Hospital Administrators: Managerial personnel responsible for implementing policy and directing the activities of hospitals.Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.Quality Indicators, Health Care: Norms, criteria, standards, and other direct qualitative and quantitative measures used in determining the quality of health care.Benchmarking: Method of measuring performance against established standards of best practice.Quality Assurance, Health Care: Activities and programs intended to assure or improve the quality of care in either a defined medical setting or a program. The concept includes the assessment or evaluation of the quality of care; identification of problems or shortcomings in the delivery of care; designing activities to overcome these deficiencies; and follow-up monitoring to ensure effectiveness of corrective steps.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Educational Measurement: The assessing of academic or educational achievement. It includes all aspects of testing and test construction.Breeding: The production of offspring by selective mating or HYBRIDIZATION, GENETIC in animals or plants.Clinical Competence: The capability to perform acceptably those duties directly related to patient care.Weight Gain: Increase in BODY WEIGHT over existing weight.Quality of Health Care: The levels of excellence which characterize the health service or health care provided based on accepted standards of quality.Animal Feed: Foodstuff used especially for domestic and laboratory animals, or livestock.United StatesHealth Manpower: The availability of HEALTH PERSONNEL. It includes the demand and recruitment of both professional and allied health personnel, their present and future supply and distribution, and their assignment and utilization.Cattle: Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.Psychomotor Performance: The coordination of a sensory or ideational (cognitive) process and a motor activity.Personnel Selection: The process of choosing employees for specific types of employment. The concept includes recruitment.Task Performance and Analysis: The detailed examination of observable activity or behavior associated with the execution or completion of a required function or unit of work.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.ROC Curve: A graphic means for assessing the ability of a screening test to discriminate between healthy and diseased persons; may also be used in other studies, e.g., distinguishing stimuli responses as to a faint stimuli or nonstimuli.Rural Health Services: Health services, public or private, in rural areas. The services include the promotion of health and the delivery of health care.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Professional Practice Location: Geographic area in which a professional person practices; includes primarily physicians and dentists.Personnel Turnover: A change or shift in personnel due to reorganization, resignation, or discharge.Foreign Medical Graduates: Physicians who hold degrees from medical schools in countries other than the ones in which they practice.Medically Underserved Area: A geographic location which has insufficient health resources (manpower and/or facilities) to meet the medical needs of the resident population.Career Choice: Selection of a type of occupation or profession.Athletic Performance: Carrying out of specific physical routines or procedures by one who is trained or skilled in physical activity. Performance is influenced by a combination of physiological, psychological, and socio-cultural factors.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.False Positive Reactions: Positive test results in subjects who do not possess the attribute for which the test is conducted. The labeling of healthy persons as diseased when screening in the detection of disease. (Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Foreign Professional Personnel: Persons who have acquired academic or specialized training in countries other than that in which they are working. The concept excludes physicians for which FOREIGN MEDICAL GRADUATES is the likely heading.Salaries and Fringe Benefits: The remuneration paid or benefits granted to an employee.Algorithms: A procedure consisting of a sequence of algebraic formulas and/or logical steps to calculate or determine a given task.Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Dental Auxiliaries: Personnel whose work is prescribed and supervised by the dentist.Education, Public Health Professional: Education and training in PUBLIC HEALTH for the practice of the profession.Allied Health Personnel: Health care workers specially trained and licensed to assist and support the work of health professionals. Often used synonymously with paramedical personnel, the term generally refers to all health care workers who perform tasks which must otherwise be performed by a physician or other health professional.Forecasting: The prediction or projection of the nature of future problems or existing conditions based upon the extrapolation or interpretation of existing scientific data or by the application of scientific methodology.Professional Competence: The capability to perform the duties of one's profession generally, or to perform a particular professional task, with skill of an acceptable quality.Physicians: Individuals licensed to practice medicine.False Negative Reactions: Negative test results in subjects who possess the attribute for which the test is conducted. The labeling of diseased persons as healthy when screening in the detection of disease. (Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Reagent Kits, Diagnostic: Commercially prepared reagent sets, with accessory devices, containing all of the major components and literature necessary to perform one or more designated diagnostic tests or procedures. They may be for laboratory or personal use.Employee Performance Appraisal: The assessment of the functioning of an employee in relation to work.Personnel Loyalty: Dedication or commitment shown by employees to organizations or institutions where they work.Career Mobility: The upward or downward mobility in an occupation or the change from one occupation to another.Neuropsychological Tests: Tests designed to assess neurological function associated with certain behaviors. They are used in diagnosing brain dysfunction or damage and central nervous system disorders or injury.Evaluation Studies as Topic: Studies determining the effectiveness or value of processes, personnel, and equipment, or the material on conducting such studies. For drugs and devices, CLINICAL TRIALS AS TOPIC; DRUG EVALUATION; and DRUG EVALUATION, PRECLINICAL are available.Australia: The smallest continent and an independent country, comprising six states and two territories. Its capital is Canberra.Health Services Needs and Demand: Health services required by a population or community as well as the health services that the population or community is able and willing to pay for.Employment: The state of being engaged in an activity or service for wages or salary.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Biological Markers: Measurable and quantifiable biological parameters (e.g., specific enzyme concentration, specific hormone concentration, specific gene phenotype distribution in a population, presence of biological substances) which serve as indices for health- and physiology-related assessments, such as disease risk, psychiatric disorders, environmental exposure and its effects, disease diagnosis, metabolic processes, substance abuse, pregnancy, cell line development, epidemiologic studies, etc.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Cultural Diversity: Coexistence of numerous distinct ethnic, racial, religious, or cultural groups within one social unit, organization, or population. (From American Heritage Dictionary, 2d college ed., 1982, p955)Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Personnel Management: Planning, organizing, and administering all activities related to personnel.