Pathological processes involving the PERIODONTIUM including the gum (GINGIVA), the alveolar bone (ALVEOLAR PROCESS), the DENTAL CEMENTUM, and the PERIODONTAL LIGAMENT.
Inflammation and loss of connective tissues supporting or surrounding the teeth. This may involve any part of the PERIODONTIUM. Periodontitis is currently classified by disease progression (CHRONIC PERIODONTITIS; AGGRESSIVE PERIODONTITIS) instead of age of onset. (From 1999 International Workshop for a Classification of Periodontal Diseases and Conditions, American Academy of Periodontology)
Inflammation of gum tissue (GINGIVA) without loss of connective tissue.
A numerical rating scale for classifying the periodontal status of a person or population with a single figure which takes into consideration prevalence as well as severity of the condition. It is based upon probe measurement of periodontal pockets and on gingival tissue status.
An abnormal extension of a gingival sulcus accompanied by the apical migration of the epithelial attachment and bone resorption.
Loss or destruction of periodontal tissue caused by periodontitis or other destructive periodontal diseases or by injury during instrumentation. Attachment refers to the periodontal ligament which attaches to the alveolar bone. It has been hypothesized that treatment of the underlying periodontal disease and the seeding of periodontal ligament cells enable the creating of new attachment.
Resorption or wasting of the tooth-supporting bone (ALVEOLAR PROCESS) in the MAXILLA or MANDIBLE.
Oral tissue surrounding and attached to TEETH.
The structures surrounding and supporting the tooth. Periodontium includes the gum (GINGIVA), the alveolar bone (ALVEOLAR PROCESS), the DENTAL CEMENTUM, and the PERIODONTAL LIGAMENT.
A species of gram-negative, anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria originally classified within the BACTEROIDES genus. This bacterium produces a cell-bound, oxygen-sensitive collagenase and is isolated from the human mouth.
Chronic inflammation and loss of PERIODONTIUM that is associated with the amount of DENTAL PLAQUE or DENTAL CALCULUS present. Chronic periodontitis occurs mostly in adults and was called adult periodontitis, but this disease can appear in young people.
A film that attaches to teeth, often causing DENTAL CARIES and GINGIVITIS. It is composed of MUCINS, secreted from salivary glands, and microorganisms.
A fluid occurring in minute amounts in the gingival crevice, believed by some authorities to be an inflammatory exudate and by others to cleanse material from the crevice, containing sticky plasma proteins which improve adhesions of the epithelial attachment, have antimicrobial properties, and exert antibody activity. (From Jablonski, Illustrated Dictionary of Dentistry, 1982)
The failure to retain teeth as a result of disease or injury.
The flowing of blood from the marginal gingival area, particularly the sulcus, seen in such conditions as GINGIVITIS, marginal PERIODONTITIS, injury, and ASCORBIC ACID DEFICIENCY.
An index which scores the degree of dental plaque accumulation.
Inflammation and loss of PERIODONTIUM that is characterized by rapid attachment loss and bone destruction in the presence of little local factors such as DENTAL PLAQUE and DENTAL CALCULUS. This highly destructive form of periodontitis often occurs in young people and was called early-onset periodontitis, but this disease also appears in old people.
Infections with bacteria of the family BACTEROIDACEAE.
Removal of dental plaque and dental calculus from the surface of a tooth, from the surface of a tooth apical to the gingival margin accumulated in periodontal pockets, or from the surface coronal to the gingival margin.
A species of bacteria in the family SPIROCHAETACEAE, frequently isolated from periodontal pockets (PERIODONTAL POCKET).
The practice of personal hygiene of the mouth. It includes the maintenance of oral cleanliness, tissue tone, and general preservation of oral health.
A procedure for smoothing of the roughened root surface or cementum of a tooth after subgingival curettage or scaling, as part of periodontal therapy.
A species of Gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic spherical or rod-shaped bacteria indigenous to dental surfaces. It is associated with PERIODONTITIS; BACTERIAL ENDOCARDITIS; and ACTINOMYCOSIS.
Abnormal concretion or calcified deposit that forms around the teeth or dental prostheses.
A species of gram-negative, anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria isolated from the gingival margin and sulcus and from infections of the upper respiratory tract and pleural cavity.
The oval-shaped oral cavity located at the apex of the digestive tract and consisting of two parts: the vestibule and the oral cavity proper.
A genus of gram-negative, anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria. Its organisms are normal inhabitants of the oral, respiratory, intestinal, and urogenital cavities of humans, animals, and insects. Some species may be pathogenic.
The optimal state of the mouth and normal functioning of the organs of the mouth without evidence of disease.
A species of gram-negative, anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria originally classified within the BACTEROIDES genus. This bacterium is a common commensal in the gingival crevice and is often isolated from cases of gingivitis and other purulent lesions related to the mouth.
Total lack of teeth through disease or extraction.
Localized destruction of the tooth surface initiated by decalcification of the enamel followed by enzymatic lysis of organic structures and leading to cavity formation. If left unchecked, the cavity may penetrate the enamel and dentin and reach the pulp.
A dental specialty concerned with the histology, physiology, and pathology of the tissues that support, attach, and surround the teeth, and of the treatment and prevention of disease affecting these tissues.
Secondary or systemic infections due to dissemination throughout the body of microorganisms whose primary focus of infection lies in the periodontal tissues.
A combination of the debris index and the dental calculus index to determine the status of oral hygiene.
An acute or chronic GINGIVITIS characterized by redness and swelling, NECROSIS extending from the interdental papillae along the gingival margins, PAIN; HEMORRHAGE, necrotic odor, and often a pseudomembrane. The condition may extend to the ORAL MUCOSA; TONGUE; PALATE; or PHARYNX. The etiology is somewhat unclear, but may involve a complex of FUSOBACTERIUM NUCLEATUM along with spirochetes BORRELIA or TREPONEMA.
A genus of microorganisms of the order SPIROCHAETALES, many of which are pathogenic and parasitic for man and animals.
Infections with bacteria of the genus TREPONEMA.
Accumulations of microflora that lead to pathological plaque and calculus which cause PERIODONTAL DISEASES. It can be considered a type of BIOFILMS. It is subtly distinguished from the protective DENTAL PELLICLE.
A genus of PASTEURELLACEAE described as gram-negative, nonsporeforming, nonmotile, facultative anaerobes. Most members are found both as pathogens and commensal organisms in the respiratory, alimentary, and genital tracts of animals.
Treatment for the prevention of periodontal diseases or other dental diseases by the cleaning of the teeth in the dental office using the procedures of DENTAL SCALING and DENTAL POLISHING. The treatment may include plaque detection, removal of supra- and subgingival plaque and calculus, application of caries-preventing agents, checking of restorations and prostheses and correcting overhanging margins and proximal contours of restorations, and checking for signs of food impaction.
The act of cleaning teeth with a brush to remove plaque and prevent tooth decay. (From Webster, 3d ed)
The clear, viscous fluid secreted by the SALIVARY GLANDS and mucous glands of the mouth. It contains MUCINS, water, organic salts, and ptylin.
A member of the MATRIX METALLOPROTEINASES that cleaves triple-helical COLLAGEN types I, II, and III.
The thickest and spongiest part of the maxilla and mandible hollowed out into deep cavities for the teeth.
Solutions for rinsing the mouth, possessing cleansing, germicidal, or palliative properties. (From Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)
The total of dental diagnostic, preventive, and restorative services provided to meet the needs of a patient (from Illustrated Dictionary of Dentistry, 1982).
A genus of gram-negative, anaerobic, nonsporeforming, nonmotile rods or coccobacilli. Organisms in this genus had originally been classified as members of the BACTEROIDES genus but overwhelming biochemical and chemical findings indicated the need to separate them from other Bacteroides species, and hence, this new genus was created.
A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to dental or oral health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.
A wedge-shaped collar of epithelial cells which form the attachment of the gingiva to the tooth surface at the base of the gingival crevice.
Devices used in the home by persons to maintain dental and periodontal health. The devices include toothbrushes, dental flosses, water irrigators, gingival stimulators, etc.
An abnormal extension of a gingival sulcus not accompanied by the apical migration of the epithelial attachment.
Horizontal and, to a lesser degree, axial movement of a tooth in response to normal forces, as in occlusion. It refers also to the movability of a tooth resulting from loss of all or a portion of its attachment and supportive apparatus, as seen in periodontitis, occlusal trauma, and periodontosis. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p507 & Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p313)
Agents that cause agglutination of red blood cells. They include antibodies, blood group antigens, lectins, autoimmune factors, bacterial, viral, or parasitic blood agglutinins, etc.
Removal of degenerated and necrotic epithelium and underlying connective tissue of a periodontal pocket in an effort to convert a chronic ulcerated wound to an acute surgical wound, thereby insuring wound healing and attachment or epithelial adhesion, and shrinkage of the marginal gingiva. The term is sometimes used in connection with smoothing of a root surface or ROOT PLANING. (Jablonski; Illustrated Dictionary of Dentistry, 1982)
A genus of gram-positive, rod-shaped bacteria whose organisms are nonmotile. Filaments that may be present in certain species are either straight or wavy and may have swollen or clubbed heads.
A family of coccoid to rod-shaped nonsporeforming, gram-negative, nonmotile, facultatively anaerobic bacteria that includes the genera ACTINOBACILLUS; HAEMOPHILUS; MANNHEIMIA; and PASTEURELLA.
A species of CAMPYLOBACTER isolated from cases of human PERIODONTITIS. It is a microaerophile, capable of respiring with OXYGEN.
One of a set of bone-like structures in the mouth used for biting and chewing.
Infections with bacteria of the family PASTEURELLACEAE.
Infections with bacteria of the genus FUSOBACTERIUM.
The fibrous CONNECTIVE TISSUE surrounding the TOOTH ROOT, separating it from and attaching it to the alveolar bone (ALVEOLAR PROCESS).
Cell-surface components or appendages of bacteria that facilitate adhesion (BACTERIAL ADHESION) to other cells or to inanimate surfaces. Most fimbriae (FIMBRIAE, BACTERIAL) of gram-negative bacteria function as adhesins, but in many cases it is a minor subunit protein at the tip of the fimbriae that is the actual adhesin. In gram-positive bacteria, a protein or polysaccharide surface layer serves as the specific adhesin. What is sometimes called polymeric adhesin (BIOFILMS) is distinct from protein adhesin.
The bonelike rigid connective tissue covering the root of a tooth from the cementoenamel junction to the apex and lining the apex of the root canal, also assisting in tooth support by serving as attachment structures for the periodontal ligament. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)
A species of gram-negative, anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria originally classified within the BACTEROIDES genus. This bacterium has been isolated from the mouth, urine, feces, and infections of the mouth, soft tissue, respiratory tract, urogenital tract, and intestinal tract. It is pathogenic, but usually in association with other kinds of organisms.
Conditions in which a bifurcation or trifurcation of the molar tooth root becomes denuded as a result of periodontal disease. It may be followed by tooth mobility, temperature sensitivity, pain, and alveolar bone resorption.
A genus of gram-negative, anaerobic cocci parasitic in the mouth and in the intestinal and respiratory tracts of man and other animals.
CHILDBIRTH before 37 weeks of PREGNANCY (259 days from the first day of the mother's last menstrual period, or 245 days after FERTILIZATION).
A genus of gram-negative, anaerobic, nonsporeforming, nonmotile rods. Organisms of this genus had originally been classified as members of the BACTEROIDES genus but overwhelming biochemical and chemical findings in 1990 indicated the need to separate them from other Bacteroides species, and hence, this new genus was established.
An offensive, foul breath odor resulting from a variety of causes such as poor oral hygiene, dental or oral infections, or the ingestion of certain foods.
Infections with bacteria of the genus ACTINOBACILLUS.
"Decayed, missing and filled teeth," a routinely used statistical concept in dentistry.
An enzyme substrate which permits the measurement of peptide hydrolase activity, e.g. trypsin and thrombin. The enzymes liberate 2-naphthylamine, which is measured by colorimetric procedures.
Inflammation of the gingiva surrounding the crown of a tooth.
An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.
Conditions or pathological processes associated with the disease of diabetes mellitus. Due to the impaired control of BLOOD GLUCOSE level in diabetic patients, pathological processes develop in numerous tissues and organs including the EYE, the KIDNEY, the BLOOD VESSELS, and the NERVE TISSUE.
Gram-negative bacteria isolated from infections of the respiratory and intestinal tracts and from the buccal cavity, intestinal tract, and urogenital tract. They are probably part of the normal flora of man and animals.
Encrustations, formed from microbes (bacteria, algae, fungi, plankton, or protozoa) embedding in extracellular polymers, that adhere to surfaces such as teeth (DENTAL DEPOSITS); PROSTHESES AND IMPLANTS; and catheters. Biofilms are prevented from forming by treating surfaces with DENTIFRICES; DISINFECTANTS; ANTI-INFECTIVE AGENTS; and antifouling agents.
Common name for an extinct species of the Homo genus. Fossils have been found in Europe and Asia. Genetic evidence suggests that limited interbreeding with modern HUMANS (Homo sapiens) took place.
A genus of gram-negative, anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria found in cavities of humans and other animals. No endospores are formed. Some species are pathogenic and occur in various purulent or gangrenous infections.
A gram-negative gliding bacterium isolated from the oral cavity. It is a pathogen often causing PERIODONTITIS.
The inter- and intra-relationships between various microorganisms. This can include both positive (like SYMBIOSIS) and negative (like ANTIBIOSIS) interactions. Examples include virus - bacteria and bacteria - bacteria.
A class of statistical methods applicable to a large set of probability distributions used to test for correlation, location, independence, etc. In most nonparametric statistical tests, the original scores or observations are replaced by another variable containing less information. An important class of nonparametric tests employs the ordinal properties of the data. Another class of tests uses information about whether an observation is above or below some fixed value such as the median, and a third class is based on the frequency of the occurrence of runs in the data. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed, p1284; Corsini, Concise Encyclopedia of Psychology, 1987, p764-5)
Rare, autosomal recessive disorder occurring between the first and fifth years of life. It is characterized by palmoplantar keratoderma with periodontitis followed by the premature shedding of both deciduous and permanent teeth. Mutations in the gene for CATHEPSIN C have been associated with this disease.
The constricted part of the tooth at the junction of the crown and root or roots. It is often referred to as the cementoenamel junction (CEJ), the line at which the cementum covering the root of a tooth and the enamel of the tooth meet. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p530, p433)
The endogenous compounds that mediate inflammation (AUTACOIDS) and related exogenous compounds including the synthetic prostaglandins (PROSTAGLANDINS, SYNTHETIC).
The application of nutritional principles to regulation of the diet and feeding persons or groups of persons.
The largest and strongest bone of the FACE constituting the lower jaw. It supports the lower teeth.
Exposure of the root surface when the edge of the gum (GINGIVA) moves apically away from the crown of the tooth. This is common with advancing age, vigorous tooth brushing, diseases, or tissue loss of the gingiva, the PERIODONTAL LIGAMENT and the supporting bone (ALVEOLAR PROCESS).
A large group of anaerobic bacteria which show up as pink (negative) when treated by the Gram-staining method.
Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.
Lining of the ORAL CAVITY, including mucosa on the GUMS; the PALATE; the LIP; the CHEEK; floor of the mouth; and other structures. The mucosa is generally a nonkeratinized stratified squamous EPITHELIUM covering muscle, bone, or glands but can show varying degree of keratinization at specific locations.
Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.
A genus of parasitic flagellate EUKARYOTES distinguished by the presence of four anterior flagella, an undulating membrane, and a trailing flagellum.
A pathological process characterized by injury or destruction of tissues caused by a variety of cytologic and chemical reactions. It is usually manifested by typical signs of pain, heat, redness, swelling, and loss of function.
Infections with bacteria of the genus BACTEROIDES.
Agents that arrest cells in MITOSIS, most notably TUBULIN MODULATORS.

Pyorrhoea as cause of pyrexia. (1/894)

Three patients with fever and malaise, one of whom also had joint pains, were extensively investigated before their condition was attributed to dental sepsis. Each patient recovered fully after appropriate dental treatment. Dental sepsis should be added to the list of possible causes of pyrexia of undetermined origin, and a routine dental examination should be carried out in each case.  (+info)

Treponema denticola outer membrane enhances the phagocytosis of collagen-coated beads by gingival fibroblasts. (2/894)

Human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) degrade collagen fibrils in physiological processes by phagocytosis. Since Treponema denticola outer membrane (OM) extract perturbs actin filaments, important structures in phagocytosis, we determined whether the OM affects collagen phagocytosis in vitro by HGFs. Phagocytosis was measured by flow cytometric assessment of internalized collagen-coated fluorescent latex beads. Confluent HGFs pretreated with T. denticola ATCC 35405 OM exhibited an increase in the percentage of collagen phagocytic cells (phagocytosis index [PI]) and in the number of beads per phagocytosing cell (phagocytic capacity [PC]) compared with untreated controls. The enhancement was swift (within 15 min) and was still evident after 1 day. PI and PC of HGFs for bovine serum albumin (BSA)-coated beads were also increased, indicating a global increase in phagocytic processes. These results contrasted those for control OM from Veillonella atypica ATCC 17744, which decreased phagocytosis. The T. denticola OM-induced increase in bead uptake was eliminated by heating the OM and by depolymerization of actin filaments by cytochalasin D treatment of HGFs. Fluid-phase accumulation of lucifer yellow was enhanced in a saturable, concentration-dependent, transient manner by the T. denticola OM. Our findings were not due to HGF detachment or cytotoxicity in response to the T. denticola OM treatment since the HGFs exhibited minimal detachment from the substratum; they did not take up propidium iodide; and there was no change in their size, granularity, or content of sub-G1 DNA. We conclude that a heat-sensitive component(s) in T. denticola OM extract stimulates collagen phagocytosis and other endocytic processes such as nonspecific phagocytosis and pinocytosis by HGFs.  (+info)

In vitro induction of activation-induced cell death in lymphocytes from chronic periodontal lesions by exogenous Fas ligand. (3/894)

Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disease which gradually destroys the supporting tissues of the teeth, leading to tooth loss in adults. The lesions are characterized by a persistence of inflammatory cells in gingival and periodontal connective tissues. To understand what mechanisms are involved in the establishment of chronic lesions, we hypothesized that infiltrating lymphocytes might be resistant to apoptosis. However, both Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL were weakly detected in lymphocytes from the lesions, compared with those from peripheral blood, suggesting that these cells are susceptible to apoptosis. Nevertheless, very few apoptotic cells were observed in tissue sections from the lesions. Lymphocytes from the lesions expressed mRNA encoding Fas, whereas Fas-ligand mRNA was very weakly expressed in lymphocytes from the lesions and in periodontal tissues. Since the results indicated that lymphocytes in the lesions might be susceptible to Fas-mediated apoptosis but lack the death signal, we next investigated if these lymphocytes actually undergo apoptosis by the addition of anti-Fas antibodies in vitro. Fas-positive lymphocytes from the lesions underwent apoptosis by these antibodies, but Fas-negative lymphocytes and Fas-positive peripheral lymphocytes did not undergo apoptosis by these antibodies. These results indicate that lymphocytes in the lesions are susceptible to activation-induced cell death and are induced to die by apoptosis after the addition of exogenous Fas ligand.  (+info)

Molecular interactions of Porphyromonas gingivalis fimbriae with host proteins: kinetic analyses based on surface plasmon resonance. (4/894)

Fimbriae of Porphyromonas gingivalis are thought to play an important role in the colonization and invasion of periodontal tissues. In this study, we analyzed the interactions of P. gingivalis fimbriae with human hemoglobin, fibrinogen, and salivary components (i.e., proline-rich protein [PRP], proline-rich glycoprotein [PRG], and statherin) based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy with a biomolecular interaction analyzing system (BIAcore). The real-time observation showed that the fimbriae interacted more quickly with hemoglobin and PRG than with other proteins and more intensely with fibrinogen. The significant association constant (ka) values obtained by BIAcore demonstrated that the interactions between fimbriae and these host proteins are specific. These estimated Ka values were not too different; however, the Ka values for hemoglobin (2.43 x 10(6)) and fibrinogen (2.16 x 10(6)) were statistically greater than those for the salivary proteins (1.48 x 10(6) to 1.63 x 10(6)). The Ka value of anti-fimbriae immunoglobulin G for fimbriae was estimated to be 1. 22 x 10(7), which was 6.55-fold higher than the mean Ka value of the host proteins. Peptide PRP-C, a potent inhibitor of PRP-fimbriae interaction, dramatically inhibited fimbrial association to PRP and PRG and was also inhibitory against other host proteins by BIAcore. The binding of fimbriae to these proteins was also evaluated by other methods with hydroxyapatite beads or polystyrene microtiter plates. The estimated binding abilities differed considerably, depending on the assay method that was used. It was noted that the binding capacity of PRP was strongly diminished by immobilization on a polystyrene surface. Taken together, these findings suggest that P. gingivalis fimbriae possess a strong ability to interact with the host proteins which promote bacterial adherence to the oral cavity and that SPR spectroscopy is a useful method for analyzing specific protein-fimbriae interactions.  (+info)

Blastogenic response of human lymphocytes to oral bacterial antigens: comparison of individuals with periodontal disease to normal and edentulous subjects. (5/894)

Cell-mediated immunity in humans to antigens derived from oral plaque bacteria was investigated by using the lymphocyte blastogenesis assay. Subjects with varying severities of periodontal disease including normal, gingivitis, periodontitis, and edentulous were compared. Mononuclear leukocytes were separated from peripheral blood and cultured with antigens prepared by sonication of Actinomyces viscosus (AV), Actinomyces naeslundii (AN), Veillonella alcalescens (VA), Leptotrichia buccalis (LB), Bacteroides melaninogenicus (BM), and homologous dental plaque (DP). The lymphocyte response of subjects with gingivitis or periodontitis was significantly greater than that of normal subjects to antigens of AV, AN, and DP, but did not differ from the response of edentulous subjects. Periodontitis subjects were significantly more reactive than edentulous and normal subjects in response to VA, LB, and BM. These findings suggest that the tested gram-negative bacteria and the host response they evoke are associated with advanced periodontal destruction.  (+info)

