Promazine: A phenothiazine with actions similar to CHLORPROMAZINE but with less antipsychotic activity. It is primarily used in short-term treatment of disturbed behavior and as an antiemetic.Perazine: A phenothiazine antipsychotic with actions and uses similar to those of CHLORPROMAZINE. Extrapyramidal symptoms may be more common than other side effects.Phenothiazines: Compounds containing dibenzo-1,4-thiazine. Some of them are neuroactive.Thioridazine: A phenothiazine antipsychotic used in the management of PHYCOSES, including SCHIZOPHRENIA.Triflupromazine: A phenothiazine used as an antipsychotic agent and as an antiemetic.Neutral Red: A vital dye used as an indicator and biological stain. Various adverse effects have been observed in biological systems.Antipsychotic Agents: Agents that control agitated psychotic behavior, alleviate acute psychotic states, reduce psychotic symptoms, and exert a quieting effect. They are used in SCHIZOPHRENIA; senile dementia; transient psychosis following surgery; or MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION; etc. These drugs are often referred to as neuroleptics alluding to the tendency to produce neurological side effects, but not all antipsychotics are likely to produce such effects. Many of these drugs may also be effective against nausea, emesis, and pruritus.Chlorpromazine: The prototypical phenothiazine antipsychotic drug. Like the other drugs in this class chlorpromazine's antipsychotic actions are thought to be due to long-term adaptation by the brain to blocking DOPAMINE RECEPTORS. Chlorpromazine has several other actions and therapeutic uses, including as an antiemetic and in the treatment of intractable hiccup.Cytochrome P-450 CYP1A2: A cytochrome P450 enzyme subtype that has specificity for relatively planar heteroaromatic small molecules, such as CAFFEINE and ACETAMINOPHEN.Prochlorperazine: A phenothiazine antipsychotic used principally in the treatment of NAUSEA; VOMITING; and VERTIGO. It is more likely than CHLORPROMAZINE to cause EXTRAPYRAMIDAL DISORDERS. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p612)Drug Information Services: Services providing pharmaceutic and therapeutic drug information and consultation.Pamphlets: Printed publications usually having a format with no binding and no cover and having fewer than some set number of pages. They are often devoted to a single subject.Drug Labeling: Use of written, printed, or graphic materials upon or accompanying a drug container or wrapper. It includes contents, indications, effects, dosages, routes, methods, frequency and duration of administration, warnings, hazards, contraindications, side effects, precautions, and other relevant information.Patient Education as Topic: The teaching or training of patients concerning their own health needs.Formularies as Topic: Works about lists of drugs or collections of recipes, formulas, and prescriptions for the compounding of medicinal preparations. Formularies differ from PHARMACOPOEIAS in that they are less complete, lacking full descriptions of the drugs, their formulations, analytic composition, chemical properties, etc. In hospitals, formularies list all drugs commonly stocked in the hospital pharmacy.Drug Industry: That segment of commercial enterprise devoted to the design, development, and manufacture of chemical products for use in the diagnosis and treatment of disease, disability, or other dysfunction, or to improve function.Medical Records Systems, Computerized: Computer-based systems for input, storage, display, retrieval, and printing of information contained in a patient's medical record.Procarbazine: An antineoplastic agent used primarily in combination with mechlorethamine, vincristine, and prednisone (the MOPP protocol) in the treatment of Hodgkin's disease.Physician-Patient Relations: The interactions between physician and patient.United States Food and Drug Administration: An agency of the PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE concerned with the overall planning, promoting, and administering of programs pertaining to maintaining standards of quality of foods, drugs, therapeutic devices, etc.Phytotherapy: Use of plants or herbs to treat diseases or to alleviate pain.Drugs, Chinese Herbal: Chinese herbal or plant extracts which are used as drugs to treat diseases or