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Retirement: The state of being retired from one's position or occupation.Cognition: Intellectual or mental process whereby an organism obtains knowledge.Job Satisfaction: Personal satisfaction relative to the work situation.Dentists: Individuals licensed to practice DENTISTRY.Staff Development: The process by which the employer promotes staff performance and efficiency consistent with management goals and objectives.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Personnel Staffing and Scheduling: The selection, appointing, and scheduling of personnel.Specialization: An occupation limited in scope to a subsection of a broader field.Employee Incentive Plans: Programs designed by management to motivate employees to work more efficiently with increased productivity, and greater employee satisfaction.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Health Personnel: Men and women working in the provision of health services, whether as individual practitioners or employees of health institutions and programs, whether or not professionally trained, and whether or not subject to public regulation. (From A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, 1976)Workload: The total amount of work to be performed by an individual, a department, or other group of workers in a period of time.Mass Screening: Organized periodic procedures performed on large groups of people for the purpose of detecting disease.New South Wales: A state in southeastern Australia. Its capital is Sydney. It was discovered by Captain Cook in 1770 and first settled at Botany Bay by marines and convicts in 1788. It was named by Captain Cook who thought its coastline resembled that of South Wales. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p840 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p377)Nursing: The field of nursing care concerned with the promotion, maintenance, and restoration of health.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Tasmania: An island south of Australia and the smallest state of the Commonwealth. Its capital is Hobart. It was discovered and named Van Diemen's Island in 1642 by Abel Tasman, a Dutch navigator, in honor of the Dutch governor-general of the Dutch East Indian colonies. It was renamed for the discoverer in 1853. In 1803 it was taken over by Great Britain and was used as a penal colony. It was granted government in 1856 and federated as a state in 1901. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p1190 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, p535)Delivery of Health Care: The concept concerned with all aspects of providing and distributing health services to a patient population.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Workplace: Place or physical location of work or employment.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Reagent Strips: Narrow pieces of material impregnated or covered with a substance used to produce a chemical reaction. The strips are used in detecting, measuring, producing, etc., other substances. (From Dorland, 28th ed)American Medical Association: Professional society representing the field of medicine.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Nursing Staff: Personnel who provide nursing service to patients in an organized facility, institution, or agency.Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Education, Professional: Formal education and training in preparation for the practice of a profession.Reaction Time: The time from the onset of a stimulus until a response is observed.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Attitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.Needs Assessment: Systematic identification of a population's needs or the assessment of individuals to determine the proper level of services needed.Delegation, Professional: The process of assigning duties to a subordinate with lesser qualifications.Schools, Dental: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of dentistry.Observer Variation: The failure by the observer to measure or identify a phenomenon accurately, which results in an error. Sources for this may be due to the observer's missing an abnormality, or to faulty technique resulting in incorrect test measurement, or to misinterpretation of the data. Two varieties are inter-observer variation (the amount observers vary from one another when reporting on the same material) and intra-observer variation (the amount one observer varies between observations when reporting more than once on the same material).Physician Assistants: Health professionals who practice medicine as members of a team with their supervising physicians. They deliver a broad range of medical and surgical services to diverse populations in rural and urban settings. Duties may include physical exams, diagnosis and treatment of disease, interpretation of tests, assist in surgery, and prescribe medications. (from http://www.aapa.orglabout-pas accessed 2114/2011)Queensland: A state in northeastern Australia. Its capital is Brisbane. Its coast was first visited by Captain Cook in 1770 and its first settlement (penal) was located on Moreton Bay in 1824. The name Cooksland was first proposed but honor to Queen Victoria prevailed. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p996 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p441)Dental Assistants: Individuals who assist the dentist or the dental hygienist.Public Health Practice: The activities and endeavors of the public health services in a community on any level.Bacteriological Techniques: Techniques used in studying bacteria.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Cognition Disorders: Disturbances in mental processes related to learning, thinking, reasoning, and judgment.School Admission Criteria: Requirements for the selection of students for admission to academic institutions.Northern Territory: Territory in north central Australia, between the states of Queensland and Western Australia. Its capital is Darwin.Multivariate Analysis: A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.Medicine: The art and science of studying, performing research on, preventing, diagnosing, and treating disease, as well as the maintenance of health.Occupational Diseases: Diseases caused by factors involved in one's employment.Organizational Objectives: The purposes, missions, and goals of an individual organization or its units, established through administrative processes. It includes an organization's long-range plans and administrative philosophy.Nurses: Professionals qualified by graduation from an accredited school of nursing and by passage of a national licensing examination to practice nursing. They provide services to patients requiring assistance in recovering or maintaining their physical or mental health.Models, Educational: Theoretical models which propose methods of learning or teaching as a basis or adjunct to changes in attitude or behavior. These educational interventions are usually applied in the fields of health and patient education but are not restricted to patient care.Primary Health Care: Care which provides integrated, accessible health care services by clinicians who are accountable for addressing a large majority of personal health care needs, developing a sustained partnership with patients, and practicing in the context of family and community. (JAMA 1995;273(3):192)Attention: Focusing on certain aspects of current experience to the exclusion of others. It is the act of heeding or taking notice or concentrating.Internship and Residency: Programs of training in medicine and medical specialties offered by hospitals for graduates of medicine to meet the requirements established by accrediting authorities.Occupational Health: The promotion and maintenance of physical and mental health in the work environment.Models, Organizational: Theoretical representations and constructs that describe or explain the structure and hierarchy of relationships and interactions within or between formal organizational entities or informal social groups.Biopsy: Removal and pathologic examination of specimens in the form of small pieces of tissue from the living body.