Environmental modulation of oral treponeme virulence in a murine model. (6/894)

This investigation examined the effects of environmental alteration on the virulence of the oral treponemes Treponema denticola and Treponema pectinovorum. The environmental effects were assessed by using a model of localized inflammatory abscesses in mice. In vitro growth of T. denticola and T. pectinovorum as a function of modification of the cysteine concentration significantly enhanced abscess formation and size. In contrast, growth of T. denticola or T. pectinovorum under iron-limiting conditions (e.g., dipyridyl chelation) had no effect on abscess induction in comparison to that when the strains were grown under normal iron conditions. In vivo modulation of the microenvironment at the focus of infection with Cytodex beads demonstrated that increasing the local inflammation had no effect on lesion induction or size. In vivo studies involved the determination of the effects of increased systemic iron availability (e.g., iron dextran or phenylhydrazine) on the induction, kinetics, and size of lesions. T. denticola induced significantly larger lesions in mice with iron pretreatment and demonstrated systemic manifestations of the infectious challenge and an accompanying spreading lesion with phenylhydrazine pretreatment (e.g., increases in circulating free hemoglobin). In contrast, T. pectinovorum virulence was minimally affected by this in vivo treatment to increase iron availability. T. denticola virulence, as evaluated by lesion size, was increased additively by in vivo iron availability, and cysteine modified growth of the microorganism. Additionally, galactosamine sensitized mice to a lethal outcome following infection with both T. denticola and T. pectinovorum, suggesting an endotoxin-like activity in these treponemes. These findings demonstrated the ability to modify the virulence capacity of T. denticola and T. pectinovorum by environmental conditions which can be evaluated by using in vivo murine models.  (+info)

C-telopeptide pyridinoline cross-links. Sensitive indicators of periodontal tissue destruction. (7/894)

C-telopeptides and related pyridinoline cross-links of bone Type I collagen are sensitive markers of bone resorption in osteolytic diseases such as osteoporosis and osteoarthritis. We have studied the release of C-telopeptide pyridinoline crosslinks of Type I collagen as measures of bone destruction in periodontal disease. Studies in preclinical animal models and humans have demonstrated the relationship between radiographic bone loss and crevicular fluid C-telopeptide levels. We have recently found that C-telopeptide levels correlate strongly with microbial pathogens associated with periodontitis and around endosseous dental implants. Host-modulation of bone-related collagen breakdown has been shown by studies in humans demonstrating that MMP inhibition blocks tissue destruction and release of C-telopeptides in patients with active periodontal disease.  (+info)

Cryptobacterium curtum gen. nov., sp. nov., a new genus of gram-positive anaerobic rod isolated from human oral cavities. (8/894)

Novel Eubacterium-like isolates, strains 12-3T and KV43-B, which were isolated from the periodontal pocket of an adult patient with periodontal disease and necrotic dental pulp, respectively, were studied taxonomically and phylogenetically. The morphological and differential biochemical characteristics of these organisms are also described in this paper. These organisms were Gram-positive, anaerobic, non-spore-forming, rod-shaped bacteria that were inert in most of the conventional biochemical tests and closely resembled members of asaccharolytic oral Eubacterium species. On the other hand, protein profiles of whole cells in SDS-PAGE and Western immunoblotting reaction analysis distinguished these isolates from strains of the previously described genus Eubacterium. The G+C content of the DNAs from the novel isolates was 50 and 51 mol%, respectively. The levels of DNA-DNA relatedness to other asaccharolytic oral Eubacterium species, including Eubacterium brachy, Eubacterium lentum, Eubacterium nodatum, Eubacterium timidum, Eubacterium saphenum, Eubacterium minutum and Eubacterium exiguum, was less than 11%. These organisms also exhibited a very low level of reassociation with the DNA of Eubacterium limosum, the type species of the genus Eubacterium. The results of 16S rDNA sequence comparisons revealed that these organisms represent a novel lineage distinct from all previously described genera of Gram-positive, rod-shaped bacteria. On the basis of our results, it is suggested that strains 12-3T and KV43-B should be classified in a new genus and species, for which the name Cryptobacterium curtum gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Cryptobacterium curtum is 12-3T (= ATCC 700683T).  (+info)