promote general well-being. The concept does not include synthesized compounds manufactured in China.United StatesUniversal Precautions: Prudent standard preventive measures to be taken by professional and other health personnel in contact with persons afflicted with a communicable disease, to avoid contracting the disease by contagion or infection. Precautions are especially applicable in the diagnosis and care of AIDS patients.Horner Syndrome: A syndrome associated with defective sympathetic innervation to one side of the face, including the eye. Clinical features include MIOSIS; mild BLEPHAROPTOSIS; and hemifacial ANHIDROSIS (decreased sweating)(see HYPOHIDROSIS). Lesions of the BRAIN STEM; cervical SPINAL CORD; first thoracic nerve root; apex of the LUNG; CAROTID ARTERY; CAVERNOUS SINUS; and apex of the ORBIT may cause this condition. (From Miller et al., Clinical Neuro-Ophthalmology, 4th ed, pp500-11)Abducens Nerve Diseases: Diseases of the sixth cranial (abducens) nerve or its nucleus in the pons. The nerve may be injured along its course in the pons, intracranially as it travels along the base of the brain, in the cavernous sinus, or at the level of superior orbital fissure or orbit. Dysfunction of the nerve causes lateral rectus muscle weakness, resulting in horizontal diplopia that is maximal when the affected eye is abducted and ESOTROPIA. Common conditions associated with nerve injury include INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; ISCHEMIA; and INFRATENTORIAL NEOPLASMS.Mydriasis: Dilation of pupils to greater than 6 mm combined with failure of the pupils to constrict when stimulated with light. This condition may occur due to injury of the pupillary fibers in the oculomotor nerve, in acute angle-closure glaucoma, and in ADIE SYNDROME.Carotid Artery, Internal, Dissection: The splitting of the vessel wall in one or both (left and right) internal carotid arteries (CAROTID ARTERY, INTERNAL). Interstitial hemorrhage into the media of the vessel wall can lead to occlusion of the internal carotid artery and aneurysm formation.Miosis: Pupillary constriction. This may result from congenital absence of the dilatator pupillary muscle, defective sympathetic innervation, or irritation of the CONJUNCTIVA or CORNEA.Hypohidrosis: Abnormally diminished or absent perspiration. Both generalized and segmented (reduced or absent sweating in circumscribed locations) forms of the disease are usually associated with other underlying conditions.Hemifacial Spasm: Recurrent clonic contraction of facial muscles, restricted to one side. It may occur as a manifestation of compressive lesions involving the seventh cranial nerve (FACIAL NERVE DISEASES), during recovery from BELL PALSY, or in association with other disorders. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1378)Patents as Topic: Exclusive legal rights or privileges applied to inventions, plants, etc.Polymers: Compounds formed by the joining of smaller, usually repeating, units linked by covalent bonds. These compounds often form large macromolecules (e.g., BIOPOLYMERS; PLASTICS).Biological Therapy: Treatment of diseases with biological materials or biological response modifiers, such as the use of GENES; CELLS; TISSUES; organs; SERUM; VACCINES; and humoral agents.Biological Products: Complex pharmaceutical substances, preparations, or matter derived from organisms usually obtained by biological methods or assay.Antirheumatic Agents: Drugs that are used to treat RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS.Polyethylene Glycols: Polymers of ETHYLENE OXIDE and water, and their ethers. They vary in consistency from liquid to solid depending on the molecular weight indicated by a number following the name. They are used as SURFACTANTS, dispersing agents, solvents, ointment and suppository bases, vehicles, and tablet excipients. Some specific groups are NONOXYNOLS, OCTOXYNOLS, and POLOXAMERS.Solubility: The ability of a substance to be dissolved, i.e. to form a solution with another substance. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Capsules: Hard or soft soluble containers used for the oral administration of medicine.Solvents: Liquids that dissolve other substances (solutes), generally solids, without any change in chemical composition, as, water containing sugar. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Emulsions: Colloids formed by the combination of two immiscible liquids such as oil and water. Lipid-in-water emulsions are usually liquid, like milk or lotion. Water-in-lipid emulsions tend to be creams. The formation of emulsions may be aided by amphiphatic molecules that surround one component of the system to form MICELLES.Drug Contamination: The presence of organisms, or any foreign material that makes a drug preparation impure.Drug Compounding: The preparation, mixing, and assembling of a drug. (From Remington, The Science and Practice of Pharmacy, 19th ed, p1814)Oils: Unctuous combustible substances that are liquid or easily liquefiable on warming, and are soluble in ether but insoluble in water. Such substances, depending on their origin, are classified as animal, mineral, or vegetable oils. Depending on their behavior on heating, they are volatile or fixed. (Dorland, 28th ed)Alginates: Salts of alginic acid that are extracted from marine kelp and used to make dental impressions and as absorbent material for surgical dressings.Thyroid Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the THYROID GLAND.Cyclohexylamines: A family of alicyclic hydrocarbons containing an amine group with the general formula R-C6H10NH2.Antibodies, Bispecific: Antibodies, often monoclonal, in which the two antigen-binding sites are specific for separate ANTIGENIC DETERMINANTS. They are artificial antibodies produced by chemical crosslinking, fusion of HYBRIDOMA cells, or by molecular genetic techniques. They function as the main mediators of targeted cellular cytotoxicity and have been shown to be efficient in the targeting of drugs, toxins, radiolabeled haptens, and effector cells to diseased tissue, primarily tumors.Tetracyclines: Closely congeneric derivatives of the polycyclic naphthacenecarboxamide. (Gilman et al., Goodman and Gilman's The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, 8th ed, p1117)Carcinoma: A malignant neoplasm made up of epithelial cells tending to infiltrate the surrounding tissues and give rise to metastases. It is a histological type of neoplasm but is often wrongly used as a synonym for "cancer." (From Dorland, 27th ed)Trehalase: An enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of alpha,alpha-trehalose and water to D-glucose. EC 3.2.1.28.Work of Breathing: RESPIRATORY MUSCLE contraction during INHALATION. The work is accomplished in three phases: LUNG COMPLIANCE work, that required to expand the LUNGS against its elastic forces; tissue resistance work, that required to overcome the viscosity of the lung and chest wall structures; and AIRWAY RESISTANCE work, that required to overcome airway resistance during the movement of air into the lungs. Work of breathing does not refer to expiration, which is entirely a passive process caused by elastic recoil of the lung and chest cage. (Guyton, Textbook of Medical Physiology, 8th ed, p406)
Perazine • Periciazine • Perphenazine • Pimozide • Prochlorperazine • Promazine • Sulforidazine • Sulpiride • Sultopride • ...
... perazine MeSH D03.494.741.593 --- perphenazine MeSH D03.494.741.639 --- prochlorperazine MeSH D03.494.741.661 --- promazine ...
... perazine MeSH D02.886.369.593 --- perphenazine MeSH D02.886.369.639 --- prochlorperazine MeSH D02.886.369.661 --- promazine ...
... nafadotride nemonapride olanzapine paliperidone penfluridol perazine perphenazine pimozide prochlorperazine promazine ...
N05AA01 Chlorpromazine N05AA02 Levomepromazine N05AA03 Promazine N05AA04 Acepromazine N05AA05 Triflupromazine N05AA06 ... Thiopropazate N05AB06 Trifluoperazine N05AB07 Acetophenazine N05AB08 Thioproperazine N05AB09 Butaperazine N05AB10 Perazine ...
N05AB10 Perazine. N05AC 피페리딘 구조의 페노치아진 계열[편집]. N05AC01 Periciazine. N05AC02 Thioridazine. N05AC03 Mesoridazine. N05AC04 ... N05AA03 Promazine. N05AA04 Acepromazine. N05AA05 Triflupromazine. N05AA06 Cyamemazine. N05AA07 Chlorproethazine. N05AB 피페라진 구조의 ...
Perazine • Periciazine • Perphenazine • Pimozide • Prochlorperazine • Promazine • Sulforidazine • Sulpiride • Sultopride • ...
Perazine. *Periciazine. *Perphenazine. *Piperacetazine. *Pipotiazine. *Prochlorperazine. *Promazine. *Sulforidazine. * ...
Perazine. *Perphenazine. *Periciazine. *Pinoxepin. *Piperacetazine. *Pipotiazine. *Piquindone. *Prochlorperazine. *Promazine. * ...