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Fellowships and Scholarships: Stipends or grants-in-aid granted by foundations or institutions to individuals for study.Memory: Complex mental function having four distinct phases: (1) memorizing or learning, (2) retention, (3) recall, and (4) recognition. Clinically, it is usually subdivided into immediate, recent, and remote memory.Health Policy: Decisions, usually developed by government policymakers, for determining present and future objectives pertaining to the health care system.Education, Nursing: Use for general articles concerning nursing education.Policy: A course or method of action selected to guide and determine present and future decisions.Radiopharmaceuticals: Compounds that are used in medicine as sources of radiation for radiotherapy and for diagnostic purposes. They have numerous uses in research and industry. (Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p1161)Pilot Projects: Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Vocational Education: Education for specific trades or occupations.Diagnosis, Computer-Assisted: Application of computer programs designed to assist the physician in solving a diagnostic problem.Medical Staff: Professional medical personnel who provide care to patients in an organized facility, institution or agency.Area Under Curve: A statistical means of summarizing information from a series of measurements on one individual. It is frequently used in clinical pharmacology where the AUC from serum levels can be interpreted as the total uptake of whatever has been administered. As a plot of the concentration of a drug against time, after a single dose of medicine, producing a standard shape curve, it is a means of comparing the bioavailability of the same drug made by different companies. (From Winslade, Dictionary of Clinical Research, 1992)Motor Skills: Performance of complex motor acts.Models, Statistical: Statistical formulations or analyses which, when applied to data and found to fit the data, are then used to verify the assumptions and parameters used in the analysis. Examples of statistical models are the linear model, binomial model, polynomial model, two-parameter model, etc.Education, Dental: Use for articles concerning dental education in general.Immunoassay: A technique using antibodies for identifying or quantifying a substance. Usually the substance being studied serves as antigen both in antibody production and in measurement of antibody by the test substance.Nuclear Energy: Energy released by nuclear fission or nuclear fusion.Positron-Emission Tomography: An imaging technique using compounds labelled with short-lived positron-emitting radionuclides (such as carbon-11, nitrogen-13, oxygen-15 and fluorine-18) to measure cell metabolism. It has been useful in study of soft tissues such as CANCER; CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM; and brain. SINGLE-PHOTON EMISSION-COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY is closely related to positron emission tomography, but uses isotopes with longer half-lives and resolution is lower.Pediatrics: A medical specialty concerned with maintaining health and providing medical care to children from birth to adolescence.Public Health: Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.Efficiency: Ratio of output to effort, or the ratio of effort produced to energy expended.Equipment Design: Methods of creating machines and devices.Random Allocation: A process involving chance used in therapeutic trials or other research endeavor for allocating experimental subjects, human or animal, between treatment and control groups, or among treatment groups. It may also apply to experiments on inanimate objects.Students, Medical: Individuals enrolled in a school of medicine or a formal educational program in medicine.Education, Medical, Graduate: Educational programs for medical graduates entering a specialty. They include formal specialty training as well as academic work in the clinical and basic medical sciences, and may lead to board certification or an advanced medical degree.Vocational Guidance: Systematic efforts to assist individuals in selecting an occupation or suitable employment on the basis of aptitude, education, etc.Health Care Reform: Innovation and improvement of the health care system by reappraisal, amendment of services, and removal of faults and abuses in providing and distributing health services to patients. It includes a re-alignment of health services and health insurance to maximum demographic elements (the unemployed, indigent, uninsured, elderly, inner cities, rural areas) with reference to coverage, hospitalization, pricing and cost containment, insurers' and employers' costs, pre-existing medical conditions, prescribed drugs, equipment, and services.Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay: An immunoassay utilizing an antibody labeled with an enzyme marker such as horseradish peroxidase. While either the enzyme or the antibody is bound to an immunosorbent substrate, they both retain their biologic activity; the change in enzyme activity as a result of the enzyme-antibody-antigen reaction is proportional to the concentration of the antigen and can be measured spectrophotometrically or with the naked eye. Many variations of the method have been developed.Credentialing: The recognition of professional or technical competence through registration, certification, licensure, admission to association membership, the award of a diploma or degree, etc.Diagnostic Errors: Incorrect diagnoses after clinical examination or technical diagnostic procedures.Physicians, Family: Those physicians who have completed the education requirements specified by the American Academy of Family Physicians.Longitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.Emigration and Immigration: The process of leaving one's country to establish residence in a foreign country.Job Description: Statement of the position requirements, qualifications for the position, wage range, and any special conditions expected of the employee.Physicians, Women: Women licensed to practice medicine.Curriculum: A course of study offered by an educational institution.Laboratory Personnel: Professionals, technicians, and assistants staffing LABORATORIES.Learning: Relatively permanent change in behavior that is the result of past experience or practice. The concept includes the acquisition of knowledge.Nurse's Role: The expected function of a member of the nursing profession.Students, Dental: Individuals enrolled a school of dentistry or a formal educational program in leading to a degree in dentistry.Tumor Markers, Biological: Molecular products metabolized and secreted by neoplastic tissue and characterized biochemically in cells or body fluids. They are indicators of tumor stage and grade as well as useful for monitoring responses to treatment and predicting recurrence. Many chemical groups are represented including hormones, antigens, amino and nucleic acids, enzymes, polyamines, and specific cell membrane proteins and lipids.Great BritainComputer Simulation: Computer-based representation of physical systems and phenomena such as chemical processes.Public Health Administration: Management of public health organizations or agencies.Polymerase Chain Reaction: In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.Professional Role: The expected function of a member of a particular profession.Health Services Accessibility: The degree to which individuals are inhibited or facilitated in their ability to gain entry to and to receive care and services from the health care system. Factors influencing this ability include geographic, architectural, transportational, and financial considerations, among others.Leadership: The function of directing or controlling the actions or attitudes of an individual or group with more or less willing acquiescence of the followers.Epidemiology: Field of medicine concerned with the determination of causes, incidence, and characteristic behavior of disease outbreaks affecting human populations. It includes the interrelationships of host, agent, and environment as related to the distribution and control of disease.Civil Defense: Preventive emergency measures and programs designed to protect the individual or community in times of hostile attack.Health Care Surveys: Statistical measures of utilization and other aspects of the provision of health care services including hospitalization and ambulatory care.