TY - JOUR. T1 - Radiographic evaluation of destructive periodontal disease in blue mink in relation to age and blood morphology. AU - Hammer, Anne Sofie. AU - Andersen, Thomas Holmen. AU - Eriksen, Thomas. AU - Kortegaard, Hanne E.. AU - Dietz, Hans Henrik. AU - Chriél, Mariann. PY - 2005. Y1 - 2005. N2 - In this study, blood samples and jaws were collected from 2 genotypes of blue mink (n = 289) in order to examine phenotypic expression of specific characteristics of Chediak-Higashi Syndrome (C-HS). Blood samples were subjected to differential counts to assess the proportion of abnormal polymorphonuclear leukocytes characteristic for CH-S (C-HS-leukocytes). Abnormal leukocytes with characteristic signs of C-HS were found in blood smears from all mink included in this study. Four teeth in one half of the mandible (P3, P4, M1, M2) were subjected to quantitative radiographic evaluation of alveolar bone loss and tooth loss. There was a high prevalence of destructive periodontal disease among blue ...
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During the past decade the association between periodontal diseases and general diseases has attracted renewed research interest. The mouth has once again become an integral part of the rest of the human body. This review covers the possible associations between periodontal disease and diabetes, coronary heart disease, osteoporosis, pulmonary diseases and depression and focuses on more recent publications.. A majority of published studies confirms support for a relationship between periodontal disease and diabetes mellitus. Treatments of periodontal disease including the use of local or systemic antibiotics have been shown to affect the glycemic control. From a clinical point of view diabetes should be regarded as one of the factors increasing the risk for periodontal disease.. At present there is but limited evidence that periodontitis is associated with an increased risk for coronary heart disease and further research is needed to explore such a relationship in prospective studies. Studies ...
This multicenter clinical study will investigate biomarkers of periodontal disease progression. The study will enroll 375 subjects with periodontal disease and 125 periodontally healthy subjects. All subjects will be monitored clinically and have samples taken every 2 months for 12 months for analysis of inflammatory and immunological biomarkers and microbial species. Subjects displaying periodontal disease progression greater than an established threshold will receive periodontal rescue therapy at progressing periodontal sites and continue with monitoring. Periodontally healthy subjects and non-progressing sites in subjects with periodontal disease will serve as controls. After 12 months, subjects with periodontal disease will receive periodontal therapy consisting of 4 quadrants of scaling and root planing. Periodontally healthy subjects will receive prophylaxis and scaling and exit the study. Following periodontal therapy, subjects with periodontal disease will be followed for a maintenance ...
This multicenter clinical study will investigate biomarkers of periodontal disease progression. The study will enroll 375 subjects with periodontal disease and 125 periodontally healthy subjects. All subjects will be monitored clinically and have samples taken every 2 months for 12 months for analysis of inflammatory and immunological biomarkers and microbial species. Subjects displaying periodontal disease progression greater than an established threshold will receive periodontal rescue therapy at progressing periodontal sites and continue with monitoring. Periodontally healthy subjects and non-progressing sites in subjects with periodontal disease will serve as controls. After 12 months, subjects with periodontal disease will receive periodontal therapy consisting of 4 quadrants of scaling and root planing. Periodontally healthy subjects will receive prophylaxis and scaling and exit the study. Following periodontal therapy, subjects with periodontal disease will be followed for a maintenance ...
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Osaka-Dental-University-Susceptible rats (ODUS/Odu) are a useful animal model for human periodontal disease. Through comprehensive gene expression profiling, we aimed to evaluate the utility of ODUS/Odu-derived cells as an alternative to animal models for biomedical research into human periodontal disease. Using a GeneChip Rat Expression Array containing 15923 probes, the gene expression profiles of embryonic fibroblasts obtained from 13.5-day-old embryos of ODUS/Odu or control rats were comprehensively analyzed. This profiling revealed alterations in some genes that are likely to be related to periodontal disease in ODUS/Odu, based on a comparison with genes found in databases. Osteopontin (OPN), which is involved in immune defense reactions, bone metabolism and chronic inflammation, was among the genes whose expressions were significantly altered. Realtime RT-PCR analysis showed that the OPN mRNA level was increased by more than 5.8-fold in ODUS/Odu. Moreover, the expression of CD44, a ...
Periodontal disease (also known as periodontitis and gum disease) is a progressive condition and the leading cause of tooth loss amongst adults in the developed world. Periodontal disease occurs when the toxins found in plaque begin to irritate or inflame the gingiva (gum tissue). The resulting bacterial infection often known as gingivitis, can eventually lead to the destruction of the gum tissue and underlying bone. If periodontal disease is not treated, it can also lead to loose teeth or tooth loss.. There are many common types of periodontal disease including aggressive, chronic, necrotizing periodontitis, and periodontitis associated with systemic diseases. Each of these types of periodontal disease has its own distinct characteristics and symptoms, and all require prompt treatment by a dentist to halt subsequent bone and tissue loss.. Common Signs & Symptoms. It is extremely important to note that periodontal disease can progress without any signs or symptoms such as pain. This is why ...
Treating Periodontal Disease There are many ways to treat gum disease. The skilled periodontist at our office in Pasadena can develop a periodontal disease treatment plan specifically for you. One of the first steps in treating the early stages of periodontal disease is removing plaque, tartar, and other hardened deposits from the surface of tooth roots, which helps stop the spread of infection. A method known as scaling and root planing is used to deep clean teeth below the gum line.. Other methods for treating the early stages of periodontal disease include applying antimicrobial agents or antibiotics to eliminate infection-causing bacteria. As periodontal disease progresses, surgical procedures might be needed to clean and remove abscesses that have developed in the gums. Periodontal surgery can also be performed to remove and replace diseased gum tissue or to help gum tissue reattach to the teeth.. Seeking treatment for periodontal disease when it is still in the early stages is best. Prompt ...
Define periodontal disease rate. periodontal disease rate synonyms, periodontal disease rate pronunciation, periodontal disease rate translation, English dictionary definition of periodontal disease rate. n. 1. A quantity measured with respect to another measured quantity: a rate of speed of 60 miles an hour. 2. A measure of a part with respect to a whole; a...
Los Angeles, CA, April 24, 2013-- Dr. Sam Markzar, Los Angeles periodontist, warns parents of the effects of periodontal disease on children.
Our team hears this question a lot. While many people believe periodontal disease is an adult problem, studies have indicated that periodontal disease, also known as gum disease, as well as other serious infections such as gingivitis and periodontitis, are prevalent among kids and adolescents. First, lets identify the differences between gingivitis, periodontitis, and periodontal disease.. Gingivitis. Gingivitis is a type of periodontal disease in which only your childs gums are affected. Characterized by swollen and red gums that bleed easily, gingivitis causes an inflammation of the gums, and is the first stage and mildest form of periodontal disease. The good news is that gingivitis is often reversible. Treatment for gingivitis includes having your child come in for a professional teeth cleaning. It also includes daily brushing, which will help eliminate plaque from the surfaces of your childs teeth. Your child should also get in the habit of flossing daily to remove plaque and food ...
The word periodontal means around the tooth. Periodontal disease attacks the gums and the bone that support the teeth. Plaque is a sticky film of food debris, bacteria, and saliva. If plaque is not removed, it turns into calculus (tartar). When plaque and calculus are not removed, they begin to destroy the gums and bone. Periodontal disease is characterized by red, swollen, and bleeding gums.. Four out of five people have periodontal disease and dont know it! Most people are not aware of it because the disease is usually painless in the early stages.. Not only is it the number one reason for tooth loss, research suggests that there may be a link between periodontal disease and other diseases such as, stroke, bacterial pneumonia, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and increased risk during pregnancy. Researchers are determining if inflammation and bacteria associated with periodontal disease affects these systemic diseases and conditions. Smoking also increases the risk of periodontal ...
The word periodontal means around the tooth. Periodontal disease attacks the gums and the bone that support the teeth. Plaque is a sticky film of food debris, bacteria, and saliva. If plaque is not removed, it turns into calculus (tartar). When plaque and calculus are not removed, they begin to destroy the gums and bone. Periodontal disease is characterized by red, swollen, and bleeding gums.. Four out of five people have periodontal disease and dont know it! Most people are not aware of it because the disease is usually painless in the early stages.. Not only is it the number one reason for tooth loss, research suggests that there may be a link between periodontal disease and other diseases such as, stroke, bacterial pneumonia, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and increased risk during pregnancy. Researchers are determining if inflammation and bacteria associated with periodontal disease affects these systemic diseases and conditions. Smoking also increases the risk of periodontal ...
The word periodontal means around the tooth. Periodontal disease attacks the gums and the bone that support the teeth. Plaque is a sticky film of food debris, bacteria, and saliva. If plaque is not removed, it turns into calculus (tartar). When plaque and calculus are not removed, they begin to destroy the gums and bone. Periodontal disease is characterized by red, swollen, and bleeding gums.. Four out of five people have periodontal disease and dont know it! Most people are not aware of it because the disease is usually painless in the early stages.. Not only is it the number one reason for tooth loss, research suggests that there may be a link between periodontal disease and other diseases such as, stroke, bacterial pneumonia, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and increased risk during pregnancy. Researchers are determining if inflammation and bacteria associated with periodontal disease affects these systemic diseases and conditions. Smoking also increases the risk of periodontal ...
The meaning of the word periodontal is around the tooth. Also known as gum diseases periodontal diseases are nothing but serious infections caused by bacteria that harm the gums and tissues in the vicinity of the mouth. While dental cavities or caries only affects the tooth Periodontal disease is devastating affecting the bones that surround the tooth, gums, coverings of teeth root and tooth membrane. A physician specializing in the treatment of periodontal disease is known as Periodontist.. The disease should not be taken lightly and if its left untreated it can spread and affect the bones under the teeth which would eventually dissolve and would not longer support the teeth in its place. The chronic form of the disease is responsible for tooth loss in seventy percent of the cases affecting seventy five percent of the people at some time in their lives.. The causes of periodontal disease are similar to any other oral disease wherein plaque buildup and bacteria are responsible for the ...
Attempts at treating periodontal disease during pregnancy to achieve improved outcomes have had inconsistent conclusions. Recently, several large clinical randomized controlled trials failed to conclude that standard periodontal therapy during pregnancy reduced the incidence of adverse pregnancy outcomes (e.g., preterm birth and low birth weight) [20-22] The question of when to treat periodontal disease was put forward.. Pregnancy may not be an appropriate period for periodontal disease treatment as discussed by Xiong et al. [23]: 1) Treating periodontal disease during pregnancy may be too late to reduce the local and systemic inflammation activated by oral bacterial pathogens. 2) Dental scaling and root planning during treatment itself may cause bacteremia triggering systemic inflammation, leading to adverse pregnancy and birth outcomes, 3) Because of safety concerns on the frequency of periodontal treatment during pregnancy, the treatments are often restrict to 1 or 2 courses, which may not be ...
In Study I, the aim was to examine the involvement of a high amount of dental plaque, severe gingival inflammation and periodontal disease in the development of early atherosclerotic lesions in women. The carotid arteries were examined with ultrasonography. Periodontal disease appeared to be a principal independent predictor in the development of atherosclerotic process women with periodontal disease. Our findings indicated that a high amount of dental plaque, severe gingival inflammation as well as periodontal disease seemed to be associated with the development of atherosclerotic lesions in women already at the early subclinical stage. In Study III, the aim was to examine early atherosclerotic changes in carotid arteries and relate the findings to the serum levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) in subjects whose periodontal status have been followed for at least 18 years. Women had significantly lower hsCRP values and significantly higher highdensity lipoprotein (HDL) ...
BOSTON, USA: Studies have indicated that individuals with a high body mass index are more prone to developing periodontal disease than other people are. Being overweight or obese might also negatively affect ones response to nonsurgical periodontal therapy. In line with these findings, a recently published study has suggested that overweight or obese patients, particularly men, carrying a certain genetic variant were at an even greater overall risk of developing periodontitis.
This chapter is the simplest in the book in terms of concepts, but proved the hardest to write, owing to the broad controversy that surrounds classification systems for periodontal diseases. Traditionally, classification systems were simple. Owing to a paucity of knowledge and evidence from research, little was known about these diseases and thus simple terms were applied, by necessity. During the 1970s, 1980s and early 1990s, research into periodontal diseases exploded and our knowledge base broadened dramatically. The classification categories of the 1970s, 1980s and early 1990s therefore expanded to encompass new diseases for which there was putative evidence, based largely on case reports. However, there are important differences between having knowledge and having understanding. As a consequence (as with most things in the modern world), the wheel has turned almost full circle and the 1999 International Workshop on Periodontal Disease Classification has re-reduced the number of common ...
Periodontal disease (also known as periodontitis and gum disease) is a progressive disease which affects the supporting and surrounding tissue of the gums, and also the underlying jawbone. If left untreated, periodontal disease can result in loose, unstable teeth, and even tooth loss. Periodontal disease is in fact the leading cause of tooth loss in adults in the developed world and should not be taken lightly.. Periodontal disease begins when the toxins found in plaque start to attack the soft or gingival tissue surrounding the teeth. This bacterium embeds itself in the gum and rapidly breeds, causing a bacterial infection. As the infection progresses, it starts to burrow deeper into the tissue causing inflammation or irritation between the teeth and gums. The response of the body is to destroy the infected tissue, which is why the gums appear to recede. The resulting pockets between the teeth deepen and, if no treatment is sought, the tissue which makes up the jawbone also recedes causing ...
Periodontal disease (also known as periodontitis and gum disease) is a progressive disease which affects the supporting and surrounding tissue of the gums, and also the underlying jawbone. If left untreated, periodontal disease can result in loose, unstable teeth, and even tooth loss. Periodontal disease is in fact the leading cause of tooth loss in adults in the developed world and should not be taken lightly.. Periodontal disease begins when the toxins found in plaque start to attack the soft or gingival tissue surrounding the teeth. This bacterium embeds itself in the gum and rapidly breeds, causing a bacterial infection. As the infection progresses, it starts to burrow deeper into the tissue causing inflammation or irritation between the teeth and gums. The response of the body is to destroy the infected tissue, which is why the gums appear to recede. The resulting pockets between the teeth deepen and, if no treatment is sought, the tissue which makes up the jawbone also recedes causing ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Periodontal disease, chronic kidney disease and mortality. T2 - Results from the third national health and nutrition examination survey. AU - Ricardo, Ana C.. AU - Athavale, Ambarish. AU - Chen, Jinsong. AU - Hampole, Hemanth. AU - Garside, Daniel. AU - Marucha, Phillip. AU - Lash, James P.. PY - 2015/7/7. Y1 - 2015/7/7. N2 - Background: Periodontal disease is associated with increased mortality in the general population, however its prognostic significance in chronic kidney disease (CKD) is not known. We evaluated the joint effect of periodontal disease and CKD on all-cause and cardiovascular mortality. Methods: Prospective observational study of 10,755 adult participants in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 1988-1994 (NHANES III). CKD was defined as estimated glomerular filtration rate ,60 ml/minute/1.73 m2 or albumin-to-creatinine ratio ≥ 30 mg/g. Periodontal disease was defined as moderate (, 4 mm attachment loss in ≥ 2 mesial sites or 5 mm pocket ...
Aim: To estimate the prevalence of periodontal disease in Brazilian adults and to test its association with skin colour after controlling for socio-demographic variables. Methods: The periodontal status of 11,342 Brazilian adults was informed by a nationwide oral health survey. Socio-demographic variables included skin colour, gender, schooling, per capita income, age and geographical region. The association between periodontal disease and skin colour was tested by a logistic regression model, adjusting for covariates. Interactions between skin colour and socio-demographic variables were tested. Results: The prevalence of periodontal diseases was 9.0% [95% confidence interval (CI) 7.6-10.3]. Lighter-skinned black people (pardos) and dark-skinned black people (pretos) presented higher levels of periodontal disease when compared with white people [odds ratio (OR)=1.5; 95% CI 1.2; 1.8; OR=1.6; 95% CI 1.2; 2.1, respectively] even after controlling for age, gender, schooling, per capita income and ...
Periodontal disease (also called periodontitis and gum disease) has been linked to respiratory disease through recent research studies. Researchers have concluded that periodontal disease can worsen conditions such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and may actually play a causal role in the contraction of pneumonia, bronchitis and emphysema.. Periodontal disease is a progressive condition which generally begins with a bacterial infection. The bacteria found in plaque begin to colonize in gingival tissue, causing an inflammatory response in which the body destroys both gum and bone tissue. The sufferer may notice the teeth lengthening as the gums recede while the disease progresses. If left untreated, erosion of the bone tissue brings about a less stable base for the teeth, meaning loose, shifting or complete tooth loss.. There are a number of different respiratory diseases linked to periodontal disease. Pneumonia, COPD, and bronchitis are among the most common. Generally, ...
Periodontal disease (also called periodontitis and gum disease) has been linked to respiratory disease through recent research studies. Researchers have concluded that periodontal disease can worsen conditions such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and may actually play a causal role in the contraction of pneumonia, bronchitis and emphysema.. Periodontal disease is a progressive condition which generally begins with a bacterial infection. The bacteria found in plaque begin to colonize in gingival tissue, causing an inflammatory response in which the body destroys both gum and bone tissue. The sufferer may notice the teeth lengthening as the gums recede while the disease progresses. If left untreated, erosion of the bone tissue brings about a less stable base for the teeth, meaning loose, shifting or complete tooth loss.. There are a number of different respiratory diseases linked to periodontal disease. Pneumonia, COPD, and bronchitis are among the most common. Generally, ...
Periodontal disease (also called periodontitis and gum disease) has been linked to respiratory disease through recent research studies. Researchers have concluded that periodontal disease can worsen conditions such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and may actually play a causal role in the contraction of pneumonia, bronchitis and emphysema.. Periodontal disease is a progressive condition which generally begins with a bacterial infection. The bacteria found in plaque begin to colonize in gingival tissue, causing an inflammatory response in which the body destroys both gum and bone tissue. The sufferer may notice the teeth lengthening as the gums recede while the disease progresses. If left untreated, erosion of the bone tissue brings about a less stable base for the teeth, meaning loose, shifting or complete tooth loss.. There are a number of different respiratory diseases linked to periodontal disease. Pneumonia, COPD, and bronchitis are among the most common. Generally, ...
Periodontal disease is characterized by a progressive loss of supportive gingival tissue in the gums and jawbone. It is the number one cause of tooth loss among adults in the developed world. Periodontal disease occurs when toxins found in oral plaque inflame and irritate the soft tissues surrounding the teeth. If left untreated, bacteria colonies initially cause the systematic destruction of gum tissue, and then proceed to destroy the underlying bone tissue.. Osteoporosis is a common metabolic bone disease which frequently occurs in postmenopausal women, and occurs less frequently in men. Osteoporosis is characterized by bone fragility, low bone mass and a decrease in bone mineral density. Many studies have explored and identified a connection between periodontal disease and osteoporosis.. A study conducted at the University of New York at Buffalo in 1995 concluded that post-menopausal women who suffered from osteoporosis were 86% more likely to also develop periodontal disease.. Reasons for ...
Periodontal disease is characterized by a progressive loss of supportive gingival tissue in the gums and jawbone. It is the number one cause of tooth loss among adults in the developed world. Periodontal disease occurs when toxins found in oral plaque inflame and irritate the soft tissues surrounding the teeth. If left untreated, bacteria colonies initially cause the systematic destruction of gum tissue, and then proceed to destroy the underlying bone tissue.. Osteoporosis is a common metabolic bone disease which frequently occurs in postmenopausal women, and occurs less frequently in men. Osteoporosis is characterized by bone fragility, low bone mass and a decrease in bone mineral density. Many studies have explored and identified a connection between periodontal disease and osteoporosis.. A study conducted at the University of New York at Buffalo in 1995 concluded that post-menopausal women who suffered from osteoporosis were 86% more likely to also develop periodontal disease.. Reasons for ...
Periodontal disease, heart disease and stroke may seem to be unlikely bedfellows, but researchers have found that gum disease sufferers are nearly twice as likely to also suffer from coronary heart disease. In addition, research studies have discovered that oral infection is indeed a risk factor for stroke. People diagnosed with acute cerebrovascular ischemia were more likely to also be experiencing some degree of periodontal disease.. Periodontal disease is a progressive condition in which the gingival tissue surrounding the teeth is infected by the colonization of bacteria. Bacteria found in plaque colonize first above, then below the gumline, causing the tissue to pull away from the teeth. If periodontal disease is left untreated, deep pockets form between the gums and the teeth and the tissue of the underlying jawbone is also destroyed. The destruction of bone tissue causes the teeth to shift, wobble or completely detach from the bone.. Coronary heart disease occurs when the walls of the ...
Periodontal disease, heart disease and stroke may seem to be unlikely bedfellows, but researchers have found that gum disease sufferers are nearly twice as likely to also suffer from coronary heart disease. In addition, research studies have discovered that oral infection is indeed a risk factor for stroke. People diagnosed with acute cerebrovascular ischemia were more likely to also be experiencing some degree of periodontal disease.. Periodontal disease is a progressive condition in which the gingival tissue surrounding the teeth is infected by the colonization of bacteria. Bacteria found in plaque colonize first above, then below the gumline, causing the tissue to pull away from the teeth. If periodontal disease is left untreated, deep pockets form between the gums and the teeth and the tissue of the underlying jawbone is also destroyed. The destruction of bone tissue causes the teeth to shift, wobble or completely detach from the bone.. Coronary heart disease occurs when the walls of the ...
1. Pihlstrom BL, Michalowicz BS, Johnson NW. Periodontal diseases. Lancet 2005; 366: 1809-20. 16298220. 2. Calsina G, Ramon JM, Echeverría JJ. Effects of smoking on periodontal tissues. J Clin Periodontol. 2002; 29(8): 771-6. 12390575. 3. Haffajee AD and Socransky SS. Microbial etiological agents of destructive periodontal diseases. Periodontol 2000. 2005; 5: 78-111.. 4. Darveau RP. Periodontitis: a polymicrobial disruption of host homeostasis. Nat Rev Microbiol. 2010; 7: 481-490.. 5. Dewhirst FE, Chen T, Izard J, Paster BJ, Tanner AC, Yu WH et al. The human oral microbiome. J Bacteriol. 2010; JB.00542-10.. 6. Abusleme L, Dupuy AK, Dutzan N, Silva N, Burleson JA, Strasbaugh LD, et al. The subgingival microbiome in health and periodontitis and its relationship with community biomass and inflammation. ISME J. 2013; 7: 1016-1025. doi: 10.1038/ismej.2012.174 23303375. 7. Hajishengallis G, Lamont RJ. Beyond the red complex and into more complexity: the polymicrobial synergy and dysbiosis (PSD) model ...
The goal of periodontal therapy is to substantially lower the risk for future progression of periodontitis (Page and Beck, 1997). A literature search yielded more than 400 published articles related to periodontitis and risk assessment. Many of these published articles were primarily speculative in nature. Except for studies assessing the influence of individual periodontal risk factors at a tooth-site basis there appears to be few comprehensive studies assessing what risk factors are associated with periodontal disease at the subject level. Information on how clinicians assess periodontal risk for disease progression in the absence of care is almost non-existent. However, in one study it was concluded that there are significant disagreements between clinicians on the scale of risk assessment and that clinicians appear to predominantly base their risk assessments on radiographic evidence of bone loss, excluding most factors that have otherwise been associated with risk for future periodontal ...
Our understanding about periodontal disease progression improved tremendously during 1960s, when animal and human experiments demonstrated the role of bacteria in the initiation of gingivitis and periodontitis 1, 2. These studies led to the proposal of the model of bacterial etiology of periodontal disease. Further investigations in this field led to the advancement of our knowledge of pathogenic bacteria causing disease progression. Specific Gram-negative, anaerobic, or microaerophilic bacteria were implicated in the causation of periodontitis 3-7. During late 1970s and early 1980s protective and destructive roles of the immunoinflammatory responses were described in health and disease 8-14.. Most of the models of periodontal disease progression in the late 1980s stated that specific bacteria initiated the disease process by activating host responses, which were protective and destructive. The actual destruction of connective tissue and bone resulted primarily from inflammatory chemical ...
