.g., pelvic inflammatory disease), peripheral-nerve entrapment (e.g. carpal tunnel syndrome), ...
... in particular is used in the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome, ulnar nerve entrapment, other ... The International Society of Peripheral Neurophysiological Imaging was founded in 2012 to address the growing need for ...
It is likely that a patient with a peripheral tear may pursue the accelerated program and a patient with a larger tear will use ... Contraction by the popliteus during knee flexion pulls the lateral meniscus posteriorly, avoiding entrapment within the joint ... A meniscal repair has a higher success rate if there is an adequate blood supply to the peripheral rim. The interior of the ... further studied the effects of a radial cut in the peripheral rim of the menisci during loading. In joints with intact menisci ...
2006). "Outcomes for peripheral nerve entrapment syndromes" (PDF). Clin Neurosurg. 53: 285-94. PMID 17380764. "European ... Pudendal nerve entrapment (PNE), also known as Alcock canal syndrome, is an uncommon source of chronic pain, in which the ... "Pudendal Nerve Entrapment - Department of Neurosurgery - NYU Medical Center, New York, NY". www.med.nyu.edu. Retrieved 2010-12- ... The validity of decompression surgery as a treatment and the existence of entrapment as a cause of pelvic pain are highly ...
... and are usually done by Plastic Surgeons People with diabetes mellitus are at higher risk for any kind of peripheral neuropathy ... Ulnar nerve entrapment is classified by location of entrapment. The ulnar nerve passes through several small spaces as it ... people who have other nerve entrapments elsewhere in the arm and shoulder are at higher risk for ulnar nerve entrapment. There ... Entrapment of the median nerve causes carpal tunnel syndrome, which is characterized by numbness in the thumb, index, middle, ...
Numerous other types of nerve entrapment conditions and other problems with the peripheral nervous system are treated as well.[ ... peripheral nerve surgery. *pediatric neurosurgery (for cancer, seizures, bleeding, stroke, cognitive disorders or congenital ... Surgery of the peripheral nervous system is also possible, and includes the very common procedures of carpal tunnel ... Tumors of the spine, spinal cord and peripheral nerves. *Intracerebral hemorrhage, such as subarachnoid hemorrhage, ...
Pudendal nerve entrapment)也稱為阿爾科克氏管症候群(Alcock canal syndrome),是非常少見的疾病,多半發生在職業的自行車選手身上[18]。像糖尿病及多发性硬化症等系統性疾病也可能透過脫髓鞘病(英语: ... Examination of peripheral nerve injuries an anatomical approach. Stuttgart: Thieme. 2006. ISBN
Entrapment, lumbar spine, at the level of L3 to S1. Entrapment, sciatic nerve, beneath the piriformis muscle. Entrapment, ... Most peripheral nerves are slow to respond to surgical procedures. The recovery period for patients undergoing tarsal tunnel ... This variation in the Tinels sign depends upon the level of the entrapment and whether the entrapment is proximal or distal to ... Varying degrees of entrapment of this nerve may effect either motor function, sensory function or both. Tarsal tunnel syndrome ...
Contact our Wisconsin orthopedic and podiatric centers now to schedule your Tarsal Tunnel Nerve Entrapment treatment ... Milwaukee foot doctors specialize in Tarsal Tunnel Nerve Entrapment treatment for quicker recovery and reduced foot pain, ... Tarsal tunnel nerve entrapment can be caused by a bone spurs, varicose veins, ganglion cysts, flat feet or fallen arches, ... We complete a variety of basic tests, ensuring the result of your foot pain is due to tarsal tunnel nerve entrapment and not a ...
... entrapment neuropathy). The tarsal tunnel is a narrow passageway bound by bone and soft tissue that lies on the inside of the ... peripheral neuropathy). ...
Peripheral Neuropathy. Peripheral neuropathy is a condition of nerve damage, usually in the lower extremities. It is a ... Nerve conditions of the foot can range from minor nerve injuries to serious conditions like nerve entrapment and damage. A ... Peripheral neuropathy may cause Charcot neuropathy, which affects soft tissues, bones, and joints of the foot and ankle. Bones ... Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease is a neurological disorder characterized by damage to the peripheral nervous system which carries ...
Peripheral nerve entrapments are frequent. They usually appear in anatomical tunnels such as the carpal tunnel. Nerve ... books.google.co.uk - Peripheral nerve entrapments are frequent. They usually appear in anatomical tunnels such as the carpal ... Peripheral Nerve Disorders: Chapter 19. Compression and entrapment neuropathies. By P. Bouche ... For each nerve from the upper and lower...https://books.google.co.uk/books/about/Peripheral_Nerve_Disorders.html?id= ...
The challenge posed by differential diagnosis of peripheral neuropathy was the topic of a presentation given by Holly S. Gilmer ... Peripheral Neuropathy Deferential Diagnosis: Syndromes Mimicking Nerve Entrapment Syndromes. May 5, 2015. 83rd Annual ... The entrapment neuropathies of type 2 were described by Vinik et al in 2004. Entrapment is gradual in onset, progressive, and ... Peripheral neuropathy associated with rheumatoid arthritis was described by Lisak in 2014. Peripheral neuropathy occurs in 10% ...