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Group Practice, Prepaid: An organized group of three or more full-time physicians rendering services for a fixed prepayment.Fluorodeoxyglucose F18: The compound is given by intravenous injection to do POSITRON-EMISSION TOMOGRAPHY for the assessment of cerebral and myocardial glucose metabolism in various physiological or pathological states including stroke and myocardial ischemia. It is also employed for the detection of malignant tumors including those of the brain, liver, and thyroid gland. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p1162)Training Support: Financial support for training including both student stipends and loans and training grants to institutions.Databases, Factual: Extensive collections, reputedly complete, of facts and data garnered from material of a specialized subject area and made available for analysis and application. The collection can be automated by various contemporary methods for retrieval. The concept should be differentiated from DATABASES, BIBLIOGRAPHIC which is restricted to collections of bibliographic references.Organizational Innovation: Introduction of changes which are new to the organization and are created by management.Chi-Square Distribution: A distribution in which a variable is distributed like the sum of the squares of any given independent random variable, each of which has a normal distribution with mean of zero and variance of one. The chi-square test is a statistical test based on comparison of a test statistic to a chi-square distribution. The oldest of these tests are used to detect whether two or more population distributions differ from one another.Dentistry: The profession concerned with the teeth, oral cavity, and associated structures, and the diagnosis and treatment of their diseases including prevention and the restoration of defective and missing tissue.Diagnostic Tests, Routine: Diagnostic procedures, such as laboratory tests and x-rays, routinely performed on all individuals or specified categories of individuals in a specified situation, e.g., patients being admitted to the hospital. These include routine tests administered to neonates.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Image Processing, Computer-Assisted: A technique of inputting two-dimensional images into a computer and then enhancing or analyzing the imagery into a form that is more useful to the human observer.Clinical Laboratory Techniques: Techniques used to carry out clinical investigative procedures in the diagnosis and therapy of disease.Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid: Liquid chromatographic techniques which feature high inlet pressures, high sensitivity, and high speed.Probability: The study of chance processes or the relative frequency characterizing a chance process.Reference Values: The range or frequency distribution of a measurement in a population (of organisms, organs or things) that has not been selected for the presence of disease or abnormality.Health Services Research: The integration of epidemiologic, sociological, economic, and other analytic sciences in the study of health services. Health services research is usually concerned with relationships between need, demand, supply, use, and outcome of health services. The aim of the research is evaluation, particularly in terms of structure, process, output, and outcome. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Point-of-Care Systems: Laboratory and other services provided to patients at the bedside. These include diagnostic and laboratory testing using automated information entry.Exercise Test: Controlled physical activity which is performed in order to allow assessment of physiological functions, particularly cardiovascular and pulmonary, but also aerobic capacity. Maximal (most intense) exercise is usually required but submaximal exercise is also used.Animal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena: Nutritional physiology of animals.Inservice Training: On the job training programs for personnel carried out within an institution or agency. It includes orientation programs.Early Diagnosis: Methods to determine in patients the nature of a disease or disorder at its early stage of progression. Generally, early diagnosis improves PROGNOSIS and TREATMENT OUTCOME.Schools, Medical: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of medicine.Molecular Diagnostic Techniques: MOLECULAR BIOLOGY techniques used in the diagnosis of disease.Swine: Any of various animals that constitute the family Suidae and comprise stout-bodied, short-legged omnivorous mammals with thick skin, usually covered with coarse bristles, a rather long mobile snout, and small tail. Included are the genera Babyrousa, Phacochoerus (wart hogs), and Sus, the latter containing the domestic pig (see SUS SCROFA).Program Development: The process of formulating, improving, and expanding educational, managerial, or service-oriented work plans (excluding computer program development).Internationality: The quality or state of relating to or affecting two or more nations. (After Merriam-Webster Collegiate Dictionary, 10th ed)Models, Theoretical: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of systems, processes, or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Program Evaluation: Studies designed to assess the efficacy of programs. They may include the evaluation of cost-effectiveness, the extent to which objectives are met, or impact.Breast Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the human BREAST.Memory, Short-Term: Remembrance of information for a few seconds to hours.Quality Control: A system for verifying and maintaining a desired level of quality in a product or process by careful planning, use of proper equipment, continued inspection, and corrective action as required. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Policy Making: The decision process by which individuals, groups or institutions establish policies pertaining to plans, programs or procedures.Family Practice: A medical specialty concerned with the provision of continuing, comprehensive primary health care for the entire family.
The main goal of these tests is to predict job performance, and each test has its own relative strengths and weaknesses in this ... Interviews Personality Tests Biographical Data Cognitive Ability Tests Physical Ability Tests Work Samples Development and ... the researchers found that the interviews are similar in predictive accuracy for job-performance and training performance( 0.37 ... The strategies used must be in compliance with the various laws in respect to work force selection. The professional standards ...