Contrary to popular belief, periodontal or gum disease is NOT something that only happens to grown-ups and the elderly; children and adolescents are susceptible, too. Broadly speaking, gum diseases refer to a set of ailments resulting from an inflammation of the tissues and bone that support the teeth. If left untreated, it could result in rotting teeth and possible underlying complications. Usually, periodontal disease is caused by a buildup of plaque, a sticky layer of bacteria that naturally forms on teeth and gums. The most common types that affect children are chronic gingivitis and aggressive periodontitis ...
Periodontal disease is diagnosed by your dentist or dental hygienist during a periodontal examination. This type of exam should always be part of your regular dental check-up.. A periodontal probe (small dental instrument) is gently used to measure the sulcus (pocket or space) between the tooth and the gums. The depth of a healthy sulcus measures three millimeters or less and does not bleed. The periodontal probe helps indicate if pockets are deeper than three millimeters. As periodontal disease progresses, the pockets usually get deeper.. Your dentist or hygienist will use pocket depths, amount of bleeding, inflammation, tooth mobility, etc., to make a diagnosis that will fall into a category below:. Gingivitis. Gingivitis is the first stage of periodontal disease. Plaque and its toxin by-products irritate the gums, making them tender, inflamed, and likely to bleed.. Periodontitis. Plaque hardens into calculus (tartar). As calculus and plaque continue to build up, the gums begin to recede from ...
Periodontal diseases affect the majority of the population either as gingivitis or periodontitis. Recently there have been many studies that link or seek to find a relationship between periodontal disease and other systemic diseases including, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, stroke, and adverse pregnancy outcomes. For adverse pregnancy outcomes, the literature is inconclusive and the magnitude of the relationship between these 2 has not been fully decided. The goal of this paper is to review the literature regarding periodontal diseases and adverse pregnancy outcomes, and provide oral health care providers with resources to educate their patients. Alternatively, this paper will also discuss what is occurring to help increase the availability of care for pregnant women and what oral health care providers can do to help improve these issues.. ...
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This long term study looked at the effectiveness of a preventive programme on dental health in people with Down syndrome, who are known to have increased prevalence of periodontal disease (affecting the neck and root of a tooth). The researchers looked at the long-term effect of periodic plaque control on the progression of periodontal diseases and tooth mortality in 25 patients with Down syndrome in Germany. They used standard measure to assess dental caries and periodontal disease. They carried out routine dental and preventive care over at least ten years.. Results were reported for two patient groups based on age at first attendance - group (10 patients aged ≤ 15 years; group 2 (15 patients aged ≥ 16 years).. They found that nearly 60% of patients had slight bone loss in relation to age and that 25% exhibited advanced bone loss. During the 10 year period, an average of 2.5 teeth were lost in all patients, 0.5 in Group I and 3.8 in Group II.. The authors conclude that from their overall ...
In the most drastic stage of periodontal disease, the bone and the attachment of the gums to the teeth have been destroyed. This may cause your teeth to shift or loosen and can affect how your teeth come together. You may notice a bad taste or smell in your mouth. Proper dental care must be initiated to save the teeth or they may need to be removed. Professional intervention may involve pocket reduction therapy and bone grafting along with the incorporation of other therapies.. Pocket reduction therapy is required for this form of periodontal disease when the gingival tissues have not resolved after initial treatment or tissue and root therapy. This is usually necessary when gingival tissues have not shrunk enough or when the supporting bone around the teeth has been lost. Since the gum tissue has not shrunk, they provide a greater place for bacteria to live and attack the bone and tissue causing further damage to occur.. Pocket reduction is a periodontal disease therapy that turns or pulls back ...
Periodontal diseases result in the inflammation of the supporting structures of the teeth, thereby leading to attachment loss and bone loss. One of the main etiological factors responsible for this condition is the presence of subgingival biofilms, comprising microorganisms, namely bacteria, viruses, and fungi. Candida species is one of the fungi reported to be found in periodontal disease which is suggestive of the presence of an association between these variables. The aim of this systematic review was to evaluate the association of Candida species with periodontal disease and determine the prevalence of these species in the patients affected with this disease. The articles related to the subject of interest were searched in several databases, including the PubMed, Web of Science, Google Scholar Medline, Embase, Cochrane Library, and Scopus. The search process was accomplished using three keywords, namely Candida species, Chronic periodontitis, and Gingivitis. All the identified studies
Epidemiology of periodontal disease is the study of patterns, causes, and effects of periodontal diseases. Periodontal disease is a disease affecting the tissue surrounding the teeth. This causes the gums and the teeth to separate making spaces that become infected. The immune system tries to fight the toxins breaking down the bone and tissue connecting to the teeth to the gums. The teeth will have to be removed. This is an advance stage of gum disease that has multiple definitions. Adult periodontitis affects less than 10 to 15% of the population in industrialized countries, mainly adults around the ages of 50 to 60. The disease is now declining world-wide. Many studies look at the prevalence of advanced periodontitis, but have differing definitions of this term. Generally though, severe forms of periodontitis do not seem to affect more than 15% of the population of industrialized countries. The proportion of such subjects increases with age and seems to peak between 50 and 60 years. A later ...
The word periodontal literally means around the tooth. Periodontal diseases, also called gum diseases, are serious bacterial infections that destroy the gums and the surrounding tissues of the mouth. If the inflammation is left untreated, the disease will continue and the underlying bone around the teeth will dissolve and will no longer be able to hold the teeth in place. Generally, periodontal disease isnt painful, so it is possible to have it and not be aware of it. A dentist specializing in periodontal disease is called a periodontist.. ...
The word periodontal literally means around the tooth. Periodontal diseases, also called gum diseases, are serious bacterial infections that destroy the gums and the surrounding tissues of the mouth. If the inflammation is left untreated, the disease will continue and the underlying bone around the teeth will dissolve and will no longer be able to hold the teeth in place. Generally, periodontal disease isnt painful, so it is possible to have it and not be aware of it. A dentist specializing in periodontal disease is called a periodontist.. ...
Regular examinations are very important to keep track of the present status of your disease and any disease progression over time. Your periodontist will work with you to create a maintenance schedule depending on how advanced your periodontal disease is at that time. Based on many variable factors such as your overall health, the severity of bone loss, and risk factors such as smoking and genetics, your periodontist will constantly tailor your care so your periodontal disease does not progress further. He or she may recommend exams every six months for mild periodontal disease, or every few months for more advanced stages.. ...
Periodontal disease is the most common disease of companion animals-more common than kidney disease, diabetes and lymphoma. Most dogs and cats show early signs of periodontal disease by 4 years old. Many practices are realizing theres more to the treatment of periodontal disease than just cleaning and polishing. Advancing your knowledge of perio-dontal disease treatment is good for the patient and good for your practice. What follows is a list of dental …
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Details of the image Marked hard plaque (tartar) and floating teeth due to severe periodontal disease Modality: CT (bone window)
Diabetes mellitus is a complex disease characterized by insufficient insulin secretion and / or an inefficiency of target tissues to its metabolic action. Periodontal disease was recognized as the sixth leading complication of a diabetes. Gingival sulcus bleeding is considered as an important clinical parameter in the diagnosis of periodontal disease. This research is based on comparison of the clinical and paraclinical data between groups of patients with type 1 diabetes and periodontal disease on the one hand and groups of patients with periodontal disease without diabetic disease on the other hand. We can conclude that there is sufficient data to confirm the existence of a bidirectional relationship between metabolic changes in type 1 diabetes and periodontal (odontal-periodontal) disorder of patients, especially in adolescents and young adults. Both diseases can influence each other more or less, so for diabetics there is a predilection to develop periodontal disease as diabetes is a risk factor for
Our results support the hypothesis that periodontal disease is an independent stroke risk factor. This is the first case-control study that performed a meticulous clinical and radiographic evaluation of orodental conditions and etiologic subgroup analyses of stroke as a heterogeneous disease. Our patient group is representative of stroke patients in the age segment studied because our hospital is the main stroke center in the area and stroke patients ,75 years of age are commonly admitted to our wards. The role of periodontal disease as a risk factor could be explained by residual confounding, mainly by smoking, a health-neglecting lifestyle, and socioeconomic variables. We separately evaluated every smoking period using a standardized approach14 and adjusted for adult and childhood socioeconomic variables and specific periodontal risk factors, such as dental plaque and frequency of dentist visits, that are indicators of dental care and general health awareness. These factors did not modify the ...
Periodontal diseases[edit]. Periodontal disease encompasses a number of diseases of the periodontal tissues that result in ... Periodontal disease accounted for 70.8% of teeth lost in patients with the disease in South Korea.[11] Periodontal disease is ... Systemic Diseases or conditions affecting the periodontal supporting tissues. Periodontal Abscesses and Endodontic-Periodontal ... Education and Genetics also have strong relationships on influencing periodontal disease. Periodontal disease is multifactorial ...
Dental caries and periodontal disease[edit]. The tongue surface can be a reservoir for tooth pathogens and periodontal ... dental caries and periodontal disease.[3] Side effects[edit]. Tongue cleaning can cause discomfort.[4] Improper use of a tongue ... People with periodontal disease are more likely to have a thicker tongue coating and a microbial flora that produces more ... "Emerging Infectious Diseases. 13 (9): 1440-1441. doi:10.3201/eid1309.070544. ISSN 1080-6040. PMC 2857304. PMID 18252139.. ...
The patient will need to have a healthy mouth and free of periodontal disease or caries and to have had a debridement/clean ... Hemolytic disease of the newborn:[9] This disease occurs when a newborn's red blood cells are being attacked by antibodies from ... Dean, Laura (2005). Hemolytic disease of the newborn. National Center for Biotechnology Information (US).. ... "Dental plaque as a biofilm and a microbial community - implications for health and disease". BMC Oral Health. 6 (1): S14. doi ...
Periodontal disease (gum disease) is associated with diabetes[13] which may make diabetes more difficult to treat.[14] A number ... Macrovascular disease[edit]. Macrovascular disease leads to cardiovascular disease, to which accelerated atherosclerosis is a ... Mealey, BL (October 2006). "Periodontal disease and diabetes. A two-way street". Journal of the American Dental Association. ... Lakschevitz, F; Aboodi, G; Tenenbaum, H; Glogauer, M (Nov 1, 2011). "Diabetes and periodontal diseases: interplay and links". ...
Animal models for periodontal disease. Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology 2011:754857. ... Vitamin E, fluoride, and iodide protect against bone loss associated with this disease in the rice rat and a high-sucrose diet ... Journal of Wildlife Diseases 23(1):171-172.. *Weksler, M. 2006. Phylogenetic relationships of oryzomyine rodents (Muroidea: ... Periodontitis, a bacterial disease affecting the jaws, is particularly virulent in marsh rice rats; the animal has been ...
... intermedia and Prevotella nigrescens were associated with inflammatory periodontal diseases, such as pregnancy ... The Journal of Infectious Diseases. doi:10.1093/infdis/jiy705. ISSN 1537-6613. PMID 30715397.. ... "Dietary modulation of the microbiome affects autoinflammatory disease". Nature. 516 (7530): 246-249. Bibcode:2014Natur.516.. ...
Necrotizing gingivitis is part of a spectrum of disease termed necrotizing periodontal diseases. It is the most minor form of ... This disease, along with necrotizing (ulcerative) periodontitis (NP or NUP) is classified as a necrotizing periodontal disease ... Necrotizing periodontal disease is caused by a mixed bacterial infection that includes anaerobes such as P. intermedia and ... "Clinical Manifestations and Management of HIV-Related Periodontal Disease". Oral Health Care for People with HIV Infection: HIV ...
Since most toothache is the result of plaque-related diseases, such as tooth decay and periodontal disease, the majority of ... The occurrence of a periodontal abscess usually indicates advanced periodontal disease, which requires correct management to ... A periodontal abscess can occur as the result of tooth fracture, food packing into a periodontal pocket (with poorly shaped ... A gingival or periodontal abscess may develop from this situation. A periodontal abscess (lateral abscess) is a collection of ...
Accessory canals may not be big enough to allow bacterial penetration, periodontal disease must reach the apex to induce an ... American Academy of Periodontology (May 2000). "Parameter on acute periodontal diseases. American Academy of Periodontology" ( ... Perio-Endo: infection from a periodontal pocket may proliferate via accessory canals into the root canal of the affected tooth ... Treatment includes conventional endodontic therapy followed by conventional periodontal therapy. If the lesion is deemed too ...
Diseases may cause periodontal disease or bone loss to prompt tooth loss. Consequently, periodontal disease may cause increased ... Sep 2003). "Oral Infections and Vascular Disease Epidemiology Study (INVEST). Relationship between periodontal disease, tooth ... Sima C, Glogauer M (Jun 2013). "Diabetes mellitus and periodontal diseases". Curr Diab Rep. 13 (3): 445-452. doi:10.1007/s11892 ... Nov 2008). "A review of the relationship between tooth loss, periodontal disease, and cancer". Cancer Causes Control. 19 (9): ...
Moore, W.E.C.; Moore, L.V. (1994). "The bacteria of periodontal diseases". Periodontology 2000. 5 (1): 66-77. doi:10.1111/j. ... but little is known about the relationship between the organism and destructive periodontal disease. Dialister pneumosintes, ... D. pneumosintes has been recovered from deep periodontal pockets, ... Reviews of Infectious Diseases. 6 (1): 177-183. JSTOR 4453321. Drago, Lorenzo; Vassena, Christian; Saibene, Alberto M.; Del ...
Severe gingivitis in dogs can further advance into periodontal disease in which the periodontal tissues begin to degrade and, ... Kyllar, M.; Doskarova, B.; Palar, V. (2013). "Morphometric assessment of periodontal tissues in relation to periodontal disease ... Grove, T.K. (1985). "Periodontal disease". Veterinary Disease: 59-78. Phillips, F. (2004). "Diet and bone health". Nutrition ... Using a dental diet may be beneficial towards preventative care in regards to periodontal disease. Dental diets not only try to ...
April 2015). "Principles in prevention of periodontal diseases: Consensus report of group 1 of the 11th European Workshop on ... Conditions and diseases can include: Atheromas Cardiovascular disease Respiratory disease Diabetes mellitus Dental caries is an ... Often, this leads to opportunistic pathogens which may cause dental caries and periodontal disease. Pathogenic bacteria that ... Löe H (January 1993). "Periodontal disease. The sixth complication of diabetes mellitus". Diabetes Care. 16 (1): 329-34. doi: ...
Gorrel, Cecilia (2003). "Periodontal Disease". Proceedings of the 28th World Congress of the World Small Animal Veterinary ... such as a pyogenic granuloma Systemic disease causing enlargement leukemia granulolomatous diseases, such as granulomatosis ... Many systemic diseases can develop oral manifestations that may include gingival enlargement, some that are related to ... Gingival enlargement is an increase in the size of the gingiva (gums). It is a common feature of gingival disease. Gingival ...
"Pathogenesis of Inflammatory Periodontal Disease: A Summary of Current Work." Lab Invest 1976;34(3):235-249. ...
adjunctive treatment of periodontal disease with coenzyme Q10". Research communications in chemical pathology and pharmacology ... A 1995 review study found that there is no clinical benefit to the use of CoQ10 in the treatment of periodontal disease.[30] ... "Deficiency of Coenzyme Q10 in Gingival Tissue from Patients with Periodontal Disease". Proceedings of the National Academy of ... "Therapy with coenzyme Q10 for patients with periodontal disease". Journal of Dental Health. 43 (5): 659-666. doi:10.5834/jdh. ...
This may or may not be due to dental caries, periodontal disease (gum disease), trauma or other pathology of the face and mouth ... Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, (2). Papapanou, P. N. Periodontal diseases: epidemiology. Annals of periodontology/the ... There are more serious conditions such as heart disease and Parkinson's disease and even to the extreme, certain types of ... whereas periodontal disease is the primary cause of tooth loss in older age groups. There are three main ways in which missing ...
Severe periodontal or gingival diseases are important risk factors for establishment of an anaerobic pleuropulmonary infection ... Etiology and pathogenesis of periodontal diseases. Dent Clin North Am. 2005; 49:491-516,. Brook I, Frazier EH. Microbiology of ... Reviews of Infectious Disease. 13: 819-822; 1991. Finegold SM. Anaerobic bacteria in human disease. Orlando: Academic Press Inc ... "Pelvic Inflammatory Disease - CDC Fact Sheet". www.cdc.gov. November 19, 2020. Barrett S, Taylor C..A review on pelvic ...
It is associated with periodontal disease of the deciduous dentition. Associated features include abnormalities in melanocytes ... Hematologic disease: Monocyte and granulocyte disease (CFU-GM/CFU-Baso/CFU-Eos), including immunodeficiency (D70-D71, 288) ... CHS is a disease causing impaired bacteriolysis[7] due to failure of phagolysosome formation. As a result of disordered ... The disease is characterised by large lysosome vesicles in phagocytes (neutrophils), which thus have poor bactericidal function ...
Periodontal disease is a type of gum disease caused by the accumulation of plaque on the teeth due to poor oral hygiene. Plaque ... "Periodontal Care". SDCEP. Retrieved 2019-12-11. Sela MN (2001). "Role of Treponema denticola in periodontal diseases". Critical ... periodontal pathogens prominent contenders due to chronic inflammation related with periodontal disease.[citation needed] ... if left to get worse atherosclerotic vascular disease can result in cardiovascular disease. Cardiovascular disease (including ...
Periodontal disease (gum disease) is associated with diabetes which may make diabetes more difficult to treat. A number of ... Retrieved 2 July 2016.[permanent dead link] Mealey, BL (October 2006). "Periodontal disease and diabetes. A two-way street". ... Lakschevitz, F; Aboodi, G; Tenenbaum, H; Glogauer, M (Nov 1, 2011). "Diabetes and periodontal diseases: interplay and links". ... Macrovascular disease leads to cardiovascular disease, to which accelerated atherosclerosis is a contributor: Coronary artery ...
"Microbiology of Dental Decay and Periodontal Disease". Medical Microbiology. University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston. ... Featherstone JD (September 2008). "Dental caries: a dynamic disease process". Australian Dental Journal. 53 (3): 286-91. doi: ...
Department of periodontal diseases Oral rehabilitation department. Department of Orthodontics and paediatric dentistry. ...
Lang, Niklaus P. (1990). "Epidemiology of periodontal disease". Archives of Oral Biology. 35: S9-S14. doi:10.1016/0003-9969(90) ... Journal of Periodontal Research. 24 (1): 75-80. doi:10.1111/j.1600-0765.1989.tb00860.x. PMID 2524573. Lobene, RR; Weatherford, ...
In contrast, dental caries and periodontal diseases were rare in pre-Neolithic and early hominins. Tooth decay is the most ... Smoking is one of the leading risk factors associated with periodontal diseases. It is thought that smoking impairs and alters ... Eating a balanced diet and limiting sugar intake can help prevent tooth decay and periodontal disease. The Fédération dentaire ... Lai YL (August 2004). "Osteoporosis and periodontal disease". Journal of the Chinese Medical Association. 67 (8): 387-8. PMID ...
Periodontal disease in children. In Goldman HM, Cohen DW, editors: Periodontal Therapy, 5th Edition. St. Louis: Mosby, Inc. ... the term has since been dropped in favor of a more contemporary disease classification for periodontal disease. Described by ... that was used to describe what was once thought to be certain type of unique and distinguishable chronic periodontal disease ... Noted as a rare disease, periodontosis was said to have been seen primarily in young patients. And despite being defined as ...
Van Dyke TE, Serhan CN (2003). "Resolution of inflammation: a new paradigm for the pathogenesis of periodontal diseases". J. ... role(s) in human disease not yet proven[76][77] Prostanoids[edit]. Main articles: Prostaglandin, Prostacyclin, and Thromboxane ... PGI2 analogs used to treat vascular disorders like pulmonary hypertension, Raynaud's syndrome, and Buerger's disease[60][61][62 ... studies to date shown no clear benefits of LTB4 receptor antagonists for human inflammatory diseases[64][65][66] ...
"Flossing for the management of periodontal diseases and dental caries in adults". Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (12 ... "Comparison of interdental brush to dental floss for reduction of clinical parameters of periodontal disease: A systematic ... The American Dental Association has stated that flossing in combination with tooth brushing can help prevent gum disease[13] ... It has been widely accepted that the use of floss has a favourable effect on plaque removal and disease prevention and the ...
Yeo BK, Lim LP, Paquette DW, Williams RC (January 2005). "Periodontal disease -- the emergence of a risk for systemic ... The "hardened" calculus formations are at the heart of periodontal disease and treatment. The College of Registered Dental ... Gorrel C (December 1998). "Periodontal disease and diet in domestic pets". The Journal of Nutrition. 128 (12 Suppl): 2712S- ... ISBN 978-1-4377-0416-7. Darby I (September 2009). "Non-surgical management of periodontal disease". Australian Dental Journal. ...
Kinane, Denis (14 September 2017). "Authors' reply: Predictive diagnostic tests in periodontal diseases". Nature Reviews (17070 ... 2009 University of Louisville Centre Director Oral And Systemic Disease Research Dean Endowed Professor, Dept. Periodontology ...
"Treatment of periodontal disease for glycaemic control in people with diabetes mellitus". The Cochrane Database of Systematic ... Diseases of the endocrine system (ICD-10 Chapter IV: Endocrine, nutritional and metabolic diseases - Endocrine diseases, E00- ... Diabetes was one of the first diseases described.[21] The importance of insulin in the disease was determined in the 1920s.[22] ... two to four times the risk of cardiovascular disease, including ischemic heart disease and stroke; a 20-fold increase in lower ...
Pregnant women with gum disease, also called periodontal disease, are known to have more preemies than women with healthy gums. ... presumably because the mouthwash reduces the severity of periodontal disease, which is directly linked to preterm births.[21][ ...
It has been suggested that green and black tea may protect against cancer[76] or other diseases such as obesity[77] or ... "Green tea: A boon for periodontal and general health". J Indian Soc Periodontol. 16 (2): 161-7. doi:10.4103/0972-124X.99256 ... 2010). "Oxidative stress and Alzheimer's disease: dietary polyphenols as potential therapeutic agents". Expert Rev Neurother. ... In addition, there may be Lepidopteran leaf feeders and various tea diseases. ...
"Methanogenic Archaea and human periodontal disease". Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of ... from the natural environment to infectious diseases". Nature Reviews Microbiology. 2 (2): 95-108. doi:10.1038/nrmicro821. PMID ... "Archaea and their potential role in human disease". Infect Immun. 71 (2): 591-6. doi:10.1128/IAI.71.2.591-596.2003. PMC 145348 ...
"Methanogenic Archaea and human periodontal disease". Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 101 (16): 6176-81. Bibcode:2004PNAS..101.6176L. PMC ... Hall-Stoodley L, Costerton JW, Stoodley P (2004). "Bacterial biofilms: from the natural environment to infectious diseases". ... "Archaea and their potential role in human disease". Infect Immun 71 (2): 591-6. PMC 145348. PMID 12540534. doi:10.1128/IAI. ...
Journal of Periodontal Research. 9 (5): 284-9. doi:10.1111/j.1600-0765.1974.tb00683.x. PMID 4281823.. ... "Role of steroid hormone coregulators in health and disease". Hormone Research. 71 (4): 194-200. doi:10.1159/000201107. PMID ...
Haake, SK, Huang, GTJ: Molecular Biology of the host-Microbe Interaction in Periodontal Diseases (Selected Topics). In Newman, ...
Watts T.L. (1995). Coenzyme Q10 and periodontal treatment: is there any beneficial effect? Br Dent J. 178(6): 209-13. PubMed ... 29.Meredith Spindler, M Flint Beal1,Claire Henchcliffe1.»Coenzyme Q10 effects in neurodegenerative disease«, Neuropsychiatric ... Adjunctive treatment with coenzyme Q in periodontal therapy«. Res Commun Chem Pathol Pharmacol 12(1): 111-23. PubMed ...
... bone lost due to chronic infection from periodontal disease has resulted in two FDA-approved products based on this molecule. ... Kumar, Vinay (2010). Robbins and Coltran Pathologic Basis of Disease. China: Elsevier. pp. 88-89. ISBN 978-1-4160-3121-5. .. ... Like many other growth factors that have been linked to disease, PDGF and its receptors have provided a market for receptor ... "Biology of platelet-derived growth factor and its involvement in disease". Mayo Clin. Proc. 81 (9): 1241-57. doi:10.4065/81.9. ...
Mouth diseases include tongue diseases and salivary gland diseases. A common gum disease in the mouth is gingivitis which is ... It can also arise as a result of other gastrointestinal diseases such as coeliac disease. Coeliac disease is an autoimmune ... Crohn's disease is a common chronic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), which can affect any part of the GI tract,[45] but it ... "Crohn's Disease". National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse (NDDIC). July 10, 2013. Archived from the original on 9 ...
Perianal abscesses can be seen in patients with for example inflammatory bowel disease (such as Crohn's disease) or diabetes. ... Periodontal abscess *Apical periodontal abscess. *Lateral periodontal abscess. *Root abscess. *Gingival abscess ... Elston, Dirk M. (2009). Infectious Diseases of the Skin. London: Manson Pub. p. 12. ISBN 9781840765144. Archived from the ... The Infectious Diseases Society of America advises that the draining of an abscess is not enough to address community-acquired ...
Periodontal disease can also create pockets in the gums which will contain the alcohol for longer periods[citation needed]. ... Acid reflux, or gastroesophageal reflux disease, can greatly exacerbate the mouth-alcohol problem. The stomach is normally ... "Reliability of Breath-Alcohol Analysis in Individuals with Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease". Journal of Forensic Sciences. 44 ( ... "Identification, management and referral of adults with chronic kidney disease: concise guidelines" (PDF). Clin Med. 5 (6): 635 ...
... safe and affordable antimicrobial agent in the prevention and treatment of periodontal disease. ...
The col may be important in the formation of periodontal disease but is visible clinically only when teeth are extracted.[2] ... When gum tissue is not healthy, it can provide a gateway for periodontal disease to advance into the deeper tissue of the ... unlike the swollen gum papilla seen in gingivitis or the empty interdental embrasure seen in periodontal disease. Healthy gums ... I, alveolar crest fibers of the periodontal ligament (PDL). J, horizontal fibers of the PDL. K, oblique fibers of the PDL. ...