... causes arterial/arteriolar vasodilation leading to a decrease in blood pressure by activating peripheral D1 receptors.[5] It decreases afterload and also promotes sodium excretion via specific dopamine receptors along the nephron. The renal effect of fenoldopam and dopamine may involve physiological antagonism of the renin-angiotensin system in the kidney.[6] In contrast to dopamine, fenoldopam is a selective D1 receptor agonist with no effect on beta adrenoceptors, although there is evidence that it may have some alpha-1 [7] and alpha-2 adrenoceptor antagonist activity.[5] D1 receptor stimulation activates adenylyl cyclase and raises intracellular cyclic AMP, resulting in vasodilation of most arterial beds, including renal, mesenteric, and coronary arteries.[8] to cause a reduction in systemic vascular resistance. Fenoldopam has a rapid onset of action (4 minutes) and short duration of action (, 10 minutes) and a linear dose-response relationship at usual clinical doses.[9] ...
... (INN), also known as captodiamine, is an antihistamine sold under the trade names Covatine, Covatix, and Suvren which is used as a sedative and anxiolytic. The structure is related to diphenhydramine.[1] A 2004 study suggested captodiame may be helpful in preventing benzodiazepine withdrawal syndrome in people discontinuing benzodiazepine treatment.[1] In addition to its actions as an antihistamine, captodiamine has been found to act as a 5-HT2C receptor antagonist and σ1 receptor and D3 receptor agonist.[2] It produces antidepressant-like effects in rats.[2] However, captodiamine is unique among antidepressant-like drugs in that it increases brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels in the hypothalamus but not in the frontal cortex or hippocampus.[2] This unique action may be related to its ability to attenuate stress-induced anhedonia and corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) signaling in the hypothalamus.[2] ...
The hormone prolactin stimulates lactation (production of breast milk). Dopamine, released by the hypothalamus stops the release of prolactin from the pituitary gland. Domperidone, by acting as an anti-dopaminergic agent, results in increased prolactin secretion, and thus promotes lactation (that is, it is a galactogogue). In some nations, including Australia, domperidone is used off-label, based on uncertain and anecdotal evidence of its usefulness, as a therapy for mothers who are having difficulty breastfeeding.[24][25] In the United States, domperidone is not approved for this or any other use.[26][27] A study called the EMPOWER trial was designed to assess the effectiveness and safety of domperidone in assisting mothers of preterm babies to supply breast milk for their infants.[28] The study randomized 90 mothers of preterm babies to receive either domperidone 10 mg orally three times daily for 28 days (Group A) or placebo 10 mg orally three times daily for 14 days followed by domperidone ...
InChI=1S/C18H22F2N4O/c19-15-5-3-14(4-6-15)17(25)2-1-7-23-8-10-24(11-9-23)18-21-12-16(20)13-22-18/h3-6,12-13,17,25H,1-2,7-11H2 ...
Djaldetti Ruth; Giladi Nir; Hassin-Baer Sharon; Shabtai Hertzel; Melamed Eldad (November-December 2003). "Pharmacokinetics of Etilevodopa Compared to Levodopa in Patient's With Parkinson's Disease: An Open-label, Randomized, Crossover Study". Clinical Neuropharmacology. 26 (6): 322-326. doi:10.1097/00002826-200311000-00012. PMID 14646613 ...
... has also been found to increase the analgesic effects of opioid drugs in a dose-dependent manner, in contrast to 5-HT1A agonists such as 8-OH-DPAT which were found to reduce opioid analgesia.[22][23] However, since 5-HT1A agonists were also found to reduce opioid-induced respiratory depression and WAY-100635 was found to block this effect,[24] it is likely that 5-HT1A antagonists might worsen this side effect of opioids. Paradoxically, chronic administration of the very high efficacy 5-HT1A agonist befiradol results in potent analgesia following an initial period of hyperalgesia, an effect most likely linked to desensitisation and/or downregulation of 5-HT1A receptors (i.e. analogous to a 5-HT1A antagonist-like effect).[25][26][27] As with other 5-HT1A silent antagonists such as UH-301 and robalzotan, WAY 100635 can also induce a head-twitch response in rodents.[28] ...
Melis MR, Succu S, Sanna F, Melis T, Mascia MS, Enguehard-Gueiffier C, Hubner H, Gmeiner P, Gueiffier A, Argiolas A (October 2006). "PIP3EA and PD-168077, two selective dopamine D4 receptor agonists, induce penile erection in male rats: site and mechanism of action in the brain". The European Journal of Neuroscience. 24 (7): 2021-30. doi:10.1111/j.1460-9568.2006.05043.x. PMID 17067298 ...