Most diagnostic tests basically use a reference group to establish performance data such as predictive values, likelihood ... or workforce. Screenings may be performed to monitor disease prevalence, manage epidemiology, aid in prevention, or strictly ... In vitro tests can be classified according to the location of the sample being tested, including: Blood tests Urine tests, ... Glucose Tests: The Test Liver Function Tests: At a Glance Electrolytes: At a Glance Harvard.edu Diagnostic Tests > Pap Smear, ...
... knowledge tests, personality tests, structured interviews, the systematic collection of biographical data, and work samples. I/ ... Murphy, K.R. (1989). Dimensions of job performance. In R. Dillon & J.W. Pelligrino (Eds.), Testing: Theoretical and applied ... Van Dyne & LePine (1998). Helping and Voice Extra-role Behaviors: Evidence of Construct and Predictive Validity, The Academy of ... Personnel recruitment is the process of identifying qualified candidates in the workforce and getting them to apply for jobs ...
The MBTI has poor predictive validity of employees' job performance ratings.[10][46][69] As noted above under Precepts and ... One problem is that it displays what statisticians call low "test-retest reliability." So if you retake the test after only a ... For them, the meaning is in the data. On the other hand, those who prefer intuition tend to trust information that is less ... fails most efficacy tests, and does not fit the empirical facts". His studies gave the clear result that the descriptions and ...
The MBTI has poor predictive validity of employees' job performance ratings.[11][69][91] As noted above under Precepts and ... One problem is that it displays what statisticians call low "test-retest reliability." So if you retake the test after only a ... For them, the meaning is in the data. On the other hand, those who prefer intuition tend to trust information that is less ... "tests" use of binary questioning and the similar popularity of the MBPT, as akin to all others such as the related '9 Enneagram ...
It uses primarily non-intrusive testing techniques, visual inspection, and performance data to assess machinery condition. This ... There are a wide variety of tests that will provide information regarding one or more of these areas. The test used will depend ... including affordable microprocessors and increased computer literacy in the work force, has made it possible to determine the ... Verifying building systems and equipment performance through functional performance testing. *Providing full documentation and ...
Computer software provides online achievement testing, automated interpretations of standardized test data, and banks of goals ... Language impairment, for example, can reduce performance on intelligence tests and other achievement measures. Caution must be ... Earlier data demonstrating that oral reading fluency has predictive validity for reading comprehension (Stage & Jacobson, 2001 ... workforce, and lifelong literacy. Because assessment instruments and data are developed to reflect the ways in which reading is ...
Evaluating Prospective Teachers: Testing the Predictive Validity of the edTPA (Update) Author(s): Dan Goldhaber, James Cowan, ... We use longitudinal data from Washington State to provide estimates of the extent to which performance on the edTPA, a ... These students perform better in third grade reading and math tests, have larger test score gains over time, have fewer ... While edTPA scores are highly predictive of employment in the states public teaching workforce, evidence on the relationship ...
To statistically test the SFC effects, we computed SFC with the same data but with the trials shuffled between spikes and LFP ... Predictive models for life outcomes. Models to predict six life outcomes based on data collected over 15 years suggest that the ... Opinion: Restoring vigor to the biomed research workforce in the midst of COVID-19 ... post hoc tests showed that all bins differed significantly from each other). As the patterns were virtually similar for the ...
The Workforce Science Project is currently sponsoring the following projects:. Criminal Background and Job Performance. (With ... Utilizing millions of data points on worker productivity from a variety of different industries, we test two explanations for ... and then evaluate which elements of the instrument are most predictive of a wide range of performance measures. ... The Value of Psychological Tests in Predicting Work Outcomes. Through a partnership with the University of Texas Medical Branch ...
20 21 The positive predictive value gives the power of a test to change the probability that the patient has the test condition ... We used standard statistical tests to compare the practice database with the validating criteria and other data sources such as ... What is already known on this topic Delivering the performance management agenda in the NHS will depend on the availability of ... The NHS and its workforce are being made accountable for the services they provide through the emerging mechanisms of clinical ...
In many states and school districts nationwide, student performance on standardized tests plays an important role in high- ... Using longitudinal data on students in Florida and North Carolina, value-added estimates in math and science are generated to ... Citation: Harry Holzer (2012). Good Workers for Good Jobs: Improving Education and Workforce Systems in the US. CALDER Working ... Test-based accountability has become the new norm in public education over the last decade. ...
It was difficult to gather objective data on practitioner or agency performance. Although data were well-tested ... All tests of significance were 2-sided, including the χ2 tests and independent samples t tests used to compare baseline ... Most existing measures of capacity have not been tested adequately for reliability and predictive validity (29). Third, ... and workforce to deliver the preventive dose of an evidence-based intervention (12). Capacity is a determinant of performance; ...
Psychometric tests have surely shown to have a predictive value in relation to job competencies and overall performance, but ... For example, one can combine a personality test, a sales aptitude test with an emotional intelligence test for a more precise ... it is about combining multiple data for a more accurate and predictive analysis of a candidates potential. ... Preparing the workforce for the next global economic recession Employer branding has a very significant impact on hiring: ...
... it is crucial that employers recognize the value in leveraging data as a management tool. ... Predictive models of attrition *Ensemble attrition classification models. *Survival analysis. *Workforce plans based on learned ... Conditional and unconditional exact testing. *Stratified Mantel-Haenszel tests. *Stratified proportional hazard models ... performance assessments, disciplinary records, minimum wage, and tip credit calculations. ...