Periodontitis as a manifestation of systemic disease. *Periodontosis. *Necrotizing periodontal diseases. *Abscesses of the ... It is attached to the alveolar bone (C) by the fibers of the periodontal ligament and to the soft tissue of the gingiva by the ... However, the quantity of DNA available in dentin is affected by age and dental disease, whereas that in cementum is not.[12] ... The cementum is the part of the periodontium that attaches the teeth to the alveolar bone by anchoring the periodontal ligament ...
Periodontal disease in dogs and cats - Blue Cross Animal Hospital's write up on peridontal disease. ... Gum disease in dogs treatment & symptoms - Dog health care sheet on spotting the symptoms of gum disease in dogs. ... Advanced stage of gum disease is periodontitis Gum disease causes and treatment ... "A systematic review of definitions of periodontitis and methods that have been used to identify this disease". Journal of ...
Necrotizing periodontal diseases *Acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis. *Pericoronitis. *Peri-implantitis. *Periodontal ... Autoimmune blistering diseases[edit]. Mucous membrane pemphigoid and other autoimmune blistering diseases may present with oral ... "Orphanet: Rare Diseases". Orphanet. Retrieved June 3, 2016.. *^ "Cicatricial Alopecia Research Foundation". www.carfintl.org. ... Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD)[edit]. Lacy, reticulated plaques or erosions that resemble oral LP may occur in GVHD. The ...
"Interdental brushing for the prevention and control of periodontal diseases and dental caries in adults". Cochrane Database of ...
Necrotizing periodontal diseases *Acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis. *Pericoronitis. *Peri-implantitis. *Periodontal ... Systemic disease[edit]. Systemic disorders associated with aphthous-like ulceration[5] Behçet's disease. Celiac disease. Cyclic ... Behçet's disease is a triad of mouth ulcers, genital ulcers and anterior uveitis.[7] The main feature of Behçet's disease is ... Aphthous stomatitis has been associated with other autoimmune diseases, namely systemic lupus erythematosus, Behçet's disease ...
"Treatment of periodontal disease for glycaemic control in people with diabetes mellitus". Cochrane Database of Systematic ... Diabetes was one of the first diseases described.[21] The importance of insulin in the disease was determined in the 1920s.[22] ... two to four times the risk of cardiovascular disease, including ischemic heart disease and stroke; a 20-fold increase in lower ... "National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. June 2014. Archived from the original on 6 March 2016. ...
CCR6 has been associated with Crohn's disease.[7] Expression of CCR6 was found to be up-regulated in colorectal cancer. Novel ... protein 3alpha-CC chemokine receptor 6 interactions play an important role in CD4+ T-cell accumulation in periodontal diseased ... "Diverse Genome-wide Association Studies Associate the IL12/IL23 Pathway with Crohn Disease". Am. J. Hum. Genet. 84 (3): 399- ...
"Therapeutic Advances in Cardiovascular Disease. 11 (9): 243-256. doi:10.1177/1753944717714921. PMC 5562140. PMID 28651452.. ... periodontal charting, root planing, direct or indirect filling which extends below the gingiva, complex filling, flap raising ... February 2016). "Antithrombotic Therapy for VTE Disease: CHEST Guideline and Expert Panel Report". Chest. 149 (2): 315-352. doi ... Oral Diseases. 25 Suppl 1 (S1): 157-173. doi:10.1111/odi.13086. PMID 31140701.. ...
"Potential of Diagnostic Microbiology for Treatment and Prognosis of Dental Caries and Periodontal Disease". Critical Reviews in ... "Potential of Diagnostic Microbiology for Treatment and Prognosis of Dental Caries and Periodontal Disease". Critical Reviews in ... "Aspects of Treatment of Cavities and of Caries Disease" from the Disease Control Priorities Project. Page accessed August 15, ... "Aspects of Treatment of Cavities and of Caries Disease" from the Disease Control Priorities Project. Page accessed August 15, ...
Necrotizing periodontal diseases *Acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis. *Pericoronitis. *Peri-implantitis. *Periodontal ... Systemic disease[edit]. Systemic disorders associated with aphthous-like ulceration[5]. Behçet's disease. Celiac disease. ... Behçet's disease is a triad of mouth ulcers, genital ulcers and anterior uveitis.[7] The main feature of Behçet's disease is ... Inflammatory bowel disease. MAGIC syndrome. PFAPA syndrome. Reactive arthritis. Sweet's syndrome. Ulcus vulvae acutum. ...
The use of lasers in treating periodontal disease has been seen by some dental professionals as controversial.[7] The American ... The current AAP website indicates that lasers can be used to treat periodontal disease, and current controlled studies have ... Benefits of laser gum disease surgery[edit]. According to the Academy of General Dentistry (AGD), there are benefits to dental ... "50% of Americans Have Gum Disease". ABC News. Archived from the original on 7 January 2014. Retrieved 7 January 2014.. ...
2003). "Meta-analysis of periodontal disease and risk of coronary heart disease and stroke". Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol ... "Periodontal infections and coronary heart disease: role of periodontal bacteria and importance of total pathogen burden in the ... "Associations between periodontal disease and risk for atherosclerosis, cardiovascular disease, and stroke. A systematic review ... 2005). "Periodontal diseases". Lancet. 366 (9499): 1809-20. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(05)67728-8. PMID 16298220.. CS1 maint: ...
Cardiovascular disease[edit]. Smoking can cause atherosclerosis, leading to coronary artery disease and peripheral arterial ... Johnson GK, Slach NA (April 2001). "Impact of tobacco use on periodontal status". Journal of Dental Education. 65 (4): 313-21. ... Smoking also increases the chance of heart disease, stroke, atherosclerosis, and peripheral vascular disease.[62][63] Several ... Although nicotine does play a role in acute episodes of some diseases (including stroke, impotence, and heart disease) by its ...
K05) en:Gingivitis and en:periodontal diseases *(K05.0) en:Acute gingivitis ... K57.3) Diverticular disease of large intestine without perforation or abscess. *(K57.4) Diverticular disease of both small and ... K13) Other diseases of en:lip and en:oral mucosa *(K13.0) Diseases of en:lips *en:Cheilitis ... K57.0) Diverticular disease of small intestine with perforation and abscess. *(K57.1) Diverticular disease of small intestine ...
The perfect solution for people Who have lost teeth due to periodontal (gum) disease and have the correct amount of bone in the ... Periodontal Disease Dental Implants- The perfect solution for people Who have lost teeth due to periodontal (gum) disease and ... Hanookai provides Dental Implants, Treatment of Periodontal Disease, Gum Grafts, Gum Whitening, Bone Augmentations, Crown ... Periodontal Disease * 1. Dental Implants , Los angeles dentist ,Periodontal Diseasehttp://www.periodonticsdentalimplants.com/ ...
In moderate periodontal disease you will see erosion of the gum, pockets will deepen, and more potent forms of bacteria develop ...
What is periodontal disease?. Periodontal diseases are mainly the results of infections and inflammation of the gums and bone ... Periodontal disease is mostly seen in adults. Periodontal disease and tooth decay are the two biggest threats to dental health. ... Podcasts About Periodontal Disease and Diabetes. Listen to Summary: Periodontal Disease and Diabetes Podcast. Provides valuable ... Listen to Periodontal Disease and Diabetes Podcast. Informative interview of two dental professionals about periodontal disease ...
... more than 30,000 Americans are expected to die from the disease this year. ... is that periodontal disease could lead to increased pancreatic carcinogenesis because individuals with periodontal disease have ... men with periodontal disease had a 63% higher risk of developing pancreatic cancer compared to those reporting no periodontal ... Periodontal disease is caused by bacterial infection and inflammation of the gums that over time causes loss of bone that ...
How to instructions on topics such as Gum Disease, Gingivitis and more. ... wikiHow has Periodontal Diseases how to articles with step-by-step instructions and photos. ...
5. Interspecies Communication and Periodontal Disease. Periodontal diseases are mainly caused by dental plaque which is " ... Interspecies Communication and Periodontal Disease. Ajay Mahajan,1 Baljeet Singh. ,2 Divya Kashyap. ,2 Amit Kumar. ,2 and ... Interspecies Communication and Periodontal Disease,. The Scientific World Journal,. vol. 2013. ,. Article ID 765434. ,. 8. ... The role of plaque in the aetiology of the periodontal disease has been established beyond doubt. The Interspecies ...
Periodontal disease may increase breast cancer risk Postmenopausal women with periodontal disease were more likely to develop ... Nearly one out of two U.S. adults suffers from periodontal disease A new study from the Centers for Disease Control and ... Study shows that periodontal treatment can reduce symptoms of prostatitis Treating gum disease reduced symptoms of prostate ... However, it is also suspected of triggering many other diseases, like cardiopulmonary diseases. Researchers are studying the ...
... Qiyan Li,1 Michael S. Valerio,2 and Keith L. Kirkwood2 ... In periodontal disease, host recognition of bacterial constituents, including lipopolysaccharide (LPS), induces p38 MAPK ... MAPK phosphatase-1 (MKP-1), a negative regulator of MAPK activation, was also critical for periodontal disease progression. In ... signaling axis is needed for periodontal disease progression: an orally administered p38α inhibitor reduced the progression of ...
Plaque and tartar build-up constitute the primary cause of periodontal disease. Periodontal disease begins with mild gum ... However, periodontal disease, a disease of the supporting tissue around the tooth, can be so severe that the teeth loosen and ... Dental plaque can lead to periodontal disease. Tooth decay can lead to the destruction and eventual loss of teeth. ... At this point, a dentist would use a periodontal probe to measure the depth of each periodontal pocket. ...
Interestingly, the group found that clinical signs of periodontal disease were not associated with coronary heart disease. The ... or periodontal, disease may be at greater risk for coronary heart disease. The evidence remains circumstantial for two reasons ... clinically defined periodontal disease and (2) serum antibody levels to 17 oral microbes. As a key component of their analysis ... most studies have employed clinically defined measures of periodontal disease to make the link, which assumes conditions in the ...
Periodontal diseases are mainly the results of infections and inflammation of the gums and bone that surround and support the ... What is periodontal disease?. Periodontal diseases are mainly the result of infections and inflammation of the gums and bone ... Periodontal disease is mostly seen in adults. Periodontal disease and tooth decay are the two biggest threats to dental health. ... Podcasts About Periodontal Disease and Diabetes. Listen to Summary: Periodontal Disease and Diabetes Podcast. Provides valuable ...
Preventing Periodontal Disease in Dogs. The best method of prevention against periodontal disease, even with the inclusion of ... Periodontal disease in dogs, also known as periodontitis, is one of the more common ailments which affect dogs. It occurs when ... Treatment of periodontal disease starts with the removal of plaque from the teeth. All plaque will need to be removed in order ... If periodontal disease has been known to affect a relative in your dogs blood lines, it does not necessarily mean that your ...
... is one risk factor among other known factors that may contribute to increased risk of type II diabetes, ... Periodontal disease may also present a systemic infectious and inflammatory burden with potential effects on overall health[²³ ... Periodontal disease may create an oral wound that permits invasive oral microorganisms the opportunity to potentially spread ... Periodontal diseases may:. · Create an oral wound that permits invasive oral microorganisms the opportunity to potentially ...
... at the University of Michigan have shown that gene therapy can be used to successfully stop the development of periodontal ... disease, the leading cause of tooth loss in adults. ... Gene therapy used to treat periodontal disease. *Download PDF ... Heart Disease, Molecule, Necrosis, Pain, Periodontal Disease, Periodontitis, Periodontitis (Gum Disease), Pneumonia, ... Periodontal disease is also linked to systemic conditions such as heart disease, bacterial pneumonia and stroke, likely due to ...
Periodontal disease and cardiovascular disease.. Beck J1, Garcia R, Heiss G, Vokonas PS, Offenbacher S. ... Previous studies have demonstrated an association between periodontal disease severity and risk of coronary heart disease and ... It is our central hypothesis that periodontal diseases, which are chronic Gram-negative infections, represent a previously ... We further suggest that periodontal disease, once established, provides a biological burden of endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide) ...
This disease not only affects the teeth and gums, it has the ... Periodontal disease is a pet health condition that has become ... liver disease, diabetes, strokes and osteoporosis.. Periodontal disease causes the destruction of the periodontal ligament and ... Periodontal disease is a pet health condition that has become known as the silent killer. This disease not only affects the ... But unlike most diseases, periodontal disease can be prevented with proper pet dental care. Partner with your veterinarian to ...
... periodontal diseases that cause inflammed gums, tissue damage, and even tooth loss. ... is what can happen when your gums succumb to disease. Periodontal (literally meaning around the tooth) disease can take several ... Unchecked gingivitis can lead to a very serious periodontal disease called periodontitis. The deposits of plaque move deeper ... Periodontal Disease - Learn about gingivitis and periodontitis, ...
Periodontal disease has been linked to many serious conditions; new research shows high prevalence among women with breast ... Women with periodontal disease have a higher risk of breast cancer.. Periodontal disease is a common condition that ranges from ... Periodontal disease raises risk of breast cancer by 14%. Previous studies have suggested that smoking impacts the development ... Women who were smoking at the time of the study had a 32% higher risk of breast cancer if they had periodontal disease, but the ...
Inflammatory Bowel Disease Periodontal Disease Chronic Inflammatory Disease Crohn Disease Molecular Mimicry These keywords were ... Both inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and periodontal disease (PD) are chronic inflammatory diseases of which pathogenesis may ... Brandtzaeg P (2001) Inflammatory bowel disease: clinics and pathology. Do inflammatory bowel disease and periodontal disease ... Human gingival fibroblasts are critical in sustaining inflammation in periodontal disease. J Periodontal Res 44(1):21-27. doi: ...
... Date(s) Nov. 17, 2020 at 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM ... Following his periodontal residency at the University of Toronto, he was posted to Canadian Forces Base Edmonton, where he ... The current periodontal and peri-implant diagnostic classification system was released in 2018, but some practitioners have yet ... Cases will be used to highlight the most common periodontal and peri-implant diagnoses that will be encountered in general ...
The presence of bleeding gums usually when brushing or flossing is usually a sign that you have some form of periodontal ... disease but it can also mean a greater risk ... ... Periodontal disease is a progressive disease that will advance ... This will ultimately advance to more progressive forms of periodontal disease called periodontitis. Periodontal disease at this ... or periodontal disease will come back and possibly advance past the gingivitis form into advanced periodontal disease (also ...
"Periodontal disease and cardiovascular disease are both complex, multi-factorial diseases that develop over time. It may be ... "There is no compelling evidence to support that treating periodontal disease will reduce cardiovascular disease at this time," ... that independently link periodontal disease to the development or progression of cardiovascular disease in some patients. ... "Periodontal Disease and Atherosclerotic Vascular Disease: Does the Evidence Support an Independent Association?" recently ...
People with periodontal disease are usually described as... ... disease is a term for either of two types of gum disease. ... More and more research confirms the fact that periodontal disease and and heart disease are linked together. If one disease is ... Periodontal disease is the term used to describe either of two main diseases of the gums. In human anatomy, the periodontium is ... Periodontal disease occurs more frequently in people with diabetes, osteoporosis, herpes, and diseases that weaken the immune ...
Its not just one disease, according to the American Academy of Periodontology, but several with a common cause: bacteria in ... Most people have heard of gum disease, but dentists know it as periodontal disease. Its not just one disease, according to the ... Pregnant women have a higher risk of developing periodontal disease during pregnancy, so they should also be aware of the ... Not everyone with gingivitis will get this form of periodontal disease, but there are risks factors that can make certain ...
This invention relates to compositions/devices and methods for treating diseases of the oral cavity in humans and lower animals ... Periodontal disease, for example, is a major cause of tooth loss in adults. Tooth loss from periodontal disease is a ... 4. A method of treating periodontal disease in a person or lower animal suffering from such disease by placing a composition ... The size, shape, and thickness can be changed according to the condition of the periodontal disease to be treated and they are ...
Efficacy of Subgingivally Delivered Doxycycline Plus Ketoprofen Gel as an Adjunct to Non-surgical Periodontal Treatment. * ...
Periodontal disease can also be staged by the degree of periodontium affected as measured with the periodontal probe and ... The goal of treating periodontal disease is to decrease or eliminate the periodontal pocket. ... Unfortunately, most adult dogs and cats have periodontal disease. Imagine if you didnt brush your teeth for days, weeks or ... When periodontal disease is not treated, subgingival bacteria can continue to reproduce, potentially creating deeper ...
Theres no predisposition for children wearing braces to periodontal disease - as long as they follow the orthodontists ... "was that there is clearly no predisposition for children wearing braces to periodontal disease. As long as they follow the ... During each test, samples were taken from four different areas around the brace to monitor the prevalence of the periodontal ... The analysis showed that three months after the braces were fitted, periodontal bacteria were detected - this was a really ...
... free Chlorhexidine With a Cetylpyridinium Chloride in Periodontal Diseases. *Periodontal Diseases ... Procedure: Surgical Periodontal Treatment. *Device: Non Surgical Periodontal Treatment includes scaling root planing with UDS-J ... Drug: Non Surgical Periodontal Treatment includes post operative mouth wash with Listerine® (ethanol 21.6%, methyl salicylate ... Assessment of Periodontal Soft Tissue Healing Progress Between Baseline (Immediately After Surgery), 7 and 14 Days ...
Periodontal diseased Subjects with periodontal disease will be enrolled. Subjects with mild disease will have at least 4 teeth ... Periodontal Disease Intervention Other: Periodontal therapy All subjects will have professional dental prophylaxis and ... Subjects with periodontal disease will also receive Supportive Periodontal Therapy at the 3- and 6-month post-therapy visits. ... Mild periodontal disease subject: periodontal loss must meet the following criteria and must not meet the minimum criteria for ...
  • Eke PI, Thornton-Evans G, Dye BA, Genco R. Advances in Surveillance of Periodontitis: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Periodontal Disease Surveillance Project. (cdc.gov)
  • Adseverin, a protein found in the body, has been identified as the key driver behind the bone loss associated with the world's most common inflammatory disease: gum disease, or periodontitis. (news-medical.net)
  • A new study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention confirms that nearly one out of two U.S. adults age 30 and over-64.7 million Americans-has periodontitis, the advanced form of periodontal disease. (news-medical.net)
  • This time, the scientists examined the relationship between coronary heart disease and two measures of periodontitis: (1) clinically defined periodontal disease and (2) serum antibody levels to 17 oral microbes. (nih.gov)
  • We believe that these findings are relevant for future research in that they indicate that clinical measures of periodontitis may not adequately represent the systemic burden of periodontal disease. (nih.gov)
  • Periodontal disease in dogs , also known as periodontitis, is one of the more common ailments which affect dogs. (vetinfo.com)
  • Unchecked gingivitis can lead to a very serious periodontal disease called periodontitis. (howstuffworks.com)
  • This will ultimately advance to more progressive forms of periodontal disease called periodontitis. (selfgrowth.com)
  • Usually, a patient with gum disease is described as having either gingivitis or periodontitis. (wisegeek.com)
  • Periodontitis is a more progressive disease characterized by swollen gums and bleeding, the formation of deep pockets between the teeth and gums, and eventually the decay of the connective tissues, which results in tooth loss. (wisegeek.com)
  • The second-most common periodontal disease is "periodontitis. (colgate.com)
  • Untreated periodontitis can not only yield tooth loss, but create systemic health issues such as an increased risk of cardiovascular (heart) disease. (colgate.com)
  • Periodontal diseases vary in severity, from the reversible, recurring mild inflammation called gingivitis that affects many people, to the sometimes irreversible, severe, chronic periodontitis that badly erodes the bone and other supporting structures of the tooth, possibly leading to tooth loss. (lifescript.com)
  • Without proper treatment, people were told their gingivitis would inevitably progress to periodontitis, advanced disease, and ultimately tooth loss. (lifescript.com)
  • Research has established that periodontal diseases arise when specific oral bacteria infect gum tissue, triggering a complex immune response and progressive inflammation that play a major role in causing periodontitis. (lifescript.com)
  • Even though moderate disease affects a majority of adults, severe periodontitis affects only 5%-15% of adults. (lifescript.com)
  • Tooth loss from periodontal disease is a significant problem beginning at age 35, but even by age 15 it is estimated that about 4 out of 5 persons already have gingivitis and 4 out of 10 have periodontitis. (google.ca)
  • Periodontitis, which damages the bone and connective tissue that support the teeth, is a more serious form of gum disease. (umm.edu)
  • Periodontitis occurs when the gum tissues separate from the tooth and sulcus, forming periodontal pockets. (umm.edu)
  • Periodontal disease is widespread and usually caused by bacteria, which leads to an inflammation of the gums - the periodontitis. (innovations-report.com)
  • The two major forms of periodontal disease are gingivitis and periodontitis. (colgate.com)
  • Advanced gum disease, also known as periodontitis, can cause many complications inside the mouth. (colgate.com)
  • The three stages of gum disease - from least to most severe - are gingivitis, periodontitis and advanced periodontitis. (colgate.com)
  • Half of Americans aged 30 or older - 64.7 million people - have periodontitis, the more advanced form of periodontal disease. (aol.com)
  • Periodontitis , also called pyorrhea , is an advanced stage of gum disease. (faqs.org)
  • Experts will discuss the clinical consequences of comorbidity OSA and periodontitis and highlight the putative mechanisms which link periodontal inflammation to Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA). (rsm.ac.uk)
  • Sleep disorders and periodontitis are highly prevalent diseases in the general adult population. (rsm.ac.uk)
  • Her research activity focuses on periodontal medicine, particularly on the relationships between periodontitis and sleep disorders. (rsm.ac.uk)
  • Aside from gingivitis, other types of periodontal disease include periodontitis and trench mouth , also known as necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis. (wisegeek.com)
  • If the disease is caught early enough, treatment for periodontitis may not too involved. (wisegeek.com)
  • Readers are carefully guided through an extensive body of accumulated knowledge in eight broad chapters which includes: the patient's involvement in disease control and prevention, the clinician's instrumentation for the diagnosis and basic treatment of gingivitis/periodontitis along with pharmacotherapeutics and supportive maintenance therapy to ensure long-term success. (springer.com)
  • When plaque hardens, it becomes tartar and can cause trouble in the form of an infection, which can then lead to periodontal diseases such as gingivitis and periodontitis. (greenmedinfo.com)
  • Periodontal disease (also referred to as periodontitis) is regarded as the most prevalent disease in pets. (embracepetinsurance.com)
  • However, if you don't do anything to keep gingivitis in check, bacteria may multiply, allowing the disease to progress to periodontitis. (howstuffworks.com)
  • Periodontitis is an inflammatory disease triggered by a microbial dysbiosis that affects the supporting tissues around teeth and it eventually leads to tooth loss if left untreated. (nature.com)
  • Severe cases of periodontitis can lead to the deterioration of the structures that hold the teeth in place ( specifically the alveolar bone and periodontal ligament), significant bleeding, recession(loss of tissue) of the gums, surgeries and tooth extraction. (defeatdiabetes.org)
  • This so-called "two-way relationship" between periodontitis and diabetes makes periodontitis a risk factor for further diabetes complications associated with consistently high blood glucose levels, such as peripheral neuropathy , retinopathy kidney disease and amputations. (defeatdiabetes.org)
  • In its earliest stages, periodontal disease (called ginigivitis at this point) is reversible, but if periodontal disease progresses to the stage called periodontitis it is much more difficult to combat. (empowher.com)
  • These confounders are independent risk factors for cardiovascular disease and if left untreated, periodontitis has been shown to have harmful effects on the control of diabetes, serum glucose levels and increases CRP levels. (innovations-report.com)
  • Necrotizing periodontal diseases is one of the seven categories of periodontitis as defined by the American Academy of Periodontology 1999 classification system and is one of the three classifications of periodontal diseases and conditions within the 2017 classification. (wikipedia.org)
  • ANUG is also known as trench mouth, as it was observed to occur in the mouths of front line soldiers during World War I. Necrotizing ulcerative periodontitis (NUP, or simply necrotizing periodontitis, NP) or acute necrotizing ulcerative periodontitis (ANUP) is where the infection leads to attachment loss (destruction of the ligaments anchoring teeth in their sockets), but involves only the gingiva, periodontal ligament and alveolar ligament. (wikipedia.org)
  • The severity of gum disease ranges from a mild type known as gingivitis to the more serious type called periodontitis . (waterpik.com)
  • Periodontitis is periodontal disease in its later, more serious stage. (peacehealth.org)
  • These damaging processes lead to periodontal disease, which includes gingivitis (inflammation of the gums) and periodontitis (loss of bone and soft tissue around the tooth). (postindependent.com)
  • citation needed] Like measurements of prevalence of periodontitis, the measurement of incidence will vary depending upon the case definition of the disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • Other studies have demonstrated a close association between periodontitis and cognitive impairment, but this is the first study to show that exposure to the periodontal bacteria results in the formation of senile plaques that accelerate the development of neuropathology found in Alzheimer's patients," said Dr. Keiko Watanabe, professor of periodontics at the UIC College of Dentistry and corresponding author on the study. (healthcanal.com)
  • Periodontal disease is generally described in two stages, gingivitis and periodontitis. (vin.com)
  • Periodontitis is the later stage of the disease process and is defined as an inflammatory disease of the deeper supporting structures of the tooth caused by microorganisms. (vin.com)
  • Eventually, the inflammation can lead to periodontitis, i.e., the destruction of the attachment between the periodontal tissues and the teeth. (vin.com)
  • But one of the things we overlook that may have a major effect on the health of our pregnancy is periodontitis, or gum disease. (everydayfamily.com)
  • Periodontal diseases are broadly divided into gingivitis and periodontitis. (diethealthclub.com)
  • Periodontitis is the more advanced form of Periodontal Gum Disease that develops when gingivitis is left untreated for a very long time. (safariandmd.com)