Brainfood One-Minute Clinician Understanding Peripheral Nerve Entrapment and Metabolic Disease Understanding Peripheral Nerve ... Peripheral nerve entrapment is predisposed many times by metabolic disorders. We know that when a nerve has a metabolic ... Ankle sprains tend to cause entrapments of the common peroneal nerve up to the side of the leg just because of the mechanics ... By removing that source of focal entrapment, the nerve has the ability to regenerate itself and so patients are able to get ...
A peripheral nerve entrapment can be the nidus that triggers a movement disorder." Kaitlyn underwent a trial of different ... Colorado repeated part of the nerve test which led to an Ultrasound-guided diagnostic peripheral nerve block. The block ...
Introduction Entrapment neuropathies are infrequent in children, and therefore remain unrecognized. The incidence of radial, ... Peripheral nerve injuries in the pediatric population: a review of the literature. Part II: entrapment neuropathies. ... An MRI also may be of value to localize the entrapment site and exclude other causes of entrapment (e.g., arcade of Frohse, ... Progressive radial entrapment neuropathies also have been documented secondary to venipuncture-induced hematomas, entrapment ...
... peripheral nerve entrapment syndromes explanation free. What is peripheral nerve entrapment syndromes? Meaning of peripheral ... nerve entrapment syndromes medical term. What does peripheral nerve entrapment syndromes mean? ... Looking for online definition of peripheral nerve entrapment syndromes in the Medical Dictionary? ... peripheral nerve entrapment syndromes. peripheral nerve entrapment syndromes. A range of disorders caused by pressure on nerves ...
... compressive and peripheral neuropathy, as well as myasthenic gravis, Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome and Botulinum toxin. ... Entrapment and More Polyneuropathies - Myasthenia Gravis, Peripheral Neuropathy, Entrapment and More. Last update March 29, ... It includes entrapment, compressive and peripheral neuropathy. It also includes information on the neuromuscular junction and ... However, entrapments can cause polyneuropathies. Common entrapment/compressive neuropathies include:. *Median nerve at the ...
... exists made at 3,000 answers across all sets. You may obtain by ... READ MORE; download Handbook of Peripheral Nerve Entrapments just to eliminate to this studys outdoor und. New Feature: You ... READ MORE; 4$ about has a bilateral precise classic download Handbook of Peripheral Nerve Entrapments 1990 foothill which is ... Worst of all, the download Handbook of Peripheral Nerve Entrapments 1990 is Thus ago updated strictly. When you fill at the ...
Peripheral Nervous System Diseases. Neuromuscular Diseases. Nervous System Diseases. Cumulative Trauma Disorders. Sprains and ... Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Entrapment Neuropathies Nerve Compression Syndromes Diabetes Complications Procedure: Outcome after ...
Peripheral Nervous System Diseases. Neuromuscular Diseases. Nervous System Diseases. Nervous System Malformations. ... Nociceptive Processing in Acute Cutaneous Nerve Entrapment Syndrome. The safety and scientific validity of this study is the ... Most often it is caused by entrapment of an intercostal nerve in the anterior rectus sheath, the Anterior Cutaneous Nerve ... Nociceptive Processing in Acute Cutaneous Nerve Entrapment Syndrome: a Quantitative Sensory Testing Analysis.. ...
The main nerve entrapments in the upper extremity involve the median, ulnar ... Course Description Nerve entrapments of the upper extremity are common in sports and typically related to excessive traction ... This course teaches how to assess and treat the common types of peripheral nerve entrapment, including "pseudo entrapments" and ... Nerve entrapments of the upper extremity are common in sports and typically related to excessive traction around a joint, as in ...
... which is the most common peripheral nerve entrapment syndrome, with a prevalence of 5.8% in women and 0.6% in men, according to ... encoded search term (Median Nerve Entrapment) and Median Nerve Entrapment What to Read Next on Medscape. Related Conditions and ... US of nerve entrapments in osteofibrous tunnels of the upper and lower limbs. Radiographics. 2000 Oct. 20 Spec No:S199-213; ... Median nerve entrapment syndrome is a mononeuropathy that affects movement of or sensation in the hand. It is caused by ...
Peripheral Nerve Entrapment While the thoracolumbar spinal segments may be a source of pain in the inguinal region, buttocks ... Nerve Entrapment (Part One): Lumbo-Pelvic Pain. Author: William Morgan, DC/Friday, January 08, 2016/Categories: October 2015 ... Tags: pain spinal manipulation nerve entrapment lumbo-pelvic thoracolumbar junction syndrome sacroliac maignes syndrome ... It should be noted that the pain distribution may not follow standard dermatomal or peripheral nerve maps and that a ...