The present meta-analysis was conducted to estimate the magnitude of the effects of methylphenidate and amphetamine on cognitive functions central to academic and occupational functioning, including inhibitory control, working memory, short-term episodic memory, and delayed episodic memory. In addition, we examined the evidence for publication bias. Forty-eight studies (total of 1,409 participants) were included in the analyses. We found evidence for small but significant stimulant enhancement effects on inhibitory control and short-term episodic memory. Small effects on working memory reached significance, based on one of our two analytical approaches. Effects on delayed episodic memory were medium in size. However, because the effects on long-term and working memory were qualified by evidence for publication bias, we conclude that the effect of amphetamine and methylphenidate on the examined facets of healthy cognition is probably modest overall. In some situations, a small advantage may be ...
Most frequent side effects are nausea, orthostatic hypotension, headaches, and vomiting through stimulation of the brainstem vomiting centre.[9] Vasospasms with serious consequences such as myocardial infarction and stroke that have been reported in connection with the puerperium, appear to be extremely rare events.[10] Peripheral vasospasm (of the fingers or toes) can cause Raynaud's Phenomenon. Bromocriptine use has been anecdotally associated with causing or worsening psychotic symptoms (its mechanism is in opposition of most antipsychotics, whose mechanisms generally block dopamine).[11] Pulmonary fibrosis has been reported when bromocriptine was used in high doses for the treatment of Parkinson's disease.[12] Use to suppress milk production after childbirth was reviewed in 2014 and it was concluded that in this context a causal association with serious cardiovascular, neurological or psychiatric events could not be excluded with an overall incidence rate estimated to range between 0.005% ...
InChI=1S/C25H29N3O2/c1-27-14-18(13-26-25(29)30-16-17-7-4-3-5-8-17)11-21-20-9-6-10-22-24(20)19(12-23(21)27)15-28(22)2/h3-10,15,18,21,23H,11-14,16H2,1-2H3,(H,26,29)/t18-,21+,23+/m0/s1 ...
... (MDPPP) is a stimulant designer drug. It was sold in Germany in the late 1990s and early 2000s as an ingredient in imitation ecstasy (MDMA) pills.[1] It shares a similar chemical structure with α-PPP and MDPV,[2][3][4] and has been shown to have reinforcing effects in rats.[5] ...
... is a synthetic compound that acts as a selective antagonist on D2 dopamine receptors.[1] Its selectivity to the cerebral D2 receptors is characterized by its respective Ki-values, which are as follows: 1.8, 3.5, 2400 and 18000 nM for D2, D3, D4 and D1 receptors respectively. It can be radiolabelled with radioisotopes, e.g. 3H or 11C and used as a tracer for in vitro imaging (autoradiography) as well as in vivo imaging positron emission tomography (PET). Images obtained by cerebral PET scanning (e.g. PET/CT or PET/MRI) allow the non-invasive assessment of the binding capacity of the cerebral D2 dopamine receptor, which can be useful for the diagnosis of movement disorders. In particular, cerebral D2 receptor binding as measured by carbon-11-raclopride (11C-raclopride) has shown to reflect disease severity of Huntington's disease, a genetical disease characterized by selective degeneration of cerebral D2 receptors.[2] Other studies have investigated the relationship of D2 receptor ...
In 1960 the Austrian biochemist Oleh Hornykiewicz, while at the University of Vienna, examined results of autopsies of patients who had died with Parkinson's disease. He suggested that the disease was associated with, or caused by, a reduction in the levels of dopamine in the basal ganglia of the brain. Since dopamine itself did not enter the brain, he tried treating twenty patients with a racemic mixture of dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA), which could enter the brain and be converted there to dopamine by the action of DOPA decarboxylase. His results were positive, as were those of another trial in Montreal run by André Barbeau. Unfortunately, other investigators were unable to replicate these early results, and the use of DOPA remained in question until 1967, when George Cotzias at the Brookhaven National Laboratories in Upton, New York, used megadoses of DOPA, up to 16 grams per day. Not long after these results became known, Curt Porter at Merck showed that L-DOPA was the active stereoisomer, ...