  • This form of periodontitis, as the name suggests, is brought about by systemic diseases. (safariandmd.com)
  • Depending on the underlying disease, it may exhibit signs of chronic or aggressive periodontitis. (safariandmd.com)
  • Once the medical disease is controlled, your dentist will now be able to treat the periodontal gum disease with the same treatments used for chronic and aggressive periodontitis. (safariandmd.com)
  • If it is not stopped, gingivitis could lead to a more serious type of gum disease called periodontitis. (diabeticgourmet.com)
  • Periodontitis should be treated by a periodontist (a gum disease specialist) or by a general dentist who has special training in treating gum diseases. (diabeticgourmet.com)
  • Treatment of periodontitis depends on how much damage the disease has caused. (diabeticgourmet.com)
  • Not only is periodontitis a major cause of tooth loss, but it is also linked to other diseases affecting overall health. (obesityaction.org)
  • One of the world's most common infectious disease, periodontitis (PD), derives from largely uncharacterized communities of oral bacteria growing as biofilms (a.k.a. plaque) on teeth and gum surfaces in periodontal pockets. (jcvi.org)
  • Because oral diseases such as periodontitis have been shown to have altered bacterial communities, we believe that viruses and their role as drivers of ecosystem diversity are important contributors to the human oral microbiome in health and disease states. (asm.org)
  • 47.2% of adults aged 30 years and older have some form of periodontal disease. (cdc.gov)
  • The presence of bleeding gums usually when brushing or flossing is usually a sign that you have some form of periodontal disease but it can also mean a greater risk is present. (selfgrowth.com)
  • Not everyone with gingivitis will get this form of periodontal disease, but there are risks factors that can make certain people more likely to develop it. (colgate.com)
  • An estimated 8% to 10% of American adults have some form of periodontal disease. (lifescript.com)
  • Gingivitis , an inflammation of the gums, is the mildest form of periodontal disease. (faqs.org)
  • With gingivitis, the mildest form of periodontal disease, the gums are likely to become red, swollen, and tender, causing them to bleed easily during daily cleanings and flossing. (chop.edu)
  • The most basic form of periodontal disease, gingivitis can cause the gums to redden, swell and bleed easily. (howstuffworks.com)
  • Gingivitis is the early and most common form of periodontal disease. (safariandmd.com)
  • This form of periodontal disease is extremely rare, and management involves consultation with a medical doctor before rendering treatment. (safariandmd.com)
  • In moderate periodontal disease you will see erosion of the gum, pockets will deepen, and more potent forms of bacteria develop. (innerbody.com)
  • Bacteria in the mouth infect tissue surrounding the tooth, causing inflammation around the tooth leading to periodontal disease. (cdc.gov)
  • Brush and floss every day to remove the bacteria that cause gum disease. (cdc.gov)
  • Another explanation, according to Michaud, is that periodontal disease could lead to increased pancreatic carcinogenesis because individuals with periodontal disease have higher levels of oral bacteria and higher levels of nitrosamines, which are carcinogens, in their oral cavity. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • The major breakthrough came when a French chemist, Louis Pasteur, and a German physician, Koch, established the concept that bacteria caused the disease. (hindawi.com)
  • As published in the July 5, 2005 issue of the journal Circulation , the scientists found that serum antibody levels were indeed associated with coronary heart disease, suggesting the quantity and quality of the immune response against oral bacteria may provide a more relevant measure of the association. (nih.gov)
  • However, it is important to make sure that plaque is regularly brushed away from the teeth and gums to prevent the progression of bacteria into periodontal disease. (vetinfo.com)
  • Periodontal disease is also linked to systemic conditions such as heart disease, bacterial pneumonia and stroke, likely due to the spread of bacteria coming from the oral cavity that invade other parts of the body. (news-medical.net)
  • Periodontal disease begins with plaque, which is caused from bacteria and food particles. (petsbest.com)
  • Both inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and periodontal disease (PD) are chronic inflammatory diseases of which pathogenesis may include complicated relationship between commensal bacteria and host immune responses. (springer.com)
  • One possible explanation for the link between periodontal disease and breast cancer is that bacteria enter the body's circulation and ultimately affect breast tissue. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Researchers have long recognized that there are at least 11 different strains of bacteria that can cause periodontal disease. (selfgrowth.com)
  • The name periodontal disease is used for problems caused by an increase in bacteria or a change in bacteria that affects the gums. (wisegeek.com)
  • It's not just one disease, according to the American Academy of Periodontology , but several with a common cause: bacteria in dental plaque. (colgate.com)
  • This research may give dentists the tools to target their treatment to the bacteria that trigger periodontal disease. (lifescript.com)
  • Oral bacteria shed from chronic periodontal infections enter the circulatory system and may contribute to diseases of the heart and other organs. (lifescript.com)
  • When periodontal disease is not treated, subgingival bacteria can continue to reproduce, potentially creating deeper periodontal pockets through bone destruction. (veterinarypartner.com)
  • During each test, samples were taken from four different areas around the brace to monitor the prevalence of the periodontal bacteria at various locations in the mouth. (bristol.ac.uk)
  • Using a diagnostic DNA microarray - a collection of microscopic DNA spots attached to a solid surface each of which will detect important oral bacteria - each plaque sample was analysed for the presence of those particular pathogens linked to gum disease. (bristol.ac.uk)
  • The analysis showed that three months after the braces were fitted, periodontal bacteria were detected - this was a really exciting finding as they had never been detected at this stage before. (bristol.ac.uk)
  • Periodontal disease is a chronic infection of bacteria around the teeth. (livestrong.com)
  • Among gram-negative bacteria implicated in periodontal diseases, Fusobacterium nucleatum, is one of the most interesting. (nih.gov)
  • As the disease progresses, the bacteria weakens the bone supporting the teeth and the affected teeth begin to loosen and drift from their normal position. (faqs.org)
  • This disease can be serious as studies have shown that bacteria from dental disease can possibly move into vital organs, causing heart and kidney disease. (revivalanimal.com)
  • As with many other oral health diseases, bacteria and plaque buildup are often the culprits. (chop.edu)
  • These chronic oral infections are characterized by the presence of a biofilm matrix that adheres to the periodontal structures and serves as a reservoir for bacteria (plaque). (intechopen.com)
  • Periodontal disease results from a complex interplay between the subgingival biofilm and the host immune inflammatory event, which develop in the gingival and periodontal tissues in response to the challenge presented by the bacteria [ 2 ]. (intechopen.com)
  • The bacteria may initiate the disease, but the progression is host immune-mediated, and several inflammatory cells and enzymes are released which have a detrimental effect on other cells, tissues, and organ systems. (intechopen.com)
  • Bottom Line: An analysis of bacteria present in the mouth showed that some types of bacteria that lead to periodontal disease were associated with higher risk of esophageal cancer. (eurekalert.org)
  • Both species of bacteria are linked with common gum disease, Ahn noted. (eurekalert.org)
  • Researchers report this week that older adults who have higher proportions of four periodontal-disease-causing bacteria inhabiting their mouths also tend to have thicker carotid arteries, a strong predictor of stroke and heart attack. (eurekalert.org)
  • As first reported in the journal Circulation, this is the first report of a direct association between cardiovascular disease and bacteria involved in periodontal disease, inflammation of the gums that affects an estimated 200 million Americans to various degrees. (eurekalert.org)
  • They measured both diseased and healthy sites for the presence of 11 oral bacteria--four widely regarded to be involved in causing periodontal disease, and the other seven serving as controls. (eurekalert.org)
  • The scientists found that the higher the levels of the periodontal-disease-causing bacteria, the more likely people were to have thicker carotid arteries. (eurekalert.org)
  • Periodontal pockets contain bacteria which may get into the bloodstream. (naturalherbsguide.com)
  • Gingivitis and periodontal disease occur when a person's gums become infected with bacteria. (wisegeek.com)
  • The presence of specific bacteria and combinations of bacteria in periodontal pockets might be an explanation for the relationship between periodontal disease and acute coronary syndrome (ACS), according to a new study published in the Journal of Periodontology. (emaxhealth.com)
  • This might be one of several explanations as to why elevated bacteria and the combination of specific pathogens in periodontal pockets can be linked to a history of ACS," said Stefan Renvert, DDS, PhD and Department of Health Sciences, Kristianstad University. (emaxhealth.com)
  • We also found that the amount of periodontal bacteria results in an inflammatory response that elevates the white blood cell counts and high sensitivity C-reactive protein levels, which has also been linked in past studies to heart disease. (emaxhealth.com)
  • A study has shown that when quercetin solution was applied to bacteria called Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (Aa) and Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg), which both signify periodontal disease in the mouth, and incubated for one to 24 hours, it led to a significant decrease in the bacteria. (greenmedinfo.com)
  • The study found that administering aloe vera gel in the periodontal pocket, a space between the tooth and gums where bacteria may flourish, can improve periodontal condition. (greenmedinfo.com)
  • Periodontal disease occurs when a thin layer of bacteria-containing film coats the structures surrounding the teeth. (embracepetinsurance.com)
  • The bacteria involved throughout this process secrets toxins, which ultimately leads to the inflammation of the periodontal tissues. (embracepetinsurance.com)
  • Periodontal disease, or gum disease, occurs when bacteria attack the gums and bone, resulting in bad breath, receding gums and tooth loss. (padental.org)
  • Periodontal disease is caused by the plaque-forming bacteria in your mouth. (padental.org)
  • Gingivitis is a mild form of gum disease and occurs when bacteria get in between the tooth and the gum, causing inflammation. (padental.org)
  • Necrotizing periodontal diseases are a type of inflammatory periodontal (gum) disease caused by bacteria (notably fusobacteria and spirochaete species). (wikipedia.org)
  • Failure of the 'feedback loop' facilitates multiplication of pathogenic bacteria within plaque and development of periodontal disease. (rawmeatybones.com)
  • A previous history of active periodontal disease increases the risk of perio disease because of the genetic predisposition which manifests as an immune system incapable of dealing with otherwise acceptable levels of bacteria. (dentistryiq.com)
  • If sufficient quantities of bacteria are present, the disease will recur. (dentistryiq.com)
  • When you consider the cause of periodontal disease it becomes clear that the methods for preventing or controlling it are focused on reduction or control of the undesirable bacteria in the mouth. (postindependent.com)
  • Periodontal disease occurs when bacteria infect the gums and the tissues that support the teeth. (catster.com)
  • The treatment for periodontal disease involves physically removing the bacteria (and all debris) from the teeth, gums, and supporting structures. (catster.com)
  • OraMD tooth oil travels between the teeth and below the gumline-killing periodontal bacteria where they thrive. (oramd.com)
  • Our blend of essential oils has been clinically proven to eliminate periodontal bacteria, plaque build-up and bad breath while creating a fresh, clean and healthy environment for your mouth. (oramd.com)
  • The original strength helps kill periodontal bacteria and provides fresh clean breath. (oramd.com)
  • Long-term exposure to periodontal disease bacteria causes inflammation and degeneration of brain neurons in mice that is similar to the effects of Alzheimer's disease in humans, according to a new study from researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago. (healthcanal.com)
  • DNA from the periodontal bacteria was also found in the brain tissue of mice in the study group, and a bacterial protein was observed inside their neurons. (healthcanal.com)
  • Using a wild-type mouse model added strength to our study because these mice were not primed to develop the disease, and use of this model gives additional weight to our findings that periodontal bacteria may kick-start the development of the Alzheimer's," Watanabe said. (healthcanal.com)
  • Periodontal disease is initiated by oral bacteria which adhere to the teeth in a substance called plaque. (vin.com)
  • Bacteria associated with periodontal disease trigger inflammatory responses in immune cells, which in later stages of the disease cause loss of both soft and hard tissue structures supporting teeth. (jcvi.org)
  • Periodontal diseases are mainly the results of infections and inflammation of the gums and bone that surround and support the teeth. (cdc.gov)
  • Each grade determines the specific appearance of the mouth and what the present condition is, whether gingivitis, which is swelling of the gums, or progression to periodontal disease. (vetinfo.com)
  • This disease not only affects the teeth and gums, it has the potential to cause an array of other serious conditions. (petsbest.com)
  • Most of us have first-hand knowledge of cavities, but less well known -- and more devastating -- is what can happen when your gums succumb to disease. (howstuffworks.com)
  • Risk factors for periodontal disease include genetic predisposition, smoking and hormonal changes in girls and women, which can make gums more sensitive so that it is easier for gingivitis to develop. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Bleeding Gums and Periodontal Disease. (selfgrowth.com)
  • Periodontal disease is the term used to describe either of two main diseases of the gums. (wisegeek.com)
  • In most cases, this disease is completely treatable under a dentist's care, so anyone who experiences any signs or symptoms, including swollen gums, bleeding gums , or pain or tenderness, should see a dentist. (wisegeek.com)
  • Periodontal diseases are disorders of the gums, or gingiva, and other tissues around the teeth. (lifescript.com)
  • Symptoms of periodontal disease include red and swollen gums, persistent bad breath, and receding gums and loose teeth. (umm.edu)
  • Gingivitis, which causes lesions (inflammatory abnormalities) that affect the gums, is a milder form of gum disease. (umm.edu)
  • A previous study had found that increased levels of cortisol can lead to increased destruction of the gums and jaw bone due to periodontal diseases. (medindia.net)
  • This includes the gums (gingiva), connective tissue (periodontal ligament), and tooth sockets (alveolar bone). (faqs.org)
  • The common signs of periodontal disease in dogs and cats include bad breath, red and swollen gums, loose teeth, irritability, drooling, and gums that bleed easily. (revivalanimal.com)
  • If the disease has progressed to a later stage, the next steps of treatment may include the complete cleaning of the gums or the removal of teeth. (revivalanimal.com)
  • Periodontal diseases, also called gum diseases, are serious bacterial infections that destroy the gums and the surrounding tissues of the mouth. (chop.edu)
  • This stage of gum disease shows evidence of the development of periodontal pockets (gums pulling away from the teeth, causing the crevice between the teeth and gums to deepen) and early loss of bone around the teeth. (chop.edu)
  • This most advanced stage of gum disease shows significant bone loss, deepening of periodontal pockets, and possibly receding gums surrounding the teeth. (chop.edu)
  • When the disease is advanced, the infected areas under the gums will be cleaned, and the tissues will then be reshaped or replaced. (chop.edu)
  • Any disease of the teeth or gums can be considered a Periodontal Disease. (naturalherbsguide.com)
  • Periodontal disease is a serious condition, which is why you should always try to stop the progression or even better - never let your gums and teeth get this bad. (sooperarticles.com)
  • During the early stages of the disease, you'll notice that your gums appear to be bright red, and very sore. (sooperarticles.com)
  • You don't want to wait until it is too late, as the more advanced stages of gum disease can completely destroy your teeth and gums - and there will be little to nothing that you can do about it. (sooperarticles.com)
  • If only the superficial gums are involved in this breakdown, the disease is referred to as gingivitis . (emedicinehealth.com)
  • A dentist provides major care for diseases of the teeth and gums. (emedicinehealth.com)
  • During any routine dental examination, a dentist will do a periodontal exam of the gums. (emedicinehealth.com)
  • Periodontal disease affects structures around your teeth, including your gums, making it painful to chew food and increasing your risk of systemic diseases. (greenmedinfo.com)
  • There are various treatment options to control the spread of periodontal disease in your gums. (greenmedinfo.com)
  • This includes the gums, bone, cementum (a bony material that surrounds the root), and the periodontal ligament (which attaches the tooth to the bone), all of which encase and support the teeth. (embracepetinsurance.com)
  • When this tartar forms under the gumline, it can irritate and infect the gums, leading to gum disease. (padental.org)
  • Periodontal diseases, also referred to as gum diseases, are infections of the gums and the bones that hold the teeth in the jaw. (defeatdiabetes.org)
  • Moderate periodontal disease can result in the swelling or tenderness of the gums, bad breath and occasional bleeding when brushing the teeth. (defeatdiabetes.org)
  • Periodontal diseases are chronic infections that affect the gums and bone supporting the teeth. (pharmacytimes.com)
  • Gingivitis, the milder form of the disease, consists of red and swollen gums. (pharmacytimes.com)
  • Long-term infection of the gums, bone, and other tissues that surround and support the teeth causes periodontal disease. (peacehealth.org)
  • Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums ( Periodontal disease rises as the join. (bio-medicine.org)
  • Previous research has suggested a link between RA and periodontal disease, a condition where chronic inflammation results in the separation of the teeth from the gums, loss of bony support, and possible tooth loss. (bio-medicine.org)
  • Eighty-two percent of the patients reported periodontal symptoms, such as a history of the disease, gum recession, swollen gums, and gum bleeding. (bio-medicine.org)
  • Gum disease or periodontal disease is an infection of the gums or gingival - a tissue which supports the teeth. (diethealthclub.com)
  • However if bleeding gums are not treated at a right time then it can lead to more serious form of the disease. (diethealthclub.com)
  • These structures include the gums, periodontal ligament, and alveolar bone . (safariandmd.com)
  • It is characterized by the bone destruction and separation of the gums from the teeth (forming what is known as a periodontal pocket) in addition to the classic signs of gingivitis. (safariandmd.com)
  • The inflammation may also decrease blood flow to the gums and cause disease progression. (obesityaction.org)
  • The goal of treatment for periodontal disease is to stop the progression of disease, improve the health of surrounding gums, and if indicated, to restore the supporting structures (bone, gum tissue and ligaments). (obesityaction.org)
  • More research is needed to define the exact mechanisms, but the present knowledge is enough to increase the efforts to treat and prevent periodontal diseases in critically ill and hospitalized patients. (dailystrength.org)
  • In addition to improved consumer dental products to help prevent periodontal disease, increased awareness exists about those at greatest risk who might benefit from more regular periodontal care. (lifescript.com)
  • Visit your dentist regularly in order to prevent periodontal disease and to catch it early if it does show up. (naturalherbsguide.com)
  • How can I prevent periodontal disease? (padental.org)
  • This is the single most important measure someone can take to prevent periodontal disease and promote dental health in pets. (petage.com)
  • What can women do to prevent Periodontal Disease? (empowher.com)
  • Brushing and flossing regularly help prevent periodontal disease. (peacehealth.org)
  • Tooth brushing really helps to prevent periodontal disease. (catster.com)
  • Because we've found that succinate has significant implications for periodontal disease, we hope that by understanding this novel mechanism, we can help prevent periodontal bone loss in those with diabetes," said Deepak Saxena, PhD, associate professor of basic science and craniofacial biology at NYU College of Dentistry and one of the project's principal investigators. (nyu.edu)
  • Scientists at the University of Michigan have shown that gene therapy can be used to successfully stop the development of periodontal disease, the leading cause of tooth loss in adults. (news-medical.net)
  • Previous studies have suggested that smoking impacts the development of periodontal disease, so the researchers took smoking status into account. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Genetics may play a role in development of periodontal disease. (naturalherbsguide.com)
  • According to the findings, risk of heart attack and development of periodontal disease share an identical gene. (emaxhealth.com)
  • The new study shows that the risk of developing heart attack and development of periodontal disease share the exact same gene that promotes chronic inflammation and increased risk of heart disease and heart attack. (emaxhealth.com)
  • Likewise, obesity appears to be an independent risk factor for the development of periodontal disease even after controlling other risk factors such as smoking, age and other medical problems. (obesityaction.org)
  • An earlier study, published in the "American Journal of Public Health" in February 1989, found that even when a smoker's diet included sufficient vitamin C, his serum levels were low and contributed to the development of periodontal disease. (livestrong.com)
  • However, the recommended daily allowance of vitamin C is enough to prevent the development of periodontal disease from vitamin C deficiency. (livestrong.com)
  • The periodontal ligament and alveolar bone become inflamed. (innerbody.com)
  • As the inflammation spreads and worsens, it will soon attack the periodontal ligament that holds the teeth in place. (innerbody.com)
  • Periodontal disease causes the destruction of the periodontal ligament and jaw bone, which anchors the teeth into the mouth. (petsbest.com)
  • Anatomically the periodontium is composed of the gingiva (gum), cementum, periodontal ligament, and alveolar supporting bone. (veterinarypartner.com)
  • a periodontal ligament. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • The periodontal disease begins at the gingiva and progress downwards and affects the tooth-supporting structures, i.e., periodontal ligament, cementum of the root, and alveolar bone. (intechopen.com)
  • Although bacterially-mediated mechanisms of alveolar bone destruction have been widely studied, the effects of a polymicrobial infection on the periodontal ligament and microbiome/virome have not been well explored. (nature.com)
  • Therefore, the current investigation introduced a new mouse model of periodontal disease to examine the effects of a polymicrobial infection on periodontal ligament (PDL) properties, changes in bone loss, the host immune response, and the microbiome/virome using shotgun sequencing. (nature.com)
  • But periodontal disease can get deeper and afflict the alveolar bone, periodontal ligament and the cementum. (ayurvediccure.com)
  • The periodontal ligament is the tissue that attaches the tooth to the alveolar bone, while the alveolar bone is the bone that makes up the tooth socket. (safariandmd.com)
  • It occurs when plaque accumulates deep below the gum line, resulting in the destruction of the periodontal ligament and bone. (safariandmd.com)
  • However, periodontal disease, a disease of the supporting tissue around the tooth, can be so severe that the teeth loosen and fall out. (innerbody.com)
  • rather, the teeth are stabilized by connective tissue called periodontal ligaments that extend between tooth-roots and sockets. (innerbody.com)
  • Treatment of periodontal disease starts with the removal of plaque from the teeth. (vetinfo.com)
  • The best method of prevention against periodontal disease, even with the inclusion of certain risk factors, is the habitual cleaning and brushing of your dog's teeth . (vetinfo.com)
  • Periodontal disease is a common condition that ranges from simple gum inflammation to a serious disease causing major damage to the soft tissue and bone that support the teeth, and loss of teeth. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Periodontal disease is inflammation and infection that breaks down and destroys the tissues that support the teeth. (selfgrowth.com)
  • This includes the gum tissues, the periodontal ligaments (PDL), and the bone supporting the teeth. (selfgrowth.com)
  • Periodontal disease was viewed as a linear process that started with gingivitis progressing to loosening of teeth and loss of bone holding the teeth. (lifescript.com)
  • While good oral hygiene, as achieved by brushing the teeth with a cleansing dentifrice, may help reduce the incidence of periodontal disease, it does not necessarily prevent or eliminate its occurrence. (google.ca)
  • And are there any connections between wearing teeth-straightening braces and having a predisposition to developing periodontal - or gum - disease? (bristol.ac.uk)
  • Since the infection is most severe around the molars and premolars, periodontal surgery that involves the extraction of the teeth may be necessary. (vetinfo.com)
  • Periodontal disease is a chronic inflammatory disease of the gum and tissues that surround and support the teeth. (umm.edu)
  • Gum disease is an inflammation of the gum line that can progress to affect the bone that surrounds and supports your teeth. (colgate.com)
  • Periodontal disease is an infection of the tissues surrounding and supporting the teeth. (faqs.org)
  • Finally, if the disease is left untreated, the teeth may be lost. (faqs.org)
  • Periodontal disease is a chronic inflammatory condition characterized by destruction of the periodontal tissues and resulting in loss of connective tissue attachment, loss of alveolar bone, and the formation of pathological pockets around the diseased teeth. (diabetesjournals.org)
  • Periodontal (gum) disease is an infection of the tissues that hold your teeth in place. (nih.gov)
  • Treatment starts with removing the plaque from the teeth in order to determine the severity of the disease and the course of treatment. (revivalanimal.com)
  • But although periodontal disease is a focus of infection around the teeth, it has its origin in an area that is remote from the mouth. (drbicuspid.com)
  • Evidence of bone loss around teeth is one of the signs of more advanced periodontal disease. (epnet.com)
  • If the inflammation is left untreated, the disease will continue and the underlying bone around the teeth will dissolve and will no longer be able to hold the teeth in place. (chop.edu)
  • Deep cleaning (also called scaling and root planing) can help remove the plaque and calculus beneath the gum and infected tissue in the early stages of the disease, while smoothing the damaged root surfaces of the teeth. (chop.edu)
  • Periodontal diseases are silent infections that often go undiagnosed until irreparable damage occurs to the teeth and oral structures. (intechopen.com)
  • Those with allergies have a slighter chance of losing teeth from periodontal disease because of their stronger immune systems. (naturalherbsguide.com)
  • While gingivitis is a type of periodontal disease, it is a mild one and can be treated by a thorough teeth cleaning. (wisegeek.com)
  • To prevent both types of gum disease, you should always brush your teeth and remove as much plaque as possible. (sooperarticles.com)
  • Even though this form of mouth disease cannot be reversed, you can put a stop to it's progression by going to your dentist on a regular basis and brushing your teeth a few times day. (sooperarticles.com)
  • Periodontal disease is a progressive process by which the structures that surround the teeth become inflamed. (embracepetinsurance.com)
  • You've been diagnosed with periodontal disease, and your dentist says if you don't do anything about it, you could eventually lose your teeth. (howstuffworks.com)
  • Periodontal disease is a microbially-mediated inflammatory disease of tooth-supporting tissues that leads to bone and tissue loss around teeth. (nature.com)