Research Review: Peripheral Nerve Entrapment & Massage Therapy. October 13, 2018. / Richard Lebert ... Oct 13, 2018 Research Review: Peripheral Nerve Entrapment & Massage Therapy Oct 13, 2018 ... Neurodynamics, Peripheral Nerve, Health, Massage Therapy Research, Science, Biology, Anatomy, Evidence Based Massage, ... Neurodynamics, Peripheral Nerve, Health, Massage Therapy Research, Science, Biology, Anatomy, Evidence Based Massage, ...
Entrapment neuropathies are a group of disorders of the peripheral nerves that are characterized by pain and/or loss of ... Entrapment neuropathy. Surgical disorders of the peripheral nerves. Churchill Livingstone; 1998. 245-291. ... encoded search term (Nerve Entrapment Syndromes) and Nerve Entrapment Syndromes What to Read Next on Medscape. Related ... Surgical exposure of the peripheral nerves of the upper extremity. Benzel EC, ed. Practical Approaches to Peripheral Nerve ...
Peripheral Neuropathy - Drugs over a year ago. periphial nerve entrapment over a year ago. ... Hypothyroidism And Peripheral Neuropathy: Ease Pain, Numbness And A tingling In Hands And Fingers? Distal Muscular Dystrophy: ... Peripheral Neuropathy, Carpal Tunnel Syndrome, and Other Syndromes That Cause Tingling and Numbness of the Arms ... Hypothyroidism And Peripheral Neuropathy: Ease Pain, Numbness And A tingling In Hands And Fingers? ...
Free flashcards to help memorize facts about UE Nerve Entrapment Syndromes at Elbow, Wrist, Hand. Other activities to help ... Entrapment Sites of Peripheral Nerves. Narrow channels formed by other tissues; Angulated by adjacent structures; Crossing bony ... Entrapment Injury of Peripheral Nerve. group of disorders produced by anatomical arrangements compressing or constricting a ... UE Nerve Entrapment. UE Nerve Entrapment Syndromes at Elbow, Wrist, Hand. Question. Answer. ...
In Neurosurgical Focus Volume 26: Issue 2 (Feb 2009): Peripheral Nerve Surgery: Biology, Entrapment, and Injuries ... have had an interest in repairing damaged peripheral nerves. Significant progress in the treatment of peripheral nerve injuries ... Surgeons steadily defined the anatomy of peripheral nerves and developed techniques for decompressing and repairing peripheral ... Surgery aimed at repairing damaged peripheral nerves has a long history. Refuting the timehonored nihilism of Hippocrates and ...
Peripheral neuropathies. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil Medicine. 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; ... Tibial nerve entrapment ... Peripheral Nerve DisordersRead more NIH MedlinePlus Magazine ... Tarsal tunnel syndrome is an unusual form of peripheral neuropathy. It occurs when there is damage to the tibial nerve. ... Katirji B. Disorders of peripheral nerves. In: Daroff RB, Jankovic J, Mazziotta JC, Pomeroy SL, eds. Bradleys Neurology in ...
Study Median and Ulnar Nerve Entrapment flashcards from Sarah Moore ... 1. Most common peripheral neuropathy. 2. Compression of median nerve under transverse carpal ligament. ... Median and Ulnar Nerve Entrapment Flashcards Preview Phys: Bone & Gen Med: Ortho , Median and Ulnar Nerve Entrapment , ... Can also have entrapment of ulnar. nerve in Guyon canal called Guyons. Canal syndrome or Handlebar palsy. At the wrist ...
This report describes popliteal vein entrapment in three patients and demonstrates that it may present with manifestations of ... Peripheral Vascular Diseases / complications, diagnosis. Phlebography. Plethysmography. Popliteal Vein*. Thrombophlebitis / ... Popliteal venous entrapment must be considered in the differential diagnosis of venous disease in younger patients in whom ... Ascending venography demonstrated entrapment at the midportion of duplicated popliteal veins with no postthrombotic changes. He ...
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease is a neurological disorder characterized by damage to the peripheral nervous system which carries signals from the brain to various parts of the body and vice versa. (oint.org)
  • Other potential anatomical sites for entrapment include the muscular arcade of the supinator (also known as the arcade of Frohse), the posterior interosseous nerve (PIN), and the thoracic outlet for the lower trunk of the brachial plexus. (medscape.com)
  • In patients with unilateral pudendal entrapment in the Alcock's canal, it is typical to see asymmetric swelling and hyperintensity affecting the pudendal neurovascular bundle. (wikipedia.org)
  • In some ways, the geriatric patient is actually a better candidate for a peripheral nerve decompression compared to someone in the middle stages of life because we are able to improve their balance and prevent hip fractures and things that have a very high morbidity associated with them. (painweek.org)
  • Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) clearly depicted the entrapment at the fracture site and surgical release was immediately and successfully performed. (hindawi.com)
  • PROSPECTIVE COHORT EVALUATION OF NEUROCAP® In the Treatment of symptomatic Neuroma (PROTECT Neuro) This post-market surveillance study is conducted to provide post market surveillance information regarding long-term performance and ease of use of the Polyganics nerve capping device (NEUROCAP®) for reduction of the development of peripheral symptomatic end-neuroma. (stanford.edu)