... developing harmonised protocols and data management systems, and prioritising multi-site research that focuses on improving ... Translation of neuroimaging techniques requires the development of diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers and testing the cost- ... Translation of neuroimaging techniques requires the development of diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers and testing the cost- ... The MicroCog test battery and Continuous Performance Test (sustained attention/response inhibition) are highly reliable and ...
Often, the most predictive measures of performance also exhibit achievement gaps.. The field of personnel psychology has termed ... for the teaching workforce-certainly a laudable goal. The bill required teacher preparation programs to report data on their ... And its not clear that these tests have any predictive value in terms of eventual student achievement. We may be losing more ... Because of racial disparities in K-12 education, many fields with barriers to entry that include testing and certification also ...
Descriptors: Teacher Certification, Scores, Tests, Mathematics Tests. Evaluating Prospective Teachers: Testing the Predictive ... We use longitudinal data from Washington State to provide estimates of the extent to which performance on the edTPA, a ... is predictive of the likelihood of employment in the teacher workforce and value-added measures of teacher effectiveness. While ... Whats in a Teacher Test? Assessing the Relationship between Teacher Licensure Test Scores and Student STEM Achievement and ...
Selection procedures include the full range of assessment techniques from traditional paper and pencil tests, performance tests ... Evidence of the validity of a test or other selection procedure by a content validity study should consist of data showing that ... F. Criterion-related validity. Demonstrated by empirical data showing that the selection procedure is predictive of or ... The first step in the construction of any affirmative action plan should be an analysis of the employers work force to ...
Automation, verification and performance testing. Continuous delivery and integration. Management and support services. Cloud ... It increases workforce productivity and enables executives to accomplish more strategic goals. ... Improving services through automation and using data to personalize their experiences increases loyalty and reduces customer ... Orchestration and execution of traffic with functional tests against an assembled VNF configuration ...
"Discriminatory tests are impermissible unless shown, by professionally acceptable methods, to be predictive of orsignificantly ... In addition, the committees studied all of the data from the field testing, made recommendations for revisions as they felt ... consist of data showing that the content of the selection procedure is representative of important aspects of performance on ... should normally be set so as to be reasonable and consistent with normal expectations of acceptable proficiency within the work force ...
test to determine if they should be measured at amortized cost and fair value.. 2. Debt instruments must meet both tests both ... 7. Performance Measure: Value Added is a better measure of performance of business entity. than the profi t. It explains the ... For the work force for Wages, Salaries. For the Government for Corporation Tax and related expenses. For the Financiers for ... 3. SNA data are used to calculate major economic indicators including GDP, GNP, Savings Rate. and Balance Of Trade figures. The ...
A system for computerizing tests, exams and assessments. Enter your own questions and the system delivers them on desktops, ... testing and evaluation testing and evaluation 360 feedback, performance management software and career development testing and ... Predictive Index Midlantic - Provides management consulting programs to help improve employee testing and evaluation testing ... TapDance Computer-Based Skills Assessment - Provides skills testing software for typing, data entry, testing and evaluation ...
In addition to the low skill level tested by current basic skills tests (e.g., the Praxis Core), another concern is that they ... The predictive validity of measures of teacher candidate programs and performance. Journal of Teacher Education, 64(5), 439-453 ... Journal of Negro Education, 58(2), 140-152.; Villegas, A. M., & Lucas, T. F. (2005). Diversifying the teacher workforce: A ... Recent data show that 49 percent of students in the US were students of color, while only 17 percent of teachers were teachers ...
Such tools create a virtual machine environment to test a prototype and production machine performance. In this phase, machine ... This brings the realization of site-wide data connection and data collection to the controller level and can, in many cases, ... 3. Predictive maintenance. More and more we will see machines that can monitor their actual state with regards to maintenance. ... 5. Shrinking workforce tech. In Western economies, the baby boomers are about to retire, leaving a smaller generation to ...
Furthermore, predictive validity of several selection methods are discussed from which work samples, GMA, tests, and structured ... Organizational performance. The back bone of this study is the secondary data comprised of comprehensive literature review. ... As someone who has undergone a reduction in work force, this course helped me better understand why transitions happen in a ... Organizational Testing and Assessment * Organizational Behavior * Organizational Behavior Final * Management and Organizational ...
The main goal of these tests is to predict job performance, and each test has its own relative strengths and weaknesses in this ... Interviews Personality Tests Biographical Data Cognitive Ability Tests Physical Ability Tests Work Samples Development and ... the researchers found that the interviews are similar in predictive accuracy for job-performance and training performance( 0.37 ... The strategies used must be in compliance with the various laws in respect to work force selection. The professional standards ...
9.4.2 Workforce Analytics. 9.4.2.1 Need for Real-Time Resource Demand and Supply Data to Drive the Adoption of Workforce ... 9.3.2.1 Predictive Clinical Analytics Reduce Medical Errors and Ensure That Appropriate Tests are Performed, A Key Factor for ... 7.2.2.1 Business Analytics Services Help Healthcare Organizations to Optimize the Use of Analytics and Drive Performance ... 2.1 Research Data. 2.1.1 Secondary Sources. 2.1.1.1 Key Data From Secondary Sources. 2.1.2 Primary Resources. 2.1.2.1 Key Data ...
... you will focus on improving corporate reporting frameworks and data visualization. You will examine performance data, discover ... predictive modeling, deep learning, statistical testing, information retrieval, and natural language processing and apply them ... We bring data and machine learning into management science to deliver workforce, associate experience, and leadership insights ... Perform hands-on data analysis, build machine-learning models, run regular A/B tests, and communicate the impact to senior ...
... data systems that leverage diverse data sources to understand how different advertisers decisions impact their performance ... predictive modeling, deep learning, statistical testing, information retrieval, and natural language processing and apply them ... Perform hands-on data analysis, build machine-learning models, run regular A/B tests, and communicate the impact to senior ... We believe passionately that employing a diverse workforce is central to our success. We make recruiting decision based on your ...
  • All of our predictive algorithms are guided by extensive legal vetting to help the employer avoid selection and compensation decisions that may otherwise result in risk. (jacksonlewis.com)
  • Using proprietary algorithms, we can model employers' exposure to a wide range of legal claims that involves a variety of issues, including, but not limited to, those involving overtime, leave entitlement, performance assessments, disciplinary records, minimum wage, and tip credit calculations. (jacksonlewis.com)
  • Are you excited by the prospect of analyzing and modeling terabytes of data on the cloud and create state-of-art algorithms to solve real world problems? (amazon.science)
  • More generally, we demonstrate the utility of using structural retirement models to analyze fiscal and workforce effects of changes to public sector pension plans, since the effects of pension reforms cumulate over many years. (caldercenter.org)
  • Automation technologies can streamline and simplify work processes, analyze data and improve decision making. (luxoft.com)
  • This could include:· Analyze and solve business problems at their root, stepping back to understand the broader context· Apply advanced statistics /data mining/ operations research techniques to analyze and make insights from big data (data sets could include: historical production data, volumes, transportation and logistics metrics, simulation/experiment results etc.) across multiple geographies. (amazon.science)
  • Build interpretable statistical models and analyze experiment results to answer questions that will drive high impact decisions across Amazon.About Amazon's Advertising business:Amazon is investing heavily in building a world class advertising business and we are responsible for defining and delivering a collection of self-service performance advertising products that drive discovery and sales. (amazon.science)
  • Dashboards are consolidating data from different stores and restaurant locations to summarize and analyze the sales across all the units. (microsoft.com)
  • If you use QuickBooks (QB) Desktop and want to analyze the data, this is the solution for you. (microsoft.com)
  • The state will earn the full, three-quarters of a point if preparation programs require a minimum 3.0 individual grade point average (GPA) or a minimum 3.2 cohort GPA for admission, or if admission is limited to applicants scoring in the top half of all college-going students on tests of academic proficiency. (nctq.org)
  • To examine the relationship between medical school applicants' performances in the Graduate Australian Medical School Admissions Test (GAMSAT) and structured interviews and their subsequent performance in medical school. (mja.com.au)
  • Through a partnership with the University of Texas Medical Branch, WSP researchers will have the unprecedented opportunity to develop a psychometric test battery for use in pre-employment hiring. (northwestern.edu)
  • It uses primarily non-intrusive testing techniques, visual inspection, and performance data to assess machinery condition. (wbdg.org)
  • Improving public sector workforce quality is challenging in sectors such as education where worker productivity is difficult to assess and manager incentives are muted by political and bureaucratic constraints. (caldercenter.org)
  • GAMSAT is designed to assess problem-solving and data interpretation in the social, physical and biological sciences, as well as critical thinking, reasoning and written communication. (mja.com.au)
  • Growth in this segment is mainly due to the growing pressure to curtail healthcare spending, large volumes of healthcare data containing valuable insights, increasing incentives by governments (especially in the US) for improving the quality and reducing the cost of care, growing adoption of electronic health records (EHRs), and rising focus on building patient registries. (researchandmarkets.com)
  • The NHS and its workforce are being made accountable for the services they provide through the emerging mechanisms of clinical governance. (bmj.com)
  • 1 2 These mechanisms will depend crucially on the availability of high quality health information in clinical practice, 3 4 and such data will need to be accessible through electronic patient record systems. (bmj.com)
  • Students in Years 2-4 of two graduate-entry medical programs were invited to complete two previously validated tests of clinical reasoning. (mja.com.au)
  • Students' test results on a set of Clinical Reasoning Problems (CRPs) and a Diagnostic Thinking Inventory (DTI) and their Year 2 examination results. (mja.com.au)
  • A hallmark of expert clinical performance is skill in clinical reasoning. (mja.com.au)
  • 10 - 13 Two studies have investigated the association between pre-admission test scores and clinical performance, including clinical reasoning, at graduation, 14 , 15 and they yielded conflicting results. (mja.com.au)
  • 16 That study found a significant relationship between pre-admission interview performance and development of clinical reasoning skill, but no relationship between interview performance and GAMSAT results or between GAMSAT results and the development of clinical reasoning skill in medical school. (mja.com.au)
  • Key responsibilities of Data Scientist include the following:· Partnering with economists and senior team members to drive science improvements and implement technical solutions at the cutting edge of machine learning and econometrics· Helping build data systems that leverage diverse data sources to understand how different advertiser's decisions impact their performance across multiple advertising products. (amazon.science)
  • These sources may include standardized tests, informal measures, observations, student self-reports, parent reports, and progress monitoring data from response-to-intervention (RTI) approaches (NJCLD, 2005). (ldonline.org)
  • Assessment is used in this paper to refer to the collection of data through the use of multiple measures, including standardized and informal instruments and procedures. (ldonline.org)
  • 5 In contrast, a review of medical schools in the United Kingdom concluded that pure measures of reasoning ability are less predictive than measures of knowledge, such as A-levels. (mja.com.au)
  • Effective February 1, 1983, the California State Legislature amended the California Education Code to bar the California Commission for Teacher Preparation and Licensing ("CTPL") from issuing any credential, permit, or certificate to any applicant unable to demonstrate basic reading, writing and mathematics skills in the English language as measured by a basic skills proficiency test. (justia.com)