  • Dental diets are formulated for reducing the amount of plaque and tartar that accumulate on the teeth and in some cases may even prevent serious oral diseases from occurring. (petage.com)
  • What we do know is that eliminating periodontal infection saves teeth. (innovations-report.com)
  • As a cause of periodontal disease, plaque and calculus that is below the gum line is a bigger problem than the more visible buildup that you can see on the teeth. (postindependent.com)
  • Unfortunately, the damage from periodontal disease is not confined to just loss of teeth. (postindependent.com)
  • While teeth cleanings that do not use anesthesia have their benefits, they cannot do as effective of a cleaning of the sulcus area, which is where periodontal disease is thought to start. (postindependent.com)
  • Periodontal disease is a disease affecting the tissue surrounding the teeth. (wikipedia.org)
  • Your teeth are supported primarily by the gum which is generally the easiest prey to all kinds of periodontal diseases. (ayurvediccure.com)
  • Gum diseases are a threat to a person's oral health and can range from simple gum inflammation to major damage to the bone and soft tissue which supports the teeth. (diethealthclub.com)
  • Periodontal gum disease treatment in San Diego comprises a number of oral health problems that affect the supporting structures of the teeth. (safariandmd.com)
  • Periodontal diseases are infections of the gum and bone that hold the teeth in place. (diabeticgourmet.com)
  • People with poor blood sugar control get gum disease more often and more severely, and they lose more teeth than do persons with good control. (diabeticgourmet.com)
  • Pain, abscess, and loosening of the teeth do not occur until the disease is advanced. (diabeticgourmet.com)
  • Periodontal disease is a chronic bacterial infection that affects the tissues surrounding and the bone supporting the teeth. (obesityaction.org)
  • In addition, certain foods have both beneficial and disease-causing capacity, potentially affecting the teeth, periodontal structures, and mucosa. (medscape.com)
  • Dental plaque can lead to periodontal disease. (innerbody.com)
  • If you have gingivitis and you don't do something about it, it could lead to periodontal disease. (sooperarticles.com)
  • Sjögren's syndrome causes decreased saliva production that can lead to periodontal disease. (emedicinehealth.com)
  • The periodontal tissues were spared from destruction by more than 60-80 percent with the use of gene therapy. (news-medical.net)
  • Inflammation and destruction of periodontal tissues are considered to result from the response of a susceptible host to a microbial biofilm containing gram-negative pathogens. (nih.gov)
  • Once systemic disease spreads, a vicious cycle begins, as all tissues affect all other tissues in the body. (drbicuspid.com)
  • This bacterial insult can result in destruction of the periodontal tissues that precipitates a systemic inflammatory and immune response leading to the release of several cytokines and immunomodulatory agents, which may affect systemic conditions and diseases. (intechopen.com)
  • The following pathogenetic mechanisms could possibly be responsible for a more intensive and faster destruction of the periodontal tissues: impaired protective mechanisms primarily involving diminished phagocytosis and chemotaxis of polymorphonuclear leukocytes, an altered microbiological flora in the periodontal pockets, an impaired metabolism of collagen, and vascular changes. (srce.hr)
  • Eventually, in periodontal disease, the tissues supporting the tooth break down. (emedicinehealth.com)
  • These molecular and cellular processes lead to destruction of the periodontal supporting tissues. (nature.com)
  • Correlations between GCF/PISF neuropeptide levels and the clinical examination parameters were evaluated in the peri-implant/periodontal soft tissues. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • This group created by individuals with healthy periodontal tissues. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • 7 The destruction of periodontal tissues increased with age and was higher than in Indians without diabetes. (pharmacytimes.com)
  • The inflammation results in the progressive destruction of the periodontal tissues, leading to attachment loss. (vin.com)
  • Also produced are cytotoxins and bacterial endotoxins which can invade tissues on their own, and in turn cause inflammation to the gingival and periodontal tissues. (vin.com)
  • More severe forms of periodontal disease can also be treated successfully but may require more extensive treatment. (cdc.gov)
  • tooth loss is a consequence of severe periodontal disease. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Periodontal disease begins with mild gum inflammation and becomes more severe over time. (innerbody.com)
  • Over the last few years, researchers have gathered a growing but somewhat circumstantial body of evidence suggesting that people who have chronic and/or severe gum, or periodontal, disease may be at greater risk for coronary heart disease. (nih.gov)
  • This therapy is basically a single administration, but it could have potentially life-long treatment effects in patients who are at risk for severe disease activity. (news-medical.net)
  • Gingivitis and more severe periodontal diseases are recognized as distinct conditions. (lifescript.com)
  • Researchers know that gingivitis does not necessarily lead to severe disease and tooth loss. (lifescript.com)
  • According to projections, more than ten million Germans have a severe form of the disease. (innovations-report.com)
  • Overall, the prevalence of both moderate and severe periodontal disease in adults and seniors has decreased from the early 1970s. (nih.gov)
  • Surgery in which infected tissue is removed and bone is reshaped may be necessary if the disease becomes too severe. (naturalherbsguide.com)
  • These two periodontal diseases are more severe than gingivitis. (wisegeek.com)
  • General anesthesia and a cuffed endotracheal tube should be used when treating moderate or severe periodontal disease. (veterinarypracticenews.com)
  • Most dental procedures done on patients with moderate or severe disease will involve some discomfort, so providing general (and regional) anesthesia is a humane approach compared to anesthesia-free options. (veterinarypracticenews.com)
  • This right mandibular first molar tooth shows evidence of severe periodontal bone loss of the distal root and periapical lucencies of both roots due to endodontic disease. (veterinarypracticenews.com)
  • Severe disease with more than 50% loss of attachment to roots and highly visible furcations. (embracepetinsurance.com)
  • Based on findings from another study in this JOP issue, CRP levels may now be reduced by periodontal treatment such as scaling and root planing in patients with severe periodontal disease. (innovations-report.com)
  • Patients who maintain rigorous control of their diabetes are less likely to develop severe and extensive periodontal disease. (pharmacytimes.com)
  • The most severe cases of gum disease can result in tissue damage, bone loss, and even tooth loss. (waterpik.com)
  • Early treatment of gum disease may prevent more severe disease, which is harder to treat. (peacehealth.org)
  • These findings, along with prior studies and our additional preliminary data showing a high prevalence of moderate to severe periodontal disease in RA patients based on comprehensive oral examinations, strongly suggest an association between these two inflammatory diseases. (bio-medicine.org)
  • The severity of disease was divided into five groups, with group 5 having the most severe disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • We have known that people with diabetes are more susceptible to periodontal diseases and have more severe disease,' said Dr. Preston D. Miller, Jr., President of the American Academy of Periodontology. (diabetesincontrol.com)
  • If you are a smoker with diabetes, age 45 or older, you are 20 times more likely than a person without these risk factors to get severe gum disease. (diabeticgourmet.com)
  • Your risk of developing periodontal disease, a severe form of gingivitis, increases with low serum levels of vitamin C. Symptoms of periodontal disease begin with inflammation of the gum around the tooth. (livestrong.com)
  • Scientists are making progress to understand how a person's genes and environment make him or her more likely to have advanced forms of periodontal disease. (lifescript.com)
  • There are different forms of periodontal disease. (umm.edu)
  • Thus, in order to prevent or treat periodontal disease, these microorganisms must be suppressed by some means other than simple mechanical scrubbing. (google.ca)
  • To treat periodontal disease and avoid chronic disease, active infection in the mouth must be treated efficiently. (drbicuspid.com)
  • See a periodontist to treat periodontal disease. (naturalherbsguide.com)
  • But using invasive surgeries to treat periodontal disease is usually a last resort. (howstuffworks.com)
  • The primary study outcome will be progression of periodontal disease as determined by CAL. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • If you don't do something about the progression of periodontal disease, the condition will continue to get worse. (sooperarticles.com)
  • Therefore, control of supragingival plaque alone is ineffective in controlling the progression of periodontal disease. (vin.com)
  • The new NIDCR grant will fund research to determine whether elevated levels of succinate accelerate the progression of periodontal disease. (nyu.edu)
  • The results showed that, after adjusting for age, smoking, diabetes, body mass index and a number of other factors, men with periodontal disease had a 63% higher risk of developing pancreatic cancer compared to those reporting no periodontal disease. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Periodontal disease is one risk factor among other known factors that may contribute to increased risk of type II diabetes, cardiovascular disease, stroke and pregnancy complications⁶. (philips.com)
  • The inflammation and infection that is caused by periodontal disease has been linked to a number of serious pet health conditions including: heart attacks, kidney disease, liver disease, diabetes, strokes and osteoporosis. (petsbest.com)
  • It has also been associated with heart disease , stroke , and diabetes , as well as oral, esophageal, head and neck, pancreatic and lung cancers . (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • People with reduced ability to fight infection due to diseases such as diabetes or treatment for cancer are also prone. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Periodontal disease occurs more frequently in people with diabetes , osteoporosis , herpes , and diseases that weaken the immune system . (wisegeek.com)
  • Smoking, certain illnesses (such as diabetes), older age, and other factors increase the risk for periodontal disease. (umm.edu)
  • Peridontal disease and heart disease share certain common risk factors, such as smoking and diabetes. (umm.edu)
  • A good example is obese patients, who are at a higher risk of developing diabetes or heart disease: The prevention scheme would be weight loss and cholesterol-lowering drugs. (colgate.com)
  • The next risk factors are smoking, diabetes, obesity, poor oral hygiene and having had previous experience with periodontal gum disease. (colgate.com)
  • As such, periodontal disease is associated with an increased risk of systemic illnesses such as cardiovascular disease and adverse outcomes in diabetes mellitus and pregnancy. (nih.gov)
  • A survey of the epidemiological, clinical and experimental studies has shown the periodontal disease to be more frequent in the patients suffering from uncontrolled diabetes mellitus and to progress more rapidly in this group of subjects affected by the disease. (srce.hr)
  • Gum disease can sometimes be a result of diabetes or some blood disorders. (naturalherbsguide.com)
  • Diabetes worsens periodontal disease. (emedicinehealth.com)
  • Periodontal disease is the most common disease of companion animals-more common than kidney disease, diabetes and lymphoma. (veterinarypracticenews.com)
  • The team observed significant associations between all measures of obesity and periodontal disease when accounting for age, smoking, race, dental profession, physical activity, fruit and vegetable intake, and diabetes status at baseline. (scienceblog.com)
  • There are many risk factors for periodontal disease besides diabetes, but these are just exacerbated for diabetics. (defeatdiabetes.org)
  • We invite you to explore our site and arm yourself with the important knowledge and support you need to prevent diabetes, manage the disease, and better understand the connection diabetes has to the health of our planet. (defeatdiabetes.org)
  • Just like in humans, poor dental health can result in serious health issues, such as heart disease, and an increased risk of cancer, diabetes and pancreatic disease. (petage.com)
  • It is known that patients with type 2 diabetes are 3 times more likely to develop periodontal disease than those without diabetes. (pharmacytimes.com)
  • Although periodontal disease is primarily associated with dental plaque, and although there are other factors leading to it (Table 2), periodontal disease is affected by pathological events related to diabetes. (pharmacytimes.com)
  • Several studies have shown that patients with marginally or poorly controlled diabetes are at increased risk of developing periodontal disease. (pharmacytimes.com)
  • Treatment of gum disease depends on a number of factors, including the severity of the disease, the quality of your oral health care, and risk factors such as smoking , diabetes , and pregnancy . (waterpik.com)
  • Diabetes and smoking are the biggest risk factors for gum disease development, increased severity, and the speed at which it occurs. (dentistryiq.com)
  • The number one systemic condition that increases susceptibility to periodontal disease is diabetes. (dentistryiq.com)
  • E13.630 - Other specified diabetes mellitus with periodontal disease is a topic covered in the ICD-10-CM . (unboundmedicine.com)
  • ICD-10 , www.unboundmedicine.com/icd/view/ICD-10-CM/895573/all/E13_630___Other_specified_diabetes_mellitus_with_periodontal_disease. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • It is notable that treatment of periodontal disease leads to improvement of other systemic conditions including diabetes, and may even lower cardiovascular risk. (bio-medicine.org)
  • Because bone loss and fracture risk are serious concerns for people with diabetes, Xin Li, PhD, associate professor of basic science and craniofacial biology at NYU College of Dentistry, has been working to understand the underlying mechanism for periodontal bone loss in people with diabetes. (nyu.edu)
  • Using mouse models, the researchers will investigate whether succinate signaling alters the oral microbiome, study the role of succinate as an inflammatory and immune mediator, and determine whether blocking succinate signaling can thwart diabetes-related periodontal bone loss. (nyu.edu)
  • 54 Million Americans have pre-diabetes and according to a new study, periodontal disease can be a possible cause. (diabetesincontrol.com)
  • Researchers from Denmark investigated if having periodontal diseases can influence pre-diabetes and contribute to the progression of diabetes. (diabetesincontrol.com)
  • They found that having periodontal disease can cause someone to develop pre-diabetic characteristics, and probably disturb the glucose regulation of a non-diabetic who has pre-diabetic characteristics, contributing to the progression of Type 2 diabetes. (diabetesincontrol.com)
  • This study found that having periodontal diseases can alter the metabolic conditions which would probably lead to the progression to pre-diabetic characteristics and Type 2 diabetes,' said Dr. Carla Pontes Andersen, Department of Periodontology at the University of Copenhagen. (diabetesincontrol.com)
  • This breakthrough research shows having periodontal disease may aggravate pre-diabetes which is a precursor for diabetes. (diabetesincontrol.com)
  • Diabetes - Individuals with diabetes are highly susceptible to get an infection, including gum disease. (diethealthclub.com)
  • These include diabetes, respiratory disorders, and heart disease. (safariandmd.com)
  • If you have diabetes, you know the disease can harm your eyes, nerves, kidneys, heart and other important systems in the body. (diabeticgourmet.com)
  • People with diabetes have a higher than normal risk of periodontal diseases. (diabeticgourmet.com)
  • Like other complications of diabetes, gum disease is linked to diabetic control. (diabeticgourmet.com)
  • In fact, people whose diabetes is well controlled have no more periodontal disease than persons without diabetes. (diabeticgourmet.com)
  • Studies show that controlling blood sugar levels lowers the risk of some complications of diabetes, such as eye and heart disease and nerve damage. (diabeticgourmet.com)
  • Thickening of blood vessels is a complication of diabetes that may increase risk for gum disease. (diabeticgourmet.com)
  • When diabetes is poorly controlled, high glucose levels in mouth fluids may help germs grow and set the stage for gum disease. (diabeticgourmet.com)
  • There have been reports in the literature of increased risk of heart disease and stroke, diabetes, respiratory disease and even premature babies with the presence of periodontal disease (visit the American Academy of Periodontology for more information - ( www.perio.org ). (obesityaction.org)
  • Adults with excess weight or obesity have long been considered to be at high risk for many chronic inflammatory disease and conditions such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes and arthritis. (obesityaction.org)
  • In the 1950s, tooth loss was extremely common, largely because of rampant tooth decay and untreated periodontal diseases. (lifescript.com)
  • The most recent survey of the nation's oral health, released in 2005 (National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey) ( www.cdc.gov/nchc/nhanes ), showed a continued decline in periodontal disease among American adults and an associated reduction in tooth loss. (lifescript.com)
  • Periodontal disease, for example, is a major cause of tooth loss in adults. (google.ca)
  • Eventually, this progression can cause tooth loss and systemic disease. (veterinarypartner.com)
  • Without proper treatment, periodontal disease can lead to tooth loss. (umm.edu)
  • If left untreated, periodontal disease can lead to tooth loss. (umm.edu)
  • there is no definitive genetic test available, but a family history of periodontal problems and tooth loss will give some indication whether an individual may be at risk. (colgate.com)
  • Gum disease and periodontal disease affect this area and may cause bleeding and tooth loss. (colgate.com)
  • It is well known that periodontal diseases, left untreated, can ultimately lead to bone loss or tooth loss. (medindia.net)
  • Some level of periodontal disease has been found in most populations studied and is responsible for a substantial portion of the tooth loss in adulthood. (diabetesjournals.org)
  • Periodontal disease is the most common cause of tooth loss among adults. (nih.gov)
  • If not taken care of properly, this can lead to gum inflammation and infection (gingivitis), tooth loss, dental disease, and possibly further health complications. (revivalanimal.com)
  • Gum disease, also known as gingivitis, is a serious condition that will normally result in tooth loss. (sooperarticles.com)
  • Periodontal disease literally means 'disease around the tooth' and is the major cause of tooth loss. (sooperarticles.com)
  • Periodontal disease affects many Americans and is the major cause of adult tooth loss. (emedicinehealth.com)
  • Untreated periodontal disease can lead to multiple problems in the mouth including bad breath, pain and tooth loss and problems in the body such as damage to the heart, kidneys and liver as they age. (postindependent.com)
  • Periodontal diseases are among the most common infectious diseases in humans, and the primary cause of tooth loss in adults. (springer.com)
  • More than 50 % of adults in Germany develop periodontal disease in the course of their lives, mostly in old age. (innovations-report.com)
  • Studies have shown diabetics to be more than three times more likely than non-diabetics to develop periodontal disease. (defeatdiabetes.org)
  • The fact is that without tooth brushing humans, cats, and dogs all reliably develop periodontal disease eventually. (catster.com)
  • Those that live long enough do develop periodontal disease. (catster.com)
  • The role of plaque in the aetiology of the periodontal disease has been established beyond doubt. (hindawi.com)
  • Arginine, a common amino acid found naturally in foods, breaks down dental plaque, which could help millions of people avoid cavities and gum disease, researchers at the University of Michigan and Newcastle University have discovered. (news-medical.net)
  • Plaque and tartar build-up constitute the primary cause of periodontal disease. (innerbody.com)
  • Several recent studies have suggested an association between dental plaque, poor oral health and lung diseases. (dailystrength.org)
  • The dental plaque, a complex biofilm, can serve as a reservoir of infection, contributing to infections of the respiratory tract like nosocomial pneumonia (hospital-acquired) mainly in the hospitalised or institutionalised elderly and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients. (dailystrength.org)
  • Hormone changes from puberty and pregnancy in the presence of bacterial plaque, for instance, will intensify the disease. (colgate.com)
  • If the disease is in an early stage, treatment is focused on controlling plaque buildup. (revivalanimal.com)
  • Periodontal disease develops from unhealthy dental plaque. (drbicuspid.com)
  • Unhealthy changes in dental plaque and unhealthy food choices will initiate periodontal disease. (drbicuspid.com)
  • In fact, bacterial plaque buildup is the leading cause of gum disease. (chop.edu)
  • Response of the body toward the bacterial challenge of dental plaque can lead to bone loss and the migration of the junctional epithelium, resulting in periodontal pocketing and periodontal disease. (intechopen.com)
  • If you allow the plaque to build up, gum disease will normally be the result. (sooperarticles.com)
  • Keep in mind that plaque doesn't need to be visible or detected in order for periodontal disease to be diagnosed. (sooperarticles.com)
  • Clinical periodontal examinations included the Silness-Löe plaque index, Löe-Silness gingival index, bleeding on probing, probing pocket depth and clinical attachment level parameters were determined. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Because the primary cause of gum disease is plaque, any type of gum disease treatment requires good daily care at home. (waterpik.com)
  • Waterpik ® oral health care products are clinically proven to reduce gingivitis, remove plaque, and improve gum health to help prevent and treat gum disease. (waterpik.com)
  • Periodontal disease is the dependable consequence of plaque accumulation and mineralisation. (rawmeatybones.com)
  • Distinct processes were identified in the community assembly of microbiota of healthy and diseased saliva, as well as of plaque, and were affected by periodontal therapy. (nature.com)
  • Mild to moderate periodontal pockets may be reduced or eliminated by proper plaque and calculus removal. (vin.com)
  • Once the periodontal pocket forms, the effect of the supragingival plaque and calculus is minimal. (vin.com)
  • The specific plaque hypothesis is based on the fact that these few species are seen in virtually all cases of chronic periodontal disease. (vin.com)
  • Here, by applying a comparative metagenomics read-classification approach, including 272 metagenomes from various human body sites, and our previously assembled draft genome of the uncultivated Candidatus Bacteroides periocalifornicus (CBP) bacterium, we show CBP's ubiquitous distribution in dental plaque, as well as its strong association with the well-known pathogenic "red complex" that resides in deep periodontal pockets. (jcvi.org)
  • Any food product that contributes to the growth of dental plaque has the potential to cause inflammation associated with periodontal disease that results from bacterial buildup in tooth biofilm (plaque). (medscape.com)
  • The CDC is currently working with key partner organizations such as the American Academy of Periodontology and the American Dental Association to improve and sustain surveillance of periodontal disease in the adult U.S. population. (cdc.gov)
  • CHICAGO-April 18, 2012-The American Academy of Periodontology (AAP) supports the American Heart Association's (AHA) scientific statement "Periodontal Disease and Atherosclerotic Vascular Disease: Does the Evidence Support an Independent Association? (perio.org)
  • According to Pamela McClain, DDS , president of the American Academy of Periodontology and a practicing periodontist in Aurora, Colorado, "Periodontal disease and cardiovascular disease are both complex, multi-factorial diseases that develop over time. (perio.org)
  • According to the American Academy of Periodontology , the risk factors of periodontal disease are numerous. (colgate.com)
  • The American Academy of Periodontology has more about periodontal disease and overall health . (bio-medicine.org)
  • For more information on periodontal disease and pregnancy, visit the American Academy of Periodontology website at www.perio.org . (everydayfamily.com)
  • Postmenopausal women with periodontal disease were more likely to develop breast cancer than women who did not have the chronic inflammatory disease. (news-medical.net)
  • In periodontal disease, host recognition of bacterial constituents, including lipopolysaccharide (LPS), induces p38 MAPK activation and subsequent inflammatory cytokine expression, favoring osteoclastogenesis and increased net bone resorption in the local periodontal environment. (hindawi.com)
  • Finally, overexpression of the p38/MK2 target RNA-binding tristetraprolin (TTP) decreased mRNA stability of key inflammatory cytokines at the posttranscriptional level, thereby protecting against periodontal inflammation. (hindawi.com)
  • We hypothesize that this association may be due to an underlying inflammatory response trait, which places an individual at high risk for developing both periodontal disease and atherosclerosis. (nih.gov)
  • We further suggest that periodontal disease, once established, provides a biological burden of endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide) and inflammatory cytokines (especially TxA2, IL-1 beta, PGE2, and TNF-alpha) which serve to initiate and exacerbate atherogenesis and thromboembolic events. (nih.gov)
  • Recent advancement in the field of oxidation research revealed that oxidative stress-induced post-translational modification (OPTM) is involved in the pathogenesis of many chronic inflammatory diseases. (springer.com)
  • Canakci CF, Cicek Y, Canakci V (2005) Reactive oxygen species and human inflammatory periodontal diseases. (springer.com)
  • Neurogenic Inflammatory Response in Peri-implant and Periodontal Diseases Assessed by Biochemical Analysis of the Neuropeptides in Gingival Crevicular Fluid. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Peridontal disease is a very prevalent disorder, and in the absence of proper oral hygiene and dental care, it can progress to a painful inflammatory condition. (dtic.mil)
  • In this paper, we discuss evidence that the p38/MAPK-activated protein kinase-2 (MK2) signaling axis is needed for periodontal disease progression: an orally administered p38 α inhibitor reduced the progression of experimental periodontal bone loss by reducing inflammation and cytokine expression. (hindawi.com)
  • Levels of bone loss and cumulative incidence of total CHD and fatal CHD indicated a biologic gradient between severity of exposure and occurrence of disease. (nih.gov)
  • Any clinical signs of aggressive periodontal disease like attachment loss, pockets, and bone loss when found should be consulted with a periodontist for appropriate care. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) may actually be beneficial for those with periodontal disease as it can help prevent bone loss in the jaw. (naturalherbsguide.com)
  • Hormonal fluctuations, advancement of gum disease, and bone loss are reason to increase cleanings to every 3-4 months. (empowher.com)
  • However, periodontal bone loss is irreversible (without regenerative surgery). (vin.com)
  • In a study in mice, periodontal bone loss was greater in normal mice with more succinate and mitigated in mice deficient in the gene for succinate receptors. (nyu.edu)
  • The results of this innovative treatment include a reduction to many gum infections and the reduction of many periodontal pockets. (selfgrowth.com)
  • If deep periodontal pockets and infection remain, periodontal surgery may be recommended. (umm.edu)
  • If you have periodontal disease, these pockets will measure more than 3 mm (millimeters) in depth. (epnet.com)
  • Antibacterial medications may be placed topically in the periodontal pockets or taken orally. (chop.edu)
  • As the disease progresses, the pockets deepen, destroying more tissue and bone in the process. (pharmacytimes.com)
  • As the disease progresses, the pockets deepen and more gum tissue and bone are destroyed. (obesityaction.org)
  • There is no specific cure for periodontal disease, so the goal of treatment is to control the infection and stop the progression of the disease. (revivalanimal.com)
  • Yes, in that once periodontal disease is established in the mouth, its pathological byproducts can seep into the bloodstream, lymph fluid, and bone structures to cause the spread of infection and inflammation to all areas of the body. (drbicuspid.com)