InChI=1S/C20H33N3O3S/c1-4-10-22-14-17(21-27(25,26)23(5-2)6-3)11-16-12-18-15(13-19(16)22)8-7-9-20(18)24/h7-9,16-17,19,21,24H,4-6,10-14H2,1-3H3/t16-,17+,19-/m1/s1 ...
... crosses the protective blood-brain barrier, whereas dopamine itself cannot. Thus, L-DOPA is used to increase dopamine concentrations in the treatment of Parkinson's disease and dopamine-responsive dystonia. This treatment was made practical and proven clinically by George Cotzias and his coworkers, for which they won the 1969 Lasker Prize.[4][5] Once L-DOPA has entered the central nervous system, it is converted into dopamine by the enzyme aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase, also known as DOPA decarboxylase. Pyridoxal phosphate (vitamin B6) is a required cofactor in this reaction, and may occasionally be administered along with L-DOPA, usually in the form of pyridoxine.. Besides the central nervous system, L-DOPA is also converted into dopamine from within the peripheral nervous system. Excessive peripheral dopamine signaling causes many of the adverse side effects seen with sole L-DOPA administration. To bypass these effects, it is standard clinical practice to coadminister (with ...
Perazine N05AC Piperidin szerkezetű fenotiazinokSzerkesztés. ATC. Magyar. INN. Gyógyszerkönyv N05AC01. Periciazin. Periciazine ... Promazine. Promazini hydrochloridum N05AA04. Acepromazin. Acepromazine N05AA05. Triflupromazin. Triflupromazine N05AA06. ...
... perazine, prilocaine, procaine, prochlorperazine, promazine, promethazine, propoxycaine, reserpine, thioproperazine, ...
Perazine • Periciazine • Perphenazine • Pimozide • Prochlorperazine • Promazine • Sulforidazine • Sulpiride • Sultopride • ...
... perazine MeSH D03.494.741.593 --- perphenazine MeSH D03.494.741.639 --- prochlorperazine MeSH D03.494.741.661 --- promazine ...
Perazine * Periciazine * Perphenazine * Pipotiazine * Prochlorperazine * Promazine * Promethazine * Propiomazine * ...
Perazine. *Periciazine. *Perphenazine. *Pipotiazine. *Poliovirus Vaccine, Live. *Prochlorperazine. *Promazine. *Promethazine. * ...
Perazine * Periciazine * Perphenazine * Pipotiazine * Poliovirus Vaccine, Live * Prochlorperazine * Promazine * Promethazine * ...
... promazine, mesoridazine, pericyazine, piperacetazine, pipothiazine, sulforidazine, thioridazine, acetophenazine, carphenazine, ... dixyrazine, fluphenazine, perazine, perphenazine, prochlorperazine thiopropazate, thioproperazine, trifluperazine, ... promazine, mesoridazine, pericyazine, piperacetazine, pipothiazine, sulforidazine, thioridazine, acetophenazine, carphenazine, ... promazine, mesoridazine, pericyazine, piperacetazine, pipothiazine, sulforidazine, thioridazine, acetophenazine, carphenazine, ...
... promazine, chlorpromazine, acepromazine, amino-promazine, perazine, prochlorperazine, trifluoperazine, and thioproperazine), ...
A. Low molecular weight active materials such as psychotropics, neuroleptics, e.g. promethazine, promazine, chlorpromazine, ... triflupromazine, alimemazine, levomepromazine, thioridazine, sulforidazine, periciazine, perazine, trifluperazine,perphenazine ...
Perazine. *Periciazine. *Perphenazine. *Pheniramine. *Piperacetazine. *Practolol. *Prochlorperazine. *Promazine. *Promethazine ...
Detailed drug Information for Epipen. Includes common brand names, drug descriptions, warnings, side effects and dosing information.
Perazine]]{{•}} [[Periciazine]]{{•}} [[Perphenazine]]{{•}} [[Pimozide]]{{•}} [[Prochlorperazine]]{{•}} [[Promazine]]{{•}} [[ ...