  • Louisiana should require candidates to pass a test of academic proficiency that assesses reading, mathematics, and writing prior to program admission that is normed to the general college-going population, rather than the prospective teacher population. (nctq.org)
  • The state should set a clear bar for admission into teacher preparation programs by requiring a minimum 3.0 individual or 3.2 cohort grade point average (GPA), or by limiting admission to candidates scoring in the top half of the entire college-going population on tests of academic proficiency. (nctq.org)
  • Additionally, it examines the long-term performance trajectories of chronically low-performing (CLP) elementary and middle schools in multiple states to identify schools that have shown rapid improvement (designated turn around [TA] schools), schools that have shown moderate improvement (MI), and schools that are persistently not improving (NI). (caldercenter.org)
  • From minimizing legal risk to improving planning and decision-making, it is crucial that employers recognize the value in leveraging data as a management tool. (jacksonlewis.com)
  • In Delaware, I was charged with helping to implement Senate Bill 51, which was explicitly passed to "raise the bar" for the teaching workforce-certainly a laudable goal. (edweek.org)
  • The growth of this market is majorly driven by the implementation of government initiatives to increase EHR adoption, growing adoption of data-driven decision-making, growing pressure to curb healthcare spending and improve patient outcomes, the emergence of big data in healthcare, and the increasing number of patient registries. (researchandmarkets.com)
  • Chinese civil servant exams, established in AD 605, may be the first documented "modern" selection tests, and have influenced subsequent examination systems. (wikipedia.org)
  • Infinet Assessment - Offers online employee testing to assist in hiring best candidates for the job. (iaswww.com)
  • Louisiana requires that approved undergraduate teacher preparation programs accept only teacher candidates who have passed a basic skills test, the Praxis Core, which is normed only to the prospective teacher population. (nctq.org)
  • Louisiana also allows teacher preparation programs to exempt candidates who demonstrate equivalent performance on the SAT or ACT. (nctq.org)
  • Teacher preparation programs that do not sufficiently screen candidates invest considerable resources in individuals who may not be able to successfully complete the program, pass licensing tests, and ultimately succeed in the classroom. (nctq.org)
  • Consider requiring candidates to pass subject-matter tests as a condition of admission into teacher programs. (nctq.org)
  • The procedure of personnel selection includes gathering data about the potential candidates with the end goal of deciding suitability and sustainability for the employment in that particular job. (wikipedia.org)
  • Pension rule changes affecting new teachers can be used to close this gap in the long run, but any effects will not be observed for decades and the implications for workforce quality are unclear. (caldercenter.org)
  • This complex pattern suggests the need for expanding the public policy menu beyond Ban the Box to include incentives to encourage employers to look more closely at their workforces to identify where the true risk groups are. (northwestern.edu)
  • This push for governmental intervention is based on guesses and assumptions rather than an empirical understanding of what data employers use, how employers use that data, or even of what monitoring most concerns employees. (northwestern.edu)
  • We use statewide administrative data from Missouri to examine the role of high schools in explaining students' initial college and major placements at 4-year public universities. (ed.gov)
  • Putting evidence to use in public health settings requires sufficient capacity - the availability of resources, structures, and workforce to deliver the preventive dose of an evidence-based intervention (12). (cdc.gov)
  • Our team uses econometrics, machine learning, and data science to help advertisers choose the right advertising product to meet their marketing goals. (amazon.science)
  • Because of racial disparities in K-12 education, many fields with barriers to entry that include testing and certification also face these challenges. (edweek.org)
  • In support of this idea, several studies on visual perception have shown that anticipatory α-activity reflects the orienting of attention ( 9 - 14 ) and influences detection performance ( 15 - 17 ). (pnas.org)
  • This research presents the first evidence using civilian data on how ex-offenders behave on the job if hired. (northwestern.edu)
  • Work at the intersection of data science and economics.The DAC AdsEcon Team is looking for a Data Scientist II to help and be part of a team to put cutting edge economic and data science advertising research into production. (amazon.science)
  • It is created on the primary motto of making data work to get maximum bang for the buck for your trade promotions. (microsoft.com)
  • In addition to ensuring that programs require a measure of academic performance for admission, Louisiana may also consider requiring subject-matter testing prior to program admission, rather than at the point of program completion. (nctq.org)
  • Or some programs might be discouraged from placing their graduates in high-needs, hard-to-staff schools because of those schools' lower-than-average test scores. (edweek.org)
  • Entry tests for graduate medical programs: is it time to re-think? (mja.com.au)
  • Everyone has worked with a "toxic employee" whose very presence in the workplace detracts from everyone else's performance and may even pose a legal risk to their employer. (northwestern.edu)
  • HR Profile, Inc. - Employment screening company that provides background checks, drug human resources testing, software employee and skills assessment, business due diligence, human resources security solutions software and more for the US and human resources internationally. (iaswww.com)
  • CertGear Systems - Test prep software, free study materials and exam software guides for SHRM/HRCI\'s human resources certifications, including PHR, software SPHR, and GPHR certifications. (iaswww.com)
  • Adatis harnesses the Twitter hash tag #nowplaying to harvest data generated by music consumers all over the world to better understand global music consumption patterns. (microsoft.com)
  • We are looking for a unique individual who is interested in bigger picture strategic thinking but with the passion for big data.Advertising is used daily to surface new selection and provide customers a wider set of product choices along their shopping journeys. (amazon.science)
  • The procedure of selection takes after strategy to gather data around a person so as to figure out whether that individual ought to be utilized. (wikipedia.org)