  • Then, periodontal disease, as a unique site of infection in the mouth, will begin to spread, causing additional systemic chronic inflammation and chronic diseases. (drbicuspid.com)
  • Sepsis, an infection of the blood, is a possible outcome of advanced periodontal disease and can lead to kidney, liver, and heart valve infections. (embracepetinsurance.com)
  • Periodontal disease, more commonly known as gum disease, is an infection. (howstuffworks.com)
  • Cancrum oris (also termed noma) is a necrotizing and destructive infection of the mouth and face, and therefore not strictly speaking a periodontal disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • The findings, which are published in PLOS ONE, suggest that periodontal disease, a common but preventable gum infection, may be an initiator of Alzheimer's, which currently has no treatment or cure. (healthcanal.com)
  • Gingivitis is not a serious form of the disease and the infection can be reversed by brushing and flossing. (diethealthclub.com)
  • Like any infection, gum disease can make it hard to keep your blood sugar under control. (diabeticgourmet.com)
  • What is the Difference Between Gingivitis and Periodontal Disease? (wisegeek.com)
  • The best solution for gingivitis and periodontal disease is prevention. (wisegeek.com)
  • Annual or semi-annual professional dental cleanings are also a good way to prevent gingivitis and periodontal disease. (wisegeek.com)
  • Symptoms of trench mouth are similar to those for gingivitis and periodontal disease. (wisegeek.com)
  • With adults, gingivitis and periodontal disease are the most common forms of gum disease. (sooperarticles.com)
  • Obesity and periodontal disease often appear to be tethered to one another. (sooperarticles.com)
  • Is there a prospective association between obesity and periodontal disease? (scienceblog.com)
  • Given the high prevalence of obesity and periodontal disease, this association may be of substantial public health importance. (scienceblog.com)
  • In recent years, there has been research supporting a link between obesity and periodontal disease. (obesityaction.org)
  • It is thought that this association, in part, could also be due to lifestyle characteristics that make individuals more prone to both obesity and periodontal disease. (obesityaction.org)
  • What are the signs and symptoms of periodontal disease? (chop.edu)
  • In one study, researchers discovered that aloe vera gel can be used to alleviate the symptoms of periodontal disease. (greenmedinfo.com)
  • The AAP believes additional long-term interventional studies are needed to better understand the specific nature of the relationship between periodontal disease and cardiovascular disease. (perio.org)
  • Researchers from Boston University investigated the relationship between periodontal disease and history of stroke in patients 60 years of age and older by examining the data of the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III). (innovations-report.com)
  • In a new study, researchers at the Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute found that periodontal disease was associated with an increased risk of cancer of the pancreas. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • After further analysis, the researchers found that periodontal disease was significantly associated with a patient's RA disease activity score and with rheumatoid nodules, leading to the conclusion that periodontal disease is independently associated with RA disease activity. (bio-medicine.org)
  • Periodontal diseases were thought to begin when chalky white deposits called calculus accumulated near the gingiva, along the base of the tooth. (lifescript.com)
  • This device is tied around a tooth and gently pressed below the margin of the gingiva so that it resides in the periodontal pocket, and is capable of delivering an effective dose of 2.5 micrograms of tetracycline per day per periodontal pocket for a prolonged period of a week or more. (google.ca)
  • An ideal method allows exposure of the root surface, preserves the attached gingiva, and allows the gingiva to be resutured in a fashion to eliminate the periodontal pocket promoting reattachment to the root surface. (veterinarypartner.com)
  • Periodontal Diseasehttp://www.periodonticsdentalimplants.com/January 2, 2012 Dr. Hanookai provides Dental Implants, Treatment of Periodontal Disease, Gum Grafts, Gum Whitening, Bone Augmentations, Crown Lengthening and Cosmetic Dentistry.Our first priority has always been patient safety and comfort. (slideshare.net)
  • Before the invention of the microscope, little was known about the etiology of the disease as a result of which the treatment approach as well as options were limited. (hindawi.com)
  • Therefore, understanding the mechanical and chemical interaction between the microorganisms becomes indispensable to formulate a successful treatment regime for the periodontal disease. (hindawi.com)
  • University of Louisville researchers recently received a patent on a synthetic biochemical compound and its variants, moving science closer to a treatment for gum disease. (news-medical.net)
  • This disease is extremely painful to dogs and the treatment process is even more painful. (vetinfo.com)
  • All treatment options for this disease are considered invasive, which is why prevention is crucially important. (vetinfo.com)
  • However, all of the treatment options for periodontal disease are quite painful and it can be fairly stated that the best plan of treatment is prevention. (vetinfo.com)
  • Earlier this year, Medical News Today reported that blueberry extract could be used as a treatment for periodontal disease . (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Periodontal disease is a progressive disease that will advance without proper treatment. (selfgrowth.com)
  • Without research on the causes and treatment of periodontal disease, that number would be much lower. (lifescript.com)
  • A second objective of this study will be to look at the effects of periodontal treatment on the levels of the biomarkers that are identified. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • The information about periodontal disease is news and, while it needs confirmation, suggests yet one more reason to tread lightly with hormone treatment of prostate cancer. (medindia.net)
  • Formerly gingevectomy was the preferred treatment in periodontal surgery. (vetinfo.com)
  • An in-depth report on the causes, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of periodontal disease. (umm.edu)
  • New biodegradable rods promise to provide better treatment for periodontal disease. (innovations-report.com)
  • The information should not be used for either diagnosis or treatment or both for any health related problem or disease. (medindia.net)
  • Advancing our understanding of how treatment for gum disease can affect overall health may help lead to the creation of evidence-based treatment standards that could benefit millions of people and simultaneously help reduce medical costs,' said Dr. Robert Genco, a member of Cigna's Dental Clinical Advisory Panel. (aol.com)
  • On average, patients who received gum disease treatment had better outcomes than patients without treatment. (aol.com)
  • The treatment and management of periodontal disease includes regular dental care, lifestyle changes, medications, and deep cleaning. (epnet.com)
  • Your dentist may need to refer you to a specialist in the treatment of gum disease, called a periodontist. (epnet.com)
  • Treatment for other types of periodontal disease may be a bit more involved, especially if the disease has progressed. (wisegeek.com)
  • Many practices are realizing there's more to the treatment of periodontal disease than just cleaning and polishing. (veterinarypracticenews.com)
  • Advancing your knowledge of perio-dontal disease treatment is good for the patient and good for your practice. (veterinarypracticenews.com)
  • The following information outlines the causes, signs, treatment and prevention of periodontal disease. (padental.org)
  • Treatment depends on the progression of the disease. (padental.org)
  • Further investigation is needed to support periodontal treatment intervention as a means of controlling systemic inflammation. (innovations-report.com)
  • Studies evaluating additional treatment methods such as repeated scaling and root planing or surgical treatment are needed to conclusively demonstrate that CRP can be improved by periodontal treatment," said Preston D. Miller, DDS and AAP president. (innovations-report.com)
  • Treatment of the acute disease is by debridement and antibiotics, usually metronidazole. (wikipedia.org)
  • More than 85% of dogs and cats over the age of three years are suffering from periodontal disease to a degree that would benefit from treatment. (rawmeatybones.com)
  • and a video demonstration of laser surgery for the treatment of periodontal disease. (agd.org)
  • Dr. Walter Wood is a Jacksonville periodontist who provides advanced periodontal disease treatment to patients with the new FDA cleared Laser Assisted New Attachment Procedure. (prweb.com)
  • Dr. Walter L Wood of First Coast Periodontics, P.A., utilizes the Laser Assisted New Attachment Procedure periodontal disease treatment method for patients with gum disease. (prweb.com)
  • As a periodontist who works to eradicate the disease, Dr. Wood has become certified on the new LANAP procedure and now offers it to patients as an alternative to traditional periodontal disease treatment methods. (prweb.com)
  • Dr. Wood knows the majority of people with gum disease are not receiving treatment, possibly out of fear of pain associated with traditional methods of treatment or out of limited time off of work. (prweb.com)
  • Dr. Wood is part of one percent of dental professionals providing the most recent FDA cleared laser procedure for gum disease and periodontal treatment. (prweb.com)
  • This study examined the microbial diversity and community assembly of oral microbiota in periodontal health and disease and after nonsurgical periodontal treatment. (nature.com)
  • There was a trend for disease-associated taxa to decrease and health-associated taxa to increase after treatment with notable variations among individual sites. (nature.com)
  • The results of this study provide a foundation for hypothesis testing and future studies of microbiome-based periodontal diagnosis, risk assessment, and treatment strategies. (nature.com)
  • When we provide periodontal treatment and behavior modification, we reduce the risks for gum disease exponentially. (dentistryiq.com)
  • When we provide periodontal treatment and behavior modification, however, we reduce the risks for gum disease in an exponential manner as well. (dentistryiq.com)
  • Eliminating or reducing as many risks as possible will improve disease prevention and treatment outcomes. (dentistryiq.com)
  • Identifying and modifying risk factors prior to and during perio therapy is critical to successful treatment outcomes, long-term periodontal health and enhanced patient care, and that's what it is all about - the care we provide for all patients, every time they give us the privilege of providing care for them. (dentistryiq.com)
  • Thus it is possible that increased attention to oral health and treatment of periodontal disease may improve outcomes for patients with RA," Bingham said. (bio-medicine.org)
  • There are a number of methodological concerns with prevalence studies, particularly 1) the ability of partial recording to reflect full-mouth conditions and 2) the use of the Community periodontal index of treatment needs (CPITN) recording system. (wikipedia.org)
  • This index was also designed to screen large populations to determine treatment needs and formulate preventive strategies, not to describe the prevalence and severity of periodontal diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • Most doctors encourage pregnant women with gum disease to seek treatment right away. (everydayfamily.com)
  • In this article, we will discuss some forms of Periodontal Gum Disease , along with the recommended treatment for each. (safariandmd.com)
  • Treatment for periodontal gum disease involves scaling and root planing along with a prescription of antibiotics and medicated mouth rinse. (safariandmd.com)
  • The functional and esthetic problems associated with these diseases compromise quality of life, and their treatment imposes large financial burdens on national health systems and private patients. (springer.com)
  • What causes periodontal disease? (chop.edu)
  • Periodontal disease is mostly seen in adults. (cdc.gov)
  • Periodontal Disease increases with age, 70.1% of adults 65 years and older have periodontal disease. (cdc.gov)
  • According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) , periodontal disease and tooth decay are the two biggest threats to dental health and are mostly seen in adults. (aol.com)
  • Poor diet causes low stomach in aging adults and sets the groundwork for Gastroesophageal reflux disease, or GERD. (emaxhealth.com)
  • Approximately 47% of U.S. adults suffer from periodontal disease . (greenmedinfo.com)
  • Because adults in America with gum disease number in the millions, the disease is reaching epidemic proportions. (prweb.com)
  • According to the Center for Disease Control (CDC), 67 percent of U.S. adults have excess weight or obesity. (obesityaction.org)
  • Chapple IL, Matthews JB (2007) The role of reactive oxygen and antioxidant species in periodontal tissue destruction. (springer.com)
  • Periodontal disease and tooth decay are the two biggest threats to dental health. (cdc.gov)
  • Then, only a dental health professional can remove the tartar and stop the periodontal disease process. (cdc.gov)
  • Treating gum disease reduced symptoms of prostate inflammation, called prostatitis, report researchers from Case Western Reserve University School of Dental Medicine and the Departments of Urology and Pathology at University Hospitals Case Medical Center. (news-medical.net)
  • Oral biologist Daniel H. Fine and his team at Rutgers School of Dental Medicine have tracked more than 2,500 Newark children since 2007 to chart the progression of a rare form of gum disease that afflicts African-American adolescents. (news-medical.net)
  • Although good dental health can lower the risk of periodontal disease to your dog, there are some risk factors that are unavoidable and which can make your dog more likely to develop it. (vetinfo.com)
  • But unlike most diseases, periodontal disease can be prevented with proper pet dental care. (petsbest.com)
  • It is important that your pet receives proper dental care to keep periodontal disease at bay. (petsbest.com)
  • Cases will be used to highlight the most common periodontal and peri-implant diagnoses that will be encountered in general dental practice. (agd.org)
  • To review examples of periodontal and peri-implant diagnoses most commonly seen in general dental practice. (agd.org)
  • Patients should expect to receive a comprehensive periodontal evaluation from their dental professional at least once a year, adds Dr. McClain. (perio.org)
  • Scientists at the University of Pittsburgh School of Dental Medicine have found that men receiving hormone treatments for prostate cancer are much more likely to show gum disease than men who do not receive hormone treatments for prostate cancer. (medindia.net)
  • In this month's issue of the Journal of Urology, researchers from the University of Pittsburgh School of Dental Medicine report that prostate cancer patients receiving ADT are three times as likely to show signs of periodontal, or gum disease, as patients who do not receive the therapy. (medindia.net)
  • Dental care every six months is very effective in controlling chronic inflammation from periodontal diseases. (colgate.com)
  • Risk assessment for periodontal and other diseases should be part of every dental examination. (colgate.com)
  • These are the conclusions from a three-year Cigna dental study that looked at the potential benefits of treated periodontal (gum) disease. (aol.com)
  • These results suggest that treating gum disease has benefits beyond better oral health and may also help to control medical costs for some patients,' said Clay Hedlund D.D.S., Cigna's dental director. (aol.com)
  • Screening for periodontal disease should be part of every regular dental examination. (epnet.com)
  • Ahn added that the study confirms that good oral health, including regular tooth brushing and dental visits, is an important way to guard against periodontal disease and the growing list of health conditions associated with it. (eurekalert.org)
  • Dental implants are a good alternative to dentures, but they can result in periodontal disease if not put in correctly. (naturalherbsguide.com)
  • The disease has become rare in developed countries, due to advances in dental care. (wisegeek.com)
  • This data highlights the importance of routine periodontal examinations and at-home dental care. (emaxhealth.com)
  • To provide a narrative review of the role of macro- and micronutrients in relation to dental caries, gingival bleeding and destructive periodontal disease. (nih.gov)
  • Dental caries and periodontal diseases are a sensitive alarm bell for an unhealthy diet, which predicts the future onset of the diseases of civilizations. (nih.gov)
  • This handbook has been designed for practicing dental clinicians and students, which includes dental hygienists, general dentists, periodontists, and students of dental hygiene and dentistry who are responsible for treating patients with a broad spectrum of periodontal diseases. (springer.com)
  • What follows is a list of dental pearls highlighting today's approach to periodontal therapy. (veterinarypracticenews.com)
  • In our practice, we often refer to various aspects of the procedure to ensure that clients comprehend the steps that may be involved: anesthetized oral exam, dental X-rays, scaling, polishing, periodontal surgery, extractions. (veterinarypracticenews.com)
  • Terrible breath is the most common sign of disease noticed by pet owners, followed closely by dental discoloration caused by obvious tartar buildup. (embracepetinsurance.com)
  • Pick recommends a four-pronged approach to fighting periodontal disease, including using a toothbrush, dental floss and electronic toothbrush and getting professional cleanings every three months from a dentist or periodontist. (howstuffworks.com)
  • So why is dental disease an epidemic? (petage.com)
  • Many of Dr. Birken's pet parents do not realize their pets have dental disease. (petage.com)
  • If a pet no longer allows people to rub their chin or mouth area, this may be a sign of discomfort due to dental disease. (petage.com)
  • So now that we recognized our pets have periodontal disease, what can we do to help improve their dental health? (petage.com)
  • First Coast Periodontics, P.A. is a periodontal practice offering patients personalized dental care for Jacksonville, Florida for over 22 years. (prweb.com)
  • As dental professionals, we are identifying and modifying risk factors for periodontal disease even if we don't recognize it as such. (dentistryiq.com)
  • Tooth brushing some times stops the progress of mild existing dental disease (dental disease is relentlessly progressive), but generally cannot reverse gum inflammation. (catster.com)
  • They may not be able to perform dental work, but they should be offer suggestions to help control the progress of the disease until you can afford an anesthetic procedure. (catster.com)
  • It is the only reliable way to slow or prevent dental disease. (catster.com)
  • And why, you may ask, don't wild dogs and cats develop dental disease? (catster.com)
  • But for treating and for inhibiting aggravation of any dental or periodontal problem you need to maintain good oral hygiene. (ayurvediccure.com)
  • Periodontal disease is often precipitated by dental plaques. (ayurvediccure.com)
  • If dental plaques are allowed to stay for long it may give rise to periodontal diseases. (ayurvediccure.com)
  • In a study published in 2005 in the "British Dental Journal," researchers found that smokers had an increased risk of developing periodontal disease related to low levels of serum vitamin C compared to subjects who had normal levels of serum vitamin C. When subjects were given two grapefruits per day for two weeks, equivalent to approximately 180 mg of vitamin C, it decreased the amount of gum bleeding the subjects experienced. (livestrong.com)
  • What are the different types of periodontal disease? (chop.edu)
  • What are types of periodontal diseases? (padental.org)
  • These findings may have significant implications for the pathogenesis of periodontal disease and biomechanical properties of the periodontium. (nature.com)
  • Factors known to govern the pathogenesis of periodontal disease of carnivores are reinterpreted from an ecological perspective. (rawmeatybones.com)
  • Following his periodontal residency at the University of Toronto, he was posted to Canadian Forces Base Edmonton, where he continue to serve as the Western Regional Periodontist. (agd.org)
  • If you have periodontal disease, your dentist may refer you to a periodontist, a dentist who specializes in treating this condition. (umm.edu)
  • A dentist specializing in periodontal disease is called a periodontist. (chop.edu)
  • If you need help and information about Periodontist Fairfield CT and Gum Disease Fairfield CT , visit the website Periodontistfairfield.com to learn more solutions on how to avoid Periodontal Disease. (sooperarticles.com)
  • Once the clinician is convinced that he is working on the right patient and tooth, the appropriate type of periodontal surgery is chosen. (veterinarypartner.com)
  • To treat this type of periodontal disease, the medical condition must be addressed first. (safariandmd.com)
  • Although deep sequencing technologies, such as whole community shotgun sequencing have the potential to capture a detailed picture of highly complex bacterial communities in any given environment, we still lack major reference genomes for the oral microbiome associated with PD and other diseases. (jcvi.org)
  • We also characterized the bacterial communities in each subject at each biogeographic site by using the V3 hypervariable segment of the 16S rRNA and did not identify distinctions between oral health and disease similar to those found in viral communities. (asm.org)
  • All significant aspects of periodontal pathogenesis are covered, including the roles played by the oral microbiome and biofilms, bacterial virulence factors, cells of the immune system, matrix metalloproteinases, proinflammatory and osteolytic cytokines, genetic factors, and antimicrobial peptides. (springer.com)
  • ICD-9 code 523.9 for Unspecified gingival and periodontal disease is a medical classification as listed by WHO under the range -DISEASES OF ORAL CAVITY, SALIVARY GLANDS, AND JAWS (520-529). (aapc.com)
  • Dr. McClain encourages physicians and dentists to communicate the association between cardiovascular disease and periodontal disease to patients. (perio.org)
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (cdc.gov)
  • Postmenopausal women with periodontal disease are more likely to develop breast cancer, according to research published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention . (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Because periodontal disease is irreversible, prevention is key to protecting your pet's oral and overall health. (revivalanimal.com)
  • PDA member, Dr. Daniel Fishel, discusses prevention and symptoms of gum disease. (padental.org)
  • Even if we cannot remove or reduce all risk factors, periodontal disease prevention or control is enhanced if we can remove or reduce some of a patient's risk factors. (dentistryiq.com)
  • This book aims to provide clinicians with a refined understanding of the biology that underlies periodontal diseases, thereby offering a sound basis for improved clinical decision making with regard to prevention strategies, diagnosis, and therapy. (springer.com)
  • With these concerns in mind, a team of NIDCR grantees and colleagues recently looked again at the possible periodontal-cardiovascular disease link in almost 7,000 adult participants of the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study. (nih.gov)
  • Periodontal disease and cardiovascular disease. (nih.gov)
  • The statement concludes that observational studies to date support an association between periodontal disease and cardiovascular disease, independent of shared risk factors. (perio.org)
  • While current research does not yet provide evidence of a causal relationship between the two diseases, scientists have identified biologic factors, such as chronic inflammation, that independently link periodontal disease to the development or progression of cardiovascular disease in some patients. (perio.org)
  • Patients' periodontal status should also be added to future longitudinal studies of cardiovascular disease. (perio.org)
  • Patients should be aware that by maintaining periodontal health, they are helping to reduce harmful inflammation in the body, which has been shown to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. (perio.org)
  • There is no compelling evidence to support that treating periodontal disease will reduce cardiovascular disease at this time," says Dr. McClain, "but we do know that periodontal care will improve your oral health status, reduce systemic inflammation, and might be good for your heart as well. (perio.org)
  • [ii] Left untreated, periodontal disease has been associated with systemic diseases such as cardiovascular disease and lung cancer. (greenmedinfo.com)
  • Women are presented with different challenges in life that can at different periods increase the risk for periodontal disease and progression. (empowher.com)
  • C-reactive protein has been reported to be elevated in people with periodontal disease, and recent studies found that testing for this protein may be predictive of developing heart disease. (eurekalert.org)
  • For example, stress and smoking are risk factors for developing periodontal disease, but for diabetics who are stressed and/or smoke, the risk is far greater. (defeatdiabetes.org)
  • At this point, a dentist would use a periodontal probe to measure the depth of each periodontal pocket. (innerbody.com)
  • Limitations include the fact that women self-reported their periodontal disease status, after being asked whether a dentist had ever told them they had it. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • If a person has a high risk for gum disease , he may need to see his dentist more often. (wisegeek.com)
  • To determine if you have periodontal disease, you'll need to have your dentist examine you on a regular basis. (sooperarticles.com)
  • If you do have periodontal disease, your dentist can tell you how to stop the progression and prevent things from getting any worse than they already are. (sooperarticles.com)
  • If you catch it in time, your dentist will be able to help you treat the earlier stages of gum disease. (sooperarticles.com)
  • Short of poor oral hygiene , smoking is the leading preventable cause of gum disease. (wisegeek.com)
  • Those who don't treat gingivitis or those who keep poor oral hygiene habits, will normally end up with periodontal disease. (sooperarticles.com)
  • Veterinarians have held that periodontal disease is the consequence of poor oral hygiene. (embracepetinsurance.com)
  • For example, home-care instructions are an attempt to modify the contribution of poor oral hygiene to the development of perio disease. (dentistryiq.com)
  • Oral hygiene is an important predictor of disease, including diseases that happen outside the mouth," she said. (healthcanal.com)
  • Maintaining an oral hygiene is very important to avoid any form of gum disease. (diethealthclub.com)
  • Certain potential biological mechanisms have been proposed for the associations between periodontal disease and systemic diseases. (philips.com)
  • Certain infections and systemic diseases. (selfgrowth.com)
  • 61],[62],[63] MMP-8 has been identified as a major tissue destructive enzyme in periodontal disease. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • It is our central hypothesis that periodontal diseases, which are chronic Gram-negative infections, represent a previously unrecognized risk factor for atherosclerosis and thromboembolic events. (nih.gov)
  • Nearly 10 - 15% of all hospital-acquired infections are nosocomial pneumonia and 20 - 50% of the patients may die of this disease. (dailystrength.org)
  • 8 Because periodontal diseases are infections, they also may impair glycemic control. (pharmacytimes.com)
  • Stress - Excess stress can increase the risk of developing some infections, including gum diseases. (diethealthclub.com)
  • According to past JOP studies, this relationship could be due to elevated CRP levels in patients with chronic periodontal disease. (innovations-report.com)
  • These are the most common signs of periodontal disease. (petage.com)
  • Interestingly, the group found that clinical signs of periodontal disease were not associated with coronary heart disease. (nih.gov)
  • In fact, a majority of pets age three display clinical signs of periodontal disease. (embracepetinsurance.com)
  • Previous research has shown that periodontal disease caused by certain oral microbiota has been associated with several types of cancer, including oral and head and neck cancers. (eurekalert.org)
  • Previous research has shown that periodontal and heart disease are linked. (emaxhealth.com)
  • Unless there is strong owner commitment and patient compliance, it is much wiser to extract a tooth affected by moderate periodontal disease rather than letting the pet suffer. (veterinarypartner.com)
  • Moderate disease with some exposure of tooth roots and 25%-50% of attachment loss. (embracepetinsurance.com)