... perazine, periciazine, thioridazine, mesoridazine, pipotiazine, haloperidol, trifluperidol, melperone, moperone, pipamperone, ... promazine, acepromazine, triflupromazine, cyamemazine, chlorproethazine, dixyrazine, fluphenazine, perphenazine, ...
... prochlor-perazine edisylate, promazine HCl, sodium bicarbonate, sodium lactate, tetracycline HCl, verapamil HCl, and Vitamin B- ...
It is very important that your doctor check the progress or you or your child while you are receiving this medicine. This will allow your doctor to see if the medicine is working properly and to decide if you should continue to use it. This medicine will add to the effects of alcohol and other CNS depressants (medicines that can make you drowsy or less alert). Some examples of CNS depressants are antihistamines or medicine for allergies or colds; sedatives, tranquilizers, or sleeping medicine; other prescription pain medicine or narcotics; medicine for seizures or barbiturates; muscle relaxants; or anesthetics, including some dental anesthetics. Check with your doctor before you or your child take any of the medicines listed above while you are using this medicine. This medicine may be habit-forming. If you or your child feel that the medicine is not working as well, do not use more than your prescribed dose. Call your doctor for instructions. Using narcotics for a long time can cause severe ...
N05AB10 Perazine. N05AC 피페리딘 구조의 페노치아진 계열[편집]. N05AC01 Periciazine. N05AC02 Thioridazine. N05AC03 Mesoridazine. N05AC04 ... N05AA03 Promazine. N05AA04 Acepromazine. N05AA05 Triflupromazine. N05AA06 Cyamemazine. N05AA07 Chlorproethazine. N05AB 피페라진 구조의 ...
N05AB10 Perazine N05AC Phenothiazines with piperidine structure. N05AC01 Periciazine N05AC02 Thioridazine N05AC03 Mesoridazine ... N05AA03 Promazine N05AA04 Acepromazine N05AA05 Triflupromazine N05AA06 Cyamemazine N05AA07 Chlorproethazine N05AB ...
Perazine. *Periciazine. *Perphenazine. *Pimozide. *Prochlorperazine. *Promazine. *Sulforidazine. *Sulpiride. *Sultopride. * ...
Protriptyline - Propoxyphene - Propofol - Propiomazine - Promethazine - Promazine - Prochlorperazine - Procarbazine - Primidone ... Perazine - Perampanel - Pentobarbital - Pentazocine - Penfluridol - Peginterferon Alfa-2b - Paroxetine - Paregoric - ...
Perazine (Peragal, Perazin, Pernazinum, Taxilan), Pericyazine (Neulactil, Neuleptil), Perospirone (Lullan), Pimozide (Orap), ... Promazine (Prozine, Sparine), Promethazine (Avomine, Phenergan), Prothipendyl (Dominal), Quetiapine (Seroquel), Remoxipride ( ...
... perazine, prilocaine, procaine, prochlorperazine, promazine, propoxycaine, reserpine, thioproperazine, thioridazine, ...
... perazine, pericyazine, perphenazine, pipotiazine, prochlorperazine, promazine, promethazine, thioproperazine, thioridazine and ...
Buprenorphine (Generic Butrans, Buprenex, Subutex) is used to treat Pain and Opioid Dependence. Learn about Buprenorphine uses before beginning treatment with Pharmacist Tips and User Reviews!
Perazine • Periciazine • Perphenazine • Pimozide • Prochlorperazine • Promazine • Sulforidazine • Thioridazine • Thiothixene • ... Perazine • Perphenazine • Periciazine • Prochlorperazine • Promazine • Quetiapine • Sulforidazine • Thioridazine • Thiothixene ... aliphatics: Chlorpromazine# • Levomepromazine/Methotrimeprazine • Promazine • Triflupromazine •. piperidines: Mesoridazine • ... Perazine • Perospirone • Perphenazine • pFPP • Piberaline • Piperazine • PIPES • Pirenzepine • Piribedil • Posaconazole • ...
Perazine. *Perphenazine. *Periciazine. *Pinoxepin. *Piperacetazine. *Pipotiazine. *Piquindone. *Prochlorperazine. *Promazine